SuzM

  • Local Expert 9,132 points
  • Reviews 21
  • Questions 410
  • Answers 167
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Atlantic is a specifically nice street"

Atlantic Avenue in Oakley runs from Edwards Road to Millsbrae Avenue. Atlantic Avenue features neatly maintained single family homes and a few apartment buildings at the Millsbrae end of the street. It is very convenient to I-71 and all of the shopping in the Oakley/Norwood/Hyde Park areas. The homes are fairly affordable as they are located in Oakley, which has decent homes for less than something similar would cost in nearby Hyde Park.
Pros
  • nice homes
  • convenient location
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Edroy Court is all apartments"

Edroy Court is a dead-end street in Oakley right off of Edwards Road. It is very unusual in that both sides are completely lined by 4-family apartment buildings. It is a quiet, tree-lined street with sidewalks on either side of the street. There is on street parking in front of the buildings; however, covered parking for the apartments runs behind the buildings and can be accessed off of Edwards Road. Edroy is conveniently located to the Rookwood Commons/Pavilion shopping area and access to I-71. The only problem I would foresee with living on Edroy is getting onto Edwards Road can, I'm sure, at times be difficult due to the heavy traffic. I also imagine this will only increase as with the continuing development across the street.
Pros
  • all apartments
  • convenient location
  • close to shopping
Cons
  • busy Edwards Road
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5
Just now

"Seal Street doesn't have much"

Seal Street in Oakley runs between Isabella and Mt. Vernon Avenues. Other than an entry into the multi-unit building that sits at the corner of Isabella and Seal, Seal doesn't offer any housing. Seal is pretty much just an access point from Isabella to Mt. Vernon. From Seal you see the yards of the houses on the adjacent streets of Isabella and Mt. Vernon. Seal also provides access points to parking for the adjacent homes.
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Stonecreek Drive is convenient apartment living"

Stonecreek Drive is one of three "streets" in the Brookstone Village Apartments in Oakley. Brookstone is a large luxury apartment complex that is conveniently located to I-71 and shopping areas. Stonecreek Drive has apartment buildings on one side and green space with power lines on the other side. Brookstone Village Apartments features many luxury amenities and offers many community events, such as their annual pool parties.
Pros
  • luxury apartments
  • convenient location
Cons
  • power lines
  • pricey apartments
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Stonebridge Drive part of luxury apartment complex"

Stonebridge Drive is one of the three streets in the Brookstone Village Apartments complex. It is a large luxury apartment complex with a convenient Oakley location. Stonebridge Drive has apartment buildings on one side of it and power lines on the other. Brookstone Village Apartments features a clubhouse, fitness center, and resort style pool area among other amenities. The community is very popular with young professionals. Stonebridge Drive is within close proximity to shopping and interstate access.
Pros
  • luxury apartments with lots of amenities
  • convenient location
Cons
  • adjacent to power lines
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Brookstone Drive offers apartment living"

Brookstone Drive is the main road of the Brookstone Village Apartments, a luxury apartment community located in Oakley off Ridge Road. Brookstone is a large apartment complex with one and two bedroom apartments. The community features a clubhouse, fitness center, and resort style pool area. The community is very popular with singles and young professionals. Brookstone has a variety of community activities, including large annual pool parties. Brookstone is conveniently located within close proximity of access to I-71. It is also close to the Center of Cincinnati shopping area and the Madison Road business district of Oakley.
Pros
  • apartment living with lots of amenities
  • convenient location
Cons
  • expensive apartments
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Millsbrae Avenue is a quiet residential street close to it all"

Millsbrae Avenue in Oakley runs from Madison Road through to Robertson Avenue. It is a relatively quiet residential street. There are a variety of housing options from single-family homes and duplexes to multi-unit apartment buildings (the smaller and older variety.) The street is part of a walkable neighborhood, with sidewalks lining either side of the street. There is on street parking available. Most of the homes have driveways with detached garages, as they are older homes that pre-date the era of attached garages. The homes on Millsbrae are neatly maintained and, because they are in Oakley, are more affordable than similar sized and type of homes in nearby Hyde Park. You can typically get a home on Millsbrae for less than $200K.

Millsbrae is conveniently located for access to the Oakley business district on Madison Road, as well as the shopping of Oakley/Norwood at Rookwood Commons and Rookwood Pavilion and at the crossroads of Madison and Edwards Roads. It also provides easy access to I-71. Millsbrae is centrally located and in close proximity to Downtown Cincinnati, the major hospitals and universities, as well as the northern suburbs and the Kenwood shopping area. Just one exit up from where you get on I-71, there is the Center of Cincinnati shopping area that features a PetsMart, Target, Meijer's and Sam's Club.
Pros
  • affordable homes
  • quiet neighborhood
  • convenient location
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Madeira has it all"

Madeira is a very nice Cincinnati suburban community. It has a variety of different types of residences, offers great schools, and features a variety of local businesses. Madeira is nestled between the very affluent suburb of Indian Hill, the bustling Kenwood community, and just up the hill from Madisonville and Mariemont. You are within close proximity to I-71, which takes you to all parts of Cincinnati, including Downtown Cincinnati.

Madeira has a variety of different homes from small to large and from old to new. In between, there are a variety of price points, making Madeira an affordable place to live. Miami Avenue is the main business area of Madeira. It is very walkable. Along Miami Avenue in Madeira you will find a public library, grocery store, small local boutiques, and several restaurants. There are also several churches and schools located along Miami Avenue. You will find a lot of businesses concentrated along Miami where it meets Camargo. Madeira is a relatively quiet community with lots to offer. I would definitely recommend a move to Madeira.
Pros
  • variety of housing options
  • convenient location
  • good shopping and dining options
Cons
  • conservative neighbors
  • lacks diversity
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Orion Avenue offers convenient and affordable living"

Orion Avenue in Pleasant Ridge is mainly a residential street that runs between Ridge Road and Dryden Avenue. At the Ridge Avenue end, there are a couple of commercial buildings and parking lots. After that, Orion is strictly residential. It is one street over from Montgomery Road, so is convenient to the main business district of Pleasant Ridge. The street consists of a variety of different styled single-family homes. Most of the homes on the street were built in the early 1900s; however, some of them date into the mid/late 1800s. There is on street parking, as a number of the homes don't have driveways. For the homes that do have driveways, most of them have detached garages as befits the age of the homes.

Orion Avenue is a relatively quiet street, despite being near such busy streets as Montgomery Road and Ridge Road. Orion is in a walkable neighborhood and features sidewalks on both sides of the street. You can easily access I-71 via Ridge Road.
Pros
  • affordable homes
  • convenient location
  • quiet street
Cons
  • near busy roads
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Brazee Street where art meets life"

Brazee Street in Oakley runs off Madison Road just up from Oakley Square. At the entrance to Brazee Street are two commercial buildings with shops and restaurants. On one side of Brazee are some very nice, single-family and duplex homes. On the other side is an old factory building which has been converted into the Brazee Street Studios. Brazee Street Studios is an artist community with more than 25 professional arts studios. After the art studio building are some more homes. Brazee Street curves around and ends in an industrial area on Enyart Avenue. Brazee is a relatively quiet street, although as it has on street parking on one side, can get some drive through traffic as people going to the Brazee Street Studio or patronizing nearby Madison Road businesses may try to park on Brazee. Brazee Street is conveniently located in the heart of the Oakley business district, which is a very walkable area.
Pros
  • affordable housing
  • convenient location
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"West 4th Street offers city living, work, and more"

West 4th Street runs from the east/west dividing line of Vine Street to Central Avenue. On West 4th you will find office buildings, residential buildings, shops, restaurants, bars, and other businesses. The end of West 4th Street which is closer to Central Avenue features smaller, older buildings, which are part of the West Fourth Street Historic District. The 32 buildings which are part of the West Fourth Street Historic District have been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1976. In this area you will find residential buildings, salons, bars, and other businesses. At the end of W. 4th is the newly constructed condo building, Parker Flats, a modern industrial style building, which runs the entire block along Central between W. 4th and McFarland Streets.
Pros
  • West Fourth Street Historic District
  • Mix of residential and business
Cons
  • parking
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"East 4th Street runs the gamut"

East 4th Street runs from Pike Street at the eastern end to Vine Street, which is the dividing line between street designations of East and West. West 4th Street start on the other side of Vine Street. At the eastern end of East 4th is Lytle Park and the Lytle Park Historic District, which consists of 28 buildings. The Cincinnati Literary Club is one of the historic buildings. The Greek Revival home is dwarfed by the surrounding buildings, which include the Residence Inn Cincinnati Downtown housed in the historic Phelps Building.

On East 4th Street you can find restaurants, offices, shops, various businesses, and residential buildings. You will also find Christ Church Cathedral, a large and impressive Episcopal church located at the corner of E. 4th and Sycamore Streets. As you traverse E. 4th Street headed west towards Vine Street, you will see a variety of architectural styles of both new and old buildings. Dominating one side of E. 4th, between Sycamore and Main Streets are the skyscrapers, Atrium Towers (Atrium I & Atrium II); this large office complex houses such businesses as Convergys and Cincinnati Bell. There are all kinds of businesses located in the office buildings that line E. 4th. Many of the buildings offer street level shops and businesses, including a Walgreens, a CVS, and a number of different banks.
Parking on E. 4th can be very difficult and traffic is usually pretty heavy.
Pros
  • Lytle Park
  • Lytle Park Historic District
Cons
  • hard to park
  • heavy traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
Just now

"Pike Street is home to the Taft Museum of Art"

Pike Street runs from East 5th Street to East 3rd Street, a very short distance. One side of the street sees a couple of imposing office buildings and the stately Palladian Style Federal architecture showplace that is now the Taft Museum of Art. The Taft Museum was built as a residence around 1820. The home, known as the Baum-Longworth-Sinton-Taft House for the various residents, is a National Historic Landmark. The last residents of the home were Anna Sinton Taft and her husband, Charles Phelps Taft. Charles Phelps Taft was half brother of U.S. President William Howard Taft who accepted his nomination fort office under the portico of the Taft House. The Tafts bequeathed their home and private art collection to Cincinnati and the home was opened to the public as the Taft Museum of Art in 1932. Across the street from the Taft Museum is Lytle Park, which features seasonal flowers and an 11-foot bronze statue of Abraham Lincoln. There is a residential building on the corner of Pike and E. Fourth Street
Pros
  • Taft Museum
  • Lytle Park
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"Lytle Street not much of a street"

Lytle Street is not really much of a street and is more like a drive with parking around the Anna Louise Inn. It runs from Pike Street around to East 3rd Street. The Anna Louise Inn, operated by Cincinnati Union Bethel, has been a safe, affordable housing institution for single women since 1909. Today, it is the only single room occupancy residence for women in Cincinnati. Lytle Street runs arounds a portion of the Anna Louise Inn. On the other side of it sits Lytle Park, a 2.31 acre park featuring seasonal flowers and an eleven foot tall statue of Abraham Lincoln. It is part of the Lytle Park Historic District, which has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1976. Under this area is the Lytle Tunnel, which takes I-71 under the park.
Pros
  • Lytle Park
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Garfield Place is a green oasis"

Garfield Place runs between Vine Street and Elm Street from east to west and is between W. 7th and W. 9th Streets from south to north. It offers a a green oasis in the center with Piatt Park, Cincinnati's oldest park. Prior to it being named Piatt Park, it was called Garfield Park due to the statue of Ohio native and U.S. President James A. Garfield, which faces the Vine Street entrance to Garfield Place and Piatt Park. At the opposite end of Piatt Park and Garfield Place is a statue of another president from Ohio, William Henry Harrison (although a native of Virginia, Harrison moved to Ohio upon his marriage.) Garfield Place interrupts the flow of E. 8th Street to W. 8th Street (a one-way street); Garfield Place actually runs both west and east on either side of Piatt Park.

At the corner of Garfield and Vine is a unique hotel, Garfield Suites. Garfield Suites Hotel offers large suites at a reasonable rate. A little further down Garfield Place is the Cincinnati Club, once a grand hotel and private club, now an event venue operated by Davis Catering. The Cincinnati Club offers an elegant site for weddings and all kinds of receptions and events. There are several different apartment buildings along Garfield Place offering Downtown living in a relatively quiet area.

Garfield Place has on-street parking at meters, but parking can be rather difficult and the meters aren't long ones. Garfield Place is a green oasis in the middle of the city, making it a pleasant place to eat lunch or just pass the time. With several apartment buildings on Garfield Place, it also offers a variety of convenient living options, although at a relatively high price. Garfield Place is a convenient location to live for those who work Downtown. It is near a number of dining and nightlife options, not too far from a variety of shopping and by the main branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.
Pros
  • convenient Downtown living
  • green oasis
Cons
  • hard to find on street parking
  • pricey apartments
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5
Just now

"Government Place is a secured area"

Government Place in Downtown Cincinnati pretty much is just the secured alley way behind the government building that contains the U.S. District Court. It runs between Walnut Street and Main Street and is secured on either end by security gates. There is no public access to Government Place.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Florence Avenue is the new in the old"

Hazelwood has a long history in the northern part of Cincinnati, at one time, it was a rural African-American community. Though many homes were built in the early-to-mid-1900s, the area remained a poor one for many years. The Hazelwood community was annexed by Blue Ash in 1959, but it was thanks to the efforts of a group of residents that Hazelwood moved into the modern era. Today, Hazelwood still has a predominantly African-American population with many of the older houses still remaining. However, recent years have seen many new homes built, including those on Florence Avenue. The Florence Avenue homes were mostly built within the last six or seven years and are a good value for being in the Sycamore School District. One of the three churches in the Hazelwood community is located on Florence Avenue. Because of the newness of the homes on Florence Avenue, it is one of the nicer streets in Hazelwood. Florence Avenue is located one street over from Cornell Road, which provides close access to I-275 via Reed Hartman Highway (and thus, easy access to I-71). It is also located close to a number of restaurants and other businesses at the intersection of Cornell and Reed Hartman.
Pros
  • affordable housing
  • excellent school district
Cons
  • eclectic housing mix
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
Just now

"Mandery Avenue reflects neighborhood decline"

My grandparents used to live on Mandery Avenue in South Fairmount. At one time, it was a nice, working class neighborhood. My grandparent's house sat on the corner of Mandery and Fairmount Avenue on what was a relatively quiet street. While it has been many years since my grandparents lived in this neighborhood, it had already started to decline before they moved to warmer climes.

At the bottom of Mandery Avenue runs Fairmount Avenue, which features woods on one side making Manderey still a relatively quiet street. Mandery Avenue has on street parking and sidewalks on both side of the street. It is made up of single-family homes primarily built in the 1920s. Because the South Fairmount neighborhood has one of the largest concentrations of section 8 housing in Cincinnati, property values tend to be pretty low. If you aren't worried about resale nor about kids going to school, it might be a good place to score a real estate bargain.

Mandery Avenue is relatively convenient to interstate access and not too far from Downtown Cincinnati, the major hospitals and universities. From Mandery Avenue, you can head down the hill on Fairmount Avenue which, several streets later, connects you to Queen City Avenue. You can also exit onto Harrison Avenue from Knorr Avenue, which is one street over from Mandery. Harrison Avenue will connect you with the Western Hills Viaduct and access to I-75. Just down the hill from Mandery, you will find schools part of the Cincinnati Public Schools (and where my grandmother used to work as a school lunch lady.)
Pros
  • cheap property
  • relatively quiet street
Cons
  • rundown neighborhood
  • nearby crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Hamilton Avenue cuts through the heart of College Hill"

Hamilton Avenue runs through a large portion of Cincinnati, but the portion that runs through College Hill runs from about Hollywood Avenue at the north end and about Ashtree Court on the south end. The main district that is the heart of College Hill runs just south of W. North Bend Road. Here you will find several shops, restaurants and other businesses in a very walkable area. Some of the businesses have been around for many years. Schwartz Jewelers has been in business for over 70 years and offers a wide selection of jewelry, decorative, and other items.

The area of Hamilton Avenue that is north of W. North Bend is primarily residential. The homes in this area are primarily nice, middle class, single-family homes of decent size with yards, driveways, and plenty of trees. There are some small multi-unit buildings in this area, as well. There are sidewalks running along both sides of Hamilton Avenue and plenty of bus stops. Traffic on Hamilton Avenue can be very busy, especially during rush hour times.

South of the central business district that is just south of W. North Bend, you will find more businesses that are a little more spread out, but still walkable. Along this stretch of Hamilton Avenue is the Cincinnati Black Theatre Company (CBTC), a non-profit theater whose mission is to "keep alive the spirit of Black Theatre." CBTC offers a variety of opportunities, besides just theater performances; they offer education, workshops, summer camps and after school programs, as well. A little further down Hamilton Avenue, you will find Summit Academy School. Summit is a non-profit school for alternative learners. Summit is a school to specifically work with students who have AD/HD, Asperger's Syndrome and similar disorders offered all for free for those qualified to attend.

As indicative of its name, College Hill is, indeed, on a hill. So, as you proceed south on Hamilton Avenue, you will be heading downhill. As you head down Hamilton Avenue, the area becomes residential again. There are a number of smaller apartment buildings on one side of the street while the other side sees many larger homes spaced out on larger lots. The homes reflect a variety of architectural styles and many of the homes here are very large and lovely. The area also gets a lot greener as you are closer to Mount Airy Forest. However, as you descend on Hamilton Avenue you will find the Twin Towers retirement complex, with its distinctive and imposing central building. The Twin Towers campus is set off of Hamilton Avenue in a wooded setting. Opposite of Twin Towers on the other side of Hamilton Avenue is the Six Acres Bed & Breakfast and Laboiteaux Woods. Six Acres B&B is located on six lovely landscaped acres off of Hamilton Avenue in a home built in the mid-1800s that once served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Laboiteaux Woods offers over two miles of walking trails, a small nature center, and a library offering education nature programs.

Overall, Hamilton Avenue in College Hill runs the gamut of diversity in both terms of business and residential, as well as the residents of the community. While traffic can be heavy due to Hamilton Avenue being a main connector road in Cincinnati, it still offers nice residential areas and lots of trees. Hamilton Avenue also offers easy access to most of the Cincinnati area via it's connection to I-75/I-74 at the south end and Ronald Reagan Highway to the north (both just outside of the College Hill neighborhood.)
Pros
  • walkable business district
  • residential and business mix
Cons
  • traffic can be heavy
  • Occasional crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Windemere Way winds through Twin Towers senior living campus"

Windemere Way winds through the Twin Towers Campus in College Hill. It runs off the main entrance street from Hamilton Avenue of South Ridge Drive. Windemere Way runs along the back side of the central complex for Twin Towers, circumventing the main parking lot for these buildings and winding behind this part of the retirement campus until it comes back out on South Ridge Drive past all of the main campus buildings and parking areas. There is another street with independent living patio homes that runs off of Windemere Way, Towerwoods Drive.

Because Windemere Way winds around the large central complex of the Twin Towers retirement complex, it is a little busier than South Ridge Drive, because it goes through and around the central parking lots of the complex. The central area of Twin Towers contains the main building, some apartment areas, and the administration building among others. As there are many employees working in these areas, there are several parking lots. This areas is a little less quiet, clean, and green than the streets taking you through the independent living cottage areas.

Windemere Way is part of the Twin Towers retirement complex campus in College Hill and, as such, is still conveniently located off Hamilton Avenue within close proximity to major interstates and Downtown Cincinnati.
Pros
  • wooded campus
  • lots of senior lifestyle amenities
Cons
  • for seniors only
Recommended for
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"South Ridge Court provides independent senior living"

South Ridge Court n College Hill is located off of South Ridge Drive, which is the main road going through the Twin Towers Retirement Complex. South Ridge Drive is located off of Hamilton Avenue and winds through the Twin Towers complex. Towards the end of South Ridge Drive is where South Ridge Court runs off of it. You will find independent living patio homes with garages located on South Ridge Court. There is open green space around the homes and woods behind, as Twin Towers is adjacent to Mount Airy Forest. The wooded areas surrounding the community and senior living lifestyle make for a quiet and serene neighborhood for older adults.

South Ridge Court and the Twin Towers complex are conveniently located on the western side of Cincinnati within close proximity of I-75/I-74 and convenient to Downtown Cincinnati.
Pros
  • secluded residences
  • wooded surrounds
Cons
  • for retirees only
Recommended for
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"South Ridge Drive provides senior living"

South Ridge Drive in College Hill is the main road going through the Twin Towers Retirement Complex. South Ridge Drive is located off of Hamilton Avenue and winds through the Twin Towers complex. The large and imposing central building of the Twin Towers complex is the first thing you see on South Ridge Drive; however, independent living cottages are located on most of South Ridge Drive. The Twin Towers campus backs up to Mount Airy Forest, so there are plenty of trees adding to the attractiveness of the retirement complex campus.

South Ridge Drive and the Twin Towers complex are conveniently located on the western side of Cincinnati in a beautiful and serene setting. it is also convenient to Downtown Cincinnati, making it easy for residents to access the arts and cultural offerings of the city. While there are no bus stops within the Twin Towers complex, there are several stops conveniently located on Hamilton Avenue right across from the complex.
Pros
  • quiet and serene location
Cons
  • for retirees only
Recommended for
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Kenwood offers shopping and more"

Kenwood is the place to shop in Cincinnati. Kenwood is part of Sycamore Township and has the upscale Kenwood Towne Center mall as its central point. Sycamore Plaza is across the street and continues the major shopping area. Kenwood also offers a movie theater, many restaurants outside of those at the mall, and a major hospital. There are many medical offices and businesses located in Kenwood; however, Kenwood is not all business. There are some houses, condos, and apartment buildings in Kenwood, as well. There is also a Catholic school and church complex.

Kenwood Towne Center is one of the premier shopping areas in Cincinnati and you can find just about anything at the mall. It has major anchors of Nordstrom, Macy's, and Dillard's and features many upscale national chains and boutiques. There are also some great restaurants at the mall (and we're not talking about the fast food Food Court.) There is a Cheesecake Factory, a Maggiano's Italian restaurant, and Aroma Sushi. There are some stores accessed from outside of the mall (such as Ann Taylor Loft and Maggiano's). There is a hulking, partially finished out lot development that features the area's only Crate & Barrel and Container Store locations. Across at Sycamore Plaza you will find more restaurants, office supplies, sporting goods, and the upscale grocery, Fresh Market. Right down the street you will find Cincinnati's only Trader Joe's. There are fast food places and many local shops and other restaurants in this area. If you want something, you can pretty much find it in the Kenwood area.

As for living in Kenwood, the homes near the Towne Center are older and many of them smaller, but fairly reasonably priced. On Kenwood Road, right across from the Towne Center are a number of older multi-unit buildings. The rents for these buildings typically tend to be pretty reasonable, but, of course, you're living on a very busy street in between shopping and a hospital. Across Galbraith Road you will find streets with some larger, more expensive homes. The Kenwood area is also served by several different school districts, depending on which street you live on.

Because Kenwood is a prime shopping district, traffic on the main streets is very heavy especially on Montgomery Road and Kenwood Road near the mall to the Interstate. Kenwood also offers to places to get on and off Interstate 71, one on Kenwood Road and one on Montgomery Road, so you have easy access to all parts of the Cincinnati area. During rush hour, traffic on I-71 in the Kenwood area also gets very heavy. So, if you don't mind navigating the traffic situation in Kenwood, then it certainly provides all the conveniences you could need. It is, however, not a walkable neighborhood, due to its lack of sidewalks and heavy traffic.
Pros
  • great dining
  • fabulous shopping
  • convenient location
Cons
  • traffic congestion
  • mall parking is congested (and hard to find during the holidays)
  • not walkable
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
Just now

"28th Avenue is close to everything, including the interstate"

If you want convenient access to the interstate, you can't get much closer than 28th Avenue, which runs right alongside the on-ramp and northbound I-71. The street consists of single-family homes, duplexes, and several multi-unit buildings. Because of the proximity to the interstate, traffic noise can sometimes be obtrusive. Also, because 28th Avenue runs into Robertson Avenue, it sees more traffic than you would think. Robertson Avenue connects Norwood and Oakley over the interstate, so many people use 28th Avenue as a quick cut-through. So, 28th Avenue is not quite as quiet as you think it might be.

As for convenience, besides easy interstate access, 28th Avenue is close to just about everything; it is right by the Rookwood shopping areas and is just several blocks away from Oakley Square. Sidewalks line either side of 28th Avenue, making it easy to walk the neighborhood. Parking on the street is generally fairly easy. As with houses of the age of the houses on this street, if they have a garage at all, it is a detached garage behind the house. House on this street should be fairly affordable and well under $200K. The rents are also fairly reasonable on this street.
Pros
  • convenient location
Cons
  • highway noise
  • through traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cox Lane is short and to the point"

Cox Lane is a short residential street in Oakley located off Edwards Road. The Malton Gallery, an art gallery, sits at the end on Edwards. Beyond that houses run only on one side of the street while trees and shrubbery line the other side of Cox. Most of the homes on Cox are single-family and were built in the early 20th century. They are cute little wood frame homes with porches and run around the $125K price range.

Cox Lane is located right across from the Rookwood Commons/Rookwood Pavilion shopping development, so is conveniently located to all kinds of restaurants and shops. There are several nearby office building, a gym, a Whole Foods, and right to the left of Cox, at the intersection of Edwards and Madison, are two gas stations, more restaurants, shopping, and businesses. You can easily access I-71 by shooting across Edwards Road onto Edmonson, making Cox a very convenient street for both driving places and walking to shopping, dining, and entertainment. Over the next few years, more will be added across the street opposite the current Rookwod development, at the Rookwood Exchange property. A Marriott Hotel will be the first business open sometime in 2013, but there are plans for more retail, entertainment offices, and more at this location.

While there is a traffic light at the end of Cox, I'm not actually sure if it faces Cox Lane or is only directed towards traffic on Edmonson and Edwards Roads. If that is the case, then I imagine getting into or out of Cox Lane during really busy traffic periods might be a problem (especially considering this area is usually pretty busy with traffic.) I imagine that with the new retail/business development, traffic will only increase. However, Cox Lane might still be a very nice little street to live on due to its lack of traffic, residential nature, and convenient location.
Pros
  • affordable homes
  • convenient location
Cons
  • off very busy main street
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mariemont is a nicely planned community"

The Village of Mariemont,nestled on the eastern side of Cincinnati, was founded in the 1920s and is one of the first planned communities in the United States. As such, it is a nice community with lovely homes, large tree-lined streets, and a quaint business district. Mariemont was built to resemble an English village and, as such, reflects a variety of English architectural styles in the buildings and homes. The Village of Mariemont was named a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

The main street through Mariemont is Wooster Pike/Route 50; since this is the road that Columia Parkway turns into, it is an easy trip from Mariemont to Downtown Cincinnati and points in between via Columbia Parkway. Along Wooster Pike, you will find the Mariemont business district with a variety of shops restaurants, businesses, a hotel, and a movie theater. The grocery store for Mariemont, Kroger used to be in this stretch of town, but moved down Wooster Pike to a larger location just outside of the main community quite a few years ago. The main business district, as is the rest of Mariemont, is very walkable. There is also some on street parking, some parking at the central fountain, and a couple of parking lots behind the businesses. So, for the most part, parking is not usually a problem. The business district has several nice restaurants and the Dilly Cafe also offers a wine shop with a large selection of wines and live music on weekends. The Mariemont Inn features both a restaurant, the National Exemplar, and a bar, Southerby's. The Quarter is another good restaurant right in the heart of Mariemont and right by the Mariemont Theater, a theater which plays both mainstream and independent films.

Throughout Mariemont you will find a variety of single-family homes, duplexes, some apartment buildings, and condos. Mariemont has seen some development in recent years with some new homes/condos being built; however, any new buildings within Mariemont are built to fit into the architectural style of the community. Unfortunately, while rents in Mariemont tend to be very reasonable, housing prices tend to be quite high for many of the larger homes on the more desirable streets (south of Wooster). If you don't mind a smaller home on a less desirable street, then there are some more affordable homes on the north side of Wooster. These areas are still nice, but the homes are smaller and closer together. While the main street of Wooster Pike is very busy most of the time (because of its connection to Downtown Cincinnati to outlying areas), the residential streets are fairly quiet. There are a couple of large parks in Mariemont, and one even offers a lovely view of the Little Miami River valley below. Mariemont has excellently rated schools and the schools are all conveniently and centrally located within this small community. Mariemont offers a variety of amenities (pools, tennis, and other recreation programs) and is a very senior friendly community offering a social service and recreation program through the MariElders.

Overall, Mariemont is a very nice community that has a lot to offer. It offers a walkable lifestyle with lots of community amenities. The homes offer a variety of English-themed architectural styles and stately tree-lined streets. There are excellent schools and great dining and shopping within this conveniently located community.
Pros
  • walkable
  • quiet residential streets
  • planned community with trees, parks and other amenities
Cons
  • Wooster Pike traffic
  • pricey housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Ludlow Avenue has its ups and its downs"

Ludlow Avenue does have a lot to offer in the way of shopping and eating. It also has a lot of traffic and parking issues. Ludlow is one of those unique streets in Cincinnati, that is really much longer than just the section called Ludlow. Ludlow basically begins behind Burnet Woods (a large, wooded park in Clifton) as it turns from Jefferson into Ludlow. There are some Greek houses and other apartments mainly geared towards college students, as well as some businesses, in this section of Ludlow. Parking tends to be a little easier (though still not great) and there is less traffic on this section of Ludlow. As you get closer to the intersection of Ludlow and Clifton Avenue, that's when parking becomes more difficult and traffic becomes heavier...you're entering the heart of the Ludlow business district.

At the corner of Ludlow and Clifton is the Skyline Chili that is often touted as the best Skyline in Cincinnati. It is usually very busy, especially late at night, as Skyline is popular with the drinking crowd. Because this Skyline is located by the University of Cincinnati and is in a lively area, it has hours much later than your typical Skyline (open until 3 AM Monday-Thursdays and 4 AM on Fridays and Saturdays). There is a parking lot around the corner, where you can park for a visit to Skyline.

Once you've hit the intersection of Ludlow and Clifton, you're in the heart of the business district and the busiest part of Ludlow. Traffic can get extremely congested here and parking can, at times, be impossible. Of course, if there weren't so many great places to go on this stretch of Ludlow, traffic wouldn't be as heavy as it is nor would parking be as difficult. It can be especially bad at night and on the weekends (especially weekend nights.) That being said, if you are fortunate enough to live nearby where you can walk, it as an excellent, walkable area and then parking and traffic aren't a bother.

There are so many great (and cheap) places to eat along Ludlow, you'll be hard pressed to decide where to go. If you decide you want Indian food, then you'll have another decision, as I think there are at least four Indian restaurants along this stretch of Ludlow. There are also a number of other ethnic cuisines. Some of the restaurants have tiny little parking lots, so you might get lucky and find a space in one; however, make sure that you are parked in the correct lot as you don't want to get towed. One of my favorite places on Ludlow is Habanero Latin American Fare, it was a place I discovered way before there was a Chipotle on every block. They have a great variety of options on their menu and offer more than just your typical burrito. Also, my favorite Indian restaurant, Ambar, is also on Ludlow. It was the first Indian restaurant I ate at and will always hold a special place because of that...not to mention that their food is SO delicious! Besides the restaurants, there are a variety of unique little boutiques and other shops, as well as other businesses, such as a florist, bank, theater, drugstore and more.

Once you head out of the business district the residential section begins with some large, old apartment buildings, which lead into the large, old homes that define the look of the Clifton Gaslight District (so called, because of the old gaslight street lights lining the streets). You will find many old, Victorian and Tudor style homes in this area. Also once out of the business district, the street widens and traffic is less heavy; parking on the street is also easier (where it is allowed). Many of the homes here are set far back from the street with their large yards, manicured shrubbery, and old trees, some of which line the streets, as well. This section of Ludlow is quieter, as befitting its residential nature. It is also very walkable (if you don't mind going up or down hill, depending on which way you walk) with sidewalks lining either side of the street. There are also many bus stops along Ludlow, making it great for public transportation. As Ludlow heads down the hill and out of the Clifton area, it becomes South Ludlow Avenue and eventually turns into Hamilton Avenue. So, the road continues on, even if the name doesn't.

Overall, Ludlow is a great street to live on (in the quiet residential section) or near. With its walkable business district and general neighborhood, it makes it convenient for locals to shop or dine. However, if you have to drive to Ludlow, it is a bit more of a hassle as traffic can be a nightmare and parking even worse. There has been more than one occasion where I've circled the block countless times looking for parking, only to give up and decide to try another day.
Pros
  • Offers a wide assortment of eateries and activities
  • Very walkable
Cons
  • Parking can be difficult
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Cincinnati is a family-oriented city"

Cincinnati is good city for families. It is also a city that very often calls its native sons and daughters back to its environs. Many young people leave Cincinnati when they go to college or just after, but many of them return once they start a family or plan to start a family. Cincinnati is a great place to raise kids, especially in the suburbs. Cincinnati offers a lower cost of living than many larger cities and even the cost of living in urban areas is lower than in other cities.

Cincinnati is a diverse city with both old and new neighborhoods. There is a revitalization of the urban core with many great restaurants and entertainment options. Cincinnati has a good arts scene, several theaters, world class music from the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and Cincinnati Pops, ballet, and opera. There are a number of nice museums, a National Historic Site, and many other places of interest or historical significance. Cincinnati has two get universities with good college sports programs, as well as excellent academic programs. Cincinnati also has year-round professional sports with the Cincinnati Bengals, Cincinnati Reds, and minor league hockey.

Housing prices in Cincinnati vary widely depending on the neighborhood, but there is something for everyone. There is affordable housing, as well as luxurious estates. One of the downsides of Cincinnati is the pollution, especially around the city, as well as the seasonal allergens which cause many people breathing issues throughout most of the year. Weather in Cincinnati can be very unpredictable, but one of the worst things about the weather is the humidity that permeates the air, especially in the summer months.

Overall, Cincinnati is a nice city with lots of parks, museums, sports, shopping, and many large international companies employing large portions of the Greater Cincinnati community.
Pros
  • decent cost of living
  • diverse neighborhoods
Cons
  • problems with pollution
  • allergy causing pollens and molds
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Delta Avenue connects Hyde Park to Columbia Parkway"

Delta Avenue runs from Erie Avenue all the way down to Riverside Drive/Kellogg Avenue through Mount Lookout Square. Delta Avenue is mainly a residential street with primarily single-family homes set back from the street surrounded by trees. As it is one of the main roads through Hyde Park to Mt. Lookout and Columbia Parkway, it has more traffic than a typical residential side street. There are some older apartment buildings along Delta, as well.

Delta provides direct access to Columbia Parkway, which connects the east side of Cincinnati with Downtown Cincinnati. It is also provides quick access to Mount Lookout Square and is close to the Hyde Park shopping areas on Observatory Avenue and Hyde Park Square. There are also a number of bus stops along Delta, making it a convenient place to access public transit.
Pros
  • convenient location
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
Just now

"Shaw Avenue is dominated by retirement complex"

Shaw Avenue runs from Wasson Road to Observatory Avenue in Hyde Park. The largest section of Shaw is from Wasson to Erie Avenue; a large portion of this road is taken up by the Marjorie P. Lee Retirement Community complex. Most of the homes on Shaw are single-family, but there are some duplex units, as well as a number of apartment/condo buildings on the section of Shaw that is between Erie and Observatory Avenues.

Because Shaw Avenue is dominated by the Marjorie P. Lee Retirement Community, and because it is only one block away from Hyde Park Square, parking can be a problem. Parking is especially difficult on the street around Marjorie P. Lee, which is right up from Erie Avenue. On the corner of Shaw and Erie is the Hyde Park Center for Older Adults (address on Erie Avenue). So, a lot of Shaw Avenue is dedicated to serving a senior population.

Shaw Avenue is conveniently located to Hyde Park Square (just a block down), so, is in a very walkable neighborhood that is close to shopping, dining, and other businesses. At the Wasson end, it is one block over from a strip mall that is on Wasson between Edwards and Michigan. It is in close proximity to the Rookwood Commons/Pavilion shopping area, as well as close to interstate access. Shaw Avenue ends at Observatory Avenue, but the street doesn't end there. On the other side of Observatory, the street becomes Linwood Avenue.

Over the years, the Marjorie P. Lee Retirement Community and its managing entity, Episcopal Retirement Homes, has not been a very good neighbor, buying up adjacent properties to expand its facility. As a result, a lot of the people in the neighborhood on not real fans of the retirement complex. Although, the neighbors on Victoria Avenue/Victoria Place have it worse, because their back yards abut the retirement complex property. Houses on Shaw Avenue range around $200-400K.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • walkable neighborhood
Cons
  • hulking retirement complex
  • parking problems
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Easthill Avenue is a convenient residential street"

Easthill Avenue sits on the border of Evanston and Hyde Park. It is a nice residential street that is accessed off of Madison Road. Easthill runs on both sides of Madison and is located right near a Metro stop. The portion of Easthill that runs on the east side of Madison is a dead end, but the longer section on the west side of Madison, while ending in a dead end, also has Pogue Avenue running off of it about halfway down. Pogue Avenue provides a less traveled access to other portions of Evanston, including the O'Bryonville business district. There are sidewalks on both sides of the tree lined street.

The houses on Easthill are large, single-family homes. The homes are very nice with lots of green space and trees, trees, trees. There are a couple of apartment buildings (or maybe condos...or both) on the corners of Easthill and Madison (the addresses are probably Madison Road, but access is located on Easthill.) The portion of Easthill that is east of Madison Road abuts the property of the Cincinnati Country Club. The portion of Easthill that is to the west of Madison abuts the property of the Bettman Natural Resources Center, operated by the Cincinnati Park Board; the nature preserve contains several acres of woodland. Properties on Easthill range from around $400K - $1 million range. The houses all have good sized driveways and large (if not multi-car) garages; the houses vary in construction style making for a lovely neighborhood street without that cookie-cutter look (it helps that the homes are older).

Easthill is conveniently located to highway access and within close proximity to both the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University. It is close to all the shopping and dining available in Hyde Park, Oakley, and Norwood and is a brief drive to Downtown Cincinnati. If you can afford a house on Easthill Avenue, I recommend it.
Pros
  • beautiful properties
  • convenient location
Cons
  • expensive properties
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Montgomery Road provides access to everything you need in Montgomery and beyond"

Montgomery Road (also known as US22/OH 3) is a major surface road in the Southwestern Ohio area. In the Montgomery area, it is the main road that provides access to all the business located in Montgomery. Businesses are either situated on or right off of Montgomery Road and a few of the surrounding side streets, especially at the main intersection of Montgomery and Cooper Roads. There are a few residences on Montgomery Road located in the area between Montgomery Park and Radabaugh Drive (right before Bethesda North Hospital). In the heart of Montgomery, around the main intersection of Cooper Road, you will find a number of shops, restaurants and other businesses. Some of the buildings in this area are very old and have historic markers indicating their landmark status. This area is very walkable and is easily accessed from nearby parking lots or the nearby residential streets. You will find some very good restaurants (Germano's, Stone Creek Dining Company, and the "world famous" Montgomery Inn); some nice neighborhood bars that frequently feature live music (Corner Pub, Village Tavern); and many shops and boutiques featuring clothing, travel gear, furniture, gifts, and more. Further up there is a CVS and some medical offices, Montgomery Elementary, some car dealers and several strip malls. You will find more restaurants, shops, and other businesses located in the various strip malls in this stretch of Montgomery Road. There are a number of salons and banks, shops offering medical supplies, jewelry, pet supplies, jewelry, shoes and more. You will also find a Kroger grocery store. Located in the same strip mall as Kroger is a great place for breakfast or brunch, the Original Pancake House. Across the street are two malls, the Market Place is set back from Montgomery Road behind the Fifth Third Bank, and the other strip mall is located on the lot next to the bank. The Market Place features several restaurants, a bar featuring live music, and a comedy club among its offerings. The strip mall situated next to the bank on Montgomery Road features an Indian restaurant, an Asian restaurant, and a salon, along with several other businesses. Past School House Lane on the left is Montgomery Park, a park that features a walking path, picnic shelters, ball fields, and a playground. Adjacent to the park are some houses. There is a a large cemetery, Hopewell Cemetery, which is adjacent to United Cemetery, a Jewish cemetery. The Montgomery pool and annex are listed across the street from the cemeteries and offer summer pool activities and year-round fitness classes, as well as other activities for adults and kids.

The large medical campus of Bethesda North Hospital is located on Montgomery Road. In this area, there are many medical buildings and offices on both sides of the street. There are also some homes, apartments, and condos located off this stretch of Montgomery Road. Montgomery Road really is the main road running through the City of Montgomery and providing you access to all the businesses located in Montgomery and beyond. You can access I-71 from Montgomery Road in Montgomery by taking Ronald Reagan Highway at the south end of Montgomery and by taking Pfeiffer Road at the north end of the city; right past the Montgomery city limits is access to I-275.

Montgomery Road is fairly busy all of the time, but is especially busy during rush hour times. During the evening rush hour, Montgomery Road can get pretty packed up in Montgomery right by the Kroger, where it goes down from two northbound lanes to one. The two lanes pick back up again at Pfeiffer Road. Through Downtown Montgomery, there are two lanes going both ways, but the curb lanes are available for parking during non-rush hour times, so are not always usable. Montgomery Road really is a business road, but there are many houses on nearby side streets. Montgomery Road through Montgomery is also very walkable, as there are sidewalks throughout on at least one side of the street. For the central Downtown Montgomery business district, sidewalks are on both sides of the street. I grew up in this area and used to walk and ride my bike through here to get to all the places I needed to go. You really can't go wrong living within a close proximity to Montgomery Road.
Pros
  • great restaurant and shopping options
  • easy access to everywhere
Cons
  • busy, busy, busy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Somewhat secluded yet convenient street"

Gideon Lane is conveniently located between Cornell and Kemper Roads. While it runs along I-71 it is still a somewhat secluded and quiet residential street. If you turn onto Cornell Road from Montgomery Road, Gideon is reached right before you cross the overpass going over I-275. The first part of Gideon runs next to a portion of I-275 and has no homes. The first place you come to is Best Friend Pet Care, a large property that operates a business separate from the home. Best Friends provides pet daycare boarding and grooming; it is also the only business located on Gideon Lane. Most of the properties on this portion of Gideon are a little older and on large wooded lots. As you proceed on Gideon Lane towards Kemper, it runs along I-71 and the houses are a newer closer to Kemper, as they are part of a newer subdivision.

While Gideon Lane runs between two very busy streets, it doesn't see a lot of through traffic. The access to Gideon is a little secluded, many people don't even know that there is a street running off of Cornell where it does. This makes it a relatively quiet street. The street is not as quiet as it could be, because it runs next to the two interstates; however, there are walls hiding the highway view (unfortunately, they don't really cut down on the noise.) Overall, Gideon Lane is a quiet street with nice homes on large wooded lots. It is nice for walking, jogging, or riding your bike on due to the lack of traffic. While Best Friends Pet Care can be a very busy location, it is at one of the street and isn't a problem once you are past it. Houses on Gideon Lane tend to be on the higher end price-wise, because of the size of the homes, lots, and school district. It is conveniently located to shopping areas restaurants, good schools, and easy access to the highway.
Pros
  • large wooded lots
  • convenient location
  • relatively quiet
Cons
  • next to highway
  • pricey property
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Michigan Avenue combines business and single-family living"

Michigan Avenue starts at Madison Road and with a slight jog, continues from Wasson Road through the heart of Hyde Park to where it ends at Far Hills Drive. It borders many of the business areas of Hyde Park, but is still primarily residential. Because it borders the business areas and is accessed off the many through roads, it tends to have more traffic than the strictly residential streets. At the outset, from Madison Road, it borders two strip mall areas on one side with mainly single-family homes otherwise lining the street. About two blocks down from Wasson Road, Michigan Avenue borders Hyde Park Square with its many shopping and dining options. Once Michigan hits the other side of Observatory Avenue, it is all residential; the trees also get more plentiful, especially as you reach Far Hills Drive. Most of the homes on Michigan Avenue probably average solidly in the $300-400K range, except for those closest to Far Hills, which are much larger and more expensive. There is a condo building at the corner of Michigan and Erie, right at Hyde Park Square, that are also in the upper pricing range; this is new construction from 2005.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • partially walkable to Hyde Park Square
  • nice single family homes
Cons
  • expensive
  • parking and traffic troubles
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5
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"Through street in industrial area"

Osborne Blvd. is a relatively new street in an industrial part of Blue Ash. There's not too much in the way of businesses on it right now, but it makes a convenient cut-through between Kenwood Road and Reed Hartman Highway.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Observatory Avenue observes family living in an upscale neighborhood"

Observatory Avenue runs from busy Madison Road all the way into Ault Park. It is one of the main cross roads in Hyde Park. It runs parallel to Erie Avenue (the other main cross road through Hyde Park) until Delta Avenue (this is also the busiest section of Observatory Avenue.) Observatory Avenue is a very nice, tree lined street. At the start, near Madison Road, Observatory runs past the Cincinnati Country Club on the south side while houses sit on tree-filled lots on the north side. After Menlo Avenue, houses line both sides of the street until right before Edwards Road, where you'll find Hyde Park Elementary School. The section of Observatory that runs between Edwards and Michigan has a number of businesses situated on either side of the street. After this section of Observatory, the rest is pretty much houses. There are lots of trees in this area, especially as the road continues on towards Ault Park (which is, technically, in Mount Lookout). The housing along Observatory Avenue is mostly larger, single-family homes with decent sized lots and lots of greenery. Houses on Observatory Avenue typically range in price from about the mid-$200s well into the $600-700K range. Observatory Place runs off Observatory Avenue and is the location of both streets' namesake, the Cincinnati Observatory. Observatory Avenue is easily accessed off Interstate 71 at the Dana Avenue exit. It is convenient to all the amenities of Hyde Park, Oakley, Mount Lookout, and other nearby neighborhoods. It is close to Downtown Cincinnati.
Pros
  • nice, large single-family homes
  • lots of trees
  • access to Ault Park
Cons
  • portion of it is somewhat busy
  • houses can be expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
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"Pavilion Street is a Mount Adams hot spot"

Pavilion Street runs from St. Paul Place and runs into Carney Street a short distance away. In between there are a number of local businesses and entertainment spots from the Mount Adams Pavilion to Crowley's Irish Pub. Mount Adams isn't very big, so Pavilion Street is an easy walk to all the entertainment, dining, and shopping hot spots in the neighborhood. The one bad thing about Pavilion Street, but really about every place in Mount Adams is that parking is at a premium and can be very difficult to find. Because of the tight, narrow, hilly and twisty streets of Mount Adams, public transit is only available on the outskirts of the neighborhood, so there are no bus stops on Pavilion Street or any of the other adjacent streets.
Pros
  • good entertainment spots
  • great views
Cons
  • hard to find parking
  • can be pretty busy Friday and Saturday nights
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Martin Drive provides a connection to Mount Adams and Eden Park"

Martin Drive is easily accessed off of eastbound Columbia Parkway. As you head up towards the hill that is Mount Adams, there are a few homes perched on the hillside between Martin Drive and Columbia Parkway. As you proceed on martin Drive past Parkside Place, you are heading towards Eden Park Drive. There is a park area where the remnants of the old reservoir stand and the defunct pumping station. Martin Drive continues to curve up the hill past Krohn Conservatory, where it ends at Eden Park Drive.

Martin Drive is the easiest way to reach Mount Adams from the west side of Cincinnati and from Northern Kentucky. It is located off Columbia Parkway, which can be easily accessed from both the 471 bridge and Fort Washington Way. There aren't a lot of homes along Martin Drive, but the few that are there have a fantastic view of the river. The rest of Mount Adams and Eden Park are convenient from Martin Drive.
Pros
  • easily accessible
  • connect Mount Adams to Northern Kentucky and western Cincinnati
Cons
  • not a lot of homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
Just now

"Ruth Lyons Lane is really just an alley"

Ruth Lyons Lane runs between East Sixth and East Seventh Streets and parallel to Walnut and Vine Streets. As it is basically an alleyway, it has no storefronts and is frequently filled with vehicles making deliveries to the adjacent buildings. It is, however, convenient as a quick through way in lieu of the sometimes busy sidewalks. Ruth Lyons is a Cincinnati broadcasting legend and whose memory continues to be celebrated in Cincinnati today.
Cons
  • it's an alley
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
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"Carew Tower Arcade reflects an elegant past"

Building of the Carew Tower was completed in 1930 and, until 2010, it was Cincinnati's tallest building. Its interior still reflects the elegance of the original art deco design. The arcade features several small shops and Hathaway's, an old school diner that has been there forever. If you want an old school diner experience in an old school building, then make sure to visit Hathaway's. The wrought iron railings and marble hallways connect Carew Tower and the arcade to the art deco gem, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel, one of the must visit spots in Cincinnati. Carew Tower features an observation deck on the 49th floor. While in Downtown Cincinnati, a visit to the Carew Tower Arcade is a must, if for no other reason than to see how buildings used to be built and decorated.
Pros
  • Hathaway's
  • Beautiful Art Deco construction
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
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"Suspension Bridge connects Ohio and kentucky"

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge was officially completed in 1867. At the time, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. The bridge was built by John A. Roebling, who was also responsible for the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. The Suspension Bridge is open to both pedestrian and auto traffic, so is a convenient way to get to either side of the river. It is a non-interstate road, but still sees a lot of traffic. The Cincinnati side approach falls between Walnut Street and Rosa Parks Street right behind the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. It also lies in between Great American Ballpark where the Cincinnati Reds play, and Paul Brown Stadium, where the Cincinnati Bengals play. The Suspension Bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
Pros
  • historic landmark
  • centrally located
  • pedestrian friendly
Cons
  • not an interstate bridge
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Ravine Street is steep"

Ravine Street is one of the steeper streets in Cincinnati. It runs from Straight Street down to Central Parkway. Most of the housing along Ravine Street is occupied by students attending the University of Cincinnati, so housing prices are very affordable; however, the neighbors ca get pretty rowdy, especially later at night. Situated at the corner of Ravine and Warner Street is the Ravine Street Market. A neighborhood grocery about halfway down the main stretch of Ravine. It offers a convenient location to pick up some of the snacks and drinks that are staples of the college life. Ravine Street passes by Fairview Park, so there is more greenery on that side of the road that abuts the park. Parking is mostly on street and can be hard to find at times, especially around McMillan. Ravine Street is very convenient to working in Downtown Cincinnati, the University of Cincinnati, and the major hospitals, in fact Ravine Street runs very close to Deaconess Hospital. Because Ravine Street is so steep, there are no bus stops along it, but there is one at the top and one at the bottom of the hill.
Pros
  • cheap housing
  • convenient location
Cons
  • steep
  • rowdy neighbors
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Reed Hartman Highway connects commuters to work"

Reed Hartman runs from just past Ronald Reagan Hwy. in Blue Ash to Fields Ertel in Sharonville, with the Blue Ash section ending before you reach Kemper Road and I-275. Most of Reed Hartman is a wide expanse of multiple lanes designed to quickly filter commuters into the large office complexes and businesses off to the sides. Some of the major employers situated off of Reed Hartman are Procter & Gamble, Toyota, and Ethicon Endo-Surgery. Located off of Reed Hartman is the large complex for Cincinnati Eye Institute. There are numerous office buildings situated on adjacent access roads. Because of the large numbers of businesses along Reed Hartman, there are around 10 different hotels/motels along this route. There are also many restaurants, from fast food chains, to casual dining, and local eateries, as well as a variety of other businesses. Every Fourth of July, the city of Blue Ash has the areas largest fireworks display and a concert featuring national headliners. Reed Hartman provides easy access to I-275, I-71, and Ronald Reagan Highway. The nearby streets are filled with other businesses , restaurants, and shopping locations, as well as more hotels. The stretch of Reed Hartman that runs between Cooper and Plainfield Road (where Reed Hartman and Plainfield merge) is the only stretch with any residential neighborhoods, the rest is strictly commercial, until you get to the one apartment complex right before Kemper Road. Reed Hartman is busy, but mostly during the week and mostly during typical commute times and lunch time. On the weekends and in the evenings it is less busy, because the workers from the companies and office parks are all gone. Reed Hartman is a convenient road that provides easy access to many points in between.
Pros
  • lots of restaurants
  • wide roadway with multiple lanes
  • light traffic on weekends and evenings
Cons
  • busy during rush hour times
  • not a lot of housing options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Timbers Drive offers convenient condo living"

Timbers Drive is a street that runs through the middle of a condo complex. On either side of Timbers, you will find several parking lot areas with condo townhomes. These condos were built in the early 1980s and it definitely shows with their dated style. On a recent drive through the various parking areas, the pavement was in need of much repair. Each unit has an assigned, numbered carport; the open spaces are left unnumbered. This is a cramped little community with none of the parking areas offering the ability to go from one section to the next, so you must go out onto Timbers Drive to do so.

The Timbers community does have a number of things going for it. First, it is conveniently located within walking distance of the Blue Ash Recreation Center (although, you do have to cross busy Read Hartman Highway to get there. Second, it does have tennis courts, a pool, and lots of trees. Timbers Drive itself is quite wide and doesn't have a lot of traffic, even though it goes through from Cooper Road to Plainfield Road. Third, as housing in this area goes, it's really affordable and newer than many of the single-family homes of similar size.

Timbers Drive and the Timbers Condos are conveniently located to many large employers, medical facilities, shopping areas, the University of Cincinnati Blue Ash Campus, and restaurants. In fact, Parker's Blue Ash Tavern is right around the corner. They have a large bar and a large dining area serving tasty food. Also very close, in fact, just across where Timbers Drive comes out on Plainfield Road, is the Blue Ash Golf Course, which has been rated in the top 75 of municipal golf courses in the country by Golf Digest magazine.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • excellent school district
  • affordable pricing
Cons
  • dated looking units
  • cramped community spaces
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Edwards Road covers it all from businesses to stately homes"

Edwards Road in Hyde Park runs from Grandin Road to Wasson Road. As you cross over Wasson Road you're in Oakley where Edwards Road continues on until it becomes the entrance ramp to northbound I-71. The stretch of Edwards Road that runs between Wasson and Erie Avenue contains a number of different businesses and restaurants, multi-unit buildings, and single-family homes. The stretch of Edwards running from Erie Avenue to Observatory Avenue consists primarily of businesses from offices and banks to small, local boutiques and galleries. Once you are past Observatory, Edwards Road becomes all residential tree-lined streets. The homes are much larger along this stretch of Edwards and they are typically situated on spacious lots. As you head down Edwards towards Grandin, you enter mansion territory. This part of Edwards is green, spread out and very expensive.

Overall, Edwards Road is on of the main thoroughfares through Hyde Park and typically has a lot of traffic between the Observatory and Wasson Road section due to the number of businesses restaurants, and schools. A lot of parking is on street, so it can sometimes be difficult to park. As you head towards the mainly residential section of Edwards Road, the homes increase in price as they increase in size and space. If you can afford to live in this section of Edwards Road, I would recommend it, but the portion closer to the businesses tends to have lots of traffic and be much noisier and hectic. However, Edwards Road provides easy access to the interstate, not to mention its convenient proximity to Downtown Cincinnati and many other prime neighborhood locations.
Pros
  • lots of places to shop and eat
  • convenient location
Cons
  • lots of traffic in business area
  • homes can be very expensive
  • difficult parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Clifton Ridge Drive is a quiet cul-de-sac close to everything"

Clifton Ridge Drive is located off of Clifton Avenue going down the hill from Ludlow and right before you pass under Interstate 75. It is a quiet cul-de-sac with large, late century single-family homes. The well-manicured lawns lead up to stately front doors and multi-car garages. There is a homeowners association, which takes care of the neighborhood beauty and owns the central green space. This part of Clifton is very wooded and the area surrounding the homes on Clifton Ridge Drive is no exception. The houses at the end of the cul-de-sac sit at the edge of a treed hillside that leads down towards Interstate 75.

Clifton Ridge Drive is convenient to the businesses and restaurants of the Ludlow business district. Also nearby are most of the major Cincinnati hospitals and the University of Cincinnati. The convenient location adds to the value of these spacious properties. The homes on Clifton Ridge are valued between $300,000 - $500,000.
Pros
  • beautiful homes
  • quiet and secluded
  • convenient location
Cons
  • expensive properties
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Walnut Street is at the heart of Downtown Cincinnati"

The streets in Downtown Cincinnati run primarily in a grid pattern with streets running east to west or north to south or vice versa. Most of the streets Downtown are one way. Walnut Street is on of those north-south streets with traffic going in the south direction towards the river (although it doesn't run quite that far.) Walnut Street runs from E. McMicken through Over-The-Rhine and through the heart of Downtown. It passes by the main library, through the theater district and runs along the east side of Fountain Square. It passes between the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and the new entertainment and living complex that is part of The Banks development. As Walnut Street passes through the heart of the Downtown entertainment area, it sees a lot of traffic, especially around the Fountain Square area. Also, as one of the main streets, it is also conveniently located to most of the shopping and dining venues.
Pros
  • new housing at The Banks
  • Entertainment and eats
Cons
  • parking
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Grandin Road is, indeed, quite grand"

Grandin Road is a long and winding road that leads from Madison Road in the O'Bryonville area to where it ends at Grandin Place. At the start, you see the Grandin House hi-rise complex, apartments and businesses on the lower levels. On either side of the road are schools, the Springer School and Summit Country Day. Grandin Road has tons of trees and the large homes along it are on spacious lots. The Cincinnati Country Club is situated along Grandin a short distance away from where it begins. As Grandin wends its way along, the homes vary in size, but most of them can qualify mini-mansions at a minimum. Some are larger than others with larger lots spaced further apart. Some of the homes are closer together and closer to the road. As Grandin continues to wind along, past Edwards Road, the real estates begin. There are many large mansions (nothing mini about most of these) of varying age and style situated are large, well-manicured lots featuring expansive lawns and many plots of trees. This is where Cincinnati's old monied families lived and some of them still do. You wouldn't be wrong to call these estates...multi-million dollar estates. While Grandin Road doesn't have a lot of businesses, dining or nightlife (none really after the Grandin House), it is conveniently situated to areas with all of those amenities.
Pros
  • beautiful mansions on spacious lots
  • lots and lots of trees
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • extremely expensive
  • traffic can be heavy around the schools near Madison Road
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Erie Avenue has it all, including traffic"

Erie Avenue is one of the main thoroughfares of Hyde Park. As such, it has a lot of traffic, but it also has a lot to offer. It runs from Madison Road, through the heart of Hyde Park and beyond. As you start off on Erie from Madison, you will find a wide, tree-lined street with lovely single-family homes. As you approach the Hyde Park Square area, you will see a number of businesses, shops, and restaurants. Hyde Park Square, situated on Erie Avenue between Edwards and Michigan Avenues is a lively business district with lots to offer residents and visitors alike. This area is very walkable from the neighboring streets and Hyde Park is a relatively safe neighborhood.

Moving down Erie Avenue away from the Square, you some more businesses in between some homes. At the point you see St. Mary's Catholic Church, the area returns to a more residential area with wider spaced lots and more trees. You will see the Church of the Redeemer, an Episcopal church and then the spacious and green campus of Clark Montessori. As you approach Delta Avenue, the road starts to bend and the only thing you see on either side is trees lining the streets and the backyards of the homes along adjacent side streets.

The road takes another turn and, as it curves around, you pass the Cincinnati Police District 2 station and then enter into another business district as Erie Avenue straightens out again. At this point, look to your right and see the Mushroom House, a home that looks like you would find Bilbo Baggins smoking his pipe snug by the fireplace. You are entering the area known as East Hyde Park, with its businesses, restaurants, bars, and apartment buildings lining either side of Erie. There are more homes, which are now closer together and a little smaller, but they are still very nice. Erie Avenue takes another turn and, as you cross Saybrook there are a few more businesses on either side of the street and the Hyde Park Country Club on the left as you enter the Oakley area heading into Fairfax, where Erie Avenue ends at Settle Street, just missing meeting up again with Madison Road.
Pros
  • lots to offer for dining, shopping & nightlife
  • beautiful homes on tree-lined street
  • two walkable business districts
Cons
  • lots of traffic
  • parking can be hard to find in the business areas
  • expensive homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
CUF
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Clifton Heights, University Heights, and Fairview make up the neighborhood called CUF"

I've lived in Cincinnati my whole life and attended the University of Cincinnati, yet I had never heard the term CUF for the neighborhoods surrounding the University. I've always heard these areas referred to by their own names of Clifton Heights, University Heights and Fairview. The neighborhoods are made up of a mix of apartments, multi-unit housing, and older homes all snuggled together on side streets as main streets are lined with businesses, medical facilities, schools, and university related buildings.

Like many college towns, these neighborhoods have housing that is predominantly geared towards students and the businesses that cater to them, as well. So, here you will find many affordable rentals and cheap eats. There are a number of single-family homes that are owner-occupied, many by University employees; or, as in the case of one of my friends, the children of former University employees. These areas are a convenient location for those working at the University of Cincinnati, which is the second largest employer in Cincinnati.

Clifton Heights has a prominent business district which has undergone a major overhaul in recent years. Most of the older buildings have been razed and replaced by new buildings that combine street level storefronts with student rentals. These businesses, along with many others that have been in the neighborhood for years, are along both Calhoun Street and West McMillan Street; these are the core streets of the Clifton Heights business district. There are a number of restaurants, from national chains to eclectic, local restaurants featuring a variety of cuisines at affordable prices. One of my favorites is Cilantro, which features extremely tasty and very cheaply priced Vietnamese fare. The current location is pretty cramped, but they are moving right down the street to a little bit larger spot.

Parking in the CUF area can be pretty difficult at times. Many of the single-family homes or even homes that have been divided into multi-unit housing don't have driveways, so on street parking is necessary. Since this is a truly urban area, the majority of businesses do not have parking lots. So, finding a spot to park on the street is key. There are some parking garages on the University of Cincinnati campus or by the hospitals, as well as some public lots by the businesses in the Clifton Heights business district. However, be warned if you park in the Clifton Heights lots, that you must make sure to feed the meters well, as towing occurs frequently and it is very expensive to retrieve your car once it has been towed.

If you will be working at any of the hospitals, businesses or the University, then you definitely want to look into the CUF area. It's a lively area with lots to offer, but because of the large student population can become a little too lively. Plus, with the transient nature of many of the residents, there is a lack of consistency in the neighbors you may have, plus the various crimes that may bring. That being said, however, the people who do own homes or businesses in this neighborhood have a strong sense of community and pride in making their neighborhood the best it can be.
Pros
  • lots of places to eat, shop, and enjoy the nightlife
  • Inexpensive rental properties
  • Nearby hospitals
  • Nearby schools
  • Walkable business district
Cons
  • transient neighbors (students)
  • neighborhood can get rowdy
  • Hard to find parking
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"English Woods: no homes, no people"

While I was growing up in Cincinnati, I'd always heard bad things about English Woods, as with many public housing neighborhoods, crime, drugs and the like. English Woods pretty much was an entire neighborhood of public housing, which was originally built in the early 1940s. My grandparents lived in not to distant South Fairmount, so I always heard things about English Woods, how bad it was, but it wasn't always so. It seems, in reading about the neighborhood online, that many of the people who grew up there, especially in its early days, have very fond memories of a community they cared about. As the years went on and a culture of drugs and crime invaded, it seems the neighborhood took a turn for the worse...this is the neighborhood I always heard about.

Over the years, general neglect and lack of care by residents took its toll to the point that there was little to do but raze the housing units. The cost of restoration to English Woods was prohibitive and not something the government wanted to undertake, so in 2005 the complex was closed, the remaining residents were moved to other nearby public housing, the community was fenced off, and demolition was slated to begin. In the years since, the community has been reduced to rubble, the worst sign of urban blight.

In early 2012, the Cincinnati Metropolitan housing Authority was awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to develop a comprehensive neighborhood transformation plan for the English Woods and Fairmount neighborhoods. This plan will be used to map out a future for the area where the English Woods complex once stood.

While there are some homes in the areas around the site of English Woods complex, these mostly fall into other neighborhoods, as English Woods pretty much was the public housing complex. There are still some other public housing sites in this area, such as Marquette Manor and Sutter View, both on Sutter Avenue. The English Woods area is easily accessible from Interstate 75 via the Hopple Street exit.
Pros
  • potential for development
Cons
  • demolished abandoned public housing
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"East Westwood is green and affordable"

East Westwood is a neighborhood of less than one square mile that lies on the west side of Cincinnati off of Westwood-Northern Boulevard. It is a very wooded area with a few side streets running off McHenry and Baltimore Avenues. It is predominantly African-American but has about a quarter or a little over a quarter of the population being white and other ethnic backgrounds. There are a number of single family homes along McHenry and Baltimore, but most of the neighborhood is made up of large rental complexes and smaller multi-family units.

The population of East Westwood is mostly low-income falling well under the average income for Cincinnati. There is plenty of public transportation with lots of Metro stops along the main roads. There is a good deal of crime in the area, typical of lower income neighborhoods. Housing is very affordable in East Westwood. There aren't really any businesses to speak of in East Westwood, but there are plenty to be found in nearby neighborhoods.

East Westwood is very close to Mt. Airy Forest and all the recreational activities it has to offer. It is also easily accessible to I-74 via Montana Avenue and to I-75 via Westwood-Northern Blvd./Hopple Street. This means that East Westwood is within close proximity to major hospitals, the University of Cincinnati, and Downtown Cincinnati.
Pros
  • affordable housing
  • relatively convenient location
  • lots of trees
Cons
  • crime
  • lack of shopping and dining
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Pogue Avenue reflects the best side of Evanston"

Pogue Avenue is located in the O'Bryonville area of Evanston. It runs off of Easthill Avenue at the edge of Hyde Park and dead ends at Owl's Nest Park. The street is conveniently located to the Madison Road business district which offers a variety of small boutiques and several restaurants and bars. There are a variety of service oriented businesses along Madison, as well. So, Pogue avenue is conveniently situated within walking distance of all of these neighborhood amenities.Pogue Avenue is also within walking distance of the Academy of World Languages, a pre K-8th grade magnet school in the Cincinnati Public Schools.

Houses along Pogue Avenue are decent, mostly single-family homes. Not all of the homes along Pogue have driveways, but there is some on street parking available. There is a church on the corner of Pogue and Cinammon. A sidewalk runs along one side of Pogue all the way and the other side has a sidewalk for most of it. This is a very walkable street in a very walkable and fairly safe neighborhood. Pogue Avenue is also conveniently located to I-71.

I have friends who live on Pogue and have a lovely home in a decent neighborhood. They have lived their for years and enjoy the convenience of the location and the friendliness of the neighbors. It is a nice neighborhood to live in and one I would like to live in if only there were any houses for sale.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • walkable neighborhood
Cons
  • lack of available housing inventory
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Millvale doesn't offer much beyond location and recreation"

Millvale is another one of those urban-industrial communities situated along railroad tracks and the Mill Creek. It is predominantly filled with run down single-family homes, some housing projects and light industrial businesses. Residents in Millvale are primarily very low income African-Americans. Millvale is a very small community, so a quick trip down Beekman Street is all it takes to pass through it. That being said, Millvale does have two things going for it, one is the convenient location and two is the recreation center.

Millvale is conveniently located off of Interstate 75 at the Hopple Street exit. This means that it is close to Downtown and close to the hospitals and the University of Cincinnati. With its easy access to I-75, the rest of the Cincinnati area is also easily accessible. The Millvale Recreation Center is really the heart of the community. It provides a variety of activities and opportunities for neighborhood residents. The rec center, like most of those in Cincinnati, offers a low annual membership fee for community members and provides a plethora of amenities from a fitness center, gym, game room, and computer center, to swimming pools and basketball courts and more.

Beekman street has an extensive network of Metro bus stops, so public transportation is easily found in this community. Communities around Millvale are English Woods, South Cumminsville and East Westwood. Camp Washington is just the other side of the railroad tracks from Millvale. Despite the neighborhood's small size, there is a good deal of crime, including violent crimes. There have also been several recent shootings in this community, so safety is definitely a concern.

Fortunately, the neighborhood is convenient to shopping and dining elsewhere, as there is nothing of note in the Millvale neighborhood. Schools are part of the Cincinnati Public Schools and the Ethel M. Taylor Academy, an elementary, is located right in Millvale.
Pros
  • recreation center
  • plenty of public transportation access
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • crime
  • urban blight
  • No central business district
  • Not much nightlife or shopping
  • Not very diverse
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"East Walnut Hills offers large homes on broad tree-lined streets"

Most of East Walnut Hills is filled with stately larger homes on broad, tree-lined streets. The nicest and largest homes tend to be in the area between Cleinview and Torrence, with Keys Crescent being one of the most desirable streets to live on. Many of the homes on the southern side of Madison Road offer sweeping views of the Ohio River Valley. The East Walnut Hills area encompasses Columbia Parkway, and the homes on the hillsides near here are no stranger to landslides. The area of East Walnut Hills running off of William Howard Taft is a little more urban with homes set closer together. This area is a little hilly, but not as much so as the nearby Mount Adams neighborhood.

There is a somewhat revitalized business area near DeSales Corner (the intersection of Madison and Woodburn where St. Francis De Sales Church is located.) Asian restaurant Suzie Wong's on Madison is located at DeSales Corner and is a great little neighborhood restaurant. There are some other business here from salons to banks and across the street is a dry cleaners. The DeSales Flats are new rentals located in the building above the street level businesses. East Walnut Hills continues along Madison Road into the O'Bryonville business district (part of Evanston), where there are several restaurants and a number of boutiques and art galleries, well as a vet and yoga studio. Up the road just a little further, and you are in the busy shopping area of Oakley/Hyde Park.

East Walnut Hills is conveniently located to Downtown Cincinnati, the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and the major hospitals. There is a recreation center located in nearby Walnut Hills, as well as a YMCA. There are a number of schools in East Walnut Hills, from Purcell Marian (alma mater of NFL great Roger Staubach), the Doherty School, to St. Ursula Academy.While there is crime in East Walnut Hills, it is not as much as in the surrounding neighborhoods, especially if you stay to the east of DeSales Corner. I had a friend who used to live near St. Ursula and her car was constantly being broken into, but she was closer to Walnut Hills proper.

Overall, East Walnut Hills is a diverse neighborhood with some beautiful properties and some new development. Property in East Walnut Hills can be a little pricey, but if you can afford it, I would definitely recommend checking it out. You will find properties from smaller single-family homes and condos to large mansions with spacious lots; property prices can range from under $40K to well over a $1 million.
Pros
  • Central location
  • Gorgeous, opulent properties
Cons
  • Rather expensive properties
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Main Street Montgomery is mainly a traffic throughway"

I grew up on Main Street and it is much different than it was then. The last decades have seen major changes to the buildings on Main Street. Even when I lived there, it was going through changes. There are very few residential places left on Main Street mostly just a couple of apartment buildings and a house or two. The homes where people lived have either been torn down and replaced by new buildings or converted into businesses (those are mostly the historic ones.) One of the things that hasn't changed, is that Main Street still sees a lot of traffic. Many people use it as an alternative to Montgomery Road as it runs parallel to Montgomery for its short course. It is in the heart of the Downtown Montgomery, so is near some fabulous restaurants and neighborhood bars, not to mention all of the shops. Main Street has its own restaurant in Pomodoris, a local Italian restaurant serving delicious wood-fired pizzas and more. Chances re, if you're in Montgomery or going through there, at some point you'll either drive on Main Street or cross over it.
Pros
  • near great food, shopping and more
Cons
  • too much traffic
  • not very residential
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Loveland-Madeira is main access to Loveland"

Loveland-Madeira is the main access point into Loveland. There are other roads that go into Loveland, but Loveland-Madeira provides access to and from I-275. There are a number of strip malls, gas stations, convenience stores and more along the route. You will find many small business locations, including a car wash and a pet boarding facility. There's a church, some homes, apartments accessed on side roads and once you get into Loveland there is a bowling alley, roller skating rink Kroger, elementary school, more strip malls and a post office. Loveland-Madeira takes you right into the heart of old Loveland. Traffic can be very heavy on LOveland-Madeira, especially during rush hour times.
Pros
  • lots of places to get food
  • a variety of businesses to meet your needs
Cons
  • traffic and more traffic
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mount Airy...more than just a forest"

Mount Airy is a small neighborhood to the northwest of Downtown Cincinnati and west of the Northside and College Hill neighborhoods. It is accessed via I-74. Overall, Mount Airy is fairly close to all the major interstates and other major roads. It is near I-75 at the south end and at the north end is very close to the Ronald Reagan Cross County Highway and beyond that I-275. Colerain Avenue cuts through the heart of Mount Airy and is US Route 27, while Hamilton Avenue slightly to the east of Mount Airy is US Route 127.

About half of the neighborhood is taken up by Mount Airy Forest, which covers a total of 1471 heavily wooded acres. The park lies in both Mt. Airy and Westwood and was established in 1911 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2010. Mount Airy forest is really the centerpiece of the Mount Airy community as it offers 23 picnic areas, three lodges, 14 miles of hiking trails and 16 miles of bridle trails among other amenities and activities, including a large and popular dog park (located on the Westwood side).

Mount Airy is a fairly quiet community with a moderate amount of crime. Housing in the neighborhood is fairly affordable typically ranging, on average, from just under $100K to around $150K. Traffic along Colerain Avenue can be very heavy, especially during rush hour times as it is a main access road to the interstates.

At the far end of the community is the Mt. Airy Hospital, part of the Mercy Health system. Mt. Airy Hospital has served the community since 1971 and provides a wide range of services on their large campus.

The Cincinnati Waldorf School is a independent school that provides high quality education for children from preschool through the 8th grade. Cincinnati Waldorf School has been providing education since 1973. Also located in Mount Airy is the Mt. Airy School, part of Cincinnati Public schools. It, too, provides preschool through 8th grade education.

There are a number of businesses, including some restaurants, along Colerain avenue, especially in the area to the north of Blue Rock Road/Kipling Avenue. While this area is not actually in Mount Airy, it is just immediately north of the community. Head a little further up Colerain Avenue and you will hit the Northgate shopping area, where you can find just about everything you need.
Pros
  • Convenient location by highways
  • Mt. Airy Forest
Cons
  • moderate crime
  • not walkable
  • It's hard to avoid Colerain traffic headed for Northgate
  • Not much nightlife or shopping
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mount Auburn offers state of the art medical facilities and historic charm"

Mount Auburn was once home to Cincinnati's wealthy elite. These homes reflected a variety of architectural styles, including Greek Revival. One of the homes built in the Greek Revival style has been restored to much of its former elegance; the house, located on Auburn Avenue, was the boyhood home of William Howard Taft (the only man to serve as both US chief justice and president). The home is now the William Howard Taft National Historic Site and is operated by the National Park Service, it is free to visit and well worth the trip. It once was a large farm estate, as were many of the homes in this area. Today, the house stands on a small lot. Right behind the property is the Hamilton County Juvenile Court Youth Center.

The Taft house, however, is the exception these days, as much of the Mount Auburn area is taken up by medical facilities and doctors offices. One of the major medical facilities, The Christ Hospital, located on Auburn Avenue, recently announced a $265 million dollar planned expansion and improvement to its existing facilities. One of the expansion projects is to build a facility dedicated to orthopedic and spine care. The streets around the campus of The Christ Hospital are filled with a variety of medical clinics and offices. So, medical care in this area is definitely not a problems. For years, I've gone to the Cincinnati Dental Services located on McMillan Street at Auburn Avenue.

There are a number of parks in Mount Auburn and a recreation center on Southern Avenue. The Mount Auburn Recreation Center offers low cost annual memberships to community members and offers swimming pools, fitness center, outdoor basketball, a playground, and much more.

While there are some homes in Mount Auburn that are on the lower end of the pricing scale, most of the properties are more expensive than in some of the surrounding areas. One of the nice things about homes in this area is that you can find a variety of properties to choose from. There are many older homes, townhomes, row houses, condos, and mid-century single family homes. There is some new construction along McMillan, which is mostly geared towards the students attending nearby University of Cincinnati. A trendy area in this neighborhood is the Prospect Hill/Liberty Hill area filled with many rehabbed townhomes, condos, and rentals. It is located just outside of the Mount Auburn Historic District and is distinct because of its particularly steep terrain. Be warned if you rely on public transportation, buses have been known to have problems traveling in this area when roads are icy.

Because of its proximity to Downtown, major medical facilities, the University of Cincinnati, and I-71, Mount Auburn is a highly convenient location with easy access to area attractions, businesses, and shopping districts. Mount Auburn is also home to two local television stations, as well as God's Bible School and College. If you like urban living in a unique setting, then Mount Auburn is the place for you.
Pros
  • beautiful properties
  • extremely convenient location
  • Christ Hospital
  • View
Cons
  • crime
  • busy streets
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"North Avondale is a centrally located stately neighborhood"

North Avondale is a centrally located community with relatively easy access to both major interstates (75 & 71), as well as close proximity to Downtown Cincinnati, Xavier University (part of the campus is in North Avondale), University of Cincinnati, major hospitals, the Cincinnati Zoo, and major shopping areas. Overall, it is nicer than Avondale, but has almost as many problems with crime these days. The area to the north of Clinton Springs is the safest part of the neighborhood, experiencing less crime than the area to the south, closest to Avondale.

You can find many large, beautiful single-family homes for quite reasonable prices in North Avondale. That's not to say that all the properties are a bargain as there a number of historically significant homes (North Avondale is known as Cincinnati's "mansion district") for sale, but there are quite a few very nice ones to be had for great prices. North Avondale is filled with many winding streets that are lined by stately old trees. There are streets in the community that are more spaced out, giving the feel of more park-like settings for many of the neighborhood homes.

Within the community, the North Avondale Neighborhood Association is a very active citizens group that has been around for more than 45 years. They host many special events, hold meetings about community issues, and generally try to improve the quality of life in North Avondale.

There are lot of churches in the North Avondale community, but very few businesses as North Avondale is primarily a residential neighborhood. The Clinton Hills Swim Club is a private, members only swim club located in a wooded setting up a winding drive. The facility offers a variety of games and activities during the open season (summer months.) The North Avondale Recreation Center is located on Clinton Springs and offers low cost annual memberships for community members. The facility features a variety of amenities from a fitness center, computer center, and game room to softball and soccer fields to tennis courts.

North Avondale Montessori is one of the magnet schools in the Cincinnati Public Schools and offers education for children from ages 3 -12. The New School Montessori is a private Montessori school also located in North Avondale.

Overall, North Avondale has a lot to offer as far as convenience and ambiance. If you play it safe and don't tempt fate, it can also be a pleasant and safe neighborhood to live in. You can find some lovely and large older homes in on quiet streets, making North Avondale a very attractive neighborhood to call home.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • highly active citizens group
  • stately and historic homes
Cons
  • Somewhat dangerous
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
Michael_Teggart
Michael_Teggart PRO I have to disagree with your assessment of North Avondale’s crime. The neighborhood is a completely separate neighborhood from Avondale and the difference in crime is day and night. Go to any crime mapping service and you can see a virtual boundary between North Avondale and Avondale. To say North Avondale has “almost as many problems with crimes these days” is completely inaccurate.
2yrs+
SuzM
SuzM I realize that North Avondale and Avondale are two separate neighborhoods, as is clearly reflected in my reviews of both neighborhoods. I have also gone to crime tracking websites and read a number of articles. Crime in North Avondale has been a problem, not as great as in Avondale. However, the portion of North Avondale that is closest to Avondale AND the area along Reading Road continues to see a good deal of crime. As I said in my review, the area of North Avondale to the north of Clnton SPrings has much less overall crime. There have been major efforts and increased police patrols in Avondale, which have helped reduce crime in that area. In fact, this year-to-date, there have been no homicides in Avondale; there has been at least one homicide this year in North Avondale. While crime in North Avondale is not as extensive as in Avondale, it is still an issue...as with any inner city neighborhood. Daylight hours in both neighborhoods tend to be safer than at night. I am not saying that North Avondale is the same as Avondale on any level, but the areas in the neighborhood where crime is more prevalent and location is definitely something to consider when moving to that area. If you look at my overall review and rankings of the two neighborhoods, North Avondale fares much, much better.
2yrs+
SCrutchfield
SCrutchfield PRO Speaking as a resident, NA is a great place to live because of it's location and charm. It's so centrally located and close to the major highways. There are many housing jewels in the neighborhood tucked away on private drives and others on the main drags (Reading, Mitchell, Clinton Springs). This is one of the few neighborhoods where I think it has something to offer every taste! Also as a member of NANA, I agree with Michael.
2yrs+
SCrutchfield
SCrutchfield PRO Want to meet the North Avondale Neighborhood Association, see what businesses are in North Avondale, and visit with local University art students? Come to North Avondale Connects, at Seasongood Park, from 2-5pm, on Oct 28th!
2yrs+
hherr
hherr PRO Next year the North Avondale Business Association will hold the same event (North Avondale Connects) earlier in the fall in order to have better weather. We are discussing using some of the store fronts and making this a walking event. We have the best collection of secret businesses along this road and by next year well be ready to showcase this unique and wonderful event. Those of you who made it this had a great time and we had a wonderful turnout!
2yrs+
hherr
hherr PRO And bring the kids, my girls has a blast meeting all the local business owners and buying gifts for this holiday.
2yrs+
SCrutchfield
SCrutchfield PRO Heather, it was a blast! Having it as a walking event would be awesome!
2yrs+
hherr
hherr PRO Shannon I agree. I look forward to see you there if not sooner!
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Madisonville is a decent mixed use neighborhood"

Madisonville is a mixed use neighborhood in the northeastern area of Cincinnati; the community was founded in 1809. There are a number of light industrial businesses along Duck Creek Road and numerous businesses line Red Bank Expressway. The majority of the residential area is east of Red Bank. The residential area of Madisonville has a wide variety of houses in a wide variety of conditions. Houses also come in all size in Madisonville from small bungalows to large single family homes to multi-unit buildings.

Property price in Madisonville range from the low teens to several hundred thousand dollars depending on the property type and condition, as well as location in the neighborhood. Rents cover a wide range of prices, as well, from several hundred to more than a thousand dollars. There a many multi-family units and older apartment buildings, as well as some very nice new apartments. Centennial Station is an upscale rental community built in the last decade in the area between Red Bank Expressway and Erie Avenue.

The Madisonville Community Council is the voice of the community and holds monthly meetings to discuss a variety of issues impacting residents and businesses in Madisonville. There is a $5.00 fee to be a member; monthly meetings are held at the Madisonville Recreation Center. The Madisonville Recreation Center is located on Stewart Road and offers an inexpensive annual membership for community members. The facility offers a computer center, pool, game room, gym, tennis courts and more.

Madisonville is conveniently located to both Downtown Cincinnati and the northern suburbs. It is easily accessed via Interstate 71. Red Bank Expressway also provides direct access to Columbia Parkway, an easy route to both the eastern part of Cincinnati and Downtown. The neighborhood is fairly racially diverse with a moderate amount of crime with a lot of the crime being centered near Madison Road. The Madison Road business district is a little rundown and typically has a lot of people loitering in this area.

There are a number of large businesses in the Madisonville area, including Fifth Third Bank, Gorilla Glue Company, and Medpace. There are several strip malls along Red Bank Expressway, including a number of restaurants. Located on the site of a former drive-in at the intersection of Madison and Red Bank is the Red Dog Pet Resort & Spa and a senior living community, Barrington of Oakley. These are all new facilities built in the last several years.

Overall, Madisonville is a decent community with a convenient location. I would definitely consider purchasing in Madisonville, provided the location were right along with the property fitting my needs and price point.
Pros
  • centrally located
  • mixed use neighborhood
  • wide range of properties
Cons
  • moderate crime
  • some areas are rundown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"East End Developing into Upscale Neighborhood"

The East End stretches along the Ohio River from Downtown Cincinnati to California and runs almost the entire length of Columbia Parkway and encompasses Lunken Airport. The area has been cleaned up a lot in recent years, especially the area closest to Downtown. A lot of new construction has taken place with some gorgeous town homes taking the place of the former run down old homes and businesses. However, there are still number of old, somewhat dilapidated looking homes in this area.

There are a few restaurants and bars along this stretch of town, but not really any shopping options. There are no grocery stores in this neighborhood, but there are several within a relatively short drive. As the East End is a community that runs next to the river, there are number of businesses related to boating and other water activities.

Housing in this area ranges in price from relatively low to very expensive, depending on if it is old or new construction, a house or a condo. There is something for everyone in this neighborhood. However, as the East End is a community along the river, it is subject to flooding, so take that into consideration when looking for a home. As it is near the river, you can also get a place with easy access to the water or a one-of-a-kind view. There is still a lot of new construction going on so there will continue to be changes to this neighborhood. With all the new construction, residents of this neighborhood are changing from lower income to average or above average income residents.
Pros
  • lots of new construction
  • wide range of housing choices
Cons
  • it floods
  • bit of a drive to the grocery
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Corryville fits the bill for students"

Corryville is a neighborhood adjacent to the University of Cincinnati with most of the residential parts being taken up by student housing. The other half of Corryville contains the main hospitals of Cincinnati. The hospitals and related medical facilities and offices take up the portion of Corryville that is north of Martin Luther King; also in this area re several buildings that are part of the University of Cincinnati. The area to the south of Martin Luther King contains the business and residential district of Corryville.

The entire area around the University of Cincinnati is undergoing a transformation with many of the old buildings being replaced by completely new constructions changing the look of the neighborhood. There are a number of new residential buildings along Martin Luther King and the nearby streets.

There are a number of small businesses along Short Vine, which culminates in the University Plaza shopping center where the local Kroger sits. Corryville is filled with a number of businesses geared towards students, including many eating establishments with cheap beer and food. Bogart's is home to concerts covering a variety of musical genres and features both local and national acts.

Because of the proximity to the University of Cincinnati and the numerous hospitals, there are several hotels in Corryville. There is also a good deal of crime in this area, but it is primarily non-violent. The Short Vine area has had a history of crime from loitering youths, especially during the summer; however, there has been an effort to stop this in recent years with a heavy police presence, especially at night.

I would honestly only recommend the Corryville neighborhood for someone planning to attend the University of Cincinnati or maybe for young singles working in the hospitals. The location is convenient and rents are super cheap, although more expensive in the newer construction.
Pros
  • excellent for students
  • Bogarts is a fun place to go
  • UC's Medical Campus is the cleanest area
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"College Hill is a quiet residential neighborhood"

College Hill is a diverse community and Cincinnati's fourth largest neighborhood. Hamilton Avenue, US Route 127, is the main artery passing through College Hill. College Hill is a neighborhood with a strong sense of community, reasonable home prices, and tree lined streets. It is bordered to the the North by hipster friendly neighborhood, North College Hill, which is not part of the City of Cincinnati. At one time College Hill was home to two different colleges hence the name of the community.

College Hill has some beautiful older homes on larger lots, making it a great residential community. While the homes in the community are architecturally diverse, many of them are designed in the Tudor style, which seems to have been a very popular style in many older Cincinnati neighborhoods. There are several parks in College Hill, Fox Preserve on the western side of the community and Laboiteaux Woods to the eastern side of the community.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital has a campus in College Hill. A unique business in College Hill is the Six Acres Bed & Breakfast located on a beautifully landscaped wooded lot in a house that was one of the stops on the underground railroad. There are a variety of small businesses along Hamilton Avenue, but not a real shopping district. There are a lot of churches in College Hill, providing choices for all denominations to attend. There are several schools in the community both public and private, including Pleasant Hill Academy, Aiken and McCauley High Schools. Fortunately for College Hill residents, there are many more shopping, dining, and entertainment options in nearby North College Hill.
Pros
  • diverse neghborhood
  • nice homes on larger lots
  • primarily residential neighborhood
Cons
  • lack of shopping and dining
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Carthage is a solid neighborhood with a growing Hispanic population"

Carthage is small community that most people just pass through unless they are attending an event at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds. It is a diverse neighborhood with a growing Hispanic population. There are a number of businesses and community services and events that reflect the Hispanic population in Carthage. Not only are the Hamilton County Fairgrounds home to the the Hamilton County Fair every August, but they also host the Cincinnati Hispanic Festival every September; Cincinnati's longest running event celebrating Latino culture.

Housing in Carthage is reasonably priced for average single-family homes. There is some new construction, but most of the homes are older. The business district is hit or miss with limited shopping and few dining options. There are, however, a few gems, such as El Valle Verde and Andy's Cafe on the food side and Parsley Pottery Studio & Gallery on the shopping side.

Traffic can be quite heavy on Vine Street as it is one of the main surface streets going through the Cincinnati area. The intersection of Paddock and Vine can be especially hairy because of the number of streets coming together in this area. Also, Paddock Road is a major exit off Interstate 75, making Carthage a conveniently accessed neighborhood.

The Carthage Civic League meets monthly and is one of the oldest community councils in Cincinnati. The Carthage Community Center offers a fitness membership to community members for reasonable monthly rates. Senior activities are offered twice week at the Community Center. There is also a community garden for residents to grow their own plots. Caldwell Park is a large park located off North Bend Road, it offers a spray park at the playground during the summer months.
Pros
  • community center and garden
  • reasonable housing prices
  • Easy acces via I-75
Cons
  • lack of shopping options
  • Rush hour traffic
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Camp Washington: a unique neighborhood with eclectic charm"

Camp Washington is smaller than the sum of its parts, as much of the Camp Washington neighborhood is taken up by a Interstate 75 and multiple lines of railroad tracks. So, the actual residential and business district of Camp Washington covers a much smaller geographic area than the actual boundaries of the neighborhood. The neighborhood still shows its industrial roots, though the number of businesses in the area are less in number than in the neighborhood's heyday. Today, there are plans in place, some of which have already been implemented, to renew the old and somewhat dilapidated industrial buildings.

Camp Washington is probably best known for being the home of Camp Washington Chili. The chili parlor, which moved into a new building in 2000, has been a mainstay of the neighborhood for over 60 years. Unlike others of the Cincinnti-style chili ilk, Camp Washington Chili on Colerain Avenue, just off the Hopple Street Viaduct, is the one and only location. The restaurant has been the recipient of visits from celebrities and politicians alike. Just across Hopple Street is US Chili and one of the more interesting shops in Cincinnati, Shenz Thetrical Supply.

There are four community organizations that serve the businesses and residents of Camp Washington, the Camp Washington Community Board, the Camp Washington Community Council, the Camp Washington Community School, and the Camp Washington Business Association. Camp Washington recently applied for a federal grant to create the Camp Washington Urban Farm Project, which is expected to create 40 jobs through the establishment of several community garden sites and a distribution network. Additional urban renewal plans include a new industrial and office complex on the old Kahn's site on Spring Grove Avenue.

Crime in Camp Washington is relatively low for the type of neighborhood that it is with most of the crime centered along the Hopple Street Viaduct area, which is a major exit off of Interstate 75. Housing prices in the neighborhood are relatively low. Many of the homes in the area are a century old or more, though some of them reflect their age and lack of upkeep.

Overall, Camp Washington is a tidy little community with a lot of potential. It is very conveniently located just off of Interstate 75 and within close proximity to the major hospitals, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati State Technical & Community College and a short drive to Downtown Cincinnati.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • growth potential
  • Rich in history
  • Tight-knit community
Cons
  • lack of fine dining
  • neighborhood in transition
  • Not much nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Bond Hill: a neighborhood trying to make a comeback"

Bond Hill is a neighborhood that has seen a lot of decline over the latter decades of the 20th century. Today, there are efforts to revitalize the community with construction of new housing along Langdon Farm. Housing in Bond Hill tends to be quite affordable, but there are many run down homes in areas that may be less than safe. Crime in Bond Hill continues to be an issue.

Bond Hill is home to the very popular Maketewah Country Club. I know many people who play golf at Maketewah, which has the reputation as the "friendliest club in town." The membership at Maketewah is diverse, as is the Bond Hill neighborhood it is situated in. The Bond Hill community is fairly racially balanced, making it a more diverse neighborhood than some of its surrounding communities.

Shopping in Bond Hill is not what it used to be, but there are still a few places to go in the community, many of them centered on African American culture. Back in the day, Jordan Crossing was a bustling mall, called the Swifton Shopping Center. I can remember my mom taking me there to shop when I was little. Over the decades, as the neighborhood declined, so did the occupancy of the mall. Located across the street along Reading Road is Woodward Career Technical High School, part of the Cincinnati Public Schools.

Bond Hill is also home to The Cincinnati Gardens, located along Seymour Avenue. The Gardens was once the premier event venue in Cincinnati and was the 7th largest venue of its kind when it opened in 1949. All kinds of events have been hosted here from boxing to hockey, to the NBA All-Star game and various live concerts from the Beatles to Madonna to Metallica. Today, the Gardens is host to many high school and youth hockey games. Today the Gardens is home to Cincinnati Rollergirls (roller derby), the Cincinnati Kings (indoor soccer), and Cincinnati Commandos (indoor football).

Overall, Bond Hill is a decent neighborhood with some issues, but changes seem to be making a difference in the community. It is centrally located with easy access to Interstate 75 (its western border) and to Interstate 71 via the Norwood Lateral, Route 562.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • affordable housing
  • Always improving
Cons
  • Occasional issues with crime
  • lack of shopping, dining and nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cooper Road the Crossroads of Montgomery"

Cooper Road is a great street and one of the main arteries going through Montgomery. The intersection of Cooper Road and Montgomery Road is full life as it is the center of Downtown Montgomery and vibrant with nightlife and dining options. The part of Cooper that comes out of Indian Hill into Montgomery is a quiet, residential area with many older houses and, unfortunately, some modern infill. I grew up in this area and it was a great place to live, so convenient to everything. Once you cross over Main Street, you hit the business district of Cooper Road. There is the Village Tavern and Corner Pub on opposite corners of Cooper and Montgomery. These are both neighborhood gathering spots that frequently feature live entertainment. Stone Creek Dining Company is an upscale restaurant with modern decor, a vibrant bar scene and great food. There are also a number of shops along this stretch of Cooper Road. You will also find Bombay Brazier, an upscale Indian Restaurant with really good food. Further along Cooper it becomes residential again with a stretch of it being the expansive Swaim Park. Further along Cooper on the other side of I-71 is Sycamore Junior High as you drive into Blue Ash. The worst thing about Cooper Road is that traffic can be very heavy at times, especially around the intersection with Montgomery Road.
Pros
  • great dining and entertainment options
  • unique boutiques and shops
  • nice mix of residential and business
Cons
  • traffic can be very heavy
  • no parking on most of Cooper Road
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"North Fairmount: Full of Urban Blight"

North Fairmount is not much different than South Fairmount, a semi-industrial neighborhood of primarily run-down older homes, many of them boarded up from years of neglect. It is an urban area to its core and is filled with mainly low-income residents. More than 50% of the North Fairmount residents live below the poverty level. The neighborhood is primarily African-American, with a growing percentage of Hispanic residents.

The neighborhood of North Fairmount lies to the west of Interstate 75 and is easily accessed via the Hopple Street exit. Its location makes it convenient to Downtown Cincinnati and the major hospitals in the Clifton/University Heights area, as well as the University of Cincinnati.

There is a very heavy crime rate in this area, with a lot of it being centered near the bordering English Woods area. There aren't really any places to shop in this community nor places to eat, although there are places not too far away. Overall, this is not really an area you would want to live in or to spend any amount of time in.
Pros
  • easy interstate access
Cons
  • high crime
  • urban blight
Recommended for
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Evanston is a large and diverse neighborhood"

Evanston is a large neighborhood that covers a diverse territory. One end of Evanston is made up of Xavier University and at the other end you will find the O'Bryonville district. In between, there is a large and diverse amount of ground covered from business and industry, to a large cemetery, one of the scariest intersections in town, and a variety of residential streets, as well as one of the best schools in Cincinnati Walnut Hills High School.

The area around Xavier University and Dana Avenue is student friendly with student friendly housing and neighborhood bars, some of which fall in Norwood. At the opposite end of Evanston is O'Bryonville. Centered along Madison Road, the O'Bryonville neighborhood has some great restaurants and eclectic boutiques. There is also a dry cleaners, yoga studio, bank, and more.

The O'Bryonville area is one of the nicer parts of Evanston with homes varying in size with diverse residents. There are a number of businesses lining Madison Road from DeSales Corner to Dana Avenue. There area around Gilbert Avenue, Montgomery Road, and Hewitt Avenue, is known as Five Points as these three roads and two others come together to form a scary intersection of close building and drug trafficking. There has been an organized effort in recent years to clean this area up; however, it is still one to avoid, unless you're driving through to other locations.

There are a number of schools located in Evanston, including the prestigious Walnut Hills High School. There are two Cincinnati Public Schools elementary schools in Evanston, Academy of World Languages and Evanston Academy. Evanston is a convenient location that is close to Downtown Cincinnati and the University of CIncinnati and major hospitals. It is also convenient to the Oakley/Norwood shopping areas with easy access to Interstate 71, which divides Evanston.

Some parts of the Evanston neighborhood are much better than others. The area along Montgomery Road right before you get to Norwood is one of the less nice areas, while the areas closer to Walnut Hills and Hyde Park are much nicer and definitely worth checking out. Of course, depending on which street you are looking at the home prices can vary quite widely. There are some very nice and large homes on Easthill Avenue, while the area near Duck Creek has smaller homes that are less expensive. If I were to choose to live in Evanston, I would pick the area near O'Bryonville as it is definitely the nicest part.
Pros
  • O'Bryonville district
  • Xavier University
Cons
  • some questionable areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
dfe
dfe O'Bryonville (part of the 45206 zip) and Easthill Ave (west edge of 45208) are just down the street from the border of Evanston the 45207 zip code.
2yrs+
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4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Paddock Hills is a secret worth revealing"

Paddock Hills has been called Cincinnati's best kept secret and it is definitely a secret worth revealing. The small community of Paddock Hills occupies less than 1 square mile of geography, but is worlds away from many of its neighboring communities. The residential area of Paddock Hills, mainly running between Paddock and Reading roads, features elegant English Tudor-style homes built in the 1920s. The homes of Paddock Hills are on pleasant, tree-line cul-de-sacs.

The businesses in Paddock Hills lie primarily along Reading Road. Sugar n' Spice has been a favorite neighborhood dining spot serving up their signature "wispy thin" pancakes since 1941. Blue Gibbon Chinese on Tennessee Avenue has been serving the Paddock Hills community for more than thirty years. Taking up a significant portion of Paddock Hills are the Avon Woods Nature Preserve and Avon Fields Gold Course.

Paddock Hills is centrally located with easy access to the major interstates. It is also an easy drive to Xavier University. Paddock Hills has a moderate amount of crime, mainly centered around Reading Road and Tennessee Avenue. Because many of the homes in Paddock Hills are quite large, real estate prices tend to be higher than in many of the surrounding areas. Paddock Hills is a racially diverse community, although the population is predominantly African American. If you are looking for a quiet, centrally located neighborhood with large, attractive homes then Paddock Hills might be the right choice.
Pros
  • large, elegant homes
  • tree-lined streets
Cons
  • lack of shopping
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Riverside"

Riverside, as its name implies, is by the river. Unfortunately, that's about all of Riverside, a strip of town that follows US Route 50 along the Ohio River. Riverside is situated between Sedamsville and Sayler Park. Most of Riverside consists of the industry along US50 (River Road), mainly situated between the river and the road and the railroad tracks that run next to the road on the river side. A lot of those industrial businesses deal with transportation of materials via river, rail, and roads. You can't miss the hulking storage silos of either Consolidated Grain and Barge or the Westway Terminals as you enter the Riverside area.

Riverside does have some residences, these are mainly situated on the north side of River Road/US 50. You will find this area to be the base of a hillside and rising. The main street of this area is creatively named Hillside Avenue, indicating its geographical position. Real estate prices in Riverside are fairly low. Riverside is a few short miles away from Downtown Cincinnati along the heavily traveled corridor of River Road/US 50.

Going up the hillside from the residential part of Riverside takes you to the community of Delhi, where you will find plenty of places to eat, shop and do business. The residents of Riverside have little choice for shopping in their neighborhood, but there are a couple of popular places to eat in Riverside, Drew's on the River and Jim & Jack's on the River; both restaurants offer a variety of menu items, mostly burgers, wraps, and sandwiches and live music on weekends.

There is a nursing care center in Riverside, Liberty Nursing Center, that offers a variety of care options, including rehab and memory care. Riverside Playground, running next to the river is one of the park areas in Riverside. It offers baseball fields and a boat launch ramp. Delshire Preserve, is a 13.4 acre nature preserve located along the north side of Hillside Avenue. It was originally preserved as a green space for the Delhi subdivision of Delshire to enjoy, but is now owned by the Western Wildlife Corridor organization, a group dedicated to preserving the wooded hillsides long the Ohio River.

Riverside is served by the St. Vincent de Paul Church, part of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. There was Catholic school in the community as well, but the Archdiocese closed it a few years ago. The community is served by Riverside Academy Elementary, a charter school offering K-8 education. Children living in Riverside attend schools in the Cincinnati Public School system, and the nearest elementary is Sayler Park School.
Pros
  • easy access to the River
  • cheap real estate
  • close to the city
Cons
  • very industrial
  • not a lot of entertainment, shopping or dining
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Roselawn is a nice neighborhood except for the crime"

Roselawn is an attractive historic neighborhood with increasingly prevalent crime. The Tudor style homes were built primarily in the 1930s and 1940s and are situated on tree-lined streets. Unfortunately, the increasing amount of crime detracts from the quality of the neighborhood. Roselawn is centrally located, making it convenient for commuting to both Downtown Cincinnati and the northern suburbs.

Roselawn has a very active community council, block watch program, and even has a community garden. Roselawn Park on Seymour Avenue has baseball fields and playground among other amenities. Because of the increasing crime in the neighborhood, there is a focus on trying to make it as nice a community to live in as it once was. Property and rental prices in Roselawn tend to be extremely reasonable, but this is due in large part to the declining safety. I wouldn't necessarily recommend moving to Roselawn, but if you want to take a gamble on the community being turned around, it might be a good time to invest for the long term.

The business district of Roselawn is primarily centered on the Valley Shopping Center on Reading Road. There you will find Amma's Kitchen a vegetarian Indian restaurant that is highly rated by local foodies. It even features an all vegan buffet one day a week. Song Long Vietnamese Restaurant also received positive reviews. You will find a LaRosa's Pizzeria in the Valley Shopping Center. LaRoas's isn't really great pizza, but it's a Cincinnati favorite and the prices are pretty cheap.

If you're looking to score a beautiful old home for a bargain price, then check out Roselawn. However, if safety is your primary concern, I would look elsewhere in town.
Pros
  • Beautiful old homes
  • Great location near highways
Cons
  • Can be very dangerous
  • Not much nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"WInton Hils offers low-income housing and industry"

Winton Hills is primarily a low-income housing and industrial business neighborhood. Despite being made up largely of large public housing communities and Procter & Gamble's Winton Hill Technical Center, the community has lots of trees and green space. A lot of the industry is concentrated along Este Ave, which runs just the other side of the Spring Grove Avenue/Vine Street industrial strip. Unfortunately, there's not a lot else the community has to offer except a bad reputation and crime. The crime, while a lot for the area, is typically concentrated in the low-income housing communities.

One of the nice amenities that the community has to offer is the Winton Hills Recreation Center which offers a variety of activities for kids and adults alike, including a fitness center, roller rink, baseball fields, swimming pool, and more. Memberships to the rec center are very inexpensive at $25 for adults and $10 for kids and seniors.

Winton Hills is not a very diverse neighborhood, as the majority of residents are African-American. Recently, because of the low-income housing options, there has been a large influx of Hispanic population.

Winton Hills is conveniently located near Interstate 75 and not too far from the central connector of the Norwood Lateral, which connects West to East and Interstate 71. Winton Hills is located less than 10 miles from Downtown Cincinnati and is within an easy drive of the northern suburbs and easily accessible from the east side of town via Route 562, the Norwood Lateral.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Lots of trees
Cons
  • lots of industry
  • A majority of the neighborhood is housing projects
  • Not much nightlife or shopping
  • Scary crime problems
  • Somewhat dangerous
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Winton Place is now Spring Grove Village"

Winton Place is now called Spring Grove Village. In 2007 residents voted to change the name from Winton Place to Spring Grove Village in order to recognize the prominence Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum plays in this tiny community. Spring Grove Cemetery was chartered in 1845 and is one of the largest non-profit cemeteries in the country.

The community of Spring Grove Village is just under two square miles in size, the majority of which is the Spring Grove Cemetery. The rest of Spring Grove Village is a quiet and safe neighborhood with attractive and affordable homes. There are many lovely, well-kept homes. Some of the homes were even designed by noted architect Samuel Hannaford, famous for designing Cincinnati's Music Hall and many other famous Cincinnati landmarks.

Spring Grove Village has greenhouses and many other service oriented businesses. There are some industrial type businesses a Kroger, and some fast food restaurants all in this small stretch of land. Spring Grove Village is conveniently located to both I-75 and I-74 and also very close to the University of Cincinnati and the major hospitals. These are just a few of the many things making Spring Grove Village a great little community.
Pros
  • attractive and affordable housing
  • convenient location that is easily accesible
  • quiet and safe
Cons
  • limited residential area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Westwood is a solid neighborhood with historic charm"

Westwood is the largest Cincinnati neighborhood and at one time was home to many of Cincinnati's wealthy. As a result there are many large and stately homes in the neighborhood reflecting its former days of glory. As the influx of German immigrants into Cincinnati increased, many of them settled in the Westwood area making it into a solid working class neighborhood.Today, as the largest neighborhood in the city, it is a diverse neighborhood with both good and bad areas; fortunately, there are more good areas than bad.

Westwood is filled with many tree lines streets, complementing the large older homes. Adding to the greenery of Westwood is Mt. Airy Forest, which is partially in Westood. Mt. Airy is one of the largest municipal parks in the United States covering more than 1400 acres of land. The park was developed in 1911 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

You can find much of what you need in Westwood. There are plenty of restaurants to keep your hunger at bay and many shops to keep your wallet lighter. You can find all kinds of cuisines in Westwood from Greek to Thai to Japanese to Mexican and everything in between. There are many of your typical chain restaurants, as well as many local favorites. There are also many places to go shopping from large box stores to small local shops that have been staples of the community for years. While there aren't a lot of high end shops in Westwood, the shopping has been improving in recent years.

While there is crime in Westwood, considering it is the largest Cincinnati neighborhood, the crime to population ration is very good. There are also areas of Westwood where crime is more concentrated. Housing prices in Westwood also run the gamut, but on average, housing costs are pretty reasonable. There are a lot of multi-family units and if you're looking to own a rental property, Westwood would be a good place to buy.

Overall, Westwood is a large and diverse neighborhood that would be a decent place to live as long as you choose to live in one of the better areas.
Pros
  • modest housing costs
  • Large historic homes
  • Mostly quiet streets
Cons
  • some areas have more crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Lower Price Hill is the historic Price Hill"

Lower Price Hill is the smallest by far of the three Price Hill neighborhoods. It also has more industry than the other two Price Hill neighborhoods. It is adjacent to Queensgate and is the closes of the Price Hill neighborhoods to Downtown Cincinnati.

Lower Price Hill, while being mostly business, is also the portion of Price Hill that has a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Lower Price Hill Historic District contains nearly 200 old buildings and homes. Many of the buildings were built in the 1850s.

Because of its relative size, Lower Price Hill has less crime than the other two Price Hill neighborhoods, but is definitely not immune to criminal activity. The population in this neighborhood is more diverse than West Price Hill. In comparison to East Price Hill, Lower Price Hill has a larger Hispanic population.

Since this area is mostly industrial, there aren't a lot of places to live. The places that are here are not the best kept, are crowded and old. Even though Mt. Echo Park is a decent park, there are not many other amenities in this community. I would probably not choose to live in Lower Price Hill.
Pros
  • proximity to Downtown
  • Mt. Echo Park
Cons
  • crime
  • primarily industrial
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"East Price Hill is on the way to West Price Hill"

East Price Hill is the largest of the three neighborhoods that make up the Price Hill community. East Price Hill is the most diverse of the three Price Hill neighborhoods, but as with the others is populated by predominantly lower to middle income white residents. Glenway, Warsaw, and Elberon Avenues are the three main arteries running through East Price Hill.

East Price Hill tends to have quite a lot of crime. It's not unusual to hear on the news that something bad happened in East Price Hill. East Price Hill does have some good things to offer, and those are several parks with fabulous views of Downtown Cincinnati and the Ohio River. You won't be disappointed hitting up Mt. Echo Park or Olden View Park for a visit.

East Price Hill, as with the other Price Hill neighborhoods and other west side communities, is predominantly Catholic. Despite this part of town being so deeply rooted in the Catholic faith East Price Hill is the home of Cincinnati Christian University, which was founded in 1924.

Recent years have seen an increase in the Hispanic population in Cincinnati in general, but more so on this side of town. Reasonable rents and property prices make this neighborhood more attractive for lower income individuals and families. Of course, one of the reasons for the lower housing costs is the amount of crime.

There aren't really any places to speak of in East Price Hill to dine or go shopping. If I were moving to this part of town I would probably avoid East Price Hill despite its reasonable housing costs and proximity to Downtown Cincinnati, there are better places to live in town.
Pros
  • low cost of housing
  • parks with stunning views
Cons
  • crime and more crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"West Price Hill a solid west side neighborhood"

West Price Hill is just one of three Price Hill neighborhoods that make up the relatively close knit Price Hill community. It is slightly smaller in size than East Price Hill, the largest of the three Price Hill neighborhoods. All of the Price Hill neighborhoods are predominantly populated by lower to middle income white residents; West Price Hill is the least diverse of the three Price Hill neighborhoods. Glenway Avenue, lined with businesses, runs through the heart of the West Price Hill neighborhood. As with most of the west side of Cincinnati, West Price Hill is a largely Catholic neighborhood. There are a number of Catholic schools and churches located throughout the Price Hill community. In recent years, there has been an increase in the Hispanic population in the Price Hill neighborhoods.

Housing in West Price Hill is typically smaller, older and quite reasonably priced. Rents, in general, tend to be lower on the west side of Cincinnati. There is also a good amount of crime. The various Price Hill neighborhoods are often reported on the news for some crime occurring there, but West Price Hill is usually not the most commonly mentioned neighborhood.

Most of the food in West Price Hill is fast food. There are your typical chain fast food restaurants, but there are also quite a few local places as well. There aren't really any standout places to dine in West Price Hill, but there are plenty of quick and cheap places to choose from. There are a number of businesses along Glenway Avenue but most of the shopping is further up Glenway in the Westwood neighborhood. Rapid Run Park is a nice, large park in West Price Hill, but most of the neighborhood is cramped city streets.

West Price Hill is a solid neighborhood with some good Catholic schools in the area. Glenway Avenue is very busy and traffic can be tough at busy times of the day. It is a fairly convenient commute to Downtown Cincinnati, but getting to the interstate is a little complicated by the number of surface streets that need to be traversed. Lower real estate prices make this an attractive area to choose to live.
Pros
  • low housing prices
Cons
  • crime
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Old World Charm and New Development Meet in the West End"

The West End of Cincinnati is exactly that, the west end of the City or, more precisely, the north-west end. At one point, it was largely a low income housing neighborhood, but is now transitioning to more of a mixed-income neighborhood. The revitalization of many historic buildings, plus the construction of the City West housing development have all added to the urban appeal of the West End as a residential area. Of course, with the redevelopment comes an increase in property prices.

One of the highlights of the West End neighborhood is the Dayton Street Historic District. This area was once known as Millionaire's Row and features some excellent examples of 19th century Italianate architecture.

There are a number of businesses located throughout the West End, including a Samuel Adams Brewery located it what was once a large brewing district. There are also a number of businesses located on Linn Street.

The Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy is an excellently rated community school. Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School is also located in the West End in a completely new facility. The West End also features several parks and playground areas.

The Betts House on Clark Street is the oldest residential structure in Cincinnati and is now an interpretive museum. The Betts House, built in 1804, is also the oldest brick house in Ohio still on its original site.

The West End is an improving neighborhood with a ways to go, but it might be a good investment in the future of Cincinnati. It is conveniently located to everything the city has to offer.
Pros
  • historic charm
  • convenient location
  • new construction
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"You take the good, you take the bad and there you have Walnut Hills"

Walnut Hills is a neighborhood of extremes both good and bad. It is conveniently located near Downtown Cincinnati and within a short distance of both the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University. Walnut Hills boasts a number of historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Many of the streets are lined with Victorian style homes, as well as homes reflecting architecture from other eras. There are also some not so nice or safe areas of Walnut Hills.

Peebles Corner, located at the intersection of Gilbert Avenue and McMillan Street is one of the Walnut Hills locations listed on the National Register. However, today it is a rundown, mainly abandoned business area that once thrived. Further down McMillan, heading towards East Walnut Hills, you will find a variety of businesses and a Kroger. This area of Walnut Hills becomes very lively during the summer months and you can find people hanging out on the street and vendors with their smokers selling fresh made BBQ.

Many of the nicer and more expensive homes in the area, including some hi-rise condo developments and townhomes are close to Eden Park. The streets of St. James Avenue and Alpine Place are particularly nice ones. From these streets, you can head down a revitalized Nassau Avenue to dine at Andy's Mediterranean Grille. Andy's features decent food and often has belly dancers performing for the diners.

Because of the nature of the neighborhood with its diverse population, there tends to be a good deal of crime in Walnut Hills. You will find more of the violent crimes in the less nice areas, with burglaries being more prevalent on the nicer streets. There are also more businesses and some light industry in the areas of Florence and Gilbert Avenues. Nearby you will find ZZ's Pizza, a small, but excellent pizza restaurant that was a neighborhood favorite for many years before closing; it has since reopened using the original recipes for its signature dishes. This used to be one of my favorite restaurants, but I haven't been to the reopened place yet.

Traffic around the Eden Park area can be quite heavy, especially on the weekends. Overall, once you are off the main thoroughfares, traffic is not that bad and on street parking is relatively easy to find. Walnut Hills has a Post Office located on Kemper Lane in one of the more residential areas. Walnut Hills also has a very active community action committee, the Walnut Hills Area Council, which meets monthly.

Overall, Walnut Hills is a diverse neighborhood that would be a good place to live if you choose the right part to live in. Stick to the streets closest to Eden Park and you can't go wrong living in this historic and conveniently located neighborhood.
Pros
  • Beautiful properties
  • Central location
  • Rich in history
  • Eden Park is beautiful
  • Pockets of trendy business
Cons
  • Not much nightlife
  • Not much shopping
  • Okay walking by day, not so much by night
  • Questionable safety
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Industry trumps housing in South Cumminsville"

South Cumminsville is located near Northside, just to the south of Interstate 74. It's kind of a forgotten neighborhood of Cincinnati. It is mostly made up of older homes (which have definitely seen their heyday, but are fairly neatly kept up nonetheless), light industry, and very little in the way of other businesses. The vast majority of residents in this area are African American with average incomes very near the poverty level.

There are few places to grab a bite to eat in this neighborhood. However, you can't go wrong if you stop by Mr. Gene's Dog House on Beekman Street. Mr. Gene's serves decent food at very reasonable prices, you can get a Chicago dog and onion rings for just $5.00. Not actually in South Cumminsville, but very close by, is neighborhood favorite, the family-owned Putz's Creamy Whip. Putz's has been in business since 1938.

The South Cumminsville Community Council is fairly active in looking for ways to improve the community, such as cleaning up litter and graffiti and stopping industrial businesses from encroaching any further on the residential areas. The neighborhood also has a great deal of crime. Because of the age of the neighborhood, its environment and locations, the real estate prices in South Cumminsville are extremely cheap. So, if you want to take a chance on a neighborhood that may see some future renewal, then it might be a good place to buy.
Pros
  • cheap real estate
Cons
  • no business district
  • urban blight
  • high crime
Recommended for
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"College students and college fun"

The Heights is an aged neighborhood near the University of Cincinnati campus. It is a cramped neighborhood of older homes, many of them converted to multiple units, set on a hillside between the UC campus and Over-The-Rhine. Because of its proximity to campus, it is a great place for students to live with very reasonable rents. It is one of the more affordable areas for off-campus housing. However, because of the number of students living in this area, it also can get pretty rowdy. This area has been known to have major street parties that are verging on riots, so it is definitely not a quiet neighborhood. However, for a college student, it is a lot of fun.

The Heights is also home to one of the best little bars in Cincinnati, Murphy's Pub located on Clifton Avenue. In business since 1969, Murphy's is not just a college bar, it is a neighborhood hangout (not everyone living in the Heights is a student.) The Heights even has its own neighborhood grocery/convenience store, the Ravine Street Market, located at the corner of Ravine and Warner. There are also a number of restaurants and shops nearby along McMillan Street and other nearby streets. Because it is a college neighborhood, you can find some good food at great prices...no high class dining here.

There are some nice little parks in this area, I like Fairview Park. Fairview Park is a small, winding park that offers fantastic views of Downtown Cincinnati. Another neighborhood park with a great view is Bellevue Hill Park. I would, however, recommend exploring these parks during the daylight hours as the Heights has above average crime rates.

Parking in the Heights can be difficult any day of the week, but especially at night. Most of the parking is on street, making it difficult to find a space, especially on the narrow side streets. However, one of the benefits of parking in the Heights, if you are going to nearby businesses or the class at UC, is that there are very few parking meters in this area, so you can score some free parking.

Overall, I would recommend the Heights as a neighborhood for college students. If you are looking to purchase a rental property, it would be a good location to find a place, but I wouldn't recommend actually living there for the most part.
Pros
  • Cheap rent
  • Close to campus
Cons
  • Above average crime
  • Rowdy college neighborhood
  • Difficult to find parking
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Hartwell: A Historic Neighborhood Surrounded by Highways"

Well, Hartwell is not totally surrounded by highways, but it does have Interstate 75 running along one side of it and Ronald Reagan Highway running along another. So, it is convenient to major roads, diverse, and has relatively low crime.

The Drake Center campus takes up a significant portion of Hartwell. Drake is the area's premier, long-term acute care facility. Right across the street from Drake is an upscale retirement community, Evergreen. Evergreen provides independent living cottages, assisted living apartments, skilled nursing, and a memory care unit. Residents of Evergreen can use the pool at Drake Center. Evergreen is a nice community where quite a few of the area's wealthy have retired. Not everyone at Evergreen is wealthy, though, so don't be afraid to check it out. It is a very nice community with lots to offer its residents. My grandmother has lived there for a number of years.

Hartwell has some very nice older, Victoria-style homes reflecting its 19th century origins. Many of these homes have been converted to multi-family units, but are now being returned to some of their former glory as single-family homes. Hartwell is a neighborhood with a sense of community and friendliness. Everybody really does know your name here. My friend that used to live in Hartwell has remained friends with many of her former neighbors.

While there are a number of businesses in Hartwell, there is not really a good shopping district. There also aren't any really special dining options...fast food anyone? However, as Hartwell is conveniently located to major roads, you can be in a better shopping or dining area in no time at all. The major attraction of Hartwell is the historic homes at reasonable prices and the sense of community to be found in this northernmost neighborhood of Cincinnati.
Pros
  • Right near major highways
  • Safe
  • Strong sense of community
Cons
  • Not much nightlife or shopping
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"Hyde Park: Where Old Money Meets Young Professionals"

Hyde Park is an upscale neighborhood in the center of Cincinnati. The neighborhood was originally created to be an exclusive community for Cincinnati's wealthy elite. There are still a number of old moneyed families who live there; however, it is for the young professionals that Hyde Park holds special appeal today.

The heart of Hyde Park is Hyde Park Square located along Erie Avenue at Edwards Road. It is here you will find a variety of restaurants and unique boutiques, making Hyde Park not only a great place to live, but a destination. Hyde Park is a very pedestrian friendly neighborhood, with broad sidewalks and safe streets. There is on street metered parking along Hyde Park Square and the nearby streets, as well as a public lot off of Edwards Road and located behind some of the businesses.

Hyde Park has a number of excellent local dining options. Some neighborhood favorites are Teller's of Hyde Park, located in an old bank building on Erie; Arthur's on Edwards is known for its burgers and is a popular happy hour hangout; and Indigo Casual Gourmet features an eclectic mix of cuisine, including many vegetarian and healthy options. Further along Erie Avenue is the area known as East Hyde Park. East Hyde Park is home to some more great restaurants, including my favorite, Saigon Cafe, and more shops and bars. East Hyde Park offers more upscale housing and is home to the Hyde Park Country Club.

Hyde Park has some expensive homes, but not all of them are over-the-top unaffordable. You can actually find some quite decently priced homes in Hyde Park. Hyde Park rents, on the other hand, are higher than many other locations in the city due to it being a desirable zip code with many amenities. Hyde Park has an odd geographic configuration and many of the places you think are in Hyde Park are actually in neighboring communities. Ault Park is located in Mt. Lookout and Hyde Park Plaza is actually located in Oakley. The nearby outdoor shopping areas of Rookwood Commons and Rookwood Pavilion are actually located in Norwood. However, there are still many unique shops in Hyde Park, mainly on the Erie and Observatory Avenue corridors.
Pros
  • Beautiful properties
  • Good shopping
  • Near downtown and other nice neighborhoods
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Linwood is a Tasty Slice of City Life"

Linwood is a less than one square mile sliver of land situated along Eastern Avenue between Columbia Parkway and Wooster Road/Pike. The neighborhood is primarily industrial. The housing that is located in Linwood tends to be older, single-family urban housing. The residents of the neighborhood are primarily lower income and white. However, the area has grown in popularity, but housing is still fairly reasonably priced. Because of its location, it also tends to be a little more quiet in the residential parts.

The area is conveniently located to some of the nicer Cincinnati neighborhoods. The neighborhood also includes the Otto Armleder Memorial Park, which features a very nice dog park, walking trails, and athletic fields. It is also near Lunken Airport and includes the Lunken Recreation Area, which includes a nice children's playground, golf course, and bike trail.

One of the best features of this tiny area of Cincinnati is the restaurants. There are two really great restaurants located on Eastern Avenue just off of the Beechmont Levy. For one of the best burgers in Cincinnati, head to Terry's Turf Club. Terry's Turf Club has been featured on the Food Networks "Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives" and has been voted as best burger in Ohio; it is also open until 2 a.m. Another great restaurant located in Linwood is Bella Luna, a romantic Italian restaurant that features live music on Fridays and Saturdays. Bella Luna has won a number of awards at Taste of Cincinnati, as well as a number of Diner's Choice Awards from OpenTable.com.
Pros
  • housing cost
  • recreational amenities
  • restaurants
Cons
  • lacks diversity
  • primarily industrial
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"South Fairmount is not my grandparent's neighborhood anymore"

Many years ago my grandparents lived in South Fairmount and back then it was a working-class neighborhood on the decline. It kind of reminded me of the neighborhood Archie Bunker lived in. Today, it is a neighborhood with one of the highest concentrations of Section 8 housing in the city. The median income in South Fairmount is lower than the median income for Cincinnati and there is a high concentration of young men and women living in rental properties. The houses in this area tend to be older and are not very well maintained. Urban blight is all around in South Fairmount.

I used to stay with my grandparents during the summer and my Grandpa and I would walk to some of the businesses on Harrison Avenue...these days, I don't think I'd get out of my car in South Fairmount, let alone walk anywhere. The only part of South Fairmount that is reasonably safe (reasonable for the area, which is not very) is the part of South Fairmount where you first enter the neighborhood over the Western Hills Viaduct. The area along Queen City and Harrison Avenues is where you will find a number of fast food restaurants (McDonald's, Arby's, and a United Dairy Farmers). Today, these places would be the extent of my foray into the neighborhood.

South Fairmount has a number of industrial businesses and not too much else besides the run down housing and fast food joints. The only thing the area has going besides cheap property prices is its location. It's close to Downtown Cincinnati, near the University of Cincinnati, and near the hospitals. If you need Section 8 housing, it may be the place to go, but otherwise I would stay away from this part of town.
Cons
  • urban blight
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Tiny Terrace Park Offers Quiet, Country-like Living"

The Village of Terrace Park is a quiet suburb of Cincinnati located along the US Route 50/Wooster Pike corridor. Its 1.2 square miles is nestled at the base of Indian Hill, just past the community of Mariemont along the banks of the Little Miami River. Terrace Park is closely allied with Mariemont, as it is part of the Mariemont School District.

Terrace Park has a number of smaller, mid-20th century homes on good sized lots. These homes are priced on the lower end of the scale for area housing prices. As Terrace Park is a desirable community to live in, this means the smaller, older homes are being snapped up and torn down in favor of larger, more modern homes; so, infill in this community is quite common. There are also many newer and larger homes in Terrace Park, so you can find a home for under $200K or well over a million dollars.

Children living in Terrace Park will attend Terrace Park Elementary, but education is continued at Mariemont Junior High and Mariemont High School, both located in nearby Mariemont. The Mariemont School District is rated as "Excellent with Distinction," the top rating achievable in the state. The Mariemont schools perform highly and their performance index in 2010 placed them 8th in the state out of 600 school districts.

There are only a handful of business in Terrace Park, mainly located along one section of Wooster Pike around Elm Avenue. There is a bank, a gas station, a convenience store/ice cream shop, dentist, insurance agencies, a gift/flower shop, and a post office among others. You will need to head down Wooster Pike to the Mariemont Kroger or to the Kroger in nearby Milford to do your grocery shopping.

The mainly residential community of Terrace Park offers quiet, country-like living within easy driving distance of Downtown Cincinnati. Terrace Park is also located on the bus line and there is even an express service for morning and afternoon commuting times.
Pros
  • peace and quiet
  • access to recreation areas
Cons
  • lacks diversity
  • high cost of housing
  • limited amenities
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Columbia-Tusculum, a quaint neighborhood with architectural charm and historic appeal"

Columbia-Tusculum is a historic neighborhood nestled between the Ohio River and nearby hills of East Walnut Hills, Mt. Lookout, and Hyde Park. It has a unique architectural charm not found elsewhere in the city. San Francisco has its famous "painted ladies" of Alamo Square, but Cincinnati has its own "painted ladies" right in Columbia-Tusculum. These brightly painted historic homes, mainly Victorian in style, are one of the key attractions of this small community. Columbia, as it was originally called, was founded in 1788, making it the oldest neighborhood in Cincinnati.

Today, Columbia-Tusculum is a lively, vibrant neighborhood full of its own unique charm. In recent years it has gone through a renewal, with some new buildings bringing in new businesses to the area. I used to drive through this area everyday while on my way to school and then work, the main corridor of Columbia Parkway is a different landscape today than it was a decade ago.

There are a number of excellent restaurants in the heart of the Columbia-Tusculum neighborhood. One of the most famous restaurants in this area is local restaurateur Jeff Ruby's The Precinct, so named because it is housed in a former police station at the corner of Columbia Parkway and Delta Avenue. The Precinct is an upscale steakhouse attracting elite from around town and around the world. It is one of former Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda's favorite restaurants. The Precinct has recently been remodeled, but if you choose to dine there, make sure your bank account is full... especially if you order the $62 steak.

Other great dining spots in Columbia-Tusculum are not as pricey as The Precinct, but they offer tasty fare at my affordable prices. There is the old neighborhood stand-by of Allyn's Cafe. Allyn's is a long-time local restaurant that has recently been remodeled. They frequently feature live music and have a variety of food on their menu, including vegetarian options. The Green Dog Cafe is a newer restaurant in the area, but is a great choice for good food that is locally sourced, sustainable and organic. They offer a variety of dishes that are vegetarian and vegan. Both Allyn's and Green Dog are located on the main corridor of Columbia Parkway. Right off of Columbia Parkway on Stanley Avenue, you will find a great little dive bar, Stanley's Pub. Stanley's features super cheap drinks and live music.

Alms Park, located on Mt. Tusculum, is a gem of a park offering fantastic views of the Ohio River valley. The park includes an Italianate Pavilion, which is available to rent for special occasions. The nearby Lunken Recreation Area features a bike path, children's playground, and a nearby farmer's market.

The recent renewal of the Columbia-Tusculum area with its new businesses and new housing, has made Cincinnati's oldest neighborhood a highly desirable location which also makes the housing more expensive. However, it is conveniently situated to Downtown Cincinnati and the surrounding communities, making it an ideal place to live.
Pros
  • Nice homes
  • Eco-friendly
  • Great location
Cons
  • heavy traffic on Columbia Parkway
  • potential for flooding from the Ohio River
  • expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Sayler Park, a quiet step back in time"

Sayler Park is a peaceful and unique community on the western edge of Cincinnati. Dubbed as "Cincinnati's Western Gateway" it is like taking a step back in time. You would never know from looking at it that Sayler Park is part of Cincinnati, as it looks likes its own small town. Established in 1911, many of the buildings and homes look just as they did early in the last century despite many being destroyed or severely damaged in an F5 tornado in 1974. You could never tell the tornado happened by looking at the neatly manicured and landscaped lawns surrounding the elegantly painted wood and brick homes of the early 20th century.

Sayler Park is sits along the Ohio River on River Road/US Route 50 as you head towards Indiana. There are a number of small businesses typical of what you would find in a small town. There are a handful of places to eat or get food, including Cabana On the River, Sayler Park Pizza, and some fast food places located more in Addyston than Sayler Park. Sayler Park also boasts a number of public parks.

Since Sayler Park sits along the Ohio River, there are a number of boating related businesses and Mariner's Landing Marina, which offers boat repair, sales, and docking. Other than a hardware store and a store that offers video game rentals, there aren't many shopping options in Sayler Park. One of the gems of Sayler Park, however, is the Parkland Theater; The Parkland is one of the oldest--if not the oldest--movie theater in Cincinnati. It mainly plays children's movies, but is a nice feature to have in this out of the way community.

The homes and quiet neighborhood, however, are the draw for Sayler Park. Besides the attractive homes and quiet lifestyle and proximity to the Ohio River, the property values in Sayler Park are quite the steal. You can find lovely 3-4 bedroom homes for under $130,000.
Pros
  • beautiful old community
  • peaceful & quiet
  • affordable homes
Cons
  • lack of shopping and dining
  • not close to Downtown
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"California living in Cincinnati is along the river"

California living Cincinnati-style is not quite the California dream, but pretty good all the same. California is on the eastern edge of Cincinnati and runs along the Ohio River. The residential area is mostly wooded and secluded from the main traffic areas. There are some houses that are along the river; these tend to not be as nice mainly because they are subject to flooding.

There are many benefits to living in California, not the least of which is the beautiful location and the convenient access to the highway, as well as proximity to Downtown Cincinnati. It is the closest you can come to country living in the city confines. The places that are closes to the route of Kellogg Avenue are the most urban, as there are a number of businesses that run along this road.

Coney Island is at the edge of California. It was once a popular amusement park, but is now home to a large public pool, Sunlite Pool, and Riverbend Music Center. Coney Island is a popular place for many outdoor events and his home to the Appalachian Festival and the annual Summerfair Art Show, one of the top rated art shows in the country. California Woods Nature Preserve is a large park with acres upon acres of forested terrain which includes walking trails, a butterfly and hummingbird garden, and a nature center which provides many educational programs.

Many of the businesses in California have to do with airplanes or transportation at Lunken Airport. There is also the Sky Galley Restaurant for some traditional American dining. If it doesn't have to do with flying, then the business may have something to do with boating as California is right on the Ohio River. Four Seasons Marina has boat docking, sells boat related gear and has a full service restaurant and outdoor tiki bar. The Sand Bar is right next to Four Seasons and offers sand volleyball, live music, bar games, food, and more.

California is not only a nice community to live in, but it is also the playground for many in the Cincinnati area. So, even if you don't decide to live here, certainly come and play here.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • wooded home lots
  • Cincinnati's playground
  • California Woods
Cons
  • flooding
  • The Kellogg Ave traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Beach Lovers
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Sedamsville has charming old buildings but lacks any charm"

Sedamsville is an old riverside community on the outskirts of Cincinnati and spans less than a square mile. It is mainly located along the River Road corridor. It is a community that has definitely seen better days...and those days were long, long ago. The area is full of many historically old homes and buildings, but as most of the residents in this area are on the very low end of the socio-economic scale, these buildings are in great disrepair.

Former major leaguer Pete Rose was born in Sedamsville and, while he may be banned from baseball for life, he is still a hometown son honored by his native Cincinnati. There is a park in Sedamsville that bears his name, one of several parks in this community, which adds to its picturesque appeal.

One of the more interesting things about Sedamsville, is that it has several places that are reported to be haunted. Some of these become special attractions during the Halloween season. One of the haunted places, the Sedamsville Rectory, is open for ghost tours year round. The building is over 130 years old and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sedamsville is near the Delhi area, which is where you would need to go for any kind of shopping. There are no businesses to speak of in Sedamsville. Just head up Delhi Pike to reach the shopping and dining options in Delhi.

Because the properties in Sedamsville are typically older and run down, you can find some real estate bargains...as long as you don't mind a major renovation.
Pros
  • low housing cost
  • near Downtown
  • scenic area
Cons
  • lack of shopping and dining
  • neighborhood is run down
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Blue Ash means business, but is great for families, too."

Blue Ash, a suburb of Cincinnati, is a small city that means business...and lots of it. There are many businesses located in Blue Ash, which means it is a great location for employment. There are some major employers located in Blue Ash, such as Procter & Gamble, Toyota, Ethicon Endo-Surgery (a division of Johnson & Johnson), and many smaller, more local based companies (although Procter & Gamble's world-wide headquarters are located in Downtown Cincinnati.)

Because Blue Ash has such a large base of businesses, they have the money to provide many community amenities, including beautiful floral displays along the streets of Downtown Blue Ash. Blue Ash also offers a nice community center with a pool and recreation center that offers a variety of activities and classes. Blue Ash also has a golf course and several small parks.

Each year, the City of Blue Ash puts on a number of very popular local events. From their summer concert series held at the Blue Ash Nature Park Amphitheatre, to the large Fourth of July Celebration "Red, White, and Blue Ash" featuring a national music headliner and spectacular fireworks, to the annual Taste of Blue Ash held at the end of every August in Downtown Blue Ash. These are just a few of the many events that go on in the Blue Ash community.

Blue Ash is a great place to raise a family, as the residential areas are typically medium to large suburban homes with well-manicured lawns and attractive landscaping. Some of the subdivisions in the community offer wooded lots or even scenic views of man-made lakes or ponds. There are some small condo communities in Blue Ash, as well as some upscale apartment buildings. The children living in Blue Ash attend the highly rated Sycamore Community Schools. The University of Cincinnati Blue Ash Campus offers an easy commute for local college students not wanting to attend the main campus.

There are two main shopping areas in Blue Ash, Downtown Blue Ash and the area along Plainfield and Hunt Roads. Downtown Blue Ash has a number of dining options, including Blue Ash Chili, Cactus Pear, and Cafe Mediterranean. There are also some local shops, a bakery, a CVS and a Walgreen's. The shopping area off of Plainfield and Hunt Roads offers a Kroger, K-Mart, and Target, along with some fast food restaurants, local restaurants InCahoots and El Pueblo, and a few other small shops. There are also several other areas in Blue Ash with shopping and restaurants. So, whether you need office supplies or sushi, you are sure to find just about everything in Blue Ash.
Pros
  • quiet suburbs
  • lots of employment opportunities
  • excellent schools
Cons
  • traffic congestion during rush hour on main thoroughfares
  • limited shopping options
  • high cost of housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Clifton: a neighborhood great for students, professors, and medical professionals."

Clifton and the surrounding area is the heart of the Cincinnati medical community. You will find some of the best hospitals and medical facilities in the country in Clifton. You are also right by the urban campus of the University of Cincinnati, which has some of the top ranking educational programs in the country. The University of Cincinnati is also the area's largest employer. Between the medical facilities and the University, there is no lack of employment opportunities in the area, making Clifton an ideal location for educators and those in the medical field. Of course, it is also an ideal spot for students to live.

The actual Clifton area is mainly residential, although areas closer to the University and medical facilities have more commercial lots. Ludlow is the heart of the Clifton business district and is also in the area called "The Gaslight District." There are multi-unit homes and large single family homes in this area. As you head down Clifton Avenue the homes become grander and more expensive. The area is very hilly and wooded, making for an attractive residential area. Some of the homes are on secluded cul-de-sacs or quiet streets. Unfortunately, the closer you get to Interstate 75, the more run down the buildings become and the less safe the neighborhood is. Overall, however, this is probably one of the safer areas surrounding the University of Cincinnati campus.

Home prices typically tend to be higher than average in this neighborhood, due to their size and desirable location. Many medical professionals and university professors live here. Rents in this neighborhood tend to be a little higher than in nearby University Heights or Clifton Heights.

Ludlow Avenue is the heart of this area with some unique local boutiques, restaurants, and bars. Some of the most unique shops in Cincinnati are located on Ludlow. You can find unique gifts for friends or family at Toku Baru, a great Bohemian outfit at the Pangaea Trading Company or a wooly sweater for those cold Cincinnati winters at The Hansa Guild. These are just a few of the cool local shops that line Ludlow Avenue.

While I tend to think that Clifton is best suited to students with its proximity to campus, there are enough large single-family homes in this part of town to accommodate professionals wanting to live in a hip, urban college town that is conveniently located to the city.
Pros
  • University of Cincinnati
  • convenient location
  • unique boutiques
Cons
  • high cost of housing
  • limited parking options
  • treacherous streets in bad weather
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Downtown Cincinnati continues to grow as a residential neighborhood"

For many years, not many people lived in Downtown Cincinnati. There were some residential buildings, but not a lot. Some of the places catered more to the less affluent denizens of the town. However, that is all changing and Downtown Cincinnati is growing in popularity as a residential neighborhood.

Recent development along the river, The Banks, and some redevelopment of old department store buildings into apartments and condos has made city living more attractive than ever. The density of housing options in Downtown has greatly increased in the last decade. Many people are opting for the ease of city living over the hassle of commuting from the suburbs. When you choose to live Downtown you have easy access to public transportation, as the main bus hub is at Government Square along Fifth Street. Downtown Cincinnati is also pedestrian and bicycle friendly.

As a resident of Downtown, you have some of the best dining options in the City at your doorstep. From Italian at Via Vite on Fountain Square to Mexican at Nada on Walnut Street or steaks at Morton's on Vine Street, the world class dining options are endless. For the best brunch in town, head to Orchids at Palm Court in the Hilton Netherland Plaza hotel. There are so many choices for eating out Downtown that you'll never go hungry...which is a good thing, there aren't too many options for buying groceries. To do some grocery shopping you'll either need to head to Findlay Market in Over-The-Rhine or Kroger on Vine Street (not recommended). The best option is probably to head over to the Newport Pavilion Kroger in Northern Kentucky (most of my friends that live Downtown shop there.)

The nightlife options in Downtown Cincinnati will keep you dancing the night away or tapping your toes to some live music while enjoying cocktails with friends. From Scene Ultra Lounge on Walnut Street or Lunar Lounge on Elm Street to the Blue Wisp Jazz Club on Race Street or Arnold's Bar & Grill on E. 8th Street, there's never a dull moment Downtown.

A lot of the housing in Downtown Cincinnati is modern in style, even the building exteriors may not be. There are both rental options and options to purchase. The housing is mostly apartment style or condominiums, many "flats" or "lofts." There are many options to choose from and some offer great views of the river or even the football or baseball stadiums.

Overall, Downtown tends to be safer than Over-The-Rhine, but as in any big city, you want to use caution and common sense. There are also many park areas that are great for walking dogs and there's even a dog park on Eggleston Avenue, Fido Fields.
Pros
  • Excellent dining and nightlife options
  • Convenient public transportation
  • Pedestrian Friendly
Cons
  • No grocery store
  • Traffic congestion
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mt. Lookout is a vibrant community with plenty to offer"

Mt. Lookout is a vibrant community with well-manicured lawns and lovely homes just like it's neighbor, Hyde Park. It's hard to tell where Hyde Park ends and Mt. Lookout begins, because the communities roll into each other and are so similar. There are properties in Mt. Lookout every bit as expensive as properties in Hyde Park, but there are also some much more affordable one, especially as you head down Delta Avenue or Linwood Avenue. You can also find some more reasonable rents in Mt. Lookout, although they still tend to be on the higher end of the scale.

Mt. Lookout has much to offer in the categories of dining and nightlife. The restaurants in Mt. Lookout offer a variety of cuisines from some of the best Thai food in the city at Ruthai's Thai Kitchen on Linwood to one of the top rated burgers in the city at Zip's Cafe on Delta. There is excellent Mediterranean fare at Pera on Mt. Lookout Square to new American cuisine featuring locally source supplies at Nectar. Some of the most popular hangouts in Cincinnati are located in Mt. Lookout. Millions Cafe and Mt. Lookout Tavern, or MLT's, are right across the street from each other and are usually packed to overflowing on weekends. Grab a drink and listen to some live music, but watch out for overage frat boys, especially at MLT's. Another good local hangout is The Stand. For more live music, check put the Redmoor, which features local and national acts. The Redmoor is also an event venue and a great place to hold a wedding or reception.

If you want to go shopping, Mt. Lookout has a unique assortment of stores. If you are into gaming or hobbies, Boardwalk Hobby Shop is one of the best stores of its kind anywhere. The owners are friendly and helpful and have been running the place for decades. The Dust Jacket is a small bookstore with vintage and used books. There are a number of other small, local shops and boutiques offering a variety of interesting items.

Beautiful Ault Park is one of the nicest parks in Cincinnati, with mature trees and pretty flowers, walking paths and views of the river. A variety of events are hosted throughout the year at Ault Park and the Grand Pavilion is a popular place for weddings. Another interesting location in Mt. Lookout is the Cincinnati Observatory, which is a fully functional 19th century observatory and home to the world's oldest telescope still in use by the public. The Cincinnati Observatory is on Observatory Place, conveniently located off of Observatory Avenue.

There are some apartments in Mt. Lookout, but most of the residences are elegant homes situated on quiet streets. One of the benefits of Mt. Lookout is its convenient location close to Downtown Cincinnati, yet with easy access to the interstate. While Mt. Lookout is not a housing bargain, it is definitely a great place to live if you can afford it.
Pros
  • excellent restaurants
  • walkable community (if you don't mind hills)
  • Safe
  • Great nightlife
Cons
  • housing can be pricey
  • parking at Mt. Lookout Square can be difficult, especially on weekends
  • Not especially diverse
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Kennedy Heights, a diverse and affordable neighborhood"

Kennedy Heights is located in the northeast corner of Cincinnati along the busy thoroughfare of Montgomery Road, one of the main surface arteries of the Cincinnati area. It is a neighbor to Pleasant Ridge, but with less of the commercial amenities to offer. Kennedy Heights is predominantly a lower-middle class African American community, although the population as a whole is diverse. The houses are older and often times smaller and less well-kept than in neighboring Pleasant Ridge, bringing the property values down to very affordable levels.

Kennedy Heights shows signs of urban blight along the Montgomery Road corridor as many empty businesses and abandoned buildings sit along its route. The large empty building at the corner of Montgomery and Kennedy used to be the neighborhood Kroger, now long-closed. There are plans currently underway to redevelop this space into a cultural center, making it a hub of community activity. A little further down Montgomery Road finds the Kennedy Heights Arts Centers, one of the highlights of the community. The arts center offers classes for children and adults, summer camps, art exhibitions and more.

Once you venture from Montgomery Road onto the side streets, you find a quiet, residential community filled with older single-family homes. Kennedy Heights Park offers a mature landscape spanning more than 12 acres of rolling hills. Daniel Drake Park offers sweeping views of the surrounding area, along with 66 acres if its own natural beauty. Drake park also offers a playground, picnic shelter, and walking paths.
Kennedy Heights Montessori provides early childhood education for children ages 3-6. As Kennedy Heights is within the City of Cincinnati, neighborhood children attend Cincinnati Public Schools.

Kennedy Heights is known to have more crime than the surrounding areas, but less so than in other parts of the city and certainly less than in other metropolitan areas of the country. Cincinnati tends to be a small, big city. We are a big enough city, but still maintain that small town mentality where any crime freaks us out. So, use your judgment. Overall, Kennedy Heights is a fairly safe, relatively quiet, modest neighborhood with affordable housing. While it may be lacking in its own amenities, it is conveniently located to communities with excellent shopping and dining.
Pros
  • mainly residential
  • affordable housing
  • Kennedy Heights Arts Center
Cons
  • crime rate
  • lack of community amenties
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Jury's still out on renewed Fay Apartments"

The Fay Apartments, a large complex of subsidized housing in North Fairmount, has long been a trouble spot in Cincinnati, ridden with crime, drugs, and disrepair. Previously known for having the most number of police runs per capita, the Fay Apartments was a bad place to be. After a multi-year and multi-million dollar renovation, as well as a name change to the Villages of Roll Hill (the neighborhood is still called Fay Apartments), things have changed. The number of housing units was reduced and along with it, the crime. While the Villages of Roll Hill are still low-income housing, the community has a new lease on life.

The redevelopment of the Fay Apartments was designed to make the community safer, greener, and more livable. The Villages of Roll Hill offers low income residents an onsite childcare facility, onsite parking, and a convenient location on the bus line. The community has been upgraded with newly renovated and rebuilt buildings, as well as fresh landscaping, central air, security cameras, and internet access.

While the redevelopment of the Fay Apartments may currently be an improvement over the previously existing community, only time will tell if the new attitude continues. Will the Villages of Roll Hill return to the old ways of the Fay Apartments. We'll have to wait and see. Overall, unless you are looking for subsidized housing, there are more attractive and affordable neighborhoods in Cincinnati to live in. The Fay Apartments really is just a large complex of low income housing and doesn't offer anything outside of that.
Pros
  • affordable housing
Cons
  • history of crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Pleasant Ridge provides urban lifestyle with suburban feel"

Pleasant Ridge is an aptly named Cincinnati neighborhood. It is on a hill (though you can't always tell) and is a very pleasant community. It is conveniently located to major highways, shopping malls, and close to Downtown Cincinnati.

The Pleasant Ridge business district along Montgomery Road is a dichotomy of the old and the new. There are many long-time businesses housed in old buildings, along with newer businesses. There are also some free standing national chains, such as Burger King and Walgreen's. It is, however, the local businesses that are the heart of the Pleasant Ridge business district. There are many great local businesses that provide a variety of shopping options. You can purchase new or used vinyl, CDs or DVDs at Everybody's Records, an independent music store that offers the obscure to the mainstream. If you can't find it at Everybody's you probably don't need it. Ridge Jewelers is a family owned shop that has been a mainstay of the Pleasant Ridge community for decades. If you need a prescription, you can visit Mullaney's Pharmacy, a locally owned and operated business for over 75 years. If you are looking for some bargain clothing shop at Glass Zipper Boutique, which sells vintage fashion and clothing on consignment. If you need a haircut or color or a day at the spa, there are options for those, as well. Pleasant Ridge's many local businesses offer a multitude of services from fitness to veterinary care and from car repair to tax preparation and planning.

If you're looking for a bite to eat, there's no need to leave Pleasant Ridge. Pleasant Ridge is home to an eclectic assortment of restaurants. From Ethiopian fare at Emanu, to vegan dining at The Loving Hut, to Cincinnati style chili or double deckers at Pleasant Ridge Chili, you're sure to find something to delight your palate. Afterwards, drop into Molly Malone's Irish Pub for a cold brew and some live music or bring your dog and enjoy their outdoor patio. There's something for everyone in Pleasant Ridge.

The main business district of Pleasant Ridge lies along Montgomery Road. It is off of Montgomery Road and the other main artery of Ridge Avenue where the homes are located. Pleasant streets are lined with generally well-kept older homes. There are park areas, a library, and a community center, as well as the Losantaville Country Club (a portion of which is located in the confines of Pleasant Ridge). Please Ridge Montessori School provides an excellent education for children residing in Pleasant Ridge and surrounding communities from preschool through sixth grade.

Overall, Pleasant Ridge is definitely a pleasant place to live with its amenities and convenient location.
Pros
  • older, established community
  • variety of dining options
  • convenient location
Cons
  • traffic can be heavy on Montgomery and Ridge Roads
  • parking can sometimes be difficult
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Northside is Cincinnati's hipster hangout"

Northside is a great small neighborhood that definitely promotes a sense of community. Today, more than ever, Northside is vibrant and inclusive community. It is family friendly, yet friendly to all lifestyles, as there is a significant GLBT population in Northside.

Northside is a pedestrian friendly urban neighborhood conveniently located just five minutes from Downtown Cincinnati. It has many small shops and local businesses and restaurants located along the main thoroughfare of Hamilton Avenue. Everything in Northside is within walking distance. When you want to leave Northside, you can easily access the interstates or main surface streets. If you don't want to drive, then take the bus, as Northside is home to the second-largest Metro (bus system) hub in Cincinnati.

Another wonderful feature of the Northside community is their sense of community. There are many community events from the Northside Arts in the Park in June, Northside Second Saturday every month, the Annual Neighborhood Yard Sale in August, to the Farmer's Market open on Wednesdays throughout the year. These are just a few of the community events happening in Northside.

Northside also has a number of parks and green spaces throughout the community. Many events are held in Hoffner Park, which is located in the center of Northside. Mt. Airy Forest, the largest park in Cincinnati, can also be found in Northside.

There are many dining and entertainment options. You can have a vegetarian brunch at Melt or lunch at Take the Cake Cafe( or take home some tasty sweets from their bakery). Then have an eclectic dinner at Honey. When you're done eating, head over to The Comet or Northside Tavern for late night drinks and live music.

Overall, Northside is a great urban neighborhood with a small town feel. The sense of community and pride in Northside amongst the residents is almost palpable. With it's convenient location and community events and amenities, Northside has much to offer as a place to live. Also, because many of the homes in Northside are older on small urban lots, housing prices are quite reasonable, making Northside an ideal place to live for singles, young professionals or first-time home buyers.
Pros
  • great restaurants and bars
  • many community events
  • convenient location just 5 minutes to Downtown
Cons
  • older buildings may need renovation
  • traffic and parking can sometimes be difficult
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Mt. Adams offers great views and high living costs"

The community of Mount Adam sits high on a hill above Downtown Cincinnati. It offers sweeping views of the city, the Ohio River, and Northern Kentucky. However, along with great views comes a high cost of living. Property and rental rates in Mount Adams are on the higher end; but, if you can afford it, you might get the opportunity to rub elbows with the rich and famous, as a number of athletes, artists, authors, actors, and Cincinnati's elite have all called Mount Adams home.

Mount Adams also offers rich entertainment and dining options. There are a number of really good restaurants in Mount Adams, such as Daveed's, Teak, and The Rookwood. Mount Adams is also home to many great nightlife spots like Mt. Adams Pavilion, Blind Lemon, and Longworth's. Because of the rich nightlife and dining in Mount Adams, traffic gets very heavy in the evening, especially on weekends. Parking is also at a premium in Mount Adams.

Long known as an arts community, Mount Adams is home to the Cincinnati Art Club and Wessel Gallery, as well as the Cincinnati Art Museum. Also located in Mount Adams are Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park and Seasongood Pavilion, which hosts many summertime entertainment events. Eden Park provides the area with verdant greenery, as well as with fitness trails, children's play areas, scenic overlooks, and picnic tables for alfresco dining. Also located in Eden Park are Mirror Lake and Krohn Conservatory. Eden Park is especially popular on the weekends and traffic can be somewhat difficult to maneuver through.

Because of its proximity to Downtown Cincinnati and excellent nightlife, Mount Adams is very popular with trendy singles and young professionals. Overall, Mount Adams is a nice neighborhood, but only if you can afford it.
Pros
  • outstanding views
  • excellent nightlife
  • convenient to Downtown Cincinnati
  • Eden Park
  • The Cincinnati Art Museum
Cons
  • Hard to find parking
  • rental and property costs are high
  • traffic congestion
  • Too little parking during events
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Montgomery is a great Cincinnati suburb with lots to offer"

Montgomery is a small city with a long history. The community was founded in 1795 with just a few homes and has expanded today to over 10,000 residents. The Montgomery Landmarks Commission helps to preserve the community's rich history by designating building of historical significance as landmarks, complete with identifying plaques.

Montgomery is an excellent community for families with kids of all ages. The Sycamore Community School District is an excellently rated school district with several elementary schools, a middle school, junior high and high school. The school system offers a variety of extracurricular activities and athletics. Montgomery has a community pool and also offers fitness classes and a variety of youth activities and athletics.

There are many wooded parks throughout Montgomery offering a variety of recreational activities from walking trails to tennis courts. Many of the parks have children's playgrounds. Most of the parks also offer picnic shelters, which can be reserved for special family gatherings.

There is also a focus on the arts in Montgomery. The joint Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra plays concerts throughout the year in the communities of Montgomery and Blue Ash. The Arts Commission hosts a number of arts related events, including an annual photo contest. Other special events in Montgomery include their annual July 4th Parade and Festival and annual Bastille Day Celebration street festival.

The business district of Montgomery resides along the main thoroughfare of Montgomery Road. Downtown Montgomery features a variety of local boutiques, shops, salons, service oriented businesses and restaurants. The world famous Montgomery Inn still stands in its original location along Montgomery Road. The famous "Ribs King" Ted Gregory and his wife got their start in Montgomery in 1951. There are also a number of unique dining options in Montgomery that include Stone Creek Dining Company, Germano's Ristorante Italiano, and Jeff Ruby's Carlo & Johnny. More shopping and restaurants can be found at Montgomery Square Shopping Center and across the street at The Marketplace. A little further up Montgomery Road finds Bethesda North Hospital and a host of medical facilities and doctors offices.

Traffic on Montgomery Road can get busy, especially during evening rush hour. There is on street parking in Downtown Montgomery during non-rush hour times, but there are also several public lots located on adjacent streets. Once removed from the main thoroughfare, the City of Montgomery becomes quiet and residential. From historic homes, to older homes, to new homes being built where old homes used to stand, Montgomery has a lot of housing to offer. However, because it is a very desirable community with its amenities, wooded lots, excellent schools, and convenient location, home prices in this area on not inexpensive. Overall, Montgomery is a great place to live, especially for families.
Pros
  • excellent school district
  • convenient location
  • quiet suburbs
Cons
  • housing is expensive
  • traffic on Montgomery Road can be heavy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Mount Washington - Quiet Residential Community"

Mount Washington is a peaceful community located in the eastern portion of Hamilton County about 10 minutes east of Downtown Cincinnati, making it an easy commute. Mt. Washington lies within the confines of the City of Cincinnati, although it is anything but urban. A portion of Mt. Washington lies adjacent to the Little Miami River and Lunken Airport. The community extends south towards the Ohio River, but does not reach it as the neighborhood of California stands in the way.

Mount Washington is primarily a residential neighborhood, with a large number of apartment buildings and duplexes. The area is showing its age, as many of the homes were built in the early to mid 20th century. However, there have been a number of new homes built in the last few decades. The main business district of Mt. Washington is small, with most of the businesses centrally located along the Beechmont Avenue corridor. Traffic can be congested in this area during morning and afternoon rush hours, but less so at other times of the day. Because Mount Washington has a large number of apartment dwellers, parts of the community seems more transient and have somewhat more crime than in the areas of Mount Washington that are concentrated with single-family homes. Because many of the homes in this area are older and there are so many apartments, the cost of housing in this area is less than in other residential neighborhoods.

Mount Washington is conveniently located to the shopping, restaurants, and medical facilities located in adjacent Anderson Township. Children living in Mt. Washington attend Cincinnati Public Schools. There is also a Catholic elementary, Guardian Angels, and a Catholic high school, McNicholas, as well as a Montessori school located in Mount Washington.

The Mt. Washington Recreation Center offers various athletic activities and classes. The center offers baseball fields, a gym, tennis court, swimming pool, and more. Several parks are also located in or near Mount Washington, including the California Woods Nature Preserve, Magrish Riverlands Preserve, and Stanbery Park.

Overall, Mt. Washington is a convenient, relatively inexpensive, family-friendly neighborhood.
Pros
  • Primarily residential
  • Conveniently located
  • Modestly priced housing
Cons
  • Lots of apartments
  • Lacks nightlife and entertainment
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Over-The Rhine sees resurgence"

Over-The-Rhine was a bustling neighborhood full of German immigrants in the 19th century. Today it is, again, a bustling neighborhood full of young professionals and those craving an urban experience like no other in Cincinnati. Over-The-Rhine is the place to go in Cincinnati for excellent dining, nightlife, and unique shopping. The last few years have seen an explosion of new housing and renovated buildings promoting an influx of new businesses into the area. One of the great things about Over-The-Rhine (OTR) is that it retains its historic charm. The OTR district has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1983. The community still has its faults, but is a far cry of the "most dangerous neighborhood in America," as it was once dubbed.

OTR, as many up-and-coming or rebounding neighborhoods often are, is an eclectic mix of people. One of the best places to experience this diversity is at Findlay Market, the oldest, continuously operated public market in Ohio. Findlay Market provides a unique shopping experience from its open air farmer's market to its indoor pavilion filled with various vendors selling everything from gelato to pasta to fresh fish and meat.

Over-The-Rhine offers a variety of entertainment options from the arts to bars. You can attend a concert at historic Music Hall, see a play at Ensemble Theatre or Know Theatre, or enjoy such local hangouts as Neon's Unplugged, Mr. Pitiful's, or The Lackman. If you're hungry, there is plenty to choose from. You can enjoy a wood fired, gourmet pizza at A Tavola Trattoria, fabulous Italian fare at Nicola's, or classic greasy spoon fare at Tucker's.

Also a destination for students of the arts, Over-The-Rhine is home to Cincinnati's School for Creative and Performing Arts and The Art Academy of Cincinnati, a private art and design college. Local arts organizations ArtsWave and ArtWorks both reside in OTR.

The Over-The-Rhine of today is definitely not the Over-The-Rhine of yesterday. And, when the City of Cincinnati finishes construction of the streetcar project, OTR will definitely be the place of tomorrow.
Pros
  • Nightlife and Entertainment
  • Unique Shopping
  • Fabulous Restaurants
  • Findlay Market
  • Rich in history
  • Very trendy
Cons
  • Parking can be diffiicult
  • Congested traffic
  • High crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Oakley: not just "Hyde Park" near"

Oakley is a great, semi-urban community in the center of Cincinnati. It borders the upscale and expensive Hyde Park neighborhood and features a revitalized business district. Oakley has always been considered a less desirable zip code than Hyde Park, but that is actually a benefit when considering home prices and rental rates. There are many advantages to living in Oakley. It is conveniently located to major highways and there are many bus stops placed throughout Oakley. It is also a great walking community with sidewalks throughout. The crime rate is moderate, with most crimes being reported as theft.

The central business district of Oakley located along the Madison Road corridor offers a variety of local shops, restaurants, and bars. Some of the shopping highlights include King Arthur's Court Toys, a mainstay of the community for decades, and Blue Manatee children's bookstore, also a long-time local business. Among the dining highlights are Essencha Tea House, Boca (an upscale restaurant), and Aglamesis Bro's Ice Cream and Candy, a community staple since 1913. The area also provides a vibrant nightlife with several local bars and frequent concerts at The 20th Century Theatre, a former local movie house converted into a concert hall and special event venue. The 20th Century features many local and national acts. Oakley is also home to The Fresh Market, an upscale specialty grocery store which has its own parking lot, but is also easy to reach on foot. There is also a branch of the public library located right off of Madison Road.

In addition to the central Madison Road business district, Oakley covers a much wider territory to include the shopping area adjacent to Interstate 71 the "Center of Cincinnati;" this shopping area includes large box stores such as Target, PetsMart, and Sam's Club. Located around the corner from this shopping area is the non-denominational Crossroads Community Church. Crossroads is a large church, which continues to grow its congregation. It pulls in people from all around the Greater Cincinnati area. Also part of the Oakley shopping community is the Hyde Park Plaza featuring a number of shops, restaurants, and one of the most popular grocery stores in the city, the Hyde Park Kroger (long-known as a great place for singles to meet.)

There are a variety of housing options in Oakley from older multi-unit apartment buildings to modern complexes, as well as small, older, single family homes to larger modern homes. Children living in Oakley attend Cincinnati Public Schools. However, there are a variety of nearby private school options, including St. Cecilia School, a K-8 Catholic school located in the heart of the Oakley Community.
Pros
  • up-and-coming
  • local shopping and restaurants
  • less expensive than Hyde Park
Cons
  • traffic congestion
  • moderate crime rate
  • urban
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
lagriffin
lagriffin I'd like to add to SuzM's mention of Essencha Tea House! If you think of tea as that bland, watered down stuff in teabags, DO head to Essencha. Loose leaf tea is a an entirely different animal! If you feel intimidated from a lack of tea knowledge, there are lots of first timers in there, and the staff will gladly answer all your questions. In my opinion, their menu of light fare is some of the BEST food in Cincinnati. Chef Brandon is very talented and creates unique and one-of-a-kind culinary delights. Fabulous, artful and FRESH sandwiches, soups and bakery items like you've never tasted - but not pricey. All in a very cozy, relaxed zen type atmosphere. Go. No, I mean go... really. Your first taste of REAL tea will likely be a life-changing experience as it was for me. ;)
2yrs+
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