MNative

  • Local Expert 3,811 points
  • Reviews 16
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Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Quirky street designs and comfortable community"

Quaint restaurants and gift shops are sprinkled into this creative winding area of streets known as Tangletown. Like a name from a children’s story, Tangletown neighborhood is in the southwest portion of Minneapolis and shares a border with Diamond Lake Road and Lyndale Avenue South. Unlike traditional street layouts, as the name suggests these streets seem to have been thrown together on a whim, creating curved lines and angles where you would normally expect the rigid lines of a typical city block. The small Fuller Park sits in the community and is the place for community festival and events, as well as a serene flower garden.

Residents of the Tangletown community have schools in the area from which to choose, making it a great place for families. The cost of the homes in the community is higher than average for Minneapolis neighborhoods, but the community is located in a popular geographical location at the base of the lake region. While some of the area homes date back to the late 1800s, many of them are from the early 1920s and more recent. Newer residences are still being constructed as people take advantage of living in what feels like a suburb. There are some shops and restaurants in the area, making commuting to larger and more crowded areas of the city not as necessary. You can even go south to other larger suburbs for shopping and entertainment if you didn’t feel like dealing with the hassles of Downtown.
Pros
  • unique community design
Cons
  • Little nightlife
  • Pricey housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"College Town Hub"

What’s in a name? When it comes to the neighborhood of University, it says it all. The heart and soul of the University of Minnesota’s campus, the University neighborhood is almost completely devoted to campus buildings and housing geared toward students. Even though the Mississippi River divides the neighborhood into two sections, the feel on both sides of the river is relatively the same – this is a college town.
The housing can be surprisingly expensive, but you pay for the prime location spots so close to campus buildings. Don’t even try to imagine a lush yard, as many of the homes seem to but right up the sidewalk. The typical older home has been converted into shared housing or multi-resident buildings. Parking can be extremely challenging, and to add to that dilemma, the streets can be quite narrow in some locations. Owning a car is a great thing for a college student, but it can mean some headaches, especially during snow removal season.
Even though it is primarily geared toward students, the University of Minnesota medical center also brings non-residents and non-students to the area. If you are one of them there are parking ramps near the clinic, but be prepared to walk. Within just a few minutes, however, you can be transported by transit from the University neighborhood to nearby communities where the nightlife, restaurants, and great shopping venues await.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Convenient for students
  • Dining and nightlife
Cons
  • parking is a nightmare
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"American-Indian Heritage Flourishes Here"

Ventura Village calls itself “the neighborhood that works” and it is clear to see why the residents can make this claim. Over the recent years community members and organizations have made it a priority to improve the quality of life for all of the members of this community through varieties of projects. New, affordable housing has been built, and the streets have the look of community pride.
There are some fabulous and unique places to shop in Ventura Village, especially at the Ancient Traders Market. You can find restaurants, eclectic goods for sale, and signs of the strong influence of the American-Indian population. Ventura Village is home to the largest population of American-Indians in the city of Minneapolis and it is refreshing to see that heritage shine through in the community.
If you are looking to live in Ventura Village you are going to be close to great medical services, including Abbott Northwestern Hospital. Homes in this area range from very early 1900 style dwellings to more modern duplexes and apartment rentals. The bus and light-rail transit systems make commuting very easy and affordable. Being so close to Downtown makes it a great location for working in the city or at one of the nearby schools.
Pros
  • Close to medical and educational faclities
  • Many eating and shopping options
Cons
  • small yards for homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Close, Connected Community"

Although the name of the neighborhood of Victory is derived from the name given to memorialize World War I veterans and fallen soldiers, it also seems to represent the victory that the community has had in developing into a peaceful, nurturing community in which to live in northwest Minneapolis. The community is less than 20 minutes away from the downtown city life and accessible easily by bus or car on major highways and the interstate. It also lies among Victory Memorial Parkway and the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway that gives residents a great place to run, walk, skate, or bicycle amid the great views. The shoreline of nearby Ryan Lake is also being protected and restored so that it provides residents with another option for great recreation in nature.
The homes of Victory were built mainly in the first part of the 20th century and are owner occupied. There are also some rental units situated to the core of the community, and some larger homes near Victory Memorial Drive. The neighbors really seem to feel a sense of connectedness with each other and when you are in the neighborhood you see them walking down the streets and taking advantage of the shops and restaurants along the way. There are some great places to dine in Victory, especially on patio seating on a beautiful fall day.
Pros
  • Beautfiul houses
  • Easy access to major highways
Cons
  • no major retail
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Tucked away in urban life"

If you want to feel tucked away in a peaceful community but still have access to metropolitan amenities, Waite Park might just be the place for you. This neighborhood is an example of one that began in the early roots of Minneapolis and that has continued to grow and thrive. Located in the northeast corner of Minneapolis, Waite Park is adjoined by the St. Anthony Parkway and has access to the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway.
There are many housing options for families and individuals in Waite Park, and the price tags reflect those, but there really seems to be something for most budgets. The styles of the homes range from traditional bungalows to ranch homes. Things like the Waite Park Community Gardens make this the kind of community where people want to settle and live. There isn’t a lot of crime, and the neighbors are active in their community.
Education also seems to be important to the residents of Waite Park, and even though there aren’t any schools at the heart of the community, there are some really good academic options in close proximity to the residential neighborhoods. Close to Waite Park is the Columbia Park Golf Course and the Waite Park and Recreation Center, both giving great opportunities for residents to be physically active.
Pros
  • great options for recreation
  • Active community
Cons
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small town atmosphere"

Webber-Camden is a great mix of a close-knit neighborhood and an industrial area for employment. Located in the northwest portion of Minneapolis, this community reaches to the northern part of Interstate 94 and the Columbia Heights area. The eastern border of Webber-Camden is the Mississippi River, which residents love because of the scenery and historic significance to the area.
The people who live in the Webber-Camden neighborhood talk about the small town feel they have when they walk down the streets and how they really feel like everyone knows their neighbors. It doesn’t feel to them like it is part of a very large city, especially when they are hanging out at Webber Park along the Mississippi River and having a picnic.
The homes in Webber-Camden represent the diverse group of people who call it home. There are some homes that more represent the working class that is common in the industrial areas of the Twin Cities, and there are homes where the middle class come to settle with their families and take advantage of the less hectic lifestyle. The prices of the homes here are reasonable, and residents can take advantage of the local shops and diners. If they need something more for retail, there are major highways nearby that can take them either north or south to larger communities.
Pros
  • small town feel
Cons
  • not a lot of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A village away from the hustle and bustle"

You can find the great Minneapolis neighborhood of Wenonah located to the very south of the region, sharing a border with the suburb of Richfield. Wenonah is also part of the Nokomis Community and shares a small portion of its border with Lake Nokomis. Because it is so close to Richfield, some families send their children to Richfield schools, although there are other schools in the area.
The community originally developed because the streetcar routes came through that portion of Minneapolis. Many of the homes in Wenonah reflect this early heritage and date back to the early to middle 1900s. Home prices are fairly typical for Minneapolis neighborhoods on the outskirts of the region. Most of them sell for below $200,000, with many closer to $100,000.
Wenonah is much like a small village, having its own stores and places to eat nearby. Many residents who feel they need to find a larger retail or business district in which to shop or work actually go into nearby Richfield instead of commuting into the busier Minneapolis districts of Downtown and Uptown. The bus line makes it easy to commute in either direction, and when you travel by car Highway 62 can take you east or west and bring you to either 35E or 35W.
Pros
  • it has a smalltown feel
Cons
  • takes longer to commute from here
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Diverse neighborhood close to great cultural experiences"

One of the oldest Minneapolis neighborhoods, Whittier retains some of the oldest homes in the city, and several of them have been beautifully restored. Even though this community used to be a residential neighborhood of single-family homes, it has turned into the place to be for those looking to rent. A larger than average number of rentals exists on these streets, drawing a diverse crowd of people calling Whittier home. It is known as a significantly culturally diverse community, adding to the richness of the experiences you can have here.
When I have taken my children to the Children’s Theatre here it is a mix of families, retired people, and young people walking the streets. You hear so many different languages in the neighborhood that it can almost be an onslaught on your ears, but it is a great way to connect with others as well. Just be prepared for some language barriers at times, but expect to enjoy the diversity as well.
With all of the diverse population, lower than average income levels, and various businesses in the Whittier neighborhood you are probably wise not to walk alone at night or leave your valuables in the car. However, don’t let these precautions keep you out of Whittier. The very present transit system can connect you with other great locations and experiences in the Minneapolis area.
Pros
  • cultural experiences for families
  • Artistic community
Cons
  • Some crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Wildlife in your urban backyard"

The neighborhood of Willard-Hay can be found in the northwest portion of Minneapolis and stretches partway to Penn and Xerxes Avenues. This nice community sits just adjacent to the Theodore Wirth Golf Course, and is in close proximity to many green spaces where you can see some great cross-sections of wildlife. It gives this city neighborhood a country feel when you see the great parklands, trails, and wetlands in the area.
The homes in this area are typical of those built in the early 1900s, but there are several pockets of newer developments. As the community continues to strengthen through the efforts of the Northside Resident Redevelopment Council (NRRC), it is expected that more new housing will be built and that current homes will continue to be renovated and made even better. There is a great diverse mix of ethnic and cultural groups in the Willard-Hay neighborhood, and the crime rates are fairly low. Two schools, the namesakes for the community, offer educational possibilities for the children of the neighborhood.
To the southern edge of the community is Olson Memorial Highway, which you can use to access the interstate and travel the advantages and extra amenities that Minneapolis offers closer to the heart of the city. You also aren’t very far away from the Warehouse District which offer eclectic shopping and entertainment possibilities.
Pros
  • wildlife and natural beauty
Cons
  • not a lot of community retail
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Boundary community that offers affordable housing"

The Windom neighborhood is situated to the very south of the Minneapolis community, and is the southern city limit boundary. While it might seem far away from everything that the city has to offer, it is actually very close to the suburbs of Edina and Richfield, two great communities themselves. The residential portion of this community is made up of homes that were built mostly before the 1940s, and are nice two or three bedroom houses that have been well-maintained. The prices for these houses are lower than average when compared to others in Minneapolis, and also offer affordable housing options to those in the surrounding suburbs. A fair share of the residences in Windom are multi-family units or apartments, making them even more affordable to young people, seniors, and young families. Edina tends to run on the higher end of average pricing, so Windom is a good option for those with a smaller budget. There are also two charter schools within the community.
The neighborhood of Windom sits at the bottom of the chain of lakes region giving residents easy access to the many opportunities for year-round activities and recreation. People from Windom can also find great places to shop along Lyndale and Penn Avenues, and there are several major retail stores near the highways in that area.
Pros
  • affordable homes for new families
  • Great for families
Cons
  • A little far from the central neighborhoods
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Family friendly and connected to the city"

The quiet and peaceful south Minneapolis neighborhood of Standish used to be considered the outer limits of the city. This area is now primarily residential and the homes are traditional bungalows seen throughout much of the Minneapolis neighborhoods. The prices of homes are lower than average in the Minneapolis neighborhood, but as new homes and apartments are built those are expected to become more in line with the typical prices around the city. Unfortunately residents do have to deal with crimes in the area, but it is not at an exorbitant rate at all. The neighborhood really is peaceful overall and the residents are kind and caring. Families who live in Standish have a few schools from which to choose for their children, and there are parks with playgrounds and wading pools.
One of the great advantages to moving to Standish is that there has recently been the development of a new light-rail line along the Hiawatha Avenue corridor that now connects this community to the amenities of the major metro area. You can get to the Mall of America, the airport, or the hub of major retail and business centers within minutes. It has created a new kind of energy in the community of Standish and will likely bring more residents there to call it home.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to both downtown and Lake Hiawatha
Cons
  • some crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"Beauty on the river"

Just five minutes from the middle of downtown, the Minneapolis neighborhood of St. Anthony West is an affluent neighborhood near the heart of the city. This river community originally drew European immigrants to the area, and now draws those who can afford the renovated homes and scenic neighborhoods. There is an eclectic mix of home styles throughout St. Anthony West, ranging from 19th century beauties to more modern townhomes and condominiums.
Along the riverside residents can take advantage of the upscale Boom Island Park that includes almost 15 acres of Mississippi River fun. There is a boat marina, playgrounds, picnic areas, and promenades. There is even a picturesque lighthouse that sits along the shoreline that once served to help river workers navigate the St. Anthony Falls. The beauty of this park is evident, and people take advantage of it for wedding photographs, receptions, and parties. The Boom Island Park (although no longer an island) is the place where you go if you want to leave on a cruise of the Mississippi River aboard the Minneapolis Queen. This riverside community is also the home of the only yacht club in the city.
There are no schools within the St. Anthony West neighborhood, but there is a library for residents. Shopping and dining can be achieved along the river at any of several small shops and diners. If you are looking for more retail possibilities, the bustle of Downtown is just minutes away by bus or car.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Next to the river
Cons
  • Expensive!
  • no schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Affordable living in a safe and friendly community"

The small neighborhood of St. Anthony East is a great fit for many young and active people in the Minneapolis area, but it is also affordable enough for students and families, although there aren’t any schools in the area. Much of the residences are rentals, but newer homes and apartments have been going up over the past few years to accommodate the growing community. Those homes that still exist in the St. Anthony East neighborhood are mainly from the very early 1900s and reflect the Colonial and bungalow styles of homes that were popular. The atmosphere in St. Anthony East is of a young and growing community, and there is little crime to worry about for residents.
One of the draws to St. Anthony East, besides affordable housing, is the convenience of the location in relation to the main metro area. You can walk on the paths to many of the venues in the neighborhood, and there is a great bus line that goes through the community as well. If you’re into biking, the 3rd Avenue Bikeway can get you to the Boom Island Park Trails and many other great biking paths in the area. There aren’t many retail shops in the area, but there are a few restaurants.
Pros
  • affordable housing
  • safe
Cons
  • little retail
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"An oasis of nature and a friendly community"

If you like the idea of living on the north side of Minneapolis, Shingle Creek might have just what you are looking for, especially if you are looking for a place to raise a family. The name itself even sounds like something from a story-book, and the residents who live there are very friendly and proud of their community. The crime rate is very low and you feel safe in this neighborhood. By freeway it is only about 6 or 7 miles from downtown, so you can commute to jobs to the south in Minneapolis or to jobs in the suburbs to the north. The homes are modestly priced, and the neighborhoods have been well-maintained.
Shingle Creek dissects the eastern part of the community, and it is a great place to watch water birds, hike, or enjoy the wading pool. Visitors can even take binoculars and their cameras and look for things like bald eagles, deer, and other wildlife that isn’t always easily seen in Minneapolis neighborhoods. If you enjoy gardens you will enjoy the Shingle Creek Common Ground Community Garden, where you can even grab a map and take a self-guided walking tour. If all of this serene nature and peaceful surroundings are too much for you, hop on I94 and head south into the bustle of the city, just minutes away from this oasis.
Pros
  • nearby nature
  • low crime and friendly people
Cons
  • not within walking distance of retail or downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nice riverside industrial neighborhood"

The northeast Minneapolis neighborhood of Sheridan is known more for its Arts Avenue than as a popular place to move and live. Most of the residents who do live in Sheridan live in apartment rentals that are more common than homes, but there is a recent trend of families moving to the area and more residential housing developments are taking place. Because of the limited homes for sale you might think that the prices are high, but they are actually well below the average Minneapolis listing price. There are a few schools and specialty learning centers within the neighborhood, bringing more families to the area. If you are in Sheridan and need to reach other parts of Minneapolis you can either cross the river and connect with Interstate 94, or maneuver through the neighborhood to make your way to 35W.
The community of Sheridan is home to many culturally rich venues, including several art galleries. As 13th Avenue continues to grow and develop, the Sheridan Neighborhood Organization has worked to bring a new library to the community and refurbish older buildings in the process. There are coffee shops, art studios, and an architectural firm in the neighborhood as well.
The commercial area along the river is probably one of the more significant aspects of the community. River industry was an important part of the history of the settlement of Minneapolis and it continues to be a highlight of the river community today.
Pros
  • art galleries
  • riverside
Cons
  • fewer homes than average
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Urban village on the river"

The new light-rail transit line now connect the Minneapolis neighborhood of Seward to places such as the Mall of America, Downtown, and the airport. Settled alongside the Mississippi River, Seward gets its name from William Seward, who served under President Lincoln. The history of the neighborhood includes the preservation of the rail workers houses that were built in the late 1800s. It is in a beautiful setting right along the Mississippi River, specifically near the Gorge.
The modern community of Seward sits on almost 400 acres of land, and about half of that is dedicated to residential areas. The closer you get to Interstate 94, the more modern the homes seem to look in this neighborhood. There are more multi-resident dwellings in this area, too. The rest of the homes throughout the community are an eclectic mix of bungalows, two-story homes, and Tudor inspired architecture. The homes are reasonably prices and are probably just around or barely below what you would find in a similar Minneapolis neighborhood. There is little crime in the area, and residents seem to appreciate the urban village feel that the community has. There is a large secondary community of artists who live in Seward and help coordinate the Seward Community Arts Network. Residents can usually find the basics of what they need without travelling to the heart of the city, as there are restaurants, shops, bakeries, and a co-op within the neighborhood.
Pros
  • near the river
  • friendly neighbors
Cons
  • right next to I94
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Inexpensive living between the lakes"

On the south side of Minneapolis is the community of Regina, which belongs to a larger neighborhood group known as Field Regina Northrop. This area is close to Lake Harriet and Lake Nokomis, and is bordered by the popular Minnehaha Creek. Regina is a residential neighborhood mostly filled with smaller, single-family homes that were built in the early 1900s, although there are several larger two-story homes in the neighborhood as well. The prices for these homes are very reasonable, especially given the proximity to the area lakes. One of the few multi-resident buildings in the area is the Town Oaks Townhouse complex that includes more than 100 townhouses that were built about 40 years ago. The residents of Regina are diverse in culture, and there are local activities that celebrate that diversity.
Perhaps one of the reasons why the home prices are so inexpensive is that the Regina neighborhood doesn’t have a lot of retail or businesses to offer residents. Most people have to go outside of their neighborhood for work and shopping. The good thing is that the community is very close to Interstate 35, but the traffic on this road going north during the week can be very heavy if you need to commute into Downtown Minneapolis.
Pros
  • close to the lakes
  • access to 35
Cons
  • lack of retail/businesses
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Great community of diversity and culture"

Named for the small lake that is shaped like a powder horn, Powderhorn Park is a great neighborhood in the southern part of Minneapolis. It really is a culturally rich and diverse place to visit and live, and there are lots of great activities and events in the park. Two of the more popular ones are the May Day Festival and Art Fair. The people of this community are friendly and seem truly interested in sharing with and learning from one another. The crime rate is also fairly low, making it a good place for families and seniors alike.
Most of the homes in the Powderhorn Park area were built just after 1900. The prices on these homes are also very reasonable, especially considering that some nearby neighborhoods have home prices double or triple those of the Powderhorn Park community. One of the drawbacks to the residential areas is that the homes are often built on fairly narrow lots, not allowing for a lot of green spaces in the neighborhood.
The former Sears Building sits in this area, and is now the Midtown Exchange, adding to the amenities and diversity of the community. There are convenient trails for walking, and public transit is able to take you to the Downtown area if needed.
Pros
  • culturally rich
  • friendly
Cons
  • small residential lots
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Newfound Gem"

You can find the Page neighborhood on the far south side of Minneapolis, near Minnehaha Creek, Diamond Lake Road, and Interstate 35W. This location gives residents easy access to both the amenities of Downtown as well as those of the neighboring suburbs to the south. The Page community belongs to a greater community organization known as Hale, Page, and Diamond Lake (HPDL) that works within these communities to make sure there is continued growth and prosperity.
Page is becoming a more popular residential neighborhood, and the homes here are almost all single-family dwellings. The styles of homes vary, from early 1900s through the 1950s, and the prices of the homes are steadily going up as more and more people seem to want to move here. As the community has grown in size, so have the retail and business offerings. Restaurants, great grocery markets, and coffee houses offer the comforts of city life in this rather quiet community.
Near the center of the neighborhood is Peal Park, providing residents with places for football and baseball games, as well as skating and hockey. If you feel like getting even further into nature, local parks, trail, and lakes are only minutes away from this southern neighborhood.
Pros
  • friendly community
Cons
  • home prices on the rise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Good schools and close to downtown"

The Northeast Park neighborhood is really like three separate communities under one roof. It sits in the northeast section of Minneapolis and therefore gets its name. Within Northeast Park there is a residential section, a shopping section, and an industrial section. The nice way it is arranged, though, is that the retail and business section, known as The Quarry, is almost like a blockade to the sights and sounds of the industry area. This makes the residential area seem further away from factories than other neighborhoods with industry in them. In The Quarry you will find a great selection of shops. Homes in Northeast Park are typically Victorian in style, but there are some newer ones and a few rental units. The prices for all of these are quite reasonable, especially given the easy access the neighborhood has to Interstate 35 and Downtown.

The Northeast Park and Recreation Center is a draw for many residents and visitors. It includes a putting green, a new awesome outdoor water park, multiple athletic playing fields, and other amenities. The Recreation Center also runs many different programs for youth in the area. One of the educational highlights of the Northeast Park neighborhood is the Chinese Immersion Charter School that is relocating into the area.
Pros
  • Chinese immersion school
Cons
  • stigma of industrial neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Independent neighborhood"

The neighborhood of Northrop, also referred to as Field Regina Northrop (part of a larger community coalition), is in the southern part of Minneapolis and is less than 5 miles from the Downtown area. The residential neighborhood of Northrop consists of smaller homes that were built just before and after WWII, many just 2 or 3 bedrooms. Most people in this area own their homes instead of rent, and the prices here are a little higher than average for these sizes of homes.
Cedar and Chicago Avenues on the boundaries of Northrop help to bring businesses and retail services to the area and make travelling outside of the community less necessary. Banks, restaurants, theatres, automotive services, and retail shops provide residents with a wide variety of services and goods. It does mean that these areas also have higher traffic levels, but access to metro transit is also available.
McRae Park is where residents go for baseball games, tennis matches, or a swim, and there are beautiful gardens and picnic areas. In the winter you can even go for outdoor ice skating – a must have in a fun Minnesota winter. The Recreation Center here also provides activities for kids in the summer and festivals for the entire community.
Pros
  • close retail and dining
Cons
  • pricey homes for the size
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"Favorite north Minneapolis community for shopping and entertainment"

The North Loop neighborhood of Minneapolis is one of my favorite places in northern Minneapolis to visit and shop. It has experienced recent growth in commercial and cultural venues. The new Target Field is where I have gone to cheer for the hometown team, and the outdoor stadium is absolutely gorgeous. Even if you are not a baseball fan, an afternoon in the spring sun with the soft sounds of the city in the background is a perfect way to spend a day. Parking near the field is fairly close with plenty of ramps. The drawback is that traffic can be quite heavy and the streets are fairly narrow at times.
The North Loop community is also known as the Warehouse District, as it has a fair share of industrial buildings. Over the years many of these warehouses have been converted into newer office spaces, retail locations, and even loft type apartment buildings. There is an amazing variety of shops in this area, and I love to shop the unique boutiques.
If you are looking for nightlife, great dining, or even cozy coffee shops the North Loop has more than you probably even need. The light-rail transit is a great way to get around, and there is constant bus service as well. Sometimes it is worth the ease to park at a remote location such as the Mall of America and take the transit into this area to avoid the traffic headaches. I’m not sure I would want to live in this very busy neighborhood, but it is a great place to visit and feel the heartbeat of city life.
Pros
  • Target Field
  • shopping
Cons
  • busy with noise and traffic
  • seems either very poor or very rich live here - economic gap
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"Build it and they will come"

Perhaps it is because until recently there were no new apartment buildings or a wide selection of grocery or retail shops, but Nicollet Island and the East Bank neighborhoods did not have the influx of development see in other places with such proximity to Downtown. That is all changing lately, and residents and visitors alike are finding that investing in the businesses and residential buildings is this area is helping to make it a great place to raise a family or settle and retire.
Almost directly in the center of Minneapolis, Nicollet Island/East Bank has grown along the riverside, and homes on the 47 acre island reflect the history of the area. They are typically Victorian, built in the late 1800s. Compared to other areas of Minneapolis, the population of Nicollet Island/East Bank is relatively small, especially in the residential areas. Homes in the area vary in price pretty drastically, from $100,000 to a million+, and the apartment choices seem just as eclectic.
More life can be found along the East Bank section of the community, as new shops, business offices, and restaurants are making this a popular place to visit and live. A new Lunds grocery store in the area also has residents really excited, bringing convenience and amenities to their own neighborhood. If you want to travel into Downtown, Nicollet Island/East Bank is closely connected via public transportation.
Pros
  • close to downtown but still small town feel
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Affordable housing near downtown"

The rather common and uncreative name doesn’t really do justice to this north Minneapolis neighborhood. While there are no spectacular sights within this community, there are some historically significant sites that are worth visiting, such as the Sumner Community Library which dates back almost 100 years. It is also an uncommon neighborhood because of the low prices on homes that are quite good condition and located within close proximity to the heart of Minneapolis. Most of the homes are single-family, and there are several rental units available as well. One stretch of historic homes in the neighborhood has block after block of buildings with the Victorian Queen Anne style painted ladies homes that still exist. Other homes in the area are more contemporary cul-de-sac in design, giving is a suburban feel.
Even though Near North is not an affluent community, its residents do take pride in their neighborhood and it shows through the development of the Northside Resident Redevelopment Council that works to improve the communities of Near North and Willard Hay. The group is a non-profit that promotes community activities and involvement. It also works to improve housing in the area and helps small businesses to grow. The crime rate in this area is not quite as high as in other north Minneapolis neighborhoods, perhaps due to this community push.
Pros
  • inexpensive homes close to downtown
Cons
  • noise
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small town living in southern Minneapolis"

At the very southeastern border of Minneapolis lies the neighborhood of Morris Park. The community originally developed as a result of the streetcar line that connected the neighborhood to Downtown, but it has remained a vibrant and growing community on its own since. The light-rail transit system recently began connecting this area to the larger and more commercialized neighborhoods to the north and near Downtown.
The homes in the area are modest smaller homes that were built anywhere between 1920 and 1960, but they are extremely reasonably priced, especially when compared to similar sizes and neighborhoods in other Minneapolis neighborhoods. The yards and exteriors of the homes are well taken care of and the streets have a cozy small-town feel to them. Many of the residents who live here are families, but it is becoming more and more popular for younger couples and those who are retired.
Within the neighborhood of Morris Park there are also the amenities of a small town – a post office, library, cafes, and small retail shops. You really can find most of the necessities you need right within this community. Morris Park itself is one of the more popular parks in the area and includes athletic courts and a community swimming pool.
Pros
  • safe - little crime
  • low housing prices
Cons
  • far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Laughing waters - a must-see!"

Even if you have no plans to move to the Minnehaha neighborhood of south Minneapolis, it is worth the time and effort to get here for a visit. The community gets its name from the Ojibwe reference in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem – The Song of Hiawatha – where Minnehaha means “laughing waters”. The waters of Minnehaha Creek flow into a beautiful 53-foot waterfall within the almost 200-acre Minnehaha Park. The park is home to majestic scenery and more than 500,000 people visit it each year. Community members also enjoy many events that are held within the park throughout the year.
If you decide to call this beautiful community home, you will have a variety of homes from which to choose. Many of the buildings are single-family “brick and mortar” homes, but there is a new development project in the works for an environmentally friendly apartment complex within the community. Even though the Minnehaha neighborhood is at the southern edge of Minneapolis, commuting to those larger metropolis areas is still not too bad, unless you are driving in rush hour. The community of Minnehaha has some nice smaller shops and restaurants, and residents can even reach other retails options further to the south.
Pros
  • the falls
Cons
  • far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
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"Diverse population"

The Midtown Phillips neighborhood of south Minneapolis is an extremely diverse community. Many, many different racial and ethnic groups are represented in the Midtown Phillips neighborhood, and the shops, businesses, and cafes are all clues to those various groups of people. It is also a neighborhood that is a combination of residential, commercial, and industry centers, adding to unique feel of the neighborhood.
On one end you can travel to the famous and wonderfully staffed Abbott Northwestern Hospital, and on the other you can find some dilapidated buildings near a pawn shop. When I have visited the Abbott campus I have been advised to never walk alone at night, and preferably have an escort during the day. The crime rate is above average, and it is not the type of neighborhood in which I personally feel safe when I am alone. The people in general are friendly, though, and I really enjoy the varieties of unique stores and shops selling everything from leather hats to international sweets.
Residents of Midtown Phillips live most often in older homes of various architectural styles, and there are many rental units throughout the community. The transit system runs through the neighborhood, making it easy to reach other parts of Minneapolis quickly.
Pros
  • Abbott
  • diversity
Cons
  • crime/safety issues
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small community along the river"

A community along the river, the McKinley neighborhood of north Minneapolis is a fairly residential neighborhood, even though there are industrial centers very close by. These offer residents of McKinley employment opportunities where they don’t have to travel into Downtown. If you do live in McKinley and want or need access to what the heart of Minneapolis has to offer, you are only 10 minutes away from the busier streets. Transit services connect residents to other parts of Minneapolis for work, sight-seeing, and shopping.
Most of the homes in McKinley are single-family buildings that were originally built in the 1920s. The home prices are fairly reasonable, especially when you consider how close the neighborhood is to Downtown without it feeling like a crowded metropolitan place. It is a place where families, single people, and retired people call home. The population of McKinley is diverse, and that can be seen in part by the variety of stores and places of worship in the neighborhood. There are 2 or 3 Christian churches, a Mosque, and a Buddhist temple in the community. The parks and businesses in the area help to make it a good place for families to settle, including Perkins Hill Park., which has gardens, playground equipment, and picnic areas.
Pros
  • scenic riverside neighborhood
  • close to downtown
Cons
  • close to industry
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Neighborhood tucked away near the industrial center"

Located in the northeast portion of Minneapolis, the Marshall Terrace neighborhood is very much an industrial community, with probably less than 25% of the area devoted to residential living. There are a lot of warehouses, railroad tracks, and some utility departments, especially along the river. The homes that do sit in Marshall Terrace tend to be modest single-family dwellings with 2 or 3 bathrooms, and the home prices in the area are very reasonable. Lots of the homes have alleys in the rear with detached garages so the streets aren’t as crowded as you might find in some neighborhoods. Even though it is located in an industrial community, residential neighborhoods sit apart from much of the industry focus, and the tree-lined streets help to give the neighborhood a more livable feel.
There is a green space in the neighborhood as well called Marshall Terrace Park. This site offers athletic and recreation opportunities like basketball courts, ball fields, a swimming pool, and picnic sites. Kids can do programs here in the summer, too. Sprinkled in between the homes and the industry area are a few restaurants and shops, and the community residents have access by car or by bike trails to the downtown area. If you’re up for the bike ride, the trails along the river in this neighborhood are very scenic.
Pros
  • close to downtown
  • inexpensive living
Cons
  • industry
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Worth the drive to Dinkytown!"

One of my favorite things about the Marcy-Holmes neighborhood of Minneapolis is Dinkytown – who wouldn’t even love a fun name like that? Dinkytown has a great variety of eclectic shops, restaurants, art, and taverns. If you are a student of the University of Minnesota, this is definitely one place you at least have to visit. The ambience is very much a college-town feel, although it is not directly adjacent to the college. There are families who live in Marcy-Holmes as well, and the neighborhood does have a K-8 school that is focused on the arts. The community has a few smaller, specialized or private schools as well.
There is a mix of home styles, from older homes to those that have been renovated, to lots of rental units. There is one area of homes in the Florence Court area that contains several dozen historic homes that have been well-maintained, giving it a residential focus. The trendy mix of apartments and multi-tenant buildings helps add to the feeling that this is for a slightly younger crowd, or at least one that prefers an active lifestyle without an emphasis on the picket-fence vision of upscale homes. There are also some sorority and fraternity homes in the area.
Pros
  • trendy Dinkytown
Cons
  • traffic and noise
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Great Lake Community"

One of the more popular neighborhoods in Minneapolis, Lynnhurst is in the southwest region of the city. While its homes are not the least expensive of the metro, they are more reasonably priced than those just to the north along the lakes. The current average price of a home in this area is just below $300,000, and most of the homes are owned. The homes have been largely renovated over the years, and the yards are typically large and well-maintained. Unlike the nearby Lyndale neighborhood, Lynnhurst does not have very many apartment buildings for rent.
Lynnhurst also gives residents great access to the lake regions, including the very popular Lake Harriet witch it borders directly in the north. The lakes are great places for year round activities, including boating, swimming, and skating. Another one of the great water attractions for the area is Minnehaha Creek which flows right through the neighborhood.
Even though Lynnhurst is one of the outlying neighborhoods of Minneapolis, residents can still often find what they need from retail in their own community. There are nice shops, restaurants, and unique little stores along the streets. If you need larger retail options it is sometimes even a good idea to then travel outside of the Minneapolis district to one of the suburbs to the south or west. These are often closer and have less traffic than if you travelled further into the city.
Pros
  • closeness to lake area for reasonable price
Cons
  • further from retail
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Popular place to rent in the heart of the city"

The neighborhood of Lyndale sits right in the middle of southern Minneapolis and is a popular place for artists to live. Most of the area is residential, but there are almost as many apartment and multi-family rental units as there are homes. The homes and rentals are fairly inexpensive which can make it a good place for those looking to be close to the center of Minneapolis without paying the steep prices of some neighboring communities.
Because of its close proximity to the amenities of the metro, residents of and visitors to Lyndale have great access to retail, restaurants, and other commercial sites. There is a great transit system throughout this neighborhood that can get you to places throughout the heart of Minneapolis within minutes.
Probably two of the biggest drawbacks to living in this neighborhood are the lack of schools within the community and the heavy traffic you can sometimes face, especially commuting outside of the area when travelling by car (although the freeway is easy to get to – it is just a busy part of the city). The location of Lyndale is nice for those who want to have access to the city aspects, but still be close enough to get to the lakes region quickly. Just to the west and northwest you can find very popular lakes for swimming, boating, canoeing, and more.
Pros
  • close to metro amenities
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Affluent Art Community"

The site of the Minneapolis Sculpture Park, Lowry Hill neighborhood of Minneapolis is an affluent neighborhood of expensive homes, condominiums, and apartment complexes. Partly because of the high costs of homes and limited housing options, the majority of people in Lowry rent instead of own their homes. Some of the least expensive homes in Lowry Hill are on the market for just over $200,000, and the prices can reach into the millions of dollars.
Residents and visitors come to this area of the Twin Cities in part for this and similar art experiences. The Walker Art Center is also adjacent to this community, along with the Dunwoody College of Technology. When you are in Lowry Park you can see a great view of the heart of Downtown, rising up among the art and cultural offerings of the area. The traffic can be quite heavy at times with tourists, residents, and business people all moving throughout the same neighborhood, but the neighborhood is fairly clean. Even amid the hustle of the pace you still feel safe and secure in this community.
Thomas Lowry Park, named after the real estate guru who helped develop the neighborhood, gives visitors and those lucky few who live in the area plenty of possibilities for recreation. There are some great paths for walking and taking in the tree-lined scenic streets.
Pros
  • great art and cultural area
Cons
  • expensive homes
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"Urban energy"

Lowry Hill East is perhaps best appreciated by singles and professionals who love to live near the retail and nightlife offerings of this great Minneapolis neighborhood. Most of the residences in Lowry Hill East are rental units, derived from larger older homes that were renovated into multi-unit dwellings. The few homes that are in this community are on the upper edge of average in price, in part due to their limited quantity.
Lowry Hill East is a great place to be if you love to walk the side streets and choose from a wide selection of bars, restaurants, taverns, boutiques, and trendy little shops. The neighborhood really does feel alive with energy.
This neighborhood is also a draw for local artists, as at the edge of this community are the Walker Art Center and Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. The Soo Visual Arts Center, The Jungle Theater, and Bryant Lake Bowl Theater are all close enough for residents of Lowry Hill East to take advantage of them.
Despite the trendy scene of Lowry Hill East, there are two schools located within the community, one an elementary, the other an international school. Getting around Lowry Hill is easy with the public transit system. It connects residents to the Chain of Lakes and the attractions that those have to offer year round.
Pros
  • great metro atmosphere
Cons
  • few homes for sale
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"At the heart of it all..."

Loring Park was once known as Central Park because of the central location of it within downtown Minneapolis. It really is part of the epicenter of Minneapolis, and is comprised mainly of commercial, retail, and cultural spaces. Those homes that do exist within the Loring Park neighborhood are going to cost more than average, and many of the residential spaces are rental units in multi-resident buildings. On the inexpensive side of the purchase price for a small home in this area you can expect to pay at least $200,000 - $300,000, but don’t be shocked by prices in the million dollar range.
There are people who can afford, and are more than willing to pay for this prime location. Loring Park is home to so many significant landmarks in the Twin Cities area. The Basilica of Saint Mary, Dunwoody Institute, University of Saint Thomas-Minneapolis Campus, and the Walker Art Center and Sculpture Garden are just a short distance from each other in this community. It is absolutely beautiful to drive into Loring Park and see these sights waiting for you.
The social and cultural life of Minneapolis is well represented in Loring Park, and even if you don’t plan to move there you can take advantage of all of the wonderful amenities. The shops, restaurants, and ethnically diverse offerings all add to the metropolitan feel of it all. There are outdoor festivals, activities in the park, concerts, and more throughout the year. Even with all of this hustle and bustle, Loring Park remains a fairly clean and beautiful part of the city. Loring Park really does feel like it is at the heart of it all in Minneapolis.
Pros
  • major attractions and landmarks
Cons
  • pricey homes
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Pet Friendly Park"

For pet lovers Longfellow is a great neighborhood with one of the largest off leash dog parks in the city. It has more than 4 acres for you to take your four-legged friend, and includes wooded paths and a trail to the beach shore of the river.
As far as humans go, Longfellow is also considered a good neighborhood, especially for affordable housing. The most common type of home you will see in Longfellow is the Bungalow, and it is famous for the signs throughout the community calling itself the “Traditional Bungalow Neighborhood”.
The close proximity of the residential area to the Mississippi River and to Minnehaha falls make it a very affordable place to live among this beautiful backdrop. Longfellow is a diverse neighborhood, and most of the residents own their homes. The Longfellow Community Council is making efforts to beautify the neighborhood, and they provide guides for homeowners how to effectively and efficiently manage their properties and make them even better. The Hiawatha Light Rail Line runs along the western border of Longfellow, connecting it to the larger metropolitan areas.
Residents of Longfellow are fortunate to have several schools for their children, including 3 elementary schools, an alternative school, and a charter school.
Pros
  • lots of schools
  • great dog park
Cons
  • few retail options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Artists Haven"

Logan Park is a mix of residential and industrial areas, situated in the northeast portion of Minneapolis. The neighborhood was originally built around Logan Park, a square dedicated to a Civil War general named Logan.
One of the drawbacks to the Logan Park neighborhood are the railroad tracks that practically divide the community into two, separating the residential side from the industrial side. Residents are working to make their community have more visual appeal and encourage new families to move to the neighborhood. The homes in this area are mainly Victorian style or those of the architecture of the 1930s. There are some low-rise rental units to be found within the community as well.
One of the attractions to the Logan Park neighborhood is the Art District, where almost 200 artists and small businesses live and work. There are various buildings dedicated for studio purposes, drawing artists of all mediums to find their creative spirits in this neighborhood.
While there are no schools within this neighborhood, Logan Park does offer a great place for individuals and families to relax or play a game of ball. There is also a wading pool and walking path, picnic areas, and an outdoor ice rink.
Pros
  • great for the arts
Cons
  • railroad tracks dividing neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Small Town Feel"

Originally developed as a community of cottages that could take advantage of Lake Calhoun and Lake Harriet, Linden Hills is now an upscale neighborhood in southwest Minneapolis. The cottages are for the most part history, replaced with larger homes that have been renovated and are selling for high prices. It is not uncommon to see homes selling for more than $500,000 in the neighborhood (although some smaller ones might be closer to $200,000), so it is not for the average Minneapolis family. The average income of residents in the Linden Hills neighborhood is greater than the average income of residents of Minneapolis and St. Paul.
There is still a line of public transportation that runs from the two lakes and connects residents and visitors to their beauty. The chain of lakes region also has what seem like endless miles of walkways, and those can connect you with the quaint shopping districts within the community. The businesses are typically small, family or individually run shops that offer everything from great cuisine to home décor.
The many trails and parks of the Linden Hills neighborhood give it the feeling that you aren’t really a part of the city when you are there. Playgrounds, athletic fields, and gorgeous gardens are all within walking distance of the residential areas.
Pros
  • clean and close to nature
Cons
  • home prices are on high end
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Affordable living north of the metro"

To the far north of Minneapolis lies the neighborhood of Lind-Bohanon and it is bordered by the city of Brooklyn Center. This small neighborhood has reasonable home prices, especially compared to the rest of the homes found in Minneapolis neighborhoods. Several families of Lind-Bohanon have chosen to make this community their home for two or three generations. This adds to the close-knit family feel of the neighborhood, and is probably one of the reasons why crime is so low in the area. If you want to get a little closer to the city life you just need to hop on Interstate 94 and you are in Downtown.
There is an elementary school within the neighborhood, as well as a private school. Residents of Lind-Bohanon also have great access to several parks and trails. The North Mississippi Regional Park is also home to the Kroening Interpretive Center which gives visitors an in-depth look at the life along and because of the Mississippi River. You can learn about the history of logging, the recreation uses of the river, transportation from a historical perspective, and more in this newly built facility. Bohanon Park offers recreation year-round, including a playground, athletic fields and courts, and an ice hockey rink for good old-fashioned outdoor Minnesota fun!
Pros
  • great community feel
  • affordable
Cons
  • little bit far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Community Pride"

Kingfield is a friendly, warm neighborhood in south Minneapolis. Comprised mainly of single-family owner occupied homes, this community prides itself in the efforts it takes to create a welcoming and secure atmosphere.
The homes of Kingfield are typical of those built in the early 1900s, with a few apartment buildings and rental units scattered throughout. Many of the streets are tree-lined and the community is considered a safe place to raise a family or live independently. The homes are on the upper price scale, many of the bungalows priced at $300,000 or more. It is also one of the largest neighborhoods of Minneapolis, and it continues to grow in strength.
There are weekly farmers’ market stands that provide an array of goods for the choosing as well as a few community gardens to enhance the look and livability of the neighborhood. In 2003 residents began a Mural Map project that strives to connect professional artists with teens to plan and pain murals on the outside walls of area businesses. There are several small businesses in the Kingfield neighborhood that provide various products for residents.
Within the Kingfield neighborhood is Martin Luther Kind Park, offering organized recreational and community activities as well as informal gatherings. There is a wading pool, basketball and volleyball courts, and ball fields.
Pros
  • neighbors who work to make community better
Cons
  • lack of retail and nightlife
  • spendy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Lap of luxury"

Prepare to live in luxury if you are considering a move to the Minneapolis neighborhood of Kenwood. Situated on the west side of Minneapolis, some of the borders to this community are of the most beautiful scenery in the central part of the state. Lake of the Isles and Cedar Lake are two of the natural beauties of Kenwood, and among these are Cedar Lake Park and numerous trails, parks, playgrounds, and green spaces for outdoor recreation. Even in the cold Minnesota winter you can enjoy snowshoeing, skating, and hiking and walking year round.
The parkways of Kenwood boast magnificent mansions, and even when the neighborhood was first developed in the late 1800s, it was billed as an affluent community for the wealth. Seven figure price tags on homes are common, so it is not the neighborhood for average Minneapolis individuals or families. Some of these extravagant homes date back a century, but have been painstakingly restored and completely revamped.
Residents of Kenwood enjoy upscale boutiques, cafes, and a deli, and have a community school within its boundaries. Even though it seems as if the residents of Kenwood have everything they could want, if they do desire to go into Downtown or Uptown, they are only about 20 minutes from those retail hotspots to the east.
Pros
  • beautiful homes
  • safe
Cons
  • expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Midwest Charm"

If you are searching for the quintessential cozy Midwest neighborhood, you don’t have to look much further than the community of Kenny. Almost all of the homes in the residential area are owner occupied and the streets and homes set upon them are very well-maintained. The prices for homes in Kenny are modest and affordable to many of the average families in the southern Minneapolis neighborhood.

Perhaps one of the most loved features of Kenny is Grass Lake. This gift from nature is made up of 27 acres of wetland and sits at the southern end of the Kenny neighborhood. It is a favorite place for bird watching and just enjoying nature. Residents also enjoy Kenny Park for year round recreation possibilities including athletic fields, a wading pool, and trails.

Even though Kenny is almost like a small town, it still has great amenities for residents. There is a fitness center, library, drug store, grocery store, hardware store, and bank within the community, as well as numerous restaurants and coffee houses. Area merchants and business owners provide the community with other necessities like veterinarian services and automobile mechanic services.

For more of the larger city aspects, Kenny is just a 15 minute ride to Downtown, and the streets of Kenny are within easy access of major road and highways. A neighborhood improvement group has been working hard for the past few years to continue to improve and maintain this great south Minneapolis neighborhood.
Pros
  • cozy neighborhood
Cons
  • can be too far from Downtown for some
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Serenity awaits"

Keewaydin lies in the heart of the Nokomis area, and residents and visitors both enjoy the amenities of Lake Nokomis and the peacefulness of southern Minneapolis. The neighborhood is fortunate to have so much natural green space within it, along with residential streets and quaint shops and restaurants.

The homes of Keewaydin are priced on average between $100,000 and $300,000, and are often found along peaceful, tree-lined streets. The curb appeal of these homes makes you think of a charming little neighborhood of a small town instead of the outlying neighborhood of a very large city.

If residents or visitors want or need to get to the larger communities in Minneapolis or St. Paul, the light-rail transit system now connects those neighborhoods, making commuting for work or recreation even that much easier.

Keewaydin really is a peaceful neighborhood with little crime and a great atmosphere for families, retired peoples, and those people looking for a less hectic pace. Lake Nakomis is just one of the ways that people can enjoy outdoor recreational activities all year round in Minnesota. The Keewaydin Park and Recreation Center offers facilities for baseball, basketball, tennis, soccer, and swimming, as well as picnic areas, playground equipment, and trails.
Pros
  • peaceful - great family atmosphere
Cons
  • lack of nightlife/entertainment
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small improvements to the neighborhood"

The Jordan neighborhood in north Minneapolis has seen its fair share of poverty, homelessness, and crime, but many residents there are committed to improving the community for everyone in it. The low home prices are an attraction for those looking to relocate to a neighborhood near Downtown Minneapolis, and the homes are for the most part in fair to good condition, most of the bungalow style common in northern neighborhoods. There are also some newer homes and apartment buildings that went up in the 1990s.

Jordan, like other neighborhoods in north Minneapolis, is no stranger to heavy foot traffic, noise, and even crime. However, there is a core group of residents who do work to try to make these negatives leave their neighborhood and who are dedicated to continuing to improve the atmosphere and reputation. In efforts to do this they are creating a community garden and joining forces to do small things like pick up litter and encourage others in the neighborhood to take pride in their community. Residents also enjoy the attractions of Jordan Park, including a wading pool and basketball courts, among other things.

Those who have settled in the Jordan neighborhood will probably also tell of the advantages of living so close to areas of employment, retail, and commercial venues of Downtown. Public transportation can get residents from their neighborhood to larger stores and entertainment within minutes.
Pros
  • residents who are working to improve neighborhood
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Residential Revival"

If you are looking for renovated homes along a beautiful residential setting, the Howe neighborhood might have just what you need. In the late 1980s a community effort put into place by the Longfellow Community Council was put into place to push for and support home renovations in this community, beginning with those by the river. Substantial upgrades on these homes have made them great real estate values, and the renovations continue to move along throughout the neighborhood toward Downtown.
Even with these renovations the prices on the homes remain fairly moderate, with some of them closer to the scenic river gorge a little steeper in price. The parks along the river, the waterfalls, and the wooden walking trails through the beautiful scenery can’t help but make you think of what the original settlers might have thought about this enchanting part of the state. Howe isn’t a large retail or commercial neighborhood, but getting to work in other communities or Downtown is still fairly easy – the average commute is probably only around 20-30 minutes from the residential part of Howe.
The school, and in fact the neighborhood, were named about poet Julia Ward Howe who wrote The Battle Hymn of the Republic – one of those songs you instantly know if you hear it.
Pros
  • the recent renovations of homes
Cons
  • not a lot of retail
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Reasonable home prices"

Settled in the northeastern part of Minneapolis, Holland is a largely residential neighborhood with most homes being built before1920. If you are looking to buy a home in the Holland neighborhood, you probably won’t face sticker shock as the homes are priced fairly moderately. There are a few rentals in the community, but not large apartment style buildings. You will most likely find duplexes and quad rentals, keeping that small town feel to the area as well.

Along Lowry, University, and Central Avenues you will find commercial and retail properties which offer residents everything from baked goods, automotive services, dining, and even art gallery space. If you can’t find what you are looking for in Holland there is transit service available to larger areas of retail and entertainment in Minneapolis.

Holland also has a high school in its community, Edison High, as well as the Northeast Library. If you’re looking to get out and about, Jackson Square Park might have just what you need. This park has various athletic fields, a wading pool, a basketball court, playground equipment, and picnic areas. They have also recently added an outdoor sculpture that is supposed to represent the community and the arts in coexistence.
Pros
  • great homes
  • easy access to Downtown
Cons
  • not a lot of green space
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Ride the Rails"

Hiawatha neighborhood is located on the southeastern edge of Minneapolis and as the signs in the area will tell you, is a “Traditional Bungalow Neighborhood”. This residential claim to fame has also put Hiawatha’s homes in several magazines and books. The best benefit of bungalow type homes is that they are designed and built with affordability and ease of maintenance in mind. The residents of Hiawatha are proud of their streets with well-maintained properties and great yard landscaping. The prices for homes in Hiawatha can be a little steep for some, but considering the great neighborhood and amount of home for the price, it doesn’t seem as overboard as some of the neighborhoods in the lake regions of Minneapolis.

Another one of the great things about Hiawatha is how easy it is for residents to reach other areas by the light-rail transit that runs right along Hiawatha Avenue. You can use this to get to the airport or the Mall of America in just minutes. Recreation is right around the corner too, with bike and pedestrian paths amid beautiful scenery.

While one-third of Hiawatha is open park land, there is also a great offering of restaurants and shopping, providing residents with all of the necessities in their own backyards. Dining, shops, and small grocers are in the commercial district but close enough for residents to access.
Pros
  • beautiful neighborhood
  • easy access with light-rail
Cons
  • homes are on the upper edge of average in price
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"A work in progress"

In North Minneapolis, the Hawthorne neighborhood is one of the communities that has seen a rise in foreclosures and empty homes, contributing to the stress the area has experienced over the years. For those looking for affordable housing, this loss of home owners in the area has left many of very reasonable options for those who are in the market. There are also classic row-houses in the neighborhood, and some of the historic homes date back to the 1880s. The people of Hawthorne are friendly and appear to want to work to improve and maintain their community.

In part of an effort to increase the safety, security, and sustainability of the Hawthorne community, a development project is in the works. The Hawthorne Eco-Village will be able to provide stable, affordable, and healthy places for individuals and families to live. It is hoped that this project will also then reduce the crime and poverty rates in the area which are relatively high, as well as improve the standard of living overall and clean up the neighborhood, while still maintaining its history.

One of the nice features of the Hawthorne community is Fairview Park in the middle of the neighborhood. You can go to the top of the hill within this park and see a great view of the skyline of Minneapolis
Pros
  • plans for Hawthorne Eco-Village
Cons
  • crime
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"On the edge of nature"

The Harrison neighborhood of Minneapolis can be found to the west of the Downtown area and has a mix of residential streets, blocks of industrial regions, parks, schools, and shopping venues. If you are looking to move to Harrison, the residential area is in the western part of the neighborhood and consists of a variety of types of homes. There are Victorian style homes or ramblers from the 1970s, homes for purchase and spaces for rent, and the prices are quite reasonable, especially when you consider the ease with which you can reach the amenities of Downtown. There is convenient access to Interstates 94 and 394, and there are plenty of options for public transportation.

One on the highlights of the Harrison neighborhood is the International Market Square. This is a favorite place for people going to get ideas for home improvement and design, as it houses home and commercial space designer showrooms, as well as interior design boutiques. For one stop shopping, the American Institute of Architects of Minnesota has offices within the Square as well.

For those who are looking for outdoor recreation opportunities, Theodore Wirth Park, Harrison Park, and Basset Creek Park have everything from snowboarding or golf to wading pools and basketball courts.
Pros
  • access to great home design studios for inspiration
Cons
  • not a lot of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small Neighborhood Of Peace in the Metro Area"

The community of Hale in the southern part of Minneapolis is a quaint neighborhood with parks, small shops, restaurants, coffee houses, and great schools. You might sometimes hear the neighborhood of Hale referred to as HPDL because it is part of a larger group of neighborhoods (Hale, Page, and Diamond Lake). The homes in this area are modest, but will still cost the homebuyer on average $200,000 or more. Many of these homes were originally built in the 1920s and 1930s and reflect the architectural styles of that time period. Almost all of the homes are single-family units, but a few rental units can be found sprinkled in the neighborhood.

The neighborhood gets its name from the Hale Elementary school, considered a very good school in the Minneapolis district. There is also an English Language Learners school in the neighborhood that provides a great education for children who might otherwise not have access to such a program.

Most of the Hale area is residential, but there are parks to the north and east for beauty and recreation. In that northern section of parks you can enjoy the scenery of Minnehaha Creek or one of the bicycle or pedestrian paths for walking or running, and Diamond Lake offers the amenities of water recreation.
Pros
  • good schools
Cons
  • prices a little spendy for size of homes
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Best of both worlds (with a bit of a price)"

The Fulton neighborhood of Minneapolis borders Edina on one side and sometimes it is difficult to tell where one community ends and the other begins. It is also bordered by Penn Avenue South and France Avenue South, and 50th Street West runs right through it. One of the most beneficial aspects of this neighborhood, however, is that Lake Harriet is just to the northeast and Minnehaha Creek flows through the neighborhood. These two waterways attract not only those seeking for a new home, but day tourists as well.

The homes in the Fulton area come with the Lake Harriet price tag – on average costing between $200,000 and $400,000, with some into seven digits. If you can afford the mortgage, Fulton has beautiful homes and great schools. Some of the best schools in the Minneapolis district are within the boundaries of Fulton, as well as a parochial school, bringing families to this neighborhood.

Besides the amenities of Lake Harriet, Fulton is also home to Pershing Park and the Pershing Park Recreation Center which offers year-round programs and activities for kids, families, and adults. There is a great commercial and retail area near France Avenue that offers dining, shopping, and entertainment for a wide range of budgets and tastes.
Pros
  • shopping
  • access to Lake Harriet
Cons
  • expensive homes
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A Neighborhood of Tradition"

The Minneapolis neighborhood of Folwell might remind you of other traditional communities of the Midwest. Most of the area is residential, and the homes are single-family buildings, often in the bungalow, story-and-1/2, or Craftsman style of architecture. Most of the people who live in Folwell own their own homes, but there are some rental units and a few apartment buildings in the neighborhood. The prices in Folwell for homes have really fluctuated over the past few years and are now very affordable.

In the southern part of the Folwell neighborhood near Lowry Avenue you can find restaurants, a library, a general store, and a few gas stores, but it is not what one might consider a shopping metropolis. If you go a little further south you will be at what is known as the West Broadway corridor, and there is where you will have more options for dining and shopping, including a Cub Foods grocery store, salons, and several other small businesses and shops. Folwell is not a very commercial neighborhood, but there are a few commercial buildings on the borders of the community.

The community is also named for one of the largest parks in northern Minneapolis, Folwell Park, and you can go to this almost 30 acre park for things like basketball, tennis, baseball, softball, soccer, or just walking and biking.
Pros
  • affordable home prices
  • small town atmosphere
Cons
  • lack of retail
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Village Feel"

As part of the Field Regina Northrop Neighborhood Group (FRNNG), the neighborhood of Field is located in south Minneapolis and is bordered by Interstate 35W to the west and Minnehaha Parkway to the south. Named after the local school and its namesake, author of children’s poetry Eugene Field, this neighborhood is a quaint mix of homes, green spaces, parks, and small businesses.

The homes in Field are most noticeably smaller two-bedroom stucco, stone, and brick homes that were built just before World War II. The people who live there are most often families, students, and the retired. The homes of Field are nestled among tree lined streets and are of average prices for single family dwellings in the Minneapolis area.

Residents of Field get to enjoy the popular corner of Chicago and 48th where you can find anything from Turtle Bread, to restaurants, shops, and even a creamery. This friendly atmosphere of this local hot spot make residents feel right at home as they walk to dinner or stroll for shopping. The businesses of Field help residents feel like they are living in their own little village among the hustle of big city lights which can be reached within moments if needed or desired.

One highlight for activities and recreation is the McRae Park and Recreation Center where youth have opportunities for athletic events of all kinds, and in the spring is the site of a neighborhood festival that celebrates the diversity of the Field neighborhood.
Pros
  • unique shopping experiences
Cons
  • little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Classic Picket-Fence Community"

Named after a Swedish engineer and inventor named John Ericsson, the Ericsson neighborhood lies in the southeast portion of Minneapolis. It is just one of several neighborhoods that are within the Nokomis community of Minneapolis.

Primarily a residential neighborhood consisting of single-family dwellings, Ericsson also is home to a western half filled with recreational land. Of the homes that are in Ericsson, the average price is consistent with those of other Minneapolis neighborhoods, and the styles include classic two-stories and bungalows set back against the streets of the neighborhood. The streets are clean and the yards are well maintained among the mid-20th century style homes.

The Lake Hiawatha Golf Course, Lake Hiawatha Park, and Minnehaha Creek call the Ericsson neighborhood their home. The Hiawatha Lake Park Recreation Center offers residents year round activities filled with art, music, crafts, education, and dance opportunities.
There is a low crime rate in Ericsson and volunteers within the community work to make sure that it stays that way by providing safe, nurturing choices and options for residents when it comes to businesses and schools. There are several small businesses within the community, and residents have access to two light rail stations that can bring them into the busy city streets and places such as Mall of America within minutes.
Pros
  • safe - low crime
Cons
  • lack of city feel/ammenities
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Home of HCMC and North Central University"

One of the oldest communities in Minneapolis, Elliot Park is rich in history but is still infused with a city feeling. Just south of downtown Minneapolis, Elliot Park was first surveyed just four years after Minneapolis was founded, and the land that the actual Elliot Park sits upon was donated by Dr. Joseph Elliot, a local doctor and farmer.

The late 1800s saw the boom of many mansions built in this neighborhood, and these enormous homes were later converted into apartments and multifamily dwellings in order to accept the increasing population into the area. Another trend that developed at that time was the construction of three-story brick and stone apartment buildings, and some of them still stand today, such as the Rappahannock condos and the Roselle apartments buildings.

The residents of Elliot Park on average are in a significantly lower income bracket than the average of those in other parts of Minneapolis. The housing market in the area is steady, and community programs have continued to grow to provide opportunities and assistance for those in need. Section 8 Housing, programs for teens at risk, and assistance for the aging population are all efforts to make Elliot Park a better community.

Two major institutions are located in Elliot Park – the Hennepin County Medical Center and North Central University. There are also several smaller businesses located in the neighborhood, including a restored diner.
Pros
  • medical facility
Cons
  • higher crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Location, Location, Location"

East Calhoun, sometimes referred to by its neighborhood organization name of ECCO (East Calhoun Community Organization), is situated in the Minneapolis Calhoun-Isle area and is considered to be part of Uptown. As Lake Calhoun is considered one of the premier attractions in the Minneapolis area, it is no wonder that East Calhoun is a popular place to visit, and for the fortunate few, call home.

The residential area of ECCO is upscale and comes with a golden price-tag. The average price of a single family home in this neighborhood is more than $600,000, and perhaps only a dozen or so properties even go on the market each year. With so few homes up for sale and the glamor and convenience of the neighborhood, it is little wonder that many wish to find a home here. Beyond the high priced homes are a few apartment buildings, condos, and duplexes for those looking for smaller spaces and to spend less.

Beyond the extravagant homes of the neighborhood, ECCO is home to movie theatres, night clubs, boutiques, fine dining, coffee shops, and grocers. This neighborhood also boasts itself as the “epicenter of the Twin Cities” and makes every effort to live up to that billing. If you tire of the beautiful homes and luxury shopping, there are countless outdoor activities on the water, along the shoreline, and amid the trails.
Pros
  • great recreation opportunities
  • beautiful
Cons
  • spendy
  • few homes every up for sale
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Luxury Living"

The East Isles neighborhood of Minneapolis is situated on the eastern side of Lake of the Isles, within the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes region. Lake of the Isles is a regional park area consisting of Lake Calhoun, Lake Harriet, and Cedar Lake, and includes more than seven acres of historically designated wetlands and parkland. It also happens to be one of the most popular destinations in the Metro area for recreation and day-vacations. Included in this outdoor splendor is the influence of the Midtown Greenway, a bike trail and walking path developed over an older existing rail line. It runs through the southern portion of the neighborhood and eventually connects with the Mississippi River to the east.

The residents of East Isles have a long history of non-agricultural residency in that particular part of the city, with the first homes constructed on a boulevard in 1907. This history has provided a solid foundation for a neighborhood of affluence and amenities. Residents have everything from boutiques to upscale dining to quaint ice cream shops at their disposal. This neighborhood is extremely sought after and the housing market reflects those desires. The low-end housing begins around $400,000 for a small or modest size single-family home, and can reach well into the 7-digit price range. The impression in East Isles is that you get what you pay for, and it appears that plenty of people are willing to pay for that luxury of nature among urban splendor.
Pros
  • beautiful for even day trips
Cons
  • pricey neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Revitalized Community"

The East Harriet neighborhood of Minneapolis is a lesson in investing in community resources. Residents of East Harriet have used the Minneapolis Neighborhood Revitalization Program (NRP) to identify and address the needs of the community. Through volunteer efforts and cooperative arrangements, the Lyndale Farmstead Park has been transformed from a daycare facility with non-existent community opportunities and activities to a beneficial neighborhood gathering site, just since the 1990s. New park facilities, lighting, playground space, and athletic courts have been added as well.

Long before residents of East Harriet decided to revitalize their community, founder Colonel William S. King built his summer estate there, the Lyndale Farmstead, and he was influential in making sure that enough land was set aside for park acreage around Lake Harriet.
More than 90 homeowners have also taken advantage of the programs offered through NRP and have transformed their homes through the use of low interest home improvement loans. Typical homes in this neighborhood are two-story and have curb appeal. More than 300 trees on local boulevards have recently been planted and pedestrian lighting among certain streets has been upgraded.

The residential neighborhoods are bordered in part by Lake Harriet, the namesake of the neighborhood, and Lakewood Cemetery. The Lyndale Park Rose Garden, along with the Thomas Sadler Roberts Bird Sanctuary, are both popular places within East Harriet.
Pros
  • community spirit and pride
Cons
  • easy access to lakes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Core of Minneapolis Business"

Situated at the core of downtown Minneapolis is the neighborhood of Downtown West, which is also the Central Business District of Minneapolis. Home to Fortune 500 companies, upscale retail stores, luxury hotels, and trendy boutiques, the Downtown West community is the epitome of a neighborhood of success.

The Nicollet Mall runs south from Washington Avenue and is filled with extensive dining and shopping options for residents and visitors. Near that you have Hennepin Avenue which runs south from the Mississippi River and provides numerous locations for theatres, the arts, and entertainment. Downtown West is also the proud home of the Minnesota Orchestra, founded in 1903 and located in the Nicollet Mall.
The Downtown West neighborhood is not extensively residential, but there are apartment buildings and condos amid the office buildings, shops, and hotels. The residential spaces are often small one or two bedroom units, but for a steeper price tag than you might find in nearby communities. While many people spend their days in Downtown West, only a small number actually call it home.

In order to help create and maintain a positive atmosphere and environment, the Downtown Minneapolis Neighborhood Association (DMNA) works with residents and business owners in Downtown West to provide support services and improvement projects, as well as serve as a liaison between the residents and the developing agencies.
Pros
  • luxury boutiques
Cons
  • expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Culture and Trendy Rennovations"

In the heart of Minneapolis you will find the neighborhood of Downtown East, a center for culture, heritage, and trendy renovations. Surrounded in part by the Mississippi River and Interstate 35W, Downtown East is home to many recreational and social opportunities. The infamous Metrodome, Gold Medal Park, the MacPhail Center for Music, and the Guthrie Theatre all call the Downtown East community home. These major influences help to provide and promote awareness of social, historical, and cultural activities and opportunities. Whether you want to see a play, watch a ball game, or visit and learn more about a historical mill or factory, Downtown East has what you are looking for, and more.

Many of the older mills and industry buildings have more recently been converted and renovated into trendy lofts, commercial properties, or residential spaces (many of them high-rise). While only a small portion of the overall neighborhood is comprised of residential buildings, those who live there and those who visit can all take advantage of numerous restaurants and shops in the area, especially along the waterfront where a new park has been developed. This new park attempts to teach visitors about the history of Minneapolis, specifically about the milling industry and featuring the Mill City Museum.
Pros
  • theatres and shops
Cons
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"The Life of the City"

The Diamond Lake neighborhood is one of metropolitan convenience combined with a friendly suburban feel. It is named for Diamond Lake, just to the western edge of the community. Located on the south side of Minneapolis and surrounded by Interstate 35W, Highway 77, Highway 62, Cedar Avenue, and Diamond Lake Road, this main artery neighborhood has easy access to the Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport as well as the lively atmosphere of city life.

The residents of the Diamond Lake neighborhood are considered a part of the Nokomis community, which is a larger grouping of smaller neighborhoods. Diamond Lake is connected to the Lake Nokomis recreation areas and nearby parks through the northeastern tip of the community. There are approximately 2200 households in this Minneapolis community of Nokomis, where people come from all walks of life and who are employed in various job settings. Homes currently sell for an average of $200,000 - $300,000 for well-kept, single-family residences.

Shopping, businesses, and restaurants are not in short supply in this neighborhood, and almost every taste and preference can be found. Diamond Lake Park, a central landmark of the neighborhood since 1926, includes more than 30 acres of land and more than 40 acres of water. This island of nature within a bustling city helps to give it the peaceful feeling of an oasis.
Pros
  • lots of shopping options
Cons
  • traffic
  • parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"The Market Makes It the Place to Be"

Situated east of the Powderhorn Park is the neighborhood of Corcoran. This community is named after William Wilson Corcoran (1793-1889) who was the founder of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.. Connected to Downtown, the famous Mall of America, and the airport by light rail transit, this neighborhood is home to a diverse and growing population of Minnesotans.

Mostly a residential neighborhood, Corcoran has more than 60% of its land devoted to housing. Most of the cottage and bungalow style homes were constructed prior to 1920, and it continues to be a place where many families choose to make their homes. Residents can enjoy the local Corcoran Park and Recreation Center, playground, various athletic fields, a wading pool, and a volleyball court for year-round activities and opportunities. There are even new neighborhood murals which are springing up and making their marks as new landmarks of the community. Residents can also take advantage of the Midtown YWCA.

One of the special features of Corcoran is the Midtown Farmers’ Market, a relatively new project developed by the Corcoran Neighborhood Organization. Included in this market are products, produce, and other goods from more than 70 famers and vendors. More than 40,000 people come to take advantage of the wonderful offerings that the market has to offer.
Pros
  • The Midtown Market
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • little nightlife in immediate area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"Historic Neighborhood on the River"

The Cooper neighborhood, part of the larger Longfellow Community, of southeastern Minneapolis runs along the western shore of the Mississippi River, and is adjacent to the Mississippi River Gorge – an 80+ foot gorge cut by the years of engineering maneuvering during the milling boom of the history of Minneapolis. This is now a federally protected natural landscape.

The neighborhood of Cooper got its name from James Fenimore Cooper, an American novelist who was born in 1789 and is probably most famous for writing The Last of the Mohicans. It is now primarily a residential neighborhood, with a commercial corridor near Lake Street. Residents and visitors can find parks scattered among the banks of the Mississippi River. Homes in the area are on average between $100,000 and $200,000, with virtually all of them being priced less than $300,000.

In 2005 the residents said goodbye to Cooper Elementary School, meaning that those children now have to travel to other communities for their education. However, Cooper is also home to the very prestigious Minnehaha Academy on West River Parkway, a rigorous private Christian school that overlooks the Mississippi River. There are also a variety of restaurants and stores in the Cooper neighborhood, including the Blue Moon Coffee Café, Corazon, the Craftsman Restaurant, and Riverstone Salon and Spa.
Pros
  • history of the area
  • low costs of homes
Cons
  • lost an elementary school
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"City Life Meets Country Charm"

Tucked away behind city parks, rivers, and industrial railroads is the neighborhood of Columbia Park of northeast Minneapolis. Columbia Park gets its name from a few sources: the acquisition of the park in the “Columbian year” of 1892, the 400th year since Christopher Columbus first ventured to America, and the nearby location of Columbia Heights. The residential setting of Columbia Park is hidden away between the city of Columbia Heights, industrial areas, a park, and a golf course.

The homes of Columbia Park are in large part brick Tudors or two-story traditional colonial homes. These owner-occupies homes are well-maintained and the residents enjoy minimal traffic in their community. There is a direct bus route available to the downtown area, and the biking and walking trails lead residents to St. Anthony Parkway or along the river – combining the feel of city life and country charm. The neighborhood used to be the site of a shallow lake, named Lake Sandy, but is now the site of a sprinkling of wetlands.

For those looking to get out and enjoy the recreational opportunities the 18-hole Columbia Golf Course, or check out the archery, ski trails, sledding hills, rugby field, an off-leash dog run, tennis courts, wading pool, or playground within this community.
Pros
  • Beautiful park and golf course
  • Near public transportation
  • Seclusion from the rest of the city
Cons
  • little traffic
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Rennovations Revived this Community"

Commuters who want a smaller residential feel with big city advantages – look no further. The Cleveland neighborhood of northwest Minneapolis, named after President Grover Cleveland, is conveniently located near downtown Minneapolis, Golden Valley, and Maple Grove. The city of Minneapolis is to the east, while the city of Robbinsdale sits to the west.

The neighborhood consists mainly of single-family homes of modest size, but there is a commercial area that is located at the corner of Penn and Lowry. The recent renovation of Lowry Avenue in 2010 brought new opportunities for commercial businesses and home developments to the community. It is also being discussed as a possible neighborhood to participate in a light rail expansion project.
The neighborhood of Cleveland is bordered in part by tree lined trails for pedestrians and bikers, and Theodore Wirth Park is located on Victory Memorial Parkway where residents and visitors can golf, ski, picnic, or hike. Residents of Cleveland include families, retired individuals, and students from a variety of the city’s schools.

This friendly neighborhood hosts Live on the Drive (a community music event), an annual garden tour, several block parties, art crawls, community art and theatre shows and performances, and numerous other social and educational endeavors. The Camden Music School for all ages is also a part of this growing Minneapolis community.
Pros
  • new businesses in this area
  • Beautiful historic district
  • Cheap housing
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"Front and Central"

The name says it all – Central. Tucked right into the heart of a bustling city is the Central neighborhood in the center of south Minneapolis. As one of the oldest neighborhoods in southern Minneapolis, Central homes are representative of historical architecture and charm.
Many of these homes were built in the late 19th century and boast Queen Anne architecture styles as well as the look of Colonial estates. Nestled in between these larger homes are more traditional Tudors and bungalows, as well as some apartment buildings. The homes are for the most part owner-occupied, but there are some rental units as well as low-rise multifamily homes available. Home prices and income levels are at median to low ranges for the Minneapolis area.

Part of the attraction of the neighborhood of Central is the close proximity it has to the life and offerings of the city. Downtown, the Lakes District, the Midtown Exchange and Global Market, and easy access to the freeway all contribute to the diverse population of Central. There are many ethnic groups and cultural groups represented by the people of the Central neighborhood.

Home to one of the famous Carnegie libraries, the Hosmer Community Library, Central also features the Friendship Academy of Fine Arts, the Green Central Gym, and the Sabathani Community Center.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown and other key areas
Cons
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Essence of Ethic Diversity"

Cedar-Riverside is its own unique village in the center of the Twin Cities of Minnesota. Also referred to as the West Bank, Cedar-Riverside gets its name from Cedar and Riverside Avenues which bring to life varieties of ethnic restaurants, shops, and specialty boutiques. This neighborhood that was formerly known as Snoose Boulevard, was once home to Scandinavian immigrants who mainly worked in the industries located along the Mississippi River.

The population of the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood eventually grew to include artists, musicians, actors, and students. It is now the largest immigrant community in the Twin Cities, continuing to grow upon its immigrant roots. This community is home to the University of Minnesota’s West Bank Campus, as well as Augsburg College. The U of M brings with it the students and influences of the performance and visual arts schools and law school.

By the Light Rail line you can reach Downtown Minneapolis in just 5 minutes, and there are bus and bike routes that connect you to numerous communities and trails. Those who live in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood might be found in the high-rise condominiums or the smaller single family homes originally built in the early 20th century, as there is great diversity in the housing options.

Within Cedar-Riverside you can also find the Coyle Community Center, Currie park for games of basketball, wading, and softball, Murphy Square (the oldest park in Minneapolis), the Riverside Park, West Bank Arts Quarter, and the Franklin Terrace Off-Leash Dog Park.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Right next to downtown and university campuses
Cons
  • traffic
  • Crowded
  • Higher crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Trendy Community of Lake Living"

The CARAG neighborhood, also known as the Calhoun Area Residents Action Group, is nestled into the heart of Uptown and just walking distance from Lake Calhoun. This unique neighborhood is a mixture of single-family homes, of which 75% were built before 1920, and of all varieties of architecture. Among the newer homes you can find Arts and Crafts style homes and other revival styles. There are also townhouses, duplexes, and apartment buildings of all sizes and styles within the neighborhood. Originally developed as a streetcar subdivision of Minneapolis, CARAG is now a trendy community that offers much to both residents and visitors.

Retail business and varieties of services can be found within CARAG, and residents don’t have to travel far to dine in restaurants serving all types of menu options. Situated in the community are also art and theatre venues for residents and visitors, as well as the Emily O. Goodridge-Grey Accelerated School for those in grades K-6. Residents can also take part in services offered by the synagogue or one of four churches in the CARAG neighborhood.

The Bryant Square Recreation Center is the place for residents to find recreational activities all year, including a summer dip in the Bryant Square Park wading pool, and in the winter, an opportunity for hockey or ice skating on the rink that originated in 1913. A small outdoor theatre known as POPS, or Public Outdoor Performance Space is located in the hillside of the Bryant Square Recreation Center.
Pros
  • Close to the lakes
  • Easy access to downtown
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Relax in a Lakeside Community"

The Cedar-Isles-Dean neighborhood of western Minneapolis also belongs to the larger Calhoun-Isles Community. Taking its name from three sources, Cedar Lake, Lake of the Isles, and Dean Parkway, this neighborhood is home to many parks and trails, representative of the more relaxed design and feel of the western suburbs of Minneapolis.

The Midtown Greenway, a significant trail system, runs through the neighborhood of Cedar-Isles-Dean. This community is also home to other “green” spaces which are very much the boasted perks of living in this suburb of Minneapolis. An expansive connection of trails and bikeways wind their way through Cedar-Isles-Dean. Residents and visitors take advantage of the numerous outdoor activities that can be enjoyed through the parks and trails year round in Minnesota. The southern border of this neighborhood has also seen a recent boon in the number and selection of boutiques, shops, and restaurants

This smaller neighborhood is basically divided into smaller residential sections. Most of the homes are single-family, but there are also several options of apartments and condominiums available in the area as well. Homes range from modest and charming picket-fence style homes, to completely remodeled historical homes, to modern and trendy lofts. In order to call Cedar-Isles-Dean home, however, you will need to fall in with the small percentage of people who have a family income of more than double the citywide average.
Pros
  • By multiple lakes
  • Natural Beauty
Cons
  • Very expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Luxury of Nature Meets Metro"

On Minneapolis’s western edge sits the Bryn-Mawr neighborhood. Bisected by the major thoroughfare of Interstate 394, Byrn-Mawr is also bordered by Theodore Wirth Park, Bassett Creek, the Bryn-Mawr Meadows, and Cedar Lake Park. These picturesque parks that surround this community help to make the suburbs feel less crowded and instead, full of green, serene spaces. Even in the 1800s this neighborhood was described as a garden suburb, in large part because it is so close to area lakes. It is now surrounded by more than 650 acres of parks, trails, and waterways, and to some still feels much like a small town.

Bryn-Mawr gets its roots from the early settlers who came from Bryn Mawr Pennsylvania, where the meaning of the name is also derived from Welsh roots – meaning “big hill”. This modern neighborhood has been called one of the most livable metropolitan places in which to live, partly because it can still provide residents with easy access to the nearby larger and more developed areas of Minneapolis for shopping, dining, and businesses.

Many of the residents who live in the Bryn-Mawr neighborhood are executives and professionals, and many of them even telecommute from their home offices. These homes include all types of architectural styles, from Victorian to colonial to ramblers. There is a low crime rate in Bryn-Mawr and higher than average levels of education and income among the residents. Set within this community are also two elementary schools, the Bryn-Mawr Community and Park View Montessori, and Anwatin, the local junior high school.
Pros
  • Beautiful historic homes
  • Natural surroundings
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Neigborhood of Community Spirit"

The roots of the Bryant neighborhood go back to 1887 when it was first incorporated by the city of Minneapolis. Developed in more entireties by the 1930s, this neighborhood was named for the American poet by the name of William Cullen Bryant. Located in south Minneapolis, this community is near what is now Chicago Avenue and Interstate 35W.

The current and modern neighborhood is now also where you can find residential areas of single-family homes, with a few multifamily dwellings in the northwestern portion of the neighborhood. In 2000 the population of the Bryant neighborhood was 2,789 and showing signs of continued growth.

The neighborhood also boasts an enthusiastic community group, the Bryant Neighborhood Organization, which organizes and presents a wide variety of programs and events. These include things such as movies in the park, youth sport activities, housing fairs, neighborhood garage sales, holiday and sledding parties, and the Metro Blooms Raingarden workshops. Plans for a new community dog park are also underway for pet loving residents of the neighborhood. The community leaders reach their residents through newsletters and open meetings.
The Bryant neighborhood is leading the way in community enrichment programs such as the Bryant Unity Development Garden (BUD Garden), the Mixed Blood Theatre Company, and a large Boys and Girls Club.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Community involvement
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"A Garden Community"

A historically rich neighborhood, the Bottineau community can be found in northeast Minneapolis and is bordered by the Mississippi River to the west, and to the east, University Avenue. Named after the explorer who originally bought the neighborhood’s land in 1845, Pierre Bottineau, the Bottineau neighborhood has now turned into a modern and ethnically diverse neighborhood. The current population is just over 1200 people and is a popular choice for artists in which to live and work. The Bottineau offers easy access to large city amenities while still claiming some of the suburban aspects of a smaller neighborhood.

There are several options that make Bottineau a convenient and fulfilling place in which to call home. Within the neighborhood there is a community library, a large park, and even a community garden called Mulberry Junction Community Garden. The gardens are a collaborative effort and boast more than 30 plots where residents of Bottineau have first choice of garden spaces for $10 or $20 for the entire season, depending upon the size of the plot. Organic and healthy planting and growing guidelines are encouraged, and the community garden members even contribute some of the fruits of their labors to a local food shelf. To add to the community feel of it all, there are garden tools and wheelbarrows available for use as well.
Pros
  • Community Garden
  • Affordable housing
  • Artistic community
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
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"Strong Blend of Business and Culture"

A neighborhood within the original Phillips community of Minneapolis, East Phillips is bordered by Hiawatha Avenue, East Lake Street, and Bloomington Avenue. The Phillips community was just subdivided in 2005 into smaller neighborhoods so it is still common for people to refer to East Phillips as simply Phillips.

No matter which name is used, the neighborhood of East Phillips is still home to such facilities as Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Wells Fargo Mortgage company, the Green Institute/Phillips Eco-Enterprise Center, and Allina Health Care Services. Scattered among these very large institutions are smaller businesses that hint at the diverse population which resides in the community. Employees, business owners, and residents of East Phillips have access to the varieties of places in the neighborhood via the LRT Lake Street/Midtown bus service. The Midtown Greenway, a 5.5 mile corridor of bicycle and walking paths, can also be used to maneuver from one place to another.

The Midtown Exchange Project that brought the Midtown Global Market to the neighborhood is a reflection of the diversity in the community. As you walk through the mall-like structure of Midtown you can move from authentic Mexican grocers to genuine African jewelry and clothing, and the aromas in the air are simply hints at what new dish or fragrance you will experience just around the corner.

Those who live in the East Phillips neighborhood might come from a variety of the residential homes and buildings, which span a large amount of size, architecture, and expense. In one area you might see a massive Victorian style home that is indicative of the history of the neighborhood, and in another you will see smaller, less expensive and elaborate multifamily dwellings.
Pros
  • Amazing medical facility
  • Midtown Global Market
Cons
  • not always safe to go out at night alone
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Small Things in Great Packages"

If good things really do come in small packages, then the Beltrami neighborhood can be considered a good thing. The smallest neighborhood in Minneapolis, Beltrami can be found in the heart of Minneapolis only minutes away from the University of Minnesota and the life of the Downtown area. An early influence of Italian-Americans is in part the reason why the neighborhood was named after a 19th century Italian scholar and explorer, Giacomo Costantino Beltrami. A monument in his honor can still be found in the neighborhood.

The modern neighborhood is a mix of diverse residents, representing a cross-section of ethnicities and cultures. If you live in Beltrami you might be among the artists, students, or working class – as all of them can be found to call Beltrami home. It is not uncommon to find working artists with studios in Beltrami as they utilize the diverse spirit of the neighborhood and close proximity to businesses and schools.

The Beltrami neighborhood is also home to Beltrami Park where residents can take advantage of six bocce balls courts, a basketball court, baseball fields, soccer fields, a sandpit volleyball courts, and tennis courts. The homes in the area consist mainly of single-family homes, but there are a few small multifamily buildings available as well. There are large tracts of industrial land covering the southwestern part of the community.
Pros
  • Close to campus and downtown
Cons
  • Not too family friendly
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Multicultural Metro Neighborhood"

Located just south of Powderhorn Lake and near Chicago and Cedar Avenues, the Bancroft neighborhood is so named for the Bancroft Elementary school, in turn named after American historian George Bancroft. Most of the homes in this neighborhood (80%) were built before 1940, and the area also includes some commercial development.

Almost a century ago residents of this neighborhood would travel by streetcars to downtown Minneapolis, or shop amid their own streets at small businesses owned by grocers, butchers, or even dentists. It is even said that organ grinders and their monkeys would provide entertainment along the streets in the neighborhood.

The modern residential community gives residents and visitors easy access to downtown by Interstate 35W. Residents of the Bancroft neighborhood live in mostly owner-occupied housing, and within their community have access to two schools: the Bancroft Elementary School and El Colegio/CreArte Center for the Arts. There is a thriving business and community sense in the neighborhood and community members are a part of a larger multi-neighborhood initiative to further improve the neighborhoods of South Minneapolis.

As strong community involvement and enrichment efforts have taken place, communities such as Bancroft have seen positive changes. The median income in Bancroft has increased by $15,000 in 2000 to $55,000 in 2009. The residents of the Bancroft neighborhood represent a cross-culture of American heritages, including African American, Latino, Somalia, and Asian, of which the influences and traditions are helping to grow the community.

Whether you are looking for an experience in the arts or want to take advantage of the nearby Lake Nokomis or Hiawatha Golf Course, the Bancroft neighborhood area might be just what you need.
Pros
  • part of multicultural and multi-neighborhood initiative
  • Close to I-35W
Cons
  • Limited dining and shopping
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"A meeting of nature and the metro"

Established primarily in the 1940s, the hilly Minneapolis neighborhood of Audubon Park is named after the famous John James Audubon. Audubon was an influential and dynamic American naturalist and ornithologist. This neighborhood can be found in northeast Minneapolis, bound in part by the Saint Anthony Parkway and Central Avenue.

Many of the residents of Audubon Park feel that their community is a traditional neighborhood comprised in part by more natural surroundings than afforded an extremely busy and overbuilt city block. Those who live in Audubon Park try to live to the ideals set forth by their namesake who wrote, “A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.”

Volunteers within the community work to further conservation issues and ensure that the neighborhood is worthy of such a name, and many in the neighborhood are proud of their flower gardens and natural contributions to reduce their carbon footprints. There are citizen safety patrols that work to make certain that residents feel safe and secure. Homes in this neighborhood come in all price ranges and architectural styles.

Whether you visit or become a permanent resident, in Audubon Park you will find the Holy Land Restaurant & Deli, the Eastside Food Co-op, and amazing merchants such as Crafty Planet and Audubon Coffee. Audubon neighborhood is also on the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway and part of the Central Avenue culturally infused community and retail experiences.
Pros
  • Eco- friendly community
  • Green and clean
Cons
  • lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A slice of urban peace and comfort"

Named for its influential resident, Maude Armatage, the Armatage neighborhood of Minneapolis has been home to families for decades. Single family housing began to develop in the 1940s and much of the neighborhood was built by the end of the 1960s. The community center in this neighborhood is also named after Maude. Created in 1952 this Armatage Community School aimed to carry out many of the wonderful plans for the community to which Maude aspired. It was her work that led to a vigorous park system in Minneapolis that incorporated park and school cooperative projects. Maude also made great strides in the struggle for equal rights for women and families. Her influence can still be felt in this modern Minneapolis neighborhood.

Currently the neighborhood consists of mainly single family homes, with a few multifamily dwellings interspersed. The homes are well-maintained and of moderate to upper class offerings. There are also a few small shops, businesses, and stores located primarily along Penn Avenue South that add to the community serenity. The Armatage neighborhood is also home to a public art sculpture, newer gym, and playground.

Working to continue the growth and strength of the community is a neighborhood organization known as the Neighborhood & Community Engagement Commission (NCEC). Its members meet monthly to hear concerns of residents, work on solutions, and continue a strong relationship with city leaders to communicate the voices of the residents of Armatage neighborhood.
Pros
  • secure neighborhood
  • Close to major driving routes
  • Short drive to airport and Mall of America
  • Very green and clean
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Prime lakeshore living and family fun"

West Calhoun is lakeside living at Minnesota’s best! The area is beautifully situated near Lake Calhoun and residents and visitors can expect fine living, dining, shopping, and sightseeing in this neighborhood. Lake Calhoun is one of the most popular lakes in the metro area, and here you can find the Calhoun Yacht Club and Lake Calhoun Sailing School. There are also businesses that rent out kayaks, paddle boats, and canoes, which can all be used on the lake or longer treks to Lake Harriet or Lake of the Isles through the connecting chain of canals.

There are only about 290 owned homes in the West Calhoun neighborhood, but almost 900 rented units for those looking to call this area home. These beautiful homes and rentals range from $650/month to far higher.

For those who don’t live in the West Calhoun neighborhood, there is still a wide array of options for visitors who want to take advantage of the beauty of the area. One of the highlights of this neighborhood is the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway that borders Lake Calhoun and connects to other trails and the Midtown Greenway.

Various businesses, grocery stores, cafes, restaurants, shops, and even doctor and dentist offices can be found among the streets of the West Calhoun neighborhood. Whether it is to find your new home or visit for the day, this picturesque part of Minneapolis will be one of your favorites.
Pros
  • lake living
  • majestic scenery
Cons
  • limited housing available
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"The Witchs Hat Water Tower gives a view like no other."

Prospect Park is a village nestled among two major cities. Situated to the east of the University, north of the Mississippi River, west of Minneapolis and St. Paul, and south of an industrial area, Prospect Park is almost like an oasis of homes. An old neighborhood developed in the 1800’s, Prospect Park was originally a suburb for commuters using the streetcar line to reach Minneapolis.

Perhaps most unique and noticeable about Prospect Park is the famed Witch’s Hat Water Tower, seated at the highest point in the neighborhood, and possibly the city. This famed location is open once a year on Memorial Day to allow residents and visitors the opportunity to have a panoramic view of Minneapolis.

The neighborhood consists mainly of small homes owned and lived in by families and individuals, and a few apartment buildings for students. There is a housing complex called the Glendale Housing Project that is home to about 700 families living on an average of $9000/family. There are small businesses and stores in the neighborhood as well within walking distance of the homes.

Set among the steep hills and winding streets, Prospect Park also includes Pratt Elementary School and Luxton Park (a community center). Architecture lovers will appreciate the Malcolm Willey House that was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and still sits today on Bedford Street.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A cross-section of family and student life"

Named after Como Avenue, the Como neighborhood (sometimes referred to as Southeast Como) is nestled in a vibrant University community. Just north of Dinkytown and the east bank campus of the University of MN, Como neighborhood boasts the history of early 20th century homes, many of them bungalows or of Victorian architecture.

These Victorian style homes have been in large part converted into student housing. There are a few newer homes and multi-dwelling homes that have been built in recent years, drawing new families to the area. A new University child care center has also recently opened in the neighborhood. The Como neighborhood also has an elementary school for local families, three churches of varying religions, and a mosque.

Families and student alike enjoy the close-knit neighborhood with tree-line streets and gardens. Small businesses lines several of the streets in Como Neighborhood, including 2 small grocery stores, a hardware store, coffee shops, gas stations, and several dining establishments.
Tucked into this busy neighborhood is Van Cleve Park. Families, individuals, and students can enjoy this park year round through the playground, wading pool, winter ice rink, and several sporting fields. This park also includes an area dedicated to educational gardening for children.

Continued improvement of this Como neighborhood is expected through the Southeast Como Improvement Association, which has been advocating in the neighborhood for more than 25 years.
Pros
  • There is a unique relationship between families, retired peoples, and students in the neighborhood, giving it an unusual but beneficial mix of perspectives.
Cons
  • The streets can be busy and traffic-filled.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students

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