LizziePelz

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  • Reviews 26
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Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Eclectic Southern Minneapolis Community"

Powderhorn Park is a lively southern Minneapolis community that shares the same name as the large patch of green that sits at its center. This is known to be a very eclectic neighborhood where a variety of people live and visit and many events are hosted, such as the Art Fair and May Day Festival in addition to others. Though relatively close to downtown, the crime rate here is rather low and the residents are friendly people who look out for one another. Powderhorn Park is a place where people of various ages and lifestyles can feel at home.

The real estate in this neighborhood is relatively cheap for both renter and buyers with
sales prices seldom going above $140,000 and leases usually settling under $700 per month. The majority of homes are within small apartment buildings and complexes, with the occasional small single family house. Though most were built before World War II, some spaces had developed after 1995, thus adding to the community's eclectic nature. The lots are rather narrow and there is little room for green space between homes, but Powderhorn Lake compensates for that lack of natural lush. There are various amenities located within this neighborhood for eating and practical shopping. For those that wish to travel to downtown or other areas, the public transit makes moving in and out of Powderhorn Park easy.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • culturally rich
  • friendly
Cons
  • Can become overcrowded
  • small residential lots
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"College Life Off Campus"

On the other side of the Mississippi River form downtown Minneapolis, Marcy- Holmes is a fun and exciting neighborhood to visit for the nearby University of Minnesota students and families from throughout the city. On the other side of I-35 is Dinkytown, a famous well known spot for unique eateries, shops, bars and art spaces. Dinkyton is a something that all Minneapolis residents are obligated to visit at least once in their lives. Even though some families do live in this community, Marcy- Holmes is noted for its young, semi- college town feel where urban hustle and bustle are a constant.

Marcy- Holmes is a renter's neighborhood with very few properties up for sale. Those who do wish to purchase a home here would have to pay over $250,000 while a lease will seldom go over $750 per month. Most of the local homes are apartment buildings and complexes that were built after 1970 while a small cluster of older historic houses till stand within the area. The properties are low maintenance and offer easy to live in homes for college crowds and a few of the buildings/ houses are the living quarters for University of Minnesota sororities and fraternities. One of the downsides of Marcy-Holmes is the high crime rate, often resulting from some rambunctious college students, but it is advised to walk with some company at night.
Pros
  • Cheap rental prices
  • Close to downtown
  • Next to the river
  • trendy Dinkytown
Cons
  • Some crime
  • traffic and noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Pleasant South Minneapolis Community"

Page is in the southern section of Minneapolis between Minnehaha Creek and Diamond Lake as well as next to I-35W. Those living here are able to take advantage of both the energy of downtown and central neighborhoods and the quiet serenity of lake side life. Page is one of three communities that is part of the Hale, Page and Diamond Lake (HPDL) coalition, in which all collectively work to keep the streets both clean and functional. Peal Park occupies the center avenues of the neighborhood and has a football and baseball fields as well as a skating rink. Residents can also visit Minnehaha Creek and the green spaces that border it as well as Diamond Lake just a few blocks to the south.

Though Page is very much like a suburban community, the main streets are home to several dining spots, coffee shops and other businesses that have opened up as the neighborhood has gained popularity. As additional people wan to relocate here, the housing prices gradually climb and are currently on the slightly expensive side. The majority of homes are historic prewar houses with one or two bedrooms that cater to a home owner population. Page maintains a suburban feel in a community that is only a few miles from downtown and other crowded neighborhoods. The many functional nearby businesses in addition to low noise and crime make Page an wonderful place to raise a family of live life alone in peace.
Pros
  • Near the creek and lake
  • Green and clean
  • friendly community
Cons
  • A little far from downtown
  • home prices on the rise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Amenities in Southern Minneapolis"

Northrop is located in southern Minneapolis just a few miles from downtown and other central neighborhoods. This community is still often referred to as Field Regina Northrop since it is located next to Field and is part of a large collective. Commuters can access downtown via I-35W just to the east with a drive that last five to ten minutes. The Saint Mary's Cemetery is located at the heart of Northrop and provides a historic landscape in addition to the old, modest sized houses that were built during the 1920's and 1930's. The homes are listed on the slightly expensive side at a little over $200,000 and very few properties are for rent since this community targets home owners.

McRae Park and its recreation center are frequented by locals who wish to stay active and become involved with community activities. The park has a tennis court, a baseball field, a swimming pool, and gardens. Festivals and children's activities are also held here during the spring and summer months and ice skating is available during the chilling winters. The majority of businesses in Northrop are located along Chicago and Cedar Avenues and leave few reasons for residents to go to other communities for amenities. Restaurants and retails shops dot these two streets and locals even have access to entertainment. Should someone wish to travel elsewhere, public transportation can take them to any other point in Minneapolis.
Pros
  • Outdoor recreation
  • Close to I-35
  • close retail and dining
Cons
  • Some crowds
  • pricey homes for the size
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"From Industry to Homes"

As the name would suggest, Northeast Park is located in northeast Minneapolis and is conveniently close to downtown. This neighborhood is divided into distinct areas for shopping, industry and housing. The land area follows the curve of I-35W, so it is able to function well with this set up. The industrial spaces are located near the Hillside Cemetery while the Quarry, a large shopping center, forms a barrier between the western edge residential area and the warehouses. The Quarry has rows and rows of retail shops that are sure to keep visitors bust for hours.

The collection of homes includes many prewar single family dwellings and some more contemporary properties. Both sale and rental prices are on the affordable side, making living this close to downtown practically a steal. Having the Quarry in the Northeast Park neighborhood, however, attracts constant crowds of people, which can add some noise every now and then. The actual Northeast Park and its recreation center host a variety of activities such as putt golf, swimming and soccer. Residents of various ages will fall in love with this neighborhood that has just about every amenity that one needs within walking distance.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Close to downtown
  • The Quarry
Cons
  • Noise from shopping crowds
  • stigma of industrial neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Shopping Mecca"

North Loop is a shopper's dream on the north side of Minneapolis. The neighborhood is sandwiched between I-94 and I-394 within the Warehouse District and is right next to Downtown West. Industrial buildings are located close to the river while shops encircle Target Field where residents and visitors can enjoy major league baseball games. The numerous forms of public transportation provide easy passage in and out of North Loop while the interstates provide routes throughout the metropolitan area. A major downside about this community, however, is that it has some of the highest traffic in Minneapolis.

The local housing mostly consists of apartment buildings and converted warehouse spaces. This community caters to a renter population and most property leases are listed at mid- range prices. N. Washington Ave. is the place to be for all the restaurants, bars and shops that one could want and even more options are located just on the other side of I-394. Residents that are looking for a little fresh air can mosey on over towards the river, but North Loop is mostly concrete. Not suitable for families or retired individuals looking for peace and quiet, this community is a happening place where younger, more mobile crowds will always find something to do.
Pros
  • Next to downtown
  • Affordable rent
  • shopping
  • Target Field
Cons
  • busy with noise and traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The Island at the Center of it All"

Nicollet Island is proof of a charming island getaway surviving well within an urban area. The island along with the East Bank area along the Mississippi River has only recently seen an influx in population since it was previously left alone. Both commercial and residential spaces have been erected, with most being added within the past thirty years, and have attracted residents of various types. Though families do occupy Nicollet Isle/ East Bank, this is a neighborhood known for a high concentration of young educated professionals. The island has some very distinct late 19th century historic houses. Given that the land area for this community is smaller, it is natural that the population would also be modest in size.

The housing prices come in a very wide range with some properties below $200,000 and others exceeding seven figures. Those interested in living in this community just have to do a very thorough search to make sure that they find a place that fits within their income. East Bank has the majority of businesses while Nicollet Island is mainly residential. The river banks have numerous eating and shopping spots as well as a new grocery store. Residents here have no need for personal vehicles since they have access to all the public transportation they will ever need.
Pros
  • Small town vibe
  • Eating and shopping spots
  • close to downtown but still small town feel
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cheap Housing Close to Downtown"

Despite the name making the location of this neighborhood obvious, Near North is quite the popular residential area. It is a little less than a mile from downtown Minneapolis and is also close to both I-94 and the Mississippi River. A variety of green spaces are within easy reach, including Wirth Park, North Commons, Hobbs Field, and Hall Park. The neighborhood is also home to numerous public and private schools such as the North Community High School and the WISE Charter School, making this a suitable place for families. Near North has many amenities ranging from restaurants to clinics, from nonprofit organizations to political offices.

Though this community is very close to downtown, it manages to preserve a semi- suburban feel. Residents, however, often have to suffer through the noise of the nearby freeway. Another downside to Near North is the occasional crime, which comes with being near the center of the city. This neighborhood is like many others in Minneapolis, with the majority of homes being small historic houses dating back to the 1920's. The prices for living in these homes are very affordable, rarely exceeding $130,000. Residents are also a short bike ride to trendy communities like Bletrami and Bottineau.
Pros
  • Many local businesses
  • inexpensive homes close to downtown
Cons
  • noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small Town Vibe in Southern Minneapolis"

One of the many southern Minneapolis neighborhoods that developed thanks to the street car, Morris Park is a little slice of heaven that is close to numerous important spots within the city. The light rail has taken the place of the street car and residents can easily travel to downtown without having to run into rush hour traffic found along the highways. The Crosstown Highway passes through the lower half of the neighborhood and the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport is close enough to sneeze on. This means residents have to deal with the noise of over passing airplanes. Morris Park is also home to the VA Medical Center, which is well known for it excellence in orthopedic medicine.

Those that live in Morris Park are close to all the green space they could ever want. The actual Morris Park is located in the center of the neighborhood and has the Morris Park School and Hiawatha Leadership Academy next to it. Lake Nokomis is a little less than a mile to the west and the Minnehaha Off-Leash Recreation Area to the east provides a place for dogs to roam free along the river banks. Minnehaha Park and Fort Snelling Gold Course are also nearby. This small town feel of Morris Park is further emphasized by the quaint local shops and cafes. Add affordable prices for the homes and Morris Park is the perfect town within a city.
Pros
  • Close to airport
  • Close to off-leash park
  • low housing prices
  • safe - little crime
Cons
  • far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Nature Paradise"

The name Minnehaha is often assumed to have a humorous connotation behind it, and such an assumption would be correct. Minnehaha is the Ojibwe word for "laughing waters." Minnehaha Creek reaches its final destination in this neighborhood and forms the 53 foot Minnehaha Falls. Hiawatha Ave. runs right next to this waterfall and along Minnehaha Park where the greenery touches the Mississippi River. This community of water and green is truly a sight to behold. This is not only a popular place to live, but it is a frequented vacation day spot for people from all around Minneapolis. The park and river banks host many events throughout the year and are filled with spectators during the spring and summer months.

Minnehaha has many properties from which to choose, most of which are brick structures as well as many environmentally friendly homes that have been developing so as to preserve the natural integrity of the neighborhood. This southern Minneapolis community has access to downtown via Hiawatha Ave. and is just across Highway 62 from the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport. Just down the road are other larger regional parks and wetlands into which the Mississippi River feeds. Minnehaha is truly the outdoors-man's dream come true.
Pros
  • By numerous bodies of water
  • Beautiful parks
  • Close to the airport
Cons
  • A little far from downtown
  • Tons of traffic during the wamrer months
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Culture, Culture, Culture"

Midtown Phillips, just south of downtown Minneapolis, is a place of diversity. People of dozens of different ethnic groups live and work here, and the local shops further illuminate this eclectic community. The dining and shopping options are endless with residents and visitors alike being taken to different parts of the world with each new spot they spot they step into. The various styles of architecture make the streets of Midtown Phillips visually stimulating. While most Minneapolis neighborhoods have areas for just businesses or just residential spaces, these avenues are shared between both homes and shops.

Those living in Midtown Phillips are close to top notch healthcare with two local hospitals; the Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and Abbott Northwestern Hospital. The crime rate in the areas surroundings these health facilities is rather high, so it is advised that no one walks out alone at night. Housing in this neighborhood is cheap, with both mortgage and rental prices suitable for those with low to moderate incomes. The majority of properties are apartments that coexist with local businesses, as well as a few single family houses built before World War II. Midtown Phillips is a hot spot for young singles looking to add some culture into their lives, but families would do better to look for safer and more spacious communities.
Pros
  • Medical facilities
  • Diverse population
  • Dining and shopping options
Cons
  • Overcrowded
  • crime/safety issues
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cheap Homes in Northern Minneapolis"

In northern Minneapolis where the neighborhoods are mostly dedicated to industrial spaces, McKinley maintains a residential atmosphere. Many of those who work in the nearby industrial areas live in this community since it is a short commute and they are not subject to the high prices of properties closer to downtown Minneapolis, I-94 is a ten to fifteen minute drive and public transportation is available for those without a car. Most of the homes are smaller historic houses built during the 1920's, and very few sell for more than $115,000, a very reasonable price for being relatively close to downtown while at the same time being out of the way of the urban crowds.

McKinley has a diverse population, where families, young single individuals and retired persons live together. The variety of worshiping places reflects the many different types of people that live here with Christian churches, a Mosque and a Buddhist temple within walking distance of every home. Residents who want some fresh green space have Perkins Park, which is by the river and the interstate and has its own gardens and playground. Those living in McKinley can also spend some time on the river banks during the warmer months.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Easy access to downtown via I-94
  • close to downtown
  • scenic riverside neighborhood
Cons
  • Noise from nearby trains
  • close to industry
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Affordable Living in the Shadow of Industry"

Marshall Terrace is located in northern Minneapolis where industry is king. Dozens of railroad tracks pass through the neighborhood and only about a quarter of the land area has been set aside for residential spaces. This sort of landscaping has made homes in the area affordable, with few being listed for more than $135,000 and rent prices rarely exceeding $650 per month. Properties that were built during the 1940's and 1950's, but a few small apartment buildings are also located here. Homes closer to the river have the advantage of being on tree-lined streets, which helps to distract from the cold industrial backdrop on the eastern edge of the neighborhood.

Residents in Marshall Terrace do have access to some public green space at Marshall Terrace Park where fields, basketball courts and a swimming pool offer many forms of physical activity. Anyone can take a bike ride to the more trendy parts of Minneapolis with Bottineau and Beltrami just downriver. The trail along the river offers a very visually pleasing ride to downtown where residents can access additional dining spots and nightlife. Marshall Terrace is an affordable, safe place to live close to downtown, but one has to get used to the noise of the nearby trains.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Next to the river
  • close to downtown
Cons
  • Noise from rail yards
  • industry
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Tower View and Diverse Population"

No neighborhood does a better job of creating its own world so close to the center of a metropolis. Prospect Park is a go between for many landscapes; Minneapolis to St. Paul, industrial areas to green spaces. This community started as a suburb that served this exact purpose, where citizens could travel in and out of downtown Minneapolis using the street car in the late 19th century. Now it has I-94 running through and it directly touches the University of Minnesota campus and the Mississippi River.

Prospect Park is home to the Witch's Hat Water Tower, which is one of the highest points in Minneapolis. At the top, locals and visitors can get one of the best possible views of the city. The population is an eclectic mix of families, single professionals and students. Most of the homes are modest single family houses while there is a small cluster of apartment buildings to cater to a student population. The neighborhood contains several businesses that most residents can walk to. Residents have access to two different public parks, Luxton Park and Tower Hill Park, and children attend the nearby Pratt Elementary School. Prospect Park is a prime example of different lifestyles living harmoniously.
Pros
  • By the river
  • Close to campus and downtown
  • Diverse population
Cons
  • High traffic
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Art and Culture by the River"

Seward it at the center of urban activity with Hiawatha Ave., I-94 and the Mississippi River forming its boundaries as well as routes for easy travel in and out of the area. The light rail runs alongside the neighborhood, connecting it to almost every corner of the Minneapolis Metropolitan Area, A portion of the land along the railroad tracks is dedicated to industrial spaces while other streets contain historic homes ranging from those built during prewar era to those erected within the last thirty years. Almost all the properties are listed at affordable prices, with those closer to the river being more expensive. I-94 separates Seward from the University of Minnesota while Hiawatha Ave. forms the divide between this community and Ventura Village.

The area has a low crime rate, which many would find surprising given it is so close to downtown. Residents have access to more restaurants, bars and shops than they will ever need, with a strip center located at Hiawatha Ave. and Country Road 48. One can stay active with the many outdoor activities available at Matthews and Brackett Parks, as well as alongside the river. Seward Elementary School borders Matthews Park and offers a reason for families to relocate here and mingle with the already occupying professional and artist crowds.
Pros
  • Next to the river
  • Close to downtown
  • Art and culture
Cons
  • Traffic
  • Noise from I-94
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Cheap Housing for Artists"

Sheridan is a quick trip from downtown, situated between the Mississippi River and the artist occupied Bottineau. This community is also an arts hot spot, famous for its Arts Avenue. While it has for years been a haven for singles, recent trends have shown clusters of families moving to the area, which helps the real estate value climb, but takes away the trendy vibe that has made this neighborhood so special. What has attracted these droves of families are the low housing prices for the apartments and few single family houses. Educational facilities also draw in those with children, but being able to cross the river to access various amenities has made living in Sheridan a must.

Sheridan is prized as an artist community, with 13th Avenue developing with gallery and venue spaces. Those who decide to settle here have access to coffee and studios, the basics for trying to launch an art career. The portion of the neighborhood that touches the river is filled with warehouse spaces, some of which have been converted into studios, Cheap prices in an area of creativity close to downtown has made people compete for real estate, and the number of available spaces still does not meet the current demand. Those that manage to lease or bu ya property, however, are living it up with local culture and nightlife.
Pros
  • Next to the river
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown
  • art galleries
Cons
  • fewer homes than average
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Lakeside Haven"

One of the many wonderful lake communities, Lynnhurst provides lake side beauty away from the obnoxious inner city noise. This neighborhood has Lake Harriet in its northwestern corner of Minnehaha Creek running through the middle. Residents have access to Lynnhurst Field and Lynnhurst Park, both providing various forms of outdoor recreation in addition to nearby lakes. Lynnhurst is near the southern edge of Minneapolis but those living here can easily travel to downtown via I-35W and the community is filled with its own unique local spots that give residents little reason to leave. W. 50th St. and Lyndale Ave. is where the majority of businesses are located, ranging from a malt shop to a coffeehouse to a few boutiques.

Housing in this Chain of Lakes neighborhood is naturally on the expensive side side and typically go for around $350,000. This is a home owner community as there are very few properties for rent. Home tend to be three or four bedrooms and are surrounded by large, well kept yards. High prices and being farther from downtown keeps traffic in Lynnhurst light and the crime rate extremely low. The neighborhood has one elementary school and a school of music, making Lynnhurst a top choice for families with income to spare.
Pros
  • Close to I-35W
  • closeness to lake area for reasonable price
Cons
  • A little far from downtown
  • further from retail
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Trendy Living Near Downtown"

Lyndale is a place for the young, ambitious and energetic. Residents have the advantage of being close to many hot spots and other trendy neighborhoods without being subjected to to the expensive real estate of downtown Minneapolis and its surrounding areas. In fact, the properties here are rather inexpensive, being affordable to those of various levels of income. Residents can travel to other parts of the city via I-35W or the light rail, with the transit station located at Nicollet Ave. and W 31st St. The neighborhood, though close to the amenities of downtown, has its own signature dining spots that offer locals unique experiences.

Residents of Lyndale have access to numerous unique eating spots as well as bars and retail shops. Nicollet Ave. leads the way to urban activity while W 36th St. leads straight to Lake Calhoun, part of the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes. Perfect for young and mobile singles, families could do better with the lack of public education and the dense crowds that go through the neighborhood. For those on a budget that like being close to both urban and scenic settings, Lydnale is top choice.
Pros
  • Light rail
  • Dining spots
  • close to metro amenities
Cons
  • Corwded
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Center of Urban Activity"

Lowry Hill East is actually southeast of Lowry Hill and provides residents with direct access to downtown via Hennepin Ave. The streets are lined with prewar apartment buildings and complexes and cater to a population mostly consisted if renters. A few single family homes are clustered within the corner of the Hennepin Ave. and Lyndale Ave. triangle. Both rent and sales prices are on the slightly more expensive side given the close proximity to downtown.

Lowry Hill East is a prime example of urban hustle and bustle. Residents have dozens of options for dining, shopping and drinking. This is also a community that draws in local artists with numerous theaters and art spaces including the Soo Visual Arts Center, the Jungle Theater and the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Lowry Hill East is a blend of the trendy and the wholesome with two schools in the neighborhood. Since most families are on a budget, though, most of the residents here are single professionals. Should anyone grow tired of the noise, the Chain of Lakes is just several blocks to the west and is the place for kicking back with nature.
Pros
  • Many dining and shopping options
  • Close to downtown
  • great metro atmosphere
Cons
  • Real estate is a little pricey
  • few homes for sale
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Where Starving Artists Wish They Could Live"

Lowry Hill is where the starving artists on the northeast side of downtown wish they could be. This is the neighborhood for artists who are earning themselves a hefty income as well as their patrons. The Walker Art Museum exhibits the latest art crazes and is accessible to the general public. The Pararde, the local park, is home to three dimensional pieces housed within the Cowles Conservatory- Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Lowry Park is sandwiched within the I-394 and I-94 crossover and is also within easy reach of Hennepin Ave., all convenient routes in and out of the neighborhood and throughout the metropolitan area.

Lowry Hill is just on the other side of the freeway from downtown and Loring Park, which can make the area congested with traffic, but many residents see living within this location well worth the inconvenience. The lower streets with residential spaces are relatively safe, but where the interstates cross is a site of frequent criminal activity given the abundance of dark spots. Housing is reserved for the wealthy, as many properties reach seven figures and rent averages around a grand per month. The picturesque streets and close proximity to downtown, however, cannot be expected to fall within small budgets. Single professionals and well to do artists will fall in love with Lowry Hill, but families will find little use in living in this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Close to downtown and Lowry Park
  • great art and cultural area
Cons
  • Crime under the interstates
  • expensive homes
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Close to Everything"

Loring Park is at the center of everything in Minneapolis. Next to Downtown West and nestles within the crosses of I-94 and I-394, this community provides mobility and amenities for its residents. Named for the park with the same name, this enormous piece of urban greenery has its own pond, winding trails and a community tennis court, offering outdoor exercise for those living within a dense urban area. Relocating to such a prime location does not come cheap, as many properties are listed for as much as $300,000 and rent often exceeds $900 per month. The neighborhood can also be too crowded for some, but only families and retired persons tend to have an issue with that.

Residents of Loring Park are close to all the food, retail and nightlife they could want. They are also within walking distance for four different institutions of higher education, including the Minneapolis Community and Technical College and the University of St. Thomas- Minneapolis Campus. Loring Parks hosts many city events including concerts, festivals and campaigns throughout the year and has stayed relatively clean for such a crowded area. Though the neighborhoods to the south and northeast are considerably dangerous at night, Loring Park has remained a considerably safe place to live.
Pros
  • Large public park
  • Close to college campuses
  • major attractions and landmarks
Cons
  • Right next to two interstates
  • crowded
  • pricey homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Good For All Sorts of Residents"

Longfellow is where individuals and their pets can enjoy the good life. This neighborhood has an off leash dog park that allows man's best friend to fully enjoy the shaded trial that has been developed along the beach banks of the Mississippi River. This bungalow community is close to downtown, which residents can easily get to by bike, car or the Hiawatha Light Rail, which runs along the western border of Longfellow. At the corner of 36th Ave. and E 35th St. is a community tennis court and wading pool where locals can keep in shape with outdoor activity. Also, E. 38th St. and Minnehaha Ave. are where several local businesses have clustered.

Houses are listed at mid-range prices, just above or just below $165,000, and the historic architecture has has this area designated as a "Traditional Bungalow Neighborhood," by the city of Minneapolis. The community is also full of both public and private schools, making Longfellow and ideal pace to raise children of various ages while also being close to the amenities that are attractive to younger single crowds. This neighborhood is a win- win for a variety of people who are looking to relocate without having to draw out larger loans.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Green spaces
  • Near public transportation
  • great dog park
  • lots of schools
Cons
  • Crowded
  • few retail options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Local Artists Best Friend"

The area immediately northeast of downtown Minneapolis is known for being the hot spot for artists, and Logan Park fits the stereotype. The neighborhood is filled with studio and apartment spaces dating back to the 1930's and vacant warehouses makes suitable spots for creating masterpieces. The railroad tracks run straight through the community making Logan Park a divide of the residential and the industrial. On both sides of the tracks are artist studios, galleries and businesses that display the work of hundreds of local aesthetic geniuses.

Logan Park of course engulfs a local green public space that goes by the same name, which basically serves as the only form of nature access within the neighborhood that is all shingles and concrete. Central Ave. NE offers various dining spots for starving artists to keep themselves from starving with local favorites like the Marrakech Cafe. The real estate here is very affordable, catering to both renters and home owners. Rent most often does not exceed $600 while buyers pay off a mortgages that are around $160,000. Though families are constantly encouraged to jump ship here, the vast majority of residents are young single artists that love having the community full of people like themselves.
Pros
  • Artist studios and apartments
  • Affordable housing
  • Very close to downtown
Cons
  • Occassional shady character
  • Very little greenery
  • railroad tracks dividing neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Charming Cottages by the Lakes"

Linden Hills is a community of luxury nestled within lakes and various patches of green. Cottages are the signature homes here, which help to create a secluded small town feel for those who reside within these streets. The selling prices for the local homes come in a wide range, though all are still on the expensive side. Many properties are listed at around half a million dollars while those with less square footage will sell for as low as $250,000. The expensive real estate helps to keep droves out and a select few in, so that neighbors do hot have to live within unbearably congested urban crowds.

Linden Hills is located within the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes and touches both Lake Harriet and Lake Calhoun. There are five parks within the neighborhood boundaries alone; Minikahda Gold Course, Berry Park, Linden Hills Field, Waveland Park, and Beards Plasisance. Each green area and body of water offers numerous outdoor activities, so residents always have a way to stay physically active or a place to kick back during the warmer months. Though a commute by personal vehicle to downtown would take some time, public transportation makes going in and out of the neighborhood extremely easy. Add a few local family businesses and a very low crime rate and Linden Hills is a urban slice of heaven for those who can manage to afford living here.
Pros
  • Next to two lakes
  • Natural beauty
  • Cottage homes
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
  • home prices are on high end
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"North Minneapolis Haven"

Lind-Nohanon is one of the far north Minneapolis neighborhoods that sits between the Mississippi River ans the rail yards of the Humboldt Industrial Area. This is a socially tight community where several families have lived for multiple generations, thus everyone in Lind-Bohanon knows each other well. The housing prices are some of the most reasonable in Minneapolis, with houses seldom listed for more than $125,000. The majority of the houses were build during the 1940's and offer slightly more square footage than the prewar bungalows that are found everywhere throughout the city.

Lind- Bohanon is a very safe neighborhood where the long standing residents look out for each other and for suspicious activity. Though this area is far from downtown, those that live here can take I-94 for a relatively short commute on the community's eastern side. People that relocate here, though, prefer living out of the way of the urban crowd, noise and crime, but the neighborhood still has many amenities to offer. The North Mississippi Regional Park is just a hop and a skip away from any local home and Bohanon Park has courts and an ice rink as well as a play ground for children. Lind- Bohanon is highly suggested for those looking not just for a place to live, but a place to stay for generations.
Pros
  • Next to the river
  • Next to I-94
  • affordable
  • great community feel
Cons
  • Far from downtown
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small Slice of Family Heaven"

King Field is where people go to feel at home, inside or outside of their physical dwellings. This beautiful, tree shaded neighborhood is repeatedly noted for its community spirit and collective effort to keep the area safe and well kept. King Field has East Harriet to the west and I-35W to the east, providing residents with a quick route in and out of the neighborhood. The Dr. Martin Luther King Park has the Reed- Sweatt Family Tennis Center and trails for those wishing to stay active. The Martin Luther King Center is also a site for a variety of community activities.

Nicollet Ave., also known as "Eat Street," runs through King Field and offers the local population a variety of eating options from bistros to delis to coffeehouses. To add some aesthetic appeal to the community, there is an ongoing mural project that was launched several years ago. A middle school and preschool also call King Field home, marking this neighborhood a suitable place to raise children. Homes are listed at both mid-range and high prices, depending on each individual property, but the vast majority sell at around $200,000. Residents fins the costs well worth it, however, if it mean living in such a friendly and safe community as King Field.
Pros
  • Close to lakes
  • Next to I-35W
  • neighbors who work to make community better
Cons
  • A little pricey
  • lack of retail and nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Between Lakes and Concrete"

Kenwood is for those who like to combine the upscale with nature. This western Minneapolis neighborhood is located on the northern point of the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes and is located right below Highway 12. The community touches both Cedar Lake and Lake of the Isles, offering an infinite number of way for residents and visitors alike to enjoy the city's fresh water attractions. Keenwood Park offers trails and other forms of outdoor recreation within the neighborhood's winding streets that were built to fit the contours of the lake shores.

Keenwood is also home to upscale businesses from cafes to bookstores to designer retail shops. Residents are as close as they can be to downtown while still being next to a lake, with the commute only being a couple of minutes. Real estate prices, however, come at staggering heights in a community such as this. Most of the homes range from $450,000 to $500,000 while a small cluster are listed at seven figures. The few properties that are for rent cost at least a grad per month. An added selling point for this neighborhood is the low crime rate, which is something of an achievement for being o close to downtown. Kenwood is the best that Minneapolis has to offer for those that love living between nature and urban energy, but one has to have a handsomely large income to live here.
Pros
  • Gorgeous homes
  • Close to downtown
  • Touches the lakes
  • safe
Cons
  • expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Neighborly Love and Charm"

Kenny has followed the general trend of the southwestern Minneapolis communities and it projects the peaceful small town atmosphere for which the are is famous. This neighborhood is on the southern edge of the city and is just across Highway 62 from the town of Richfield. Additionally, I-35W just to the east provides an easy commute to downtown and other neighborhoods within the metropolitan area. One if the prizes of this community is Grass Lake, which is 27 acres of natural wetland that is perfect for kicking back during a warm and sunny day. Kenny Park also provides numerous forms of outdoor recreation for those living within or visiting the area.

Properties within Kenny are listed at higher prices, seldom going below $200,000. This community caters to a home owner population, hence there are almost no residential spaces for rent. The streets are kept exceptionally clean and the yards are always well- maintained. Kenny is also filled with businesses suitable for its residents including a few restaurants, a bank, grocery store, library, and gym. When people think of Kenny, they think of the Midwest charm, where neighbors know each other and where families can live for multiple generations. The fresh water, green and community spirit will make any newcomer feel right at home.
Pros
  • Quaint and charming
  • Lake and parks
  • Toughes Highway 62
Cons
  • can be too far from Downtown for some
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Lake Shore Scenery"

Keewaydin is one of many scenic neighborhoods located along the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes. This south side community offers peace, quiet and nature with lakeside views, but at a much higher price than most local areas. This neighborhood engulfs the majority of Lake Nokomis, leaving the southern end open to others. The homes are larger with greater amounts of yard space and the cost to buy one of the properties usually lingers around $250,000. Though it is out of the way of downtown and other central Minneapolis neighborhoods, Keewaydin residents can take the light rail to make their commute to such places and short one.

Keewaydin is a safe and peaceful community, out of reach of the urban noise and criminal activity. Almost a secluded small town on its own, there are local shops and dining spots that reflect the local charm. In addition to various water sports at the lake, residents have access to tennis courts, basketball courts and soccer fields at the Keewaydin Park and Recreation Center. This is an ideal place for those currently or looking to raise a family, as well as those who are wishing to retire with little noise and lake side scenery. One just has to make sure that they can afford the expensive housing.
Pros
  • Next to the lake
  • Parks and outdoor recreation
  • Low crime rate
  • peaceful - great family atmosphere
Cons
  • Dull for younger crowds
  • Expensive real estate
  • lack of nightlife/entertainment
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Much Room For Improvement"

Jordan is a northern Minneapolis neighborhood that is undergoing both physical and social renovation. The community is notorious for being an area of town struck by crime and poverty, but there are local efforts to revitalize Jordan. Numerous tasks forces led by community members have been working to clean the streets, watch for suspicious activity and even plant a community garden. Jordan is a good spot for those looking to make a extreme impact within their community.

The cheap real estate prices are what keep attracting new residents, with few houses selling for more than $130,000. Those looking for entertainment or more dining options can easily travel to downtown Minneapolis via I-94 or Emerson Ave. N., which turns into N. 7th St. going southbound. Those who do not have their own vehicle can go in and out of Jordan by using the public bus system that extends throughout the metropolitan area. The one green patch within the neighborhood is Jordan Park, which offers a trail and a basketball court. Jordan outranks other communities in the realm of prices in accordance with location, but the high crime rate makes some people uneasy.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown
  • residents who are working to improve neighborhood
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Between the Light Rail and the River"

Howe is a residential neighborhood within southern Minneapolis. The community is bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and Hiawatha Ave. to the west. Many of the homes were remodeled during the 80's and are now listed at mid-range prices at around $175,000. a few properties that are for rent seldom cost more than $700 per month. Of course as homes get closer to the river, the prices clime higher. Even then, the costs for these properties are extremely reasonable for being so close to the river and to downtown.

The main selling point for Howe is the local scenery dotted with green patches and waterfalls, with which pedestrian trails take full advantage. The neighborhood has little to offer in dining and shopping, but resident here prefer to keep such spots out for the sake of preserving the natural beauty of their surroundings rather than congest the streets with too many commercial spaces. Those who need those amenities, though, are just a hop and a skip form downtown and other business friendly communities with Hiawatha and Minnehaha Avenues. Howe School ad Dowling Elementary School are both close to the river, as is the Fairview Hiawatha Clinic.
Pros
  • Remodeled homes
  • Next to the river
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • not a lot of retail
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Energy North of Downtown"

Holland is a northeastern Minneapolis neighborhood that provides a small town vibe close to the urban center. The homes are listed at reasonable prices, very few of which are for rent, and the majority were built at the turn of the 20th century. Residents are close to the Mississippi River and Jackson Square Park where one can engage in a variety of outdoor activities. The park is also has a sculpture for some aesthetic appeal, especially since this is pretty much the only green spot in the neighborhood. Holland is next to the starving artist community of Bottineau with some of the creativity bleeding between boundaries.

University and Central Avenues have the majority of restaurants and shopping spots, dotted with the occasional bar or coffeehouse, while the streets in between are reserved for residential spaces. Locals can get everything from traditionally made ethnic dishes to gifts to fine art. Should someone wish to travel outside of Holland, there are numerous public transportation stops at which to catch a quick ride to downtown or other nearby communities. Edison High School is the local public school and Edison Heights Field provides the students with fresh air and a modest green space for outdoor exercise.
Pros
  • Nice affordable homes
  • Close to downtown
  • Near public transportation
Cons
  • Can get overcrowded
  • not a lot of green space
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Families and Singles...Relocate Here"

Hiawatha has brought real estate fame to Minneapolis in being one of the ultimate bungalow communities. The charming, historic prewar homes along with well- maintained yards provide endless curb appeal that makes this neighborhood irresistible. Such popularity has put houses within this southern Minneapolis community on the slightly expensive side, but residents feel that it is well worth all the positive features. The light rail runs right through the area via Hiawatha Ave., which allows locals to travel to downtown and the to the airport with extreme ease.

There are various spots within Hiawatha to enjoy the great outdoors including Minnehaha Park, Hiawatha School Park and the banks of the Mississippi River that is immediately to the east. Residents are also a short bike ride from Lake Hiawatha and the Hiawatha Golf Course. The neighborhood is equipped with schools for those with children as well as several dining and shopping spots for those who do not feel like steeping too far from home along E. 46th Street. The cherry on top of the picturesque homes, riverside views and friendly neighbors sundae is the extremely low crime rate. Though it is perfect for the family lifestyles, Hiawatha is actually home to various types of residents of different ages and backgrounds.
Pros
  • Light rail
  • Close to the lake and river
  • Low crime rate
  • beautiful neighborhood
Cons
  • Homes are a little expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Cheap Housing in a Hard Hit Community"

An abundance of foreclosures have left many properties vacant at very affordable sale and rental prices. This northern Minneapolis neighborhood is next to the Mississippi River and provides quick access to other parts of the metropolitan area via I-94. Fairview Park offers some outdoor recreation and is located at the very center of the community. This area is close to the Warehouse District and its smaller neighborhoods located across the Mississippi as well as North Loop. Hawthorne has very few dining, retail and entertainment spots, but residents only have to travel less than a mile to downtown for everything they could need.

The Hawthorne neighborhood is a work in progress since hard economic times have made it a place of crime and poverty. There are efforts, however, to rebuild the community into an affordable and enjoyable place to live. Hawthorne is a wise investment for those who want to spend little money to buy a house and then have the property value increase over time as the neighborhood undergoes revitalization. Several local businesses dot the streets, but Hawthorne is mainly a residential area. Those looking to buy or rent their first house or those who simply wish to pinch pennies have numerous options with all the properties that are still vacant within this community. Residents should be weary of the occasional suspicious activity.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown
  • Revitalization
Cons
  • High crime and poverty
  • Few retail spots
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Gateway Between the Green and Grey"

Harrison is the transition between nature and the urban sprawl. While the concrete jungle of Sumner-Glenwood sits on the community's eastern edge, the western half is home to breathtakingly beautiful houses and parks. Residents have easy access to downtown and other Minneapolis parks with both I-394 and I-94 nearby in addition to public transportation stops. Those living in Harrison are close to Harrison Park, Theodore Wirth Park and Basset Creek Park, which provide residents with golf and swimming during the warmer months and snowboarding during the winter.

For being so close to downtown as well as nature, the housing prices are extremely reasonable. Houses for sale are priced at around $100,000 and few properties are leased at above $600 per month. The International Market Square is a Harrison hot spot for showcasing innovative architectural and interior designs, as well as the location for several local shops. One downside to this neighborhood, however, is the high crime rate that is concentrated within the eastern half of the community. Hence, this is not the place to for those with young children. Those who can put up with the sound of the occasional sirens and shady characters will come to love the blend of different landscapes and people that make up Harrison.
Pros
  • International Market Square
  • Steps from downtown
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • High crime
  • not a lot of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Idela for Those With Children"

Hale is part of the HPDL, the Hale, Page and Diamond Lake larger collective community. By itself though, this neighborhood offers a suburban charm with some urban amenities. Located in southern Minneapolis, parks and water surround the streets. Lake Nokomis sits on Hale's eastern side while Minnehaha Creek forms the northern boundary. Residents are also close to Diamond Lake, Pearl Lake Park and Todd Park. Between Cedar Ave. and W Lake Nokomis Parkway is one of the larger baseball fields in the city. Hence, those living here are never short of options for staying physically active.

Families will prefer Hale since it is home to renowned schools like Hale Elementary and the English Language Learners School. Additionally, this is a very safe neighborhood in which to raise children. Housing is on the expensive side with modest size dwellings selling for around $250,000. Typical for Minneapolis neighborhoods, the homes are historic, with most predating World War II. Hale is out of the way of downtown, but this distance provides a suitable balance of the commercial and residential that is ideal for family life. Should a resident wish to visit downtown, I-35W is just several blocks west of the community.
Pros
  • Top notch schools
  • Lakes and parks
  • Little crime
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
  • Lacks some shops
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Picturesque Parks and Lake"

The southwestern Minneapolis neighborhood of Ericsson is a residential area that is the picture of Midwest family life. Charming homes line litter free streets while in view a clean green parks and glistening bodies of natural water. Lake Hiawatha is on the western edge of the community and feeds into Minnehaha Creek that leads to Minnehaha Park. Both children and adults have access to engaging activities at the Hiawatha Lake Park Recreation Center with dance, music and art lessons, and residents can also play an 18-hole game at the Lake Hiawatha Golf Course.

One of the top perks of the Ericsson neighborhood is how involved the community is in keeping the area safe. There is very little crime here and parents can feel at ease about raising their children. Access to downtown is easy with the light rail that runs along Hiawatha Ave., and E. 46th St. goes directly towards the Mississippi River due east. The historic houses are sold at mid- range prices, just below or just above $190,000, and there are a few businesses dotted along the streets. Despite Ericsson being relatively close to the more congested neighborhoods of Minneapolis, it is still able to maintain a quiet and quaint charm that is usually only found in suburban areas.
Pros
  • Little crime
  • Beautiful lake and parks
  • Light rail
Cons
  • Few reatil spots
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The Prime of the Prime"

ECCO (East Calhoun Community Organization) is one of several upscale lakeside neighborhoods for which Minneapolis is well known. As the name would suggest, this community has Lake Calhoun as its western boundary while W. Lake St., Hennepin Ave. and W 36th St. serve as the remaining borders. ECCO is indeed an exclusive place to live since there are so few vacancies with most exceeding $600,000 in costs. This enables residents to enjoy some true peace and quiet while at the same time being within close range of downtown, Whittier and other hopping communities i the metropolitan area.

ECCO is also home to some city hot spots, most located along W. Lake St. Residents can enjoy a movie at the Landmark Lagoon Cinema, some java at Dunn Bros Coffee, happy hour at one of several bars, and some good eats at various restaurants. Should one grow tired of the hustle and bustle, he or she can mosey on over to Lake Calhoun for some aquatic or lakeside recreation. ECCO is the best of all possible worlds for those that live here, but it requires one to have an impressive income as well as some lady luck to grab one of the less than dozen homes that are on the market each year. Settling down here provides various access points throughout the city as well as scenic views not far from the city skyline.
Pros
  • Lakeside homes
  • Green and clean
  • Safe
Cons
  • Expensive!
  • few homes every up for sale
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Place to Both Live and Work"

Having been divided into smaller neighborhoods several years ago, many Minneapolis residents still refer to East Phillips by its former name of Phillips. One of the best features of this community is the easy access to downtown via Hiawatha Ave., along which exist many local businesses. Residents are close to health facilities such as the Abbott Northwestern Hospital and Allina Healthcare Services, as well as outdoor recreation at Stewart Park. The Midtown Greenway passes through East Phillips, offering pedestrian and bicycle paths that make it easy to move in and out of the neighborhood no matter what one's transportation limits.

East Phillips is a healthy mix of the commercial and the residential, with the majority of businesses located along E. Lake St. and Hiawatha Ave. The local population is very diverse regarding both ethnicity and age and there is also a mix of renters and home owners. To buy a home here is dirt cheap while rent prices are mid-range. Most local properties are historic apartment buildings and rowhouses with some small family houses dotted throughout the area. East Phillips is a suitable neighborhood for those looking to save money while also being close to downtown and urban Minneapolis culture.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Healthcare
  • Midtown Global Market
Cons
  • Some shady characters
  • Gets crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Luxury on the Lake"

East Isles gets its name from being located right next to the Lake of the Isles, which is part of the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes in the southwestern portion of the city. This area is a popular day vacation spot for people throughout the metropolitan area; and the density of businesses as well as the housing prices reflect that. Hennepin Ave. lies just a few blocks east of the Lake of the Isles and has dozens of high end dining and shopping corridors. The streets here do not follow the standard checker board pattern found throughout most of Minneapolis, but instead follow the contours of the lake.

Minneapolis has its expensive neighborhoods and then it has its ridiculously expensive millionaire exclusive communities like East Isles. Here, houses exceed $400,000 and often reach seven figures. Such is to be expected for a lakeside enclave that is only a two to five minute drive from downtown and hundreds of spot for eating, shopping and entertainment. East Isles was one of the first upscale communities in Minneapolis with many homes having bee built at the beginning of the 20th century. For those who can afford to live here, East Isles is just a short of absolute paradise.
Pros
  • By the lakes.
  • Beautiful streets and homes
  • Close to downtown
Cons
  • Horribly expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Lakeside Homes"

East Harriet is a successful work in progress. Almost the entire neighborhood has been shaped by its earliest investor, Colonel William S. King. The 1990's saw consistent communal efforts to revitalize East Harriet and since then many new outdoor activity areas have been dotting this community next to Lake Harriet. In addition to visiting the actual lake, residents are able to spend time at Lyndale Park and the Lyndale Farmstead Center for additional way to keep themselves engaged in the fresh outdoors.

Separating East Harriet from Lake Calhoun is the Lakewood Cemetery while I-35W just to the east of the neighborhood provides easy access to downtown Minneapolis. Tree lined streets and a low crime rate also help to make this south bound community suitable for raising a family or just settling down with some peace and quiet. With so many amenities within the neighborhood, housing prices are a tad on the expensive side. Many homes sell for as much as $250,000 while properties for rent range from $900 to $1,000 per month. Though East Harriet is mainly a residential area, there are a few dining and shopping spots for residents to enjoy.
Pros
  • Close to lakes
  • Neighborly spirit
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Urban Life Next to the Lake"

Located in southern Minneapolis, Diamond Lake is situated within the corner of I-35W and Highway 62. The community gets its name from, of course, Diamond Lake which is connected to both Todd and Pearl Lake Parks. The neighborhood is close enough for a short commute to downtown, but far enough south for the the non-invasive feel of suburbia. There are several businesses located along Chicago Ave. S. and E. 54th St. takes residents and visitors from Pearl Lake Park to Lake Nokomis, providing endless options for outdoor recreation.

Diamond Lake, though, is not for the low of moderate incomes since the majority of homes are listed at around $250,000. Renting does not provide a cheaper option in a community tat caters to home owners, but this is to be expected for any of the lakeside neighborhoods. In a city that is full of prewar homes, Diamond Lake mostly consists of larger houses that were built during the 1940's and 1950's. This are of Minneapolis is beautiful and functional place to live, but exclusively for those with larger paychecks.
Pros
  • Reatil and dining spots
  • Lake side properties
Cons
  • High traffic
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"History, Beauty and Water"

Those who live in Cooper have the luxury of being just steps away from the Mississippi River and just being downriver from downtown Minneapolis. The neighborhood was named after the historically acclaimed author, James Fenimore Cooper, and the streets maintain a historic appeal with its many homes that predate World War II. Those wishing to live in Cooper would be most comfortable with a relatively high income since a great number houses are priced just under or just over $200,000 and rent is seldom below $750 per month.

The majority of historic homes are modest in size, with one or two bedrooms. E. Lake St. is where the majority of businesses are located and it later turns into Marshall Ave. after crossing the river. There are no public schools in the Cooper community, but there is a private education option with Minnehaha Academy, which is set on the river banks. The local population, which consists of various age groups, with very few college students, enjoy having access to numerous riverside parks and easy access to downtown via W. River Parkway.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Beautiful historic neighborhood
  • Next to the river
Cons
  • No public schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Home to Both Young and Old"

The surrounding industrial areas would not make one think that a community like Como was close by. Between the University of Minnesota, Mid-City Industrial and Murray Field Area with railroad tracks passing through, Como is in fact a harmonious neighborhood where residents of various ages live together. Businesses are located along E. Hennepin and Como Avenues, but the majority of streets are filled with residential spaces. The populations is a mix of families, students, younger professionals and retired individuals. Residents can enjoy an upbeat lifestyle that is at the same time subdued. A diner and coffee shops provide places for study and casual conversation while the noise of the University neighborhood is out of reach for those who need some peace and quiet.

While most Minneapolis neighborhoods consist of either mostly renters or mostly home owners, Como caters equally to both crowds. Families and older individuals can settle down with some established houses while students can rent small bungalows or apartments. Both the sale and renting prices are mid-range, which is natural given its close proximity to downtown and the university. One of the most notable things about Como, however, is its neighborly love. Residents look out for each other and work to maintain a tight- knit, yet welcoming community.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Close to campus and downtown
Cons
  • Very high traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Close to Nature in the City"

Shingle Creek gets its name from the first shingle mills that was built in Minneapolis at the neighborhood's location back in 1852. Though it is the site of many industrial warehouses and dozens of railroad tracks, the set up of this community is such that residents are surrounded by natural beauty and are seldom bothered by industry noise and fumes. Being six miles from downtown offers those who live here a chance to get in touch with their outdoor buff side and escape the hustle and bustle of the more central Minneapolis neighborhoods while also being just a short commute away from it should they want to pain the town. All the homes in Shingle Creek are within walking distance to beautiful parks, high performing schools and bike trails. The area also has one of the lowest crime rates in Minneapolis.

House selling prices are lower to mid- range while the rent can be a little pricey, but that is due to the fact that the neighborhood markets towards families and older professionals who can afford a mortgage. Most of the homes are medium sized and were built right after World War II, offering historic appeal but with more square footage than many of the prewar bungalows found throughout Minneapolis, though they and some Tudor style houses can be found within these streets. Even though Shingle Creek is still considered an urban neighborhood, its intimately close location to the nature of Minnesota makes it common for residents to see some wildlife including deer and foxes. Families will find it difficult to find a more beautiful neighborhood with more courteous neighbors.
Pros
  • Natural Beauty
  • Affordable housing
  • Low crime
Cons
  • A bit far from downtown
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A More Affordable St. Anthony West"

Formerly the city of St. Anthony back in the late 19th century, St. Anthony East offers many amenities of being close to downtown and the river, but at a cheaper rate than St. Anthony West. The real estate prices show that being just several blocks away from the river can make all the difference in what one pays for their mortgage or rent. Housing prices are lower to mid-range and available spaces are most often apartments and row houses. The bus line runs through this community frequently, offering the utmost mobility to those who do not have their won personal vehicle. Bikers also have it easy in St. Anthony East with the 3rd Avenue Bikeway running along the southern border and connecting residents to the Heritage Trail, Father Hennepin Bluffs Trail and of course the Boom Island Park Trials.

St. Anthony East caters to a younger, more trendy crowd, encompassing many truly unique bars, lounges and artistic spaces. Club Underground has weekly stand up comedy while Hang It, Inc. offers a space for local artists to hang their newest creations. Families would find little to their advantage here given that the public and private schools are located in St. Anthony West and the high concentration of bars, though the cheap housing prices could serve to their advantage. Most of the businesses and activity is along Central Ave. NE and Monroe St., but a few hidden hot spots can be found within the less trafficked streets such as Spring St. The residential streets are surprisingly not too crowded are filled mostly with small historic houses that are perfect for cooperative living situations.
Pros
  • Close to downtown and the river
  • Affordable housing
  • Nightlife spots
Cons
  • By railroad tracks
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Heaven... if You Can Afford It"

This neighborhood has numerous good qualities, but what may deter many from relocating to this area is the fact that living here is horribly expensive. One would e extremely lucky to find an apartment that was listed below $300,000. Those looking to have access to the good spots in St. Anthony West would do better to jump ship to one of the neighboring eastern communities. What drives the real estate prices so high here is its close proximity to downtown and being right next to the Mississippi River. Professionals with high paying jobs can find themselves and abode that faces the river or the aligning park and they are also within walking distance to Nicollet Island.

St. Anthony West leads to Minneapolis's Arts District as well as the business district located along East Hennepin. The types of homes in the area vary, including some late 19th century house, pre-war brick buildings and some more modern complexes. The northern portion of the community is home to a cluster of several different churches as well as some religious affiliated schools. Any local families who have teenagers will send their kids to De Lasalle High School on Nicollet Island each morning and younger singles will mosey on down to East Hennepin for the numerous dining spots and bars for nightly and weekend entertainment. Dickman and St. Anthony Parks are also within easy reach, providing the urban dwellers some more spots to take in some fresh outdoor air. St. Anthony West is a wonderful and convenient place to live, for those who can afford it.
Pros
  • Next to the river
  • Tons of dining spots
  • Close to downtown
Cons
  • Expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"The Perfect Middle Ground"

Standish is an active and ever evolving neighborhood while also remaining a peaceful spot where residents can enjoy some shut eye rather than being constantly interrupted by the buzz of urban crowds. People of many types are able to enjoy this community, with families with smaller children making use of the schools and parks while younger and older singled enjoy easy access to a variety of dining and shopping spots in the adjacent neighborhoods. Local educational facilities include Roosevelt High School, Green Earth Children's Academy and Friendship Academy- Fine Arts, offering different options through which local children can learn. Residents also enjoy easy access to downtown via Hiawatha Ave., along which there are numerous coffee and dining spots as well as a theater and many retail stores.

Property sale and rental prices are mid-range, mostly depending on the size of the abode as well as its proximity to Hiawatha Ave. The residential streets are home to modest sized bungalows that were built in the early 1900's by northern European immigrants. Though historic homes is one of the main drawing points of Standish, there are new apartment complexes that are currently and will later on be erected. Just to the south of the neighborhood is Hiawatha Lake which has the Hiawatha Golf Course right next to it. so those living in Standish are perfectly placed between the excitement of downtown Minneapolis and the kick back atmosphere of one of the metropolitan area's many lakes.
Pros
  • Close to both downtown and Lake Hiawatha
  • Many eating spots
  • Affordable housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Mecca for Urban Artists"

Stevens Square/ Loring Heights is one of Minneapolis's smaller neighborhoods, but within those several square blocks is plenty to offer. Nicollet Ave., also known as "Eat Street" due to the hundreds of dining spots that lie along its pavement, goes right through the heart of this community. This is also one of the older neighborhoods in the city with many buildings declared historical landmarks ranging from old apartment building to small houses to full estates. Most of the residents in this area live in one of the many brick three story buildings that were erected right after World War I or in one of the apartments buildings that are specifically marketed towards local artists. Those of the creative mind can display their talents in the Stevens Square Center for the Arts, where thousands of square feet of gallery and studio space is available.

Sale and rental prices are midrange and many individuals with low incomes are able to make a life for themselves in this neighborhood that is right next to Downtown West and full of activity. I-94 separates Stevens Square from Loring Heights with most of the businesses being located in Stevens Square while most of the residential spots are in Loring Heights. Loring Park is just at the northwest corner and offers trails as well as a tennis court for anyone looking to stay active. Stevens Square has its on smaller park which is surrounded by a coffee shop, a bed and breakfast and artist lofts. An ideal setting for the younger and more exploratory crowds, but little to offer for families, especially given the higher occurrence of criminal activity.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Artistic community
  • Tons of dining spots
Cons
  • Corwded
  • Higher crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The Perfect Place For Those Who Can Afford It"

Fulton is all the rage in Minneapolis, for those who can afford it. It is top notch scenery with access to multiple forms of outdoor recreation while also being a short commute to downtown and other neighborhoods. Both Lake Harriet and Pershing Park are within arms reach where residents can enjoy swimming, jogging, bike riding and football games hosted by the local high school. The high performing schools in this community are another selling point with Southwest High, Lake Harriet Upper and Lake Harriet Lower being some of the top public schools in the metropolitan area.

People fall in love with the beautiful homes in Fulton, but most are not fans of the prices, which are almost always above $250,000. With luxury, though, comes luxury prices. While many of the far south Minneapolis neighborhoods tend to lack in shopping options, the shops in this community leave little reason to step out. The majority of businesses are located along 50th Street and include some truly unique spots such as Grethen House, Little Enchantments and the Bead Monkey. Buses run through the neighborhood, so those living in Fulton have no problem traveling to downtown or to the Edina Country Club that is just several blocks west. Fulton is suitable for a variety of residents, though they have to be able to earn enough to purchase the real estate.
Pros
  • Close to Lake Harriet
  • Tons of shopping
  • Top public schools
Cons
  • Very expensive homes.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Heart Waming for an Urban Neighborhood"

Flowell, located in northwestern Minneapolis, is heaven for those who love sending time outdoors. The 27-acre park with the same name offers numerous recreation options for residents and visitors with its baseball fields, tennis courts, basket ball courts as well as its community center. Flowell is close to the Mississippi River and to I-94, making it easy for those living in this residential neighborhood easy access to downtown while also being far enough to not have the noisy and crowdedness of an urban center. Houses are dirt cheap, seldom going above $125,000, but rental prices are within mid-range. Like the majority of Minneapolis neighborhoods, Flowell has mostly historic homes that were built during the 1920's and 1930's as bungalows that have detached garages.

Though they are moderate in number, the majority of local businesses are located on the southern boundary of Flowell on N Lowry Ave. These include the Lowry Cafe, Good Deal Oriental Food and a recycling center. Residents consist of mixed ages and lifestyles ranging from mobile singles to full families as well as different income levels given the cheap housing options. Those looking to move here can take solace in that there is little crime here. Those wishing to spend a little time out of the neighborhood can take a short car ride or even an extended bike ride to downtown. They can also spend the day putting 18 holes at the Theodore Wirth Golf Course just about a mile southwest of Flowell.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Some seclusion
  • Low crime
Cons
  • Few shopping options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Modern Day Township"

Field is a point of pride for southern Minneapolis with the streets being filled with charming homes and shady trees and I-35W being the western border, offering an easy ride in downtown just five miles away. Minnehaha Creek creates a naturally beautiful southern boundary for the community as well as a site for joggers and bikers to get their daily miles done while others can get their cardiovascular exercise done at the McRae Park and Recreation center nearby. Field is one of three neighborhoods that form the larger Field Regina Northrop (FRN) Neighborhood. This was a rural area until the middle of the 20th century, but the houses that were built before World War II still reflect a humble history. The housing prices, however, do not reflect humility with properties being listed at over $200,000.

Though it is mainly a residential area, Field has a business center at the intersection of Chicago Ave. and 48th Street where locals have access to numerous eating spots, a coffee shop a theater and a tattoo parlor. The neighborhood consist of mostly families, retired individuals and students while the more mobile young professionals can be found closer to downtown. Field is a very safe neighborhood, having a low occurrence of crime compared to other Minneapolis neighborhoods. The stucco houses, quiet residential streets and the thick lines of trees help the community maintain a township feel where abodes are separated from the business cluster by a block or two and where neighbors know each other well.
Pros
  • Low crime rate
  • Acces to shops and dining
  • Beautiful historic homes
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
  • little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Minneapoliss Beginnings"

Elliot Park is a small tucked away neighborhood next to Downtown East and is also one of the oldest communities in Minneapolis. This area has also evolved into the main medical center of the city with Augustana Care Center, Hennepin County Medical Center, Benedictine Health Care Center of Minneapolis, and many other smaller healthcare institutions. The immediate area is home to many small scale shops as well as a few coffeehouses and diners. Non-profit organizations in the area include the Minnesota AIDS Project, Minnesota Teen Challenge and the Economic Growth Center, which are all close to the North Central Bible College.

Individuals on lower incomes can afford to live in Elliot Park as both the sales an d renting prices are on the cheap side. Most of the homes are apartments or small high rises that were built before World War II. Residents wanting some physical recreation in this compacted urban spot can go to the Elliot Recreation Center, around which there is a swimming pool, baseball field and tennis court. Elliot Park is a hot spot for young singles looking to pinch pennies, but this is an area of town that families with children will want to avoid. This neighborhood has a high crime rate compared to other Minneapolis communities and one will pass by the occasional shady character on the streets. Those who are looking for a quick walk to downtown or the University of Minnesota as well as all the dining spots they could want, Elliot Park is a suitable place to hunker down.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Many eating spots
  • Walking distance to downtown
  • medical facility
Cons
  • Noisy
  • higher crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Where Business is King"

Downtown West is the business hub for Minneapolis and is also where the headquarters for numerous Fortune 500 companies are located. The typical day through these streets is passing by one suited professional after another between the many office buildings and dining spots. Downtown West is also home to smaller institutions of higher education including the University of St. Thomas Minneapolis, the Metropolitan State University- Minneapolis Campus and Minneapolis Community and Technical College. The Minneapolis City Hall and the Minneapolis Central Library sit right near the river and the Minneapolis Convention Center sits along I-94.

The Nicollet Mall provides families with something to do with many shops and restaurants while the rest of Downtown West caters to a more mature crowd with countless late night and upscale bars. Those looking to take a little look at nature can walk or take a bus down to Loring Park, where jogging trails and a tennis court are sure to keep people active. While the rest of Minneapolis has houses and complexes that offer a look into history, the majority of properties in Downtown West and newer and sleeker, and of course expensive. Rent most often exceeds $1,000 per month and sale prices are also on the pricey side. Those who can afford to live here, however, cannot deny the convenience of being able to walk to work and to all the favorite local spots.
Pros
  • Tons of dining and shopping
  • Next to the river
  • Tons of nightlife
Cons
  • High crime
  • expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Art and Nightlife Gallore"

Downtown East is at the heart of Minneapolis and is also a center for the fine arts. Cultural centers including the MacPhil Center for Music, Guthrie Theater and Mill City Museum call this urban hub home. The neighborhood touches the Mississippi River to the north and is directly next to the West Bank buildings of the University of Minnesota. Though it was formerly a place for business and aesthetic pleasures, Downtown East has also evolved into quite the residential are over the past decade. Housing consists almost entirely of apartment complexes and condos, but the cherry on top is how dirt cheap the rent is for properties closer to the interstate, sometimes going as low as $300 a month. Of course, properties facing the river are slightly more expensive and buying a place here will add a dent into someone's wallet.

Higher educational facilities dot the neighborhood from the University of Minnesota to the North Central Bible College and the Swedish Hospital provides residents with any medical needs they may have. Families and those who like anything close to absolute silence during the night would do best to avoid living here. Also, the criminal activity that takes place every now and then does deter some. The local population is mostly young professionals, students and every now and then artists. The food and nightlife options are plentiful, leaving those who live here very few reasons to ever step out. Sports fans will love living here as well since Downtown East is where the Hubert H. Humphery Metrodome is located. In short, Downtown East is a great place to live for the young at heart, but only good for visiting for those who like a little peace and quiet.
Pros
  • Tons of nightlife
  • Next to the river and campus
  • Cheap rental prices
Cons
  • High crime
  • Very noise
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Activity in South Minneapolis"

Corcoran is a heart warming residential neighborhood in South Minneapolis. It has a diverse population as well as some dining and entertainment options in addition to quick access to downtown via Hiawatha Avenue. Anyone living her can easily bike and often walk to anything they should need and only step out for work or a night on the town in the more centralized communities. Lake Street between Cedar and Hiawatha Avenues is the height of business and other activities with everything from the local YMCA to Bright Moon Restaurant and Coffee to the Midtown Framer's Market. Those who love a good story can mosey on over to Frank Theatre for a live stage performance or to the Trylon Microcinema for some independent films made from local and out of town filmmakers.

One thing that is making Corcoran distinguishable from other Minneapolis neighborhoods is the emergence of murals all along the streets. Residents and visitors also have many options for outdoor recreation with Corcoran Park which has its own trail, swimming pool, baseball field and volleyball court. The property prices are a little contradictive since the houses for sale are listed at very low rates, seldom exceeding $140,000, but rental prices are a tad expensive. Like with many Minneapolis neighborhoods, the majority of houses here were built in the 1920's and tend to of be modest sizes. The population is a mix of ages with a slightly larger portion leaning to younger in college and out of college individuals. Families, though, can feel very much at home in Corcoran if they do not mind mixing in with the occasional young adult crowd.
Pros
  • Many dining and shopping options
  • Affordable housing
  • Outdoor recreation
Cons
  • Rent is a little pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Hidden Gem"

Columbia Park is its own world away fro the rest of Minneapolis. Many natural and manmade barriers including the railroads, the river and the parks keep it tucked away from the rest of the city. Residents here still have easy access to downtown with the main roads, Central Ave. and NE University Ave., as well as public transportation that goes through the neighborhood. This is mostly a residential neighborhood, but a modest number of businesses call this community home. A large portion of the land area in Columbia Park is park space, including the Columbia Park Golf Course, where locals can enjoy a 18 hole round of the sport. The park also has facilities for other recreational activities such as a path for joggers and bikers, a rugby field, skiing trails, and an archery field.

The homes, while newer than many of the prewar houses found throughout Minneapolis, are still older, dating back to the 1940's and 1950's. The prices vary from affordable to mid-range, most depending on the size and distance from the golf course. Neighbors consist mainly of single worker professionals, though families will find themselves happy here, especially with the low crime rate. The only time residents will find themselves dissatisfied with the view is when they are crossing over the railroad yard on St. Anthony Pkwy, but this is often necessary to access the local businesses and the Mississippi River. Most of the homes are far enough away from the tracks for them to no be a bother to those living in Columbia Park.
Pros
  • Seclusion from the rest of the city
  • Beautiful park and golf course
  • Near public transportation
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
  • Little far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Good for Commuters of All Ages"

Cleveland is a commuter's paradise. It is a short enough drive to downtown and other central Minneapolis neighborhoods, but far away enough to avoid the noise that comes with living in dens urban communities. Numerous routes are within close reach with both the Mississippi River and I-94 to the east and Bottineau Blvd. just at the southwestern corner. Cleveland's Victory Memorial Parkway also gives the area some bragging rights since the city had declared it a historic district, adding more value to the pleasant tree- shaded route that provides a visually appealing stroll or ride for joggers and bikers.

In addition to Cleveland being a safe and beautiful neighborhood, is it also dirt cheap to live here, making any commute not look so bad. Houses are rarely listed for more than $145,000 and the apartments in the are given to renters for reasonable prices as well. With the area being a historic district, there are of course going to be many historic homes, creating an overall picturesque residential community. While many of Minneapolis's neighborhoods are most students, young professionals or families, Cleveland is quite diverse in terms of resident types. Parents can safely and happily stroll their children down the sidewalk while a young ambitious mind makes his or her way to their new out of college job. Retirees can also feel at home in this community, especially since the Theodore Wirth Golf Course is not too far away. Cleveland is a suitable neighborhood for those that want to take it easy.
Pros
  • Very safe
  • Beautiful historic district
  • Cheap housing
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
  • Limited eating and shopping
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Central is Central"

Given its name because it is situated in the very center of Minneapolis, Central is a model urban neighborhood that is unique to this city. The majority of businesses, which include dining and shopping spots, are located along Chicago and 4th Avenues as well as 38th Street, which also serves as the community's southern boundary. Modern Times and South Side Deli are frequented eating spots and notable community gathering locations include the Minnesota Transgender Health Coalition and the Chicago Ave. Fine Arts Center.

The top selling point for Central is that it is basically in the middle of everything. Residents can walk or ride their bikes to surrounding neighborhoods including Bancroft, Phillips, Uptown, and Downtown. Having I-35W as the western border also makes for easy access in and out of Minneapolis. Many of the residential and commercial structures were built prior to 1900, making Central one of the most historically valuable communities. The homes, most of which are modest sized houses and apartment buildings, are rented and sold at mid-range prices. This makes living within these avenues suitable for various types of people and thus the local population is quite diverse. Central tends to be preferred by younger and single crowds as opposed to families due to the high level of daily activity. Parents who want to raise their children in this part of town, however, are in arms reach of Richard R. Green Elementary.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Close to downtown and other key areas
  • Close to I-35W
Cons
  • Noisy at night
  • Properties are a bit small.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Natural Paradise a Short Drive from Downtown"

In addition to Cedar-Isles-Dean being one of the safest neighborhoods in Minneapolis, it is also one of the most expensive in both the city and the United States. The majority of homes are listed at above $400,000, which provides residents who can afford the luxury some seclusion from the urban crowds nearby. The winding streets are conveniently placed within a triangle of lakes within the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes and residents have the option of spending the day at Cedar Lake, Lake of the Isles and Lake Calhoun.

This natural set up would of course provide some of the most breathtaking scenery that Minneapolis has to offer. The streets are lined with pine trees and each property has plenty of elbow room around it. High earning single professionals make up the majority of the local population with a few families and retirees here and there. Families with children do have to go out of their way since the closest elementary school is in Kenwood on the north side of the Lake of Isles. Cedar-Isle-Dean lacks nightlife due to its motif of natural peace and quiet, but it is close enough to downtown and other areas like Whittier to where it is almost no inconvenience.
Pros
  • Natural Beauty
  • Very safe
  • By multiple lakes
Cons
  • Very expensive
  • No nightlife
  • No public schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"The International Face of Minneapolis"

Located on the opposite side of the river of the University of Minnesota and sandwiched between I-94 and I-35W, Cedar Riverside is the most ethnically and culturally diverse community in the city. Almost half of the residents are foreign born and the mix of different architectures reflects the diversity in the population. The neighborhood is home to the fine art facilities of the University of Minnesota as well as the Augsburg College. The eateries and shops in the immediate area do not have counterparts anywhere else in the city and they offer a look into Minneapolis's international population.

Those looking to quench their thirst are never short of options and can mosey on over to the Hard Times Cafe, the Acadia Cafe or the Nomad World Pub. The artistically inclined can view art and shows on campus or within more low maintenance spaces such as the Mixed Blood Theater or the Cedar Cultural Center. The housing options are pretty much limited to apartments and to renters, but they tend to come at very affordable prices. It can be difficult, however, to find vacant properties during the fall and spring semesters when many students are wanting to live just off of campus. The main downside of Cedar Riverside is the frequent crime, mostly consisting of theft and burglary. Hence residents would do well to have bolt locks on their doors.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Tons of dining, shops and bars
  • Right next to downtown and university campuses
Cons
  • Higher crime rate
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Paradise for Professionals"

CARAG was drawn into the Minneapolis city limits as a result of gaining easier access to downtown with the street cars at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, it is where business professionals live it up. Just to the south of the commercial neighborhoods of Uptown and Lyn Lake, CARAG residents are just a stroll away from various dining spots, coffeehouses and shops. The community is also directly east of the Minneapolis Chain of Lakes, offering those who live or visit the area lake side recreation.

This Minneapolis neighborhood amidst commercial activity and lakes comes with a high price. The majority of dwellings are historic apartment buildings and a few smaller houses that were built during the 1920's and 30's that have sale prices that often exceed $225,000. The center streets contain volley ball and basketball courts and the northeastern corner contains the Metro Transit Station, so the local population has both places to be active and easy access in and out of the neighborhood. CARAG is most often sought after by high earning single professionals, though a few families relocate to this area, so residents should not be surprised to see the occasional mother pushing a stroller. Though out the price range for some, those who can afford to live in this community will love the historic pre- war architecture and quick access to all the food, necessities and nightlife they could want.
Pros
  • Close to the lakes
  • Easy access to downtown
  • Walking distance to dining and nightlife
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Concrete Jungle"

The name of this neighborhood gives it all away. Camden Industrial Area is in fact a long strip of industry warehouses along I-94 that is separated from the river ad highway by a high concrete wall. Though maps will show this community along some green, there is little that is indeed green or visually appealing about this cement jungle. The Camden Industrial Area, though, is of great importance to the city of Minneapolis. Major local manufacturers create their products and provide their services here just across the railroad track from Webber Park, which is the location of the Minneapolis City Hall and Courthouse.

Those who live in the immediate area more often than not also work in one of the warehouses, and pay near nothing to do so. One will find only small apartment buildings of modest rows of low budget town homes that come with cheap rent and very rarely sell for more than $120,000. The reason behind those prices is that very few actually want to live here. Yes, it is extremely close to downtown, but anyone who needs extended periods of shut eye will not get it here with the noise of the freeway and the surrounding manufacturers, as well as the railroads that are on both sides of the river and within hearing range of Camden Industrial Area. For those that are employees of one of the manufacturers, however, there is not a more convenient living situation.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Dirt cheap rent
Cons
  • Very noise
  • By railroad tracks
  • All concrete
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Forest Green Next to Downtown Minneapolis"

Surrounded by a park and cut through by an interstate, Bryn-Mawr is a natural beauty treasure that is just a short bike ride away from downtown Minneapolis. The western half is a neatly compacted residential area that is set apart by its socially and politically active residents while the eastern half has the diagonally directed Cedar Lakes Rd. and Bryn-Mawr Meadows. The Eloise Butler Wildflower garden and Wirth Park complete the green engulfment of this central Minneapolis neighborhood with playgrounds and other green patches that make this community the gardener's and the conservationist's paradise.

The main cluster of local businesses, including the dining and shopping spots are located at the Cedar Lakes Rd. and PennAve. intersection. Though it is immediately west of downtown, Bryn-Mawr has a relatively low population density, leaving elbow room for residents that greatly desire it. Such a visually glorious neighborhood so close to downtown of course comes with a higher price. The Victorian and Tudor style houses that were built during the 1920's and 1930's exceed $200,000 in sales prices and the few space for rent do not go below $900 per month. Both families and single individuals will find comfort in this community, but the high cost of living keeps many Minneapolis locals from jumping ship to these charming and historic abodes. For those who can afford it, though, it is difficult to find a better surrounding environment with a better location than Bryn-Mawr.
Pros
  • Natural surroundings
  • Next to downtown
  • Beautiful historic homes
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Neighborly Spirit in Southern Minneapolis"

The landscape or even the amenities of Bryant offer nothing special or out of the ordinary, but it is a simple southern Minneapolis neighborhood that offers some tranquility and basic needs for residents at affordable prices. I-35W forms the western border, which give the local population easy access to downtown and other areas of the city. 38th street is where the majority of businesses are located, which include two locally owned grocery stores as well as a community gym. Bryant is a tight knit community filled with people who are out to provide the best resources for their neighbors through locally led projects and revitalization efforts. Residents can engage in many communal activities at the Phelps Recreation Center, the Urban Arts Academy or at the Minnesota Spokesman Recorder.

Housing sale prices seldom go above $160,00 and rent usually falls within the $650 to $800 range. Most of the abodes are modest in size and were erected before World War II, hence even though the streets lack some refinery in their landscaping, the homes still help to project and maintain and old world charm. The neighborhood is best suited for families with children who can attend Bryant Junior High School and spend time at Phelps Field between Park and Chicago Avenues. Younger, more active crowds may find themselves bored in this community, but anyone who is left living in Bryant can always take I-35W to downtown or other central Minneapolis neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Community involvement
  • Affordable housing
  • Peace and Quiet
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
  • Too subdued for younger crowds
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"The Mecca of Urban Meccas"

Bottineau is an artist's dream. Located within the city's art district and along the Mississippi River within close proximity to downtown, the only thing that makes this neighborhood more of a treasure is the cheap living. Successful and starving artists alike can purchase or rent warehouse or apartment spaces that predate the 1940's for very reasonable prices. Also, every type of social activity can be done within this historic community. Residents can dine at one of the many local restaurants, browse through one of the unique shops or mosey through artist studios within the California Building. University Ave. has plenty of bars for artists, professionals and visitors to gather for chatter and entertainment while a local garden and greenery along the river make for some enjoyable times outdoors.

Families looking for absolute peace and quiet would do best to avoid Bottineau since it has its healthy share f both daytime and nighttime noise, but many other types of residents including single professionals, creative entrepreneurs, students, and retirees, depending on their own personal preferences can come to truly love this central Minneapolis community. The cherry on top of it all for such a fantastic neighborhood is the extremely low criminal activity. It is hard to do better than this low maintenance home of the aesthetics.
Pros
  • Artistic community
  • Next to the river
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • A little noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Getting a New Face"

Sumner-Glenwood, more recently referred to as Heritage Park, is a work in progress. This means dirt cheap housing in a neighborhood that is only six blocks west of downtown Minneapolis. Several governing and nonprofit agencies in the city have collaborated to tear down many degraded properties and give this formerly undesirable and small community a new face, though that face has yet to become fully attractive. The landscape on the northern side of the Olson Memorial Highway can best be described as depressing. No matter where one is, there is always a construction site and/or a freeway in view.

Though the new properties are selling or renting at very affordable rates, little else can be offered by the neighborhood in the meantime. One would have to walk under I-94 for any dining, shopping or nightlife spots. Some may argue that Sumner Field can offer outdoor recreation, but the park is nothing but a small patch of grass amidst a sea of concrete with a pathway that looks to be the equivalent of only a tenth of a mile. Sumner-Glenwood is basically cookie cutter apartment in front of more cookie cutter apartments surrounded by construction supplies backed by a freeway. Also, anyone who leaves their valuables in plain site within their vehicle is sure to have them stolen. Though this is not a visually pleasant neighborhood, its convenient location cannot be ignored. Someone on almost any income can live here and only as to walk several blocks to escape the bare bone landscape.
Pros
  • Dirt cheap rent
  • Next to downtown
Cons
  • Construction
  • Nothing but apartments
  • Noise of the freeway
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Minneapoliss Tangled Streets"

As it is suggested in its name, Tangletown is an area of Minneapolis noted for its curving streets, which is quite the visual contrast from the right angle intersections that fill the rest of the city. I-35W forms the eastern border, allowing residents to have easy access to other parts of the metropolis, and the intersection of W46th Street and Nicollet Ave. offer some eating and shopping spots. Though near the southern edge of the metropolitan area, there are bus stops on every border of Tangletown, providing locals passage to various enclaves throughout Minneapolis. Many may not ever wish to leave, however, due to the undeniably beautiful tree-lines streets and the blissfully green Fuller Park.

Tangletown is indeed a visually appealing neighborhood. In addition to the various patches of green, homes built during the 1920's in the Tudor and Colonial styles add some extra curb appeal. More recently, though, a few contemporary apartment complexes have been added to the neighborhood backdrop. Real estate prices are best suited for those with handsome paychecks since even the modest size houses exceed $250,000. The population is a mix of families and high earning single professionals and a small percentage of retired persons. The only nightlife Tangletown has to offer is a local wine bar on W46th Street, but residents enjoy easy access to the more hopping neighborhoods while also being far enough from any bothersome noise.
Pros
  • Beautiful houses
  • Green and Clean
  • Close to I-35W
Cons
  • Pricey housing
  • Little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Students, Stay..... Everyone Else, Avoid"

University is the name given to the neighborhood that encompasses the University of Minnesota, and basically nothing else. The Mississippi River runs through campus with the majority of buildings on the eastern side. Students can find everything they need within the immediate area from food to shopping to nightlife within the campus bars. Even if one finds themselves tired of the noise of the college crowds and Greek houses, he or she is just a hop and a skip away from Downtown East and other surrounding trendy communities.

Older crowds, however, would do best to avoid living within University as the noise of college life can annoy many. Also, the housing situations lack permanency since almost all properties are for rent to students. Despite being marketed to a population of people that lack significant paychecks, rental prices are far from reasonable, ranging from $700 to $850. The campus offers easy access to educational facilities and art centers as well as riverside recreation. Even current students, however, grow tired of the dirt and loud drunken exclamations that often come from the night hours on campus. Convenient for students, inconvenient for everyone else. Also, University is the least suitable for families since it has one of the highest crime rates in Minneapolis.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Dining and nightlife
  • Convenient for students
Cons
  • High crime
  • Loud and obnoxious college crowds
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Where Education and Medicine are King"

Ventura Village is an urban mecca just across the freeway from downtown and the University of Minnesota. Residents are never far from healthcare with the Phillips Eye Institute, Children's Hospital ad Clinics of Minnesota and the Abbott-Northwestern Hospital in the immediate area. This densely populated area of town has numerous private schools ranging from the grade level to the university level, making the neighborhood an educational haven. Ventura Village is also filled with many restaurants and places to shop for visitors and nearby working professionals from the educational or medical institutions.

This is a community catered to single professionals, hence it is only natural that the majority of homes are apartments and condos, most of which were built before World War II. Overall, the rent and sale prices can be considered reasonable or even cheap, with properties located loser to the freeway being listed at lower prices. With the community being so densely populated comes a higher crime rate, with most offenses falling under the theft category. Given how close Ventura Village is to downtown and the University of Minnesota campus, the spaces going for $500 to $600 a month are an absolute steal, especially considering how easy it is to travel to key spots without a car.
Pros
  • Close to medical and educational faclities
  • Many eating and shopping options
  • Low real estate prices
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Freeway views
  • Higher crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Blur Between the Urban and Suburban"

Located a few miles north of downtown, Victory residents have the luxury of being within close distance to both Hwy 100 and I-94, which is useful since most in the area rely on their own personal vehicles. Since it is a little out of the way of the central communities, the properties in Victory are relatively cheap with the streets mostly lined with apartments, small bungalows and Tudor houses that were built during the 1920's and 1930's. Those who scenic routes would be content to live here since Victory Memorial Parkway runs through, continuing the extensive Minneapolis Grans Rounds Scenic Byway, a pathway that is noted for its tree-lined backdrop.

Victory's population is mostly consisted of single professionals with a small cluster of families and retried individuals. There are several spots to eat and shop, but the pride behind this neighborhood is the outdoor recreation. With both Victory Park and Porter Field nearby, along with Ryan Lake being restored, residents have plenty to do to stay active. Victory also reflects a history of industrialism with some former manufacturer spots still standing and a series of railroad tracks laying in the northeastern corner. Any individual that is looking for an active residential setting that is taken down a notch will have their expectations met in Victory.
Pros
  • Easy access to major highways
  • Close to parks
  • Beautfiul houses
Cons
  • Farther from downtown
  • Few eating and shopping spots
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Park Views North of Downtown"

Waite Park is a serene community filled with pleasantries found within both urban and suburban areas. The residents within this neighborhood are known to be some of the most socially conscious and politically active inn Minneapolis, so newcomers would do well to expect the occasional debate with their neighbors. Though active, Waite Park is also a suitable place to raise a family or live life as a laid back single professional. What limits many younger adults from jumping ship to this area are the larger houses that are marked with high prices.

Most of the homes are three or four bedrooms, again, suitable for the family lifestyle, and built back during the 1940's and 1950's. Sale prices range from $140,00 to $275,000, the latter of which deters many youthful locals. In addition to older charming homes, Waite Park is blessed with having little crime as a result of being a little out of reach of downtown and the university. Central Ave. is lined with apartments, which face Columbia Park as well as its golf course. Another outdoor public space, Waite Park, sits at the very center of the neighborhood, which caters to a more residential lifestyle rather than shop hopping and "painting the town" night escapades. This is where the protesters and political activists go to settle down once they have aged.
Pros
  • Beautiful houses
  • Natural beauty
  • Active community
Cons
  • Pricey
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Life By the Lake"

For those who love lake shore views and have funds to spare, West Calhoun is an ideal place to kick back and relax. Located in the southwestern area of Minneapolis on the northern edge of Lake Calhoun, this community is somewhat exclusive due to the expensive real estate. The avergae housing costs exceeds $400,000 and rental prices rarely go below $700, making West Calhoun one of the priciest neighborhoods in Minneapolis and in the United States. With the high costs of living and low population density comes a very low occurrence of crime, which marks the area as suitable for those who wish to get away.

This thick forested suburbia is mostly occupied by high earning professionals, retired individuals and a small cluster of families. The young and trendy will find little to do here since the lack of nightlife feeds the peace and quiet motif. Also, the distance from the central neighborhoods and the high standard of living put West Calhoun out of reach for younger crowds. Those with higher paychecks, however, have the luxury of getting access to the Minikahda Golf Course, being steps away from the lake shore, a short drive or moderate walk to Whole Foods, and seclusion from the noisy life of the busier portions of Minneapolis.
Pros
  • Natural Scenery
  • Next to the Lake
  • Peace and Quiet
Cons
  • High real estate prices
  • Limited number of properties
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Immigrant and Artist Haven"

Whittier truly paints the picture of an international city. Packed with residents from over 30 different nations, the cuisine, shops and experiences are things to not pass without some pause. Just on the other side of I-94 from downtown, Whittier offers a more down to earth and cheaper lifestyle as well as a local calendar filled with fine arts events. Named after the poet, John Greenleaf Whittier, the surrounding avenues of inspiration live up to the name. The community contains such creative centers like the Minneapolis Center of Art and Design, the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Children's Theatre.

The rent prices are also within the affordability range of many starving artists, especially if they go with the cooperative style household. Residents of various income levels can live here, though those with smaller paychecks are often confined to studio or one bedroom apartments. Whittier does have a slightly higher crime rate than other Minneapolis neighborhoods, but incidents are most often petty involving theft or burglary, hence residents want to definitely keep their homes and vehicles locked. One should stroll down Nicollet Ave. to pick from dozens of dining options or walk down W26th Street to look at the many beautiful and charming abodes. Whittier is the neighborhood to visit or live in for anyone that likes a little more color in their life.
Pros
  • Many eating and shopping options
  • Artistic community
  • Reasonable housing prices
Cons
  • Some crime
  • Can be a little too noisy at night
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"To Where the Starving Artists Flock"

Small as it is, this neighborhood is a diamond in the rough. Just across the river from downtown and across I-35W from the University of Minnesota, Beltrami is a mix of old and new, industrial and artistic. The community was originally home to European immigrants and has since become a hot spot for artists to open up their own studios with the many vacant warehouse spaces in the southwestern portion. Railroad tracks run along the industrial section while the northeastern corner is mainly residential structures. Cheap property rental and sale prices keep the artists coming while the cold industry backdrop and the occasional shady character keep families out.

For a neighborhood that is so close to downtown, the population density is relatively low, giving residents some breathing and elbow room. While nothing except warehouses and the occasional apartment building are within the Beltrami boundaries, residents can take a hop and a skip over the railroad tracks and down to where Hennepin Ave. Central Ave. crossover in the next neighborhood where there are plenty of eating and drinking spots to provide the young of age and/or heart plenty of entertainment. Beltrami locals are also close to several gallery and collective spaces where they can showcase their inspiring work. One can head over to the river about a dozen blocks away or hang out at Beltrami Park where there is a volleyball court and path. Should a resident want to leave the ear via car, he or she can take I-35W, which forms the community's east border. Families or retirees desiring luxury as well as absolute peace and quiet should not think for even a second about living here, but creative minds that do not mind living resourcefully or seeing trains and steel shingles will feel right at home.
Pros
  • Creative community
  • Close to campus and downtown
  • Close to nightlife
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Cold industrial landscape
  • Occassional shady character
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Historic Houses at Historically Low Prices"

Bancroft contains one of the oldest public school structures in Minneapolis, which is the location for Bancroft Elementary School. Located in the southern portion of the city, residents here have easy access to downtown via I-35W. Bancroft is a little off the beaten path of the more central neighborhoods, requiring a car or a long walk/ bike ride/ bus ride, but it has one advantage over other communities; affordable historic homes. Seldom priced at above $160,000, the majority of houses in this community were built before World War II, exhibiting a collective charm that is hard to find elsewhere in the metropolitan area.

38th Street, especially where it intersects Bloomington Ave., is where the majority of restaurants and shops are located, even though they are few in number. Residents looking for a few more options, however, can easily walk several blocks north through Powderhorn and into Phillips where more eating spots and shops await their business. Bancroft is a suitable place for recent graduates and young professionals that are looking to pinch a few pennies wile also being able to live in quality housing. A few apartment buildings exist, but the rental prices tend to be more than what the spaces are worth. The crime rate, when compared to other Minneapolis neighborhoods, is at a middle ground, but most incidents are theft related and seldom violent.
Pros
  • Beautiful houses
  • Low sale and rental prices
  • Close to I-35W
Cons
  • Some crime
  • Limited dining and shopping
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Green Near the Hustle and Bustle"

Audubon Park, on the northeast side of the river, is a spot for all types of residents ranging from students to families to retirees. An easy car, bike or bus ride to both downtown and the University of Minnesota, those that live here are close to just about everything that they could need. While the immediate avenues have a modest number of places to eat, shop or drink, the neighborhood offers a green and clean landscape that the environmentally conscious just cannot ignore. Add that with an eclectic mix of beautiful and unique homes and Audubon Park is a suitable home for many.

The eco-friendly motif is strong within this community, which is natural considering it was named after the famous conservationist, John J. Audubon. Some local houses can be found with their own pieces of evidence to better the environment such as solar panels, compost barrels or small organic gardens. Audubon Park is also a suitable area for outdoor activity as are the more traffic heavy streets, each lined with an abundance of healthy trees that provide shade for joggers, strollers, runners, or anyone else treading the sidewalks. Such physical beauty brings with it some property sales and rental prices that are slightly on the expensive side, but a thorough search or converting to cooperative living can help lift the burden of costs. This little slice of heaven that is close to the hustle and bustle, but far enough out of reach to enjoy some sound sleep, can make any newcomer that can find the funds to live here very happy.
Pros
  • Eco- friendly community
  • Green and clean
  • Close to downtown and campus
Cons
  • A little pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Picturesque for the Family"

Armatage is in the southwestern corner of Minneapolis, with Edina to the west and Richfield to the south. This neighborhood, though out of the way of the more central Minneapolis, has the advantage of being a short drive away from the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport and the Mall of America. The Crosstown Highway forms the southern border of Armatage, creating a convenient route for residents to travel in and out of the community with ease. This is a mostly a residential neighborhood, so there is not much nightlife about which to boast, but the local population is not left hungry since Penn Ave. is lined with several eating spots.

Armatage is noted for being peacefully quiet and having a natural charm since practically every street is lined with lush trees. Such landscaping, however, does come with high real estate prices. Those looking to buy a home would have to invest in a $200,000 or higher mortgage, while the few spots for rent seldom go below $1,000 a month. This area is best described as a family friendly neighborhood, with Armatage Elementary located right next to Armatage Park where residents can enjoy the fresh air and the green backdrops. This community, being one of the newer ones in Minneapolis, is ideal for any couple looking to start a family or already complete households, but the slow pace of life can become quite boring for younger adults that need a little more excitement in their daily lives.
Pros
  • Very green and clean
  • Close to major driving routes
  • Short drive to airport and Mall of America
Cons
  • Pricey
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Throughway Between the Urban and Suburban"

The transparent border between the urban and suburban areas of the Minneapolis metropolitan area, Wisdom offers many things for those looking to settle down a little out of the way of the hustle and bustle of the more centralized neighborhoods. The homes consist of beautiful two and three story wooded architecture and style that speak of times before World War II, offering a subtle look into history. Windom also shares the southern borders of Minneapolis with the smaller cities of Edina and Richfield and is within close proximity to the Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport. The community also offers many shopping options, most of which are from larger retailers, and residents have easy access to outdoor recreational spots like the Chain of Lakes and the Minnehaha Creek Parkway.
Named so after the former senator, William Windom, Windom is a site of activity, but such that is identified with families. Housing is a bit out of the price range of many young single adults and students, but is affordable for those with one or more children. The available housing is limited to single or multi- family abodes, most of which have been built in stages throughout the neighborhood with the smaller, single family houses forming a grid layout. The larger homes were built during the 1970's in a more spares pattern and are slightly closer to main public transportation routes. With I-35W forming the southern and eastern borders, residents enjoy being able to move in and out of the neighborhood with ease in addition to a very low crime rate compared to other Minneapolis communities.
Pros
  • Low crime rate
  • Close to airport
  • Great for families
Cons
  • A little far from the central neighborhoods
  • More expensive housing
  • A little dull for younger crowds
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A Place For All Kinds of Residents"

A mix of cultures and routines, Wisdom Park is a neighborhood well suited for residents of all types, as long as they don't mind each other; i.e., mothers pushing strollers do not mind the occasional crowd of college students and vice versa. This neighborhood is within easy reach of the downtown area as well as the University of Minnesota, making it an ideal location for those attending classes as well as those done with the college life. The main throughway through the area, Central Avenue NE, is home to numerous trendy coffeehouses, modest sized markets, and restaurants and shops that reflect the diverse immigrant population of Wisdom Park. Ethnic eateries hailing from countries like Mexico, Thailand, India, Pakistan, Colombia and Somalia create a colorful palette for the neighborhood.

Wisdom Park, so name after the park and the Minnesota congressman, is within walking distance to the shopping center called the Quarry as well as the community grocery called the Eastside Food Co-op. Despite all this activity, Wisdom Park remains one of the safest neighborhoods in Minneapolis. This low crime area is also home to an eclectic mix of abodes, showing off architectural styles from various eras, including the early 1900 Victorian inspired houses, the small and colorful bungalows on the west side of the neighborhood that popped up during the 1940's and the Tudor homes that became popular during the 60's. The type of home that one can afford in this area is circumstantial, but Wisdom Park as the advantage of not being subject to one single income level. Many of the younger residents are able to occupy the large houses by forming cooperative, in which several people live within one dwelling to make rent and other expenses cheaper.
Pros
  • Low crime rate
  • Many eating and shaopping options
  • Close to downtown and campus
Cons
  • Larger homes can be expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Touching the Hill Country"

Those who want to avoid the city life but still have access to it would not do better than to live in West Oak Hill. Located along Hwy 71 and a mile or so west of the Mopac Expressway, the streets of this neighborhood wind around tree covered hills and offer a view of the open Central Texas Hill Country. The public transit does not extend this far out, but residents tend to have cars and will find all the parking space in the world available, which is often a problem in the central neighborhoods. This is also a very safe neighborhood as communities this far west of the city are almost absent of any crime, with the worst incidents being theft.

There is a severe lack of Austin nightlife, but that is exactly what residents come here to avoid. In West Oak Hill you can see a full sky of stars from your back yard and every once in a while hear a coyote's howl. The major downside of this neighborhood, however, is the very expensive housing, which sometime reaches seven figures. Those who can afford it though, love the natural isolation from the bothersome hustle and bustle of Downtown Austin and its surrounding neighborhoods. A small cluster of newer houses basically all look the same, but the older homes, especially those that have large land plots, are truly unique. Those that love the outdoors and have the income to spare would be hard pressed to do better the West Oak Hill.
Pros
  • Near the country
  • Natural beauty
  • Close to 71 and 290
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Standard for South of 71"

West Congress while nice is pretty standard for any neighborhood that is located south of Hwy 71. In fact, it greatly resembles East Congress and South Manchaca. Though all walks of life can find a home here, the population mostly consist of families due to the cheap housing prices. For what it would cost to rent or buy a one bedroom two miles north one could get two to four bedroom in West Congress. South Congress Ave. does run as one of the neighborhood borders, but the more interesting spots are a mile or so north past Hwy 71. This is not the trendiest of neighborhoods, but it is a convenient ride to Downtown, has affordable housing and has practically everything that a family needs within reach.

There are a couple of Austin eating favorites like Hill's Austin Cafe and Casa Maria, and Stassney Square is on the neighborhoods southern edge, which is good for clothes and vintage chopping. There are plenty of childcare facilities in the neighborhood for those that need to drop off their children during the day and there are several medical offices in the immediate area. The direct access to Hwy 71 makes driving in and out of the area easy, but rush hour traffic can sometimes drive congestion into the neighborhood. Houses are of moderate size with plenty of yard space and the streets echo a vibe of a typical suburban neighborhood, which suits some, but is less desirable for those that really want to experience Austin.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • Some traffic from Hwy 71
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Luxury on the River"

Settled between the Mopac Expressway and the river, West Austin/ Tarrytown is the epitome of Austin style class with these tree lined streets that are just a walk away from the river. Close to Downtown and Zilker Park, there is nothing to love about this location except the expensive prices, but those who can afford it consider this neighborhood paradise. Restaurants back up to the water with deck seating from which one can dock onto a boat once finished with their meal and/or margarita. Most o the homes have plenty of yard space and range from $350,000 to over $1 million. Students and starting professionals can forget about living here, but well to do families and established professionals and retired individuals fill the vacant lots.

The nightlife is moderate since residents want some level of peace and quiet, but the hottest spots in the city are just a walk, bike ride or bus ride away. The old Austin charm is radiating in the architecture and street layouts and this neighborhood is situated perfectly between the urban sprawl and the rolling limestone hills the lay west. Residents enjoy access to a local golf course and ride their boats up the river all the way to Lake Travis or to many of the desirable country club and art spot along the way. Numerous public parks and access to the nature filled west provide a ride into the wild for locals who want to get in touch with the Hill Country and Lake Austin Blvd. provides a fast route to W. 6th and W. 5th streets. It is hard to do better than West Austin/ Tarrytown if you have the income to spare.
Pros
  • Historic Value
  • Green and clean
  • Next to the river
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"The University and its Dorms"

The University of Texas neighborhood is pretty much the sum of its name. It is the campus, which includes its dorms. Living here is pretty much impossible and to be avoided if you are not a student. During and outside of the rush hour, Guadalupe and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. become congested with traffic and the tons of student pedestrians that do not follow the crosswalk laws do not help the situation. The Drag is along Guadalupe and contains many shops, stores bars, restaurants and music venues. Some local favorites include Hole in the Wall, Kerby Lane Cafe and the Mellow Mushroom. Don't bother bringing your car here as there is no place to park.

Getting a room in the dorms is hard even for enrolled students as there is not enough on campus space for all 50,000 or so students. Many have to get onto a waiting list and if they have no luck they have to look elsewhere in the surrounding neighborhoods. Along MLK is the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin largest museum, which has an impressive permanent collection and hosts some truly amazing exhibits. The Bob Bullock State History Museum across the street has an IMAX theater that attracts residents from all over the city and the Mike Meyers Stadium hosts football games that draw crowds of up to 50,000 people. Safe to say, the University of Texas community is a student's world.
Pros
  • Walking distance to everything
  • Unique restaurants and shops
  • Wonderful public transportation
Cons
  • Good only fo students
  • Practically no parking
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Charming Little Mexico"

For a neighborhood that is close to so many less than desirable and crime stricken communities, this one has gone through every effort to keep itself afoot and the residents have a high level of pride that is hard to match. This is their community and no one is going to ruin that for them. Though it is called University Hills, there is no university around, or hills for that matter. The immediate access to 290 and 183 is convenient, especially considering how far from Downtown this is located. The public transportation is sort of pitiful in this enclave, so residents require a car to get around.

This neighborhood is often described as a Little Mexico and with good reason with the most of the residents being Mexican- American and the area having an abundance of tacos shops, not to mention the flat houses that have plenty of yard space and often have some chickens living in them. The houses are rather cheap in price, but not cheap in quality. For the most part, they are well built and well kept and sit under dense rows of trees. The Dottie- Jordan Park is also well maintained and is something for the surrounding community to brag about. University Hills is not the typical trendy Austin neighborhood, but it is a nice and simple suburban area that is high with neighborly spirit and is a good place to raise a family.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Access to 290 and 183
  • Green and clean
Cons
  • Far from central neighborhoods
  • Lacks public transportation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Everyhting in One Spot... If Youre Rich"

A small plot of urban land between Rosedale and Hyde Park, the Triangle State is an exclusive neighborhood of everything high class for the younger crowd with money to spend. A bunch of high rise apartments seated above upscale shopping center surrounding the Austin State Hospital, residents never have to step outside of these blocks if they do not want to. Thus, an individual can live life as a shut in here, despite that going against the Austinite spirit. While the student neighborhoods due east are for those on a tighter budget, the Triangle State caters to those coming from well to do families who instead of bargain shopping would rather spend a couple hundred dollars buying just a cotton t-shirt with jeans already half ripped.

In the southeastern corner of the neighborhood is Central Park and down the block is an H-E-B as well as another hospital, making it have more medical facilities per capita than most other Austin communities. Residents are also close to other hopping areas of town such as the Drag, Hyde Park and North University. Both N. Lamar and Guadalupe are major streets, transferring a great amount of activity in and out of the Triangle State. The name of this neighborhood refers to the triangle that forms when Guadalupe and N. Lamar intersect after Guadalupe briefly splits. The major downside of living in this area, of course, is the expensive rent, which often exceeds $1,000. The immediate surrounding are green, clean and full of culture, but one can get more bang for their buck and experience more of the weird side of Austin if they wander a bit more east.
Pros
  • Close to UT
  • Shopping and nightlife
  • Green and clean
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Another South Austin Suburb"

Sweetbriar resembles a typical South Austin suburban neighborhood and there is little difference between it and its next door neighbor Garrison Park. It has direct access to both I-35 and S. Congress Ave., so traveling into town by car or by bus is relatively easy. Both these routes, however, get very heavy traffic during rush hour and it can get pretty noisy. The housing prices, being so far south, are cheap and the area is pretty safe, hence Sweetbriar if you want to start or raise a family in an outskirt community where there is an abundance of other families and public schools.

There is an abundance of Mexican food in the area with the occasional Asian food restaurant and there is an H-E-B at the corner of S. 1st St. and W. William Canon Dr. There is a severe lack of nightlife with this being a family friendly neighborhood, but the South Congress hot spots are just a few minutes drive away. The streets are lined with ranch style houses with large front and back yards and there are numerous educational and childcare centers in the area. At the E Stassney and I-35 intersection is a shopping center that contains a Regal Metropolitan Stadium where families can go see the latest movies and different restaurants and shops that can make a parent's evening. Though a far less desirable place for the young and energetic, Sweetbriar is an excellent location in which to raise a family in safety in the Austin area.
Pros
  • Family firendly
  • Acces to I-35 and South Congress Ave.
  • Good schools and daycare
Cons
  • Lack of nightlife
  • Noise from traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Out of Sight and Out of Mind"

There is so little regard for the St. Johns neighborhood that most Austinites know nothing about it. Despite being located within the crossovers of three major highways (I-35, 290 and 183), most find little to say about this neighborhood. The housing is dirt cheap with the majority of listing prices going below $100,000, but as can be assumed, there is a reason for it. This community is a rather sketchy one and it is far form any hot spots that speak true to the spirit of Austin.

Not to say this neighborhood has not come a long way. Several decades ago, this area had no paved roads and the sewage system was less than up to code. Community leaders, some of which still live in the houses today, took the initiative to improve standards. That said, St. Johns still has plenty of room for improvement, but it could be much worse. This can accurately be labeled an ethnic enclave as the majority of residents are Mexican Americans with many knowing how too speak only Spanish. The few restaurants and shops that exist are along I-35, but many cross the interstate to take advantage of the Highland Mall area. Having direct access to three major highways causes traffic to feed into the neighborhood during rush hour and can also make getting out somewhat difficult, but traveling in and out is easy during other times of day. Residents, however, do need a car to get around. All in all, St. Johns rarely comes to the mind of an Austinite and those looking for a home close to the center and some remnants of Austin life would do better looking somewhere else.
Pros
  • Near three major highways
  • Cheap rent
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • No nightlife
  • High crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Not Just For College Students"

The St. Edwards neighborhood is an enjoyable place to live for students, young professionals and families alike who want a quaint charm with urban access. Though a Catholic university, this is anything but an ultra- conservative community, but instead one that thrives on liberal arts, music and staying green. Residents love this neighborhood and many would even top it over the neighborhoods surrounding the University of Texas. Just south of the South Congress area, locals have access to the hottest eateries and shops in the city while also being able to avoid the overbearing hustle and bustle by retreating back to their homes. Home prices are not cheap, but they are not too expensive either and rent can easily be managed between three or four people in a household.

A distinct feature of St. Edwards residents is that they love to garden and there are several businesses that feed that love from plant nurseries to the Garden District Coffeehouse so named after this social trend. The Blunn Creek Nature Preserve is a large green area that preserves plant life and the beautiful scenery attracts a loyal crowd of vagrants. Getting in and out of the neighborhood is extremely easy since South Congress has more bus stops than anyone would ever need and Hwy 71 is directly south of the St. Edwards campus. A smaller scale college neighborhood, residents have access to everything they need from coffee to yoga to clothes to groceries, but the crowds and streets are not nearly as congested as they get at the other campus north of Downtown. It is hard to do wrong in choosing to settle in this community.
Pros
  • Very green and clean
  • Good for all types of residents
  • Very close to SoCo
Cons
  • Some parking issues
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Really Nothing Here"

There is little to say about Southeast Austin. It is right next tot the airport and has to suffer from the constant noise of low flying airplanes. It is mostly giant vacant plots of land that have had nothing done to them with a small strip center or warehouse here or there. There is a small cluster of cookie cutter reproduction houses along McKinney Falls Pkwy, each with a very small yard and no trees in sight. Closer to the airport just off of where E. Riverside Dr. begins are several blocks of run down wooden shacks and mobile homes, many of which have half torn down fences and broken down cars in the front yard.

Immediately outside of the airport is a hotel and Waffle House and due to the dirt cheap rental and selling prices of property being right next to the airport, some government agencies have their offices here including the Travis County Tax Office and the Texas Workers Compensation Office. usually neighborhoods in the general southeast area tend to have higher crime rates, but there are so few people here at such a low density that there really is little room for criminal activity. Most crime statistic sights do not even include the Southeast Austin neighborhood. Anyone that does for some reason decide to live here definitely needs a car to get around and this area does have the advantage of having direct access to both Hwy 71 and Hwy 183. This neighborhood, if it can be called so, could be any under occupied district in an city, as there is no visual evidence of this being part of Austin.
Pros
  • Close to 71 and 183
Cons
  • Next to airport
  • Few houses
  • No nightlife, shopping, etc.
Recommended for
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Hills and Beautiful Houses Next to the River"

The South River City/ Travis Heights are is without a doubt one of the trendiest sections of the city of Austin and its location could not be more desirable. Directly east of South Congress, just below Lady Bird Lake and a skip and a hop to Downtown, residents have almost too much to do, but the shaded environment leaves room for sitting back to enjoy the fresh air. All the restaurants, bars, clubs and shops are just a walk away laying along South Congress and two modest parks run right through the middle of the community, engulfing almost every inch of public space in natural green.

Riverside Dr. is lined with tons of apartments, but in interior streets are dotted with charming houses with some dating back to the 1950s and 60s. This neighborhood is not for someone with a light wallet though as this prime real estate comes with prime costs. Houses sell for an average of $300,000 and rental prices stick around $950. The local population is a good mix of students, young professionals, families and retired individuals; all coming from various walks of life. Residents are close to Austin favorites such as the Magnolia Cafe and Amy's Ice Cream, not to mention the best flea market in the city and a large cluster of outdoor mobile food trailers. The minor downsides of living in South River City/ Travis Heights is the extreme lack of parking and the droves of tourists that come through the area. Aside from that, however, those can afford afford to live here fall deeply in love with the community.
Pros
  • Nightlife
  • Below the river
  • Green and clean
Cons
  • Lack of parking spaces
  • Lots of tourists
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nightlife in South Austin"

No place has more of the down to earth Austin culture this far south than South Lamar, where the general vibe is not nearly as overbearing or snobby as those within South Congress. Those who do want to visit SoCo just need to take a short a bus or bike ride northbound, but few residents feel the need to do so since this neighborhood has plenty to offer in a social scene. South Lamar Blvd. has some classic Austin favorites such as the Broken Spoke and Red's Porch and the street has its fair share of daily and nightly activity.

The main borders of the South Lamar neighborhood are of course S. Lamar Blvd., Hwy 71 and Manchaca Rd. S. Lamar and Manchaca contain most of the shops and restaurants in the area, but the streets that lie in between have some hidden gems of their own like the Victory Cafe and Behren's Guitar Studio. The location cannot be beat since this community has direct access to Hwy 71 as well as some top notch greenery with the Grennbelt and Gus Fruh park directly to the west. Living here is also affordable with housing prices being in mid range with rent averaging around $900 and selling prices being a little over or under $180,000. South Lamar has a very trendy social scene, but maintains an old school Austin charm that some communities are gradually losing. Folks both young and old, single or with a family will not want to leave once settling here.
Pros
  • Close to Grennbelt
  • Close to SoCo and Downtown
  • Old school social scene
Cons
  • South Lamar can get a little noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Where to Original Weirdos Go to Retire"

Rosedale is expresses the ultimate old Austin charm with its abundance of old 1930s and 1940s bungalows. West of Hyde Park the University of Texas, this neighborhood maintains the "Keep Austin Weird" attitude without being overbearing like many other central neighborhoods can be. Here, the original pioneers of Austin culture can sit on their front porches with their children or grandchildren and sip on some Lone Star or tea while the younger crowd can mosey over several blocks east and south to catch the latest in local live music. Rosedale is the perfect place to retire for those that want to keep the funk vibe going until the day they die.

The real estate is not cheap, however. Even older homes that have little square footage are listed for over $300,000, but this is due to being in such an ideal location. Medical Parkway, which goes straight through the neighborhood, has over two dozen different medical offices, making Rosedale the ideal place for the elderly to keep up their health so that hey can continue to freak out newcomers for years to come. The streets are lined with shady trees and Ramsey Playground is the perfect place to take the kids for some exercise. Close to the University of Texas, the Drag, Hyde Park and bordering N. Lamar Blvd. and Hwy 1, the convenience of living is Rosedale to travel to other parts of town is something that cannot be denied. A word of advice to young weird folk, save and invest you money so that you can retire here.
Pros
  • Old charm
  • Close to UT
  • Green and clean
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Cheap, By the River and a Little Boring"

Riverdale, more commonly known as Riverside, is named so because it it right below the river, which is a major draw for people in addition to the cheap rent. This neighborhood, however, lacks the allure that so man y other Austin communities have and the streets are concrete jungles that have the typical cash advance booths and liquor stores. This community has a less than favorable reputation as some suspicious characters are often spotted on the main streets, but it does not reach the level of sketchiness that Montopolis does. It is simply advised that you watch you back every so often if you are walking down E. Riverside Dr. at night.

Like its neighboring Pleasant Valley, Riverdale is being rebuilt and apartment complexes are shooting up at an incredible speed. These are targeted towards young professionals and university students as the University of Texas has a shuttle that stops by many of these apartments. Those who want to enjoy Austin nightlife have to I-35 which will take them to the Travis Heights and South Congress areas as well as a direct route to Downtown. Being right next to the river and a few parks makes enjoying Austin's outdoors easy and the cheap rental prices make being in such a location a near steal. In hindsight, a person could do better, but he or she could also do a lot worse in choosing a neighborhood in which to live. They just have to constantly step out of the area to have some fun.
Pros
  • Right below the river
  • Cheap rent
  • Close to SoCo
Cons
  • A little shady
  • Apartments only
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Apartment and Condo Mecca"

Pleasant Valley has undergone some very rapid revitalization and as a result many cookie cutter apartment complexes and cheap high rise condos have been popping up all over the place. Due to the low rent prices, many University of Texas students are choosing to live here and take the university shuttle that goes through every day. The neighborhood still suffers a stigma for being right next to Montopolis, which is one of the sketchiest and most undesirable areas in the city, but Pleasant Valley is really making a name for itself; a sort of work in progress. Due to the northern half being Roy G. Guerrero Park, the geographical area of this neighborhood is quite large in comparison to most.

Since it is a community on the rise, there are few restaurants, bars and shopping centers within the immediate area, so residents have to mosey over to adjacent communities to get the thins they need. Those who live here can take E. Riverside to the South Congress area and Lady Bird lake or they can take S. Pleasant Valley Rd. into the more interesting east side neighborhoods, hence location is a main advantage to living in Pleasant Valley. Lakeshore and Guerrero Parks are underrated green areas, so they do not suffer from having too large crowds like Zilker Park. Do not expect to find any houses in the area, as new complexes are still being build in vacant land plots. Should you want cheap rent in a developing neighborhood and don't mind traveling a half mile or so to go to hot spots, then Pleasant Valley would not be a bad choice for you.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to Lady Bird Lake
  • Shuttles
Cons
  • No houses
  • No nightlife
  • Far from UT
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Perfect For the Elderly"

Many young folk that live and have visited Austin would describe Pecan Springs/ Springdale as a snooze fest, an east side neighborhood that lacks all the charm and grassroots shops and dives that the streets due slightly west have. The homes here are flat ranch style houses that go for an average of $145,000 with rent seldom exceeding $600 a month. This is an extremely quiet area of town with few remnants of Austin style nightlife and pastimes, making it suitable for elderly retired individuals who want nothing to do with the noise or the weird for which Austin is so famous. Few people below the age of 50 live in this community.

The east side stereotype that Pecan Springs/ Springdale does maintain is neighborly spirit as it is often recounted how welcoming and friendly the residents can be. They would not, however, appreciate loud house parties or a group of people jamming on the porch as is a typical scene in more central Austin communities. A complaint among those who like being active is that this neighborhood is too far from the city hot spots, even the east side ones, but the easy access to Hwy 183 is a great advantage. There is a nice green park within the area, but it is nothing to really brag about. The short description for Pecan Springs/ Springdale is that it is good for senior citizens, bad for young professionals and students.
Pros
  • Peace and quiet
  • Close to 183
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • Far from Downtown
  • Very few young residents
Recommended for
  • Retirees
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"East Side Neighborhood Without East Side Charm"

While many east side Austin neighborhoods have for long preserved a sort of grassroots charm that attracts resident looking for cheaper rent with Austin weirdness, Parker Lane offers none. Yes, the rent and selling prices of the 1980s homes are cheap, but that is due to the lack of interest in living here. The main advantage of jumping ship to these streets is the easy access to both Hwy 71 and I-35 as well as the airport, but that makes for a lot of traffic and noise. This community has one of the first skate parks in the city, but it was built on top of a dump site, which in later years leaked out and the park had to be closed, surprising since Austin prides itself on being such a clean and green city.

Most would described Parker Lane as sketchy, but like other east side neighborhoods, it lack the community spirit and Austin funk to make up for it. The only public school in the area, Linder Elementary, is notorious for being overcrowded and having few resources for the students. There are several restaurants along I-35 and E. Oltorf, but they often suffer a reputation for having the poorest quality of food that is out shined by even fast food joints. Looking at the dynamics of Parker Lane, no one would make an automatic association between the neighborhood and Austin. There are no food trailers or live music venues, no creative spaces or well kept outdoor spaces. This area can accurately be described as a forgotten project, something to which the city turns a blind eye. If moving to Austin or deciding to relocate within the city, the most common piece of advice is simply to not move to Parker Lane.
Pros
  • Close to I-35 and 71
Cons
  • Sketchy
  • Low quality education
  • Extremely dirty
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The Height of Austin History"

Old West Austin/ Clarksville is the ultimate window into Central Austin history as it has numerous historically registered homes with shop and hot spots that still display the original Austin charm that began the massive migrations to the city that is seen today. With downtown directly to the east and Zilker Park directly south, the location of this old time paradise could not bet better. A resident here would rarely ever need to use a car due to the bus stops and short distance to key spots, and it would be ideal not to have a car has the parking here can be bothersome.

Be warned, though, as a neighborhood with such a prime location and high historic value can become very expensive to live in. The constant attempt at preserving the area has kept apartment complexes and condos from being built within these streets, so residents most often have to purchase older homes that have been well kept, which can add up in costs. Those who can afford it though, could not be happier with their choice. Whole Foods is just down the block and some of the city's signature bars and venues like The Tavern and Donn's Depot. Also, families that live in the area will have their kids go to one of the best elementary schools in the city. For those that have the income to spare, Old West Austin/ Clarksville is hard to top.
Pros
  • Historic Value
  • Green and Clean
  • Next to Downtown and Zilker Park
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
  • Parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"A Less Obnoxious Student Neighborhood"

Sandwiched between W. 38th St. and Dean Keaton, North University is much like West campus, but minus the rowdy frat houses and housing meant for big boys and girls. Rather than having apartment complexes stacked and stuffed next to each other, this neighborhood has a mix of small scale apartment complexes and small wooden houses that most often have several students living in them at once. The bars are concentrated along Guadalupe St. and W 30th, but are within easy reach of all residences in the area. There are more bus stops than students will ever need and the tree lined streets are perfect for daily walks and bike rides. The conveniently close distance to the Drag cannot be ignored and students and graduates that live in this neighborhood have access to more trendy eating, drinking and music spits than they can count.

The real estate here is valuable with the selling prices of houses moving onto the more expensive slope, but more than three quarters of residents rent, and splitting the rent with three or four other people makes living in North University affordable for almost any budget. Though there are no shopping centers or medical facilities within this exact neighborhood, those living or staying here are still a short walk or bike ride away from everything they need. The Hancock Shopping Center is just several blocks and all the hospitals on the west side of I-35 are within close reach. The University of Texas is less than eight blocks away from all houses and apartments, and walking and biking in and out of this area will make any local fit from the activity. North University is right by I-35 and close to N. Lamar Blvd., making this community and all access point. The only downside of living here is that some older residents may become tired of the high concentration of students, but many recent graduate choose to stay here until they are able to afford larger housing.
Pros
  • Extremely green and clean
  • Close to UT
  • Close to nightlife and shopping
Cons
  • High concentration of students
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Charm With a Little Dose of Austins Weird"

In the far northwest corner of central Austin (Meaning that it is still inside the 183 loop) North Shoal Creek is a charming off the funky beaten path community that is highly suitable for buying one's first home. The vast majority of the houses were built back in the 1960s, so the architecture and the interior design echo to a more colorful decade. This isn't one of the trendier neighborhoods in the "keeping it weird" Austin, but it has there are several hot spots carefully placed along the main streets of Burnet Rd. and W. Anderson Ln. Also, should you feel like living it up in Austin;s hot spots, you only need to drive a few miles down Burnet Rd. or down Hwy 1.

Local hangout spots include Cover 3 and Waterloo Ice House where residents can enjoy some cheap draft beers and friendly crowds several blocks away from home. The Village Shopping Center has the Alamo Drafthouse and several department stores and shops at the corner of W. Anderson Ln. and Burnet Rd. and nearby are a series of different restaurants including serving everything from Indian dishes to Korean cuisine. One of the Austin Public Library branches is on Steck Ave and Shoal Creek Blvd. has several fitness and medical offices including a pilates studio and and acupuncture center. The residential streets in North Shoal Creek are green and clean enough for residents to enjoy walking outdoors and basically everything they need is within walking distance. Though not as trendy as the communities due south, this is a neighborhood where young professionals can buy their first home or start a family.
Pros
  • Green and clean
  • Many restaurants and shops
  • Cheap and high qaulity housing
Cons
  • A little less trendy
  • A few miles from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Historic Look into Austin"

Nestled between Hwy 1 and Lamar Blvd., Old Enfield gives both visitors and residents an inside look into the history of Austin. A Charming green neighborhood of high class close to all the good action within Central Austin, the streets have a mix of high rise condos and old houses dating back to the mid 1800s. It was once part of the Pease Family Plantation, the remnants of which are left in Pease Park, which stretches the entire length of the neighborhood and has areas where you can walk you dog without a leash. This is also the park where Eeyore's Birthday Part is held every year.

In an effort to not be overrun by business and to maintain historic integrity, this neighborhood is almost entirely residential, offering those who live here some level of daily serenity while also just being a walk away from the unique Austin nightlife. Down the street on Lamar is Whole Foods as well as numerous vintage shops and restaurants that are all a walk, bike or bus ride away. The natural beauty of Old Enfield can best be described as majestic with rolling hills and high standing trees that provide a massive amount of shade. Out of the price range for young professionals and students, this is an ideal retirement spot for those that wan to keep it weird into old age. Old Enfield is a neighborhood that has kept true to its culture even in the face of high financial investment.
Pros
  • Historic Value
  • Green and clean
  • Next to Pease Park
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Not the Lamar We Love"

This portion of Lamar does not live up to the name of its southern portions where nightlife and culture are in an absolute abundance. This northern end is actually quite disappointing and depressing, especially where it intersects Rundberg. North Lamar Blvd., after which this neighborhood of North Lamar is named, has the only restaurant and shopping options for this area, which is still pitiful in comparison to the rest of the city.

Of course, because of this geographic and social set up, the real estate here is cheap, cheap, cheap with most of the housing being in apartment complexes that have nothing to brag about. Being next to I-35 and close to 183, traffic often feeds into the area during rush hour and also because N. Lamar is a major street in all parts of the city. There are a few Austin eating favorites like Chuy's, but the rest are generic large national chain fast food places in which can supposedly have you way at Burger King. Near W. Baker Ln. are several Chinese restaurants, which can help add a little variety to this neighborhood. The general set up of North Lamar is having businesses on I-35 and N. Lamar Blvd. with housing sandwiched in and given its long distance from the central Austin neighborhoods, nothing spectacular is found here. If you are moving to Austin because you want to experience Austin, you are better off looking elsewhere as this community tends to lack creativity, drive and spirit.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Runs along I-35
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • Little nightlife
  • Crime along Rundberg Ln.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Luxury in Northern Austin"

Who knew that there could be just high class this far north within the Austin metropolitan area? Of course this is a level of standard sophistication that can be found in any other major city like Dallas and it lacks the initial weird that makes the city of Austin such an attraction in the first place. This is a getaway for those who love the rich urban life, but cannot quite take the energetic high that the central Austin neighborhoods put into anyone that walks through them. The Domain, which is along Hwy 1 is a center filled with upscale shops and restaurants as well as high rise apartments and condos.

There are few actual houses in this neighborhood, but plenty of large apartments that exceed the size of many of Austin's regular single story abodes. You will find some level of peace and quiet and some level of nightlife activity, but there are no dive bars and no live music venues in which to enjoy the unique Austin sound. An accurate description to give North Burnet would be an urban generic as for places that cost so much they offer nothing truly special. You will see no one moseying over here during South by Southwest or reminiscing about attending Eeyore's Birthday Party. This neighborhood just tends to come across as a stuck up seclusion from the things that make Austin wonderful.
Pros
  • Some nightlife
  • Access to 183 and Hwy 1
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Generic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Nothing Here to See"

Like many of the other neighborhoods that are directly north of 183, North Austin has little to offer in location, nightlife, and in general a social scenery or life. It also has little to offer in safety as Rundberg goes right through this neighborhood and it is notorious for having some of the highest crime activity in the metropolitan area. There are plenty of eating out options along N. Lamar, but aside from that, little exists to satisfy the appetite. There is little greenery to brag about even with one tiny public park and the streets are filled with concrete and a desolate, depressing vibe.

Of course due to these circumstances, rent and selling prices are cheap. Most residents are renters since over half of the housing in the area comes from low grade apartment complexes. In addition to some slight urban decay, residents have to deal with traffic congestion that is being fed from the rush hour on Hwy 183 and N. Lamar. A few of the eateries are family owned Mexican or Chinese restaurants, but most often you will only get you stomach filled with the food chain classics of Domino's Pizza and Burger King. With the money you're saving on rent, though, you can spend as much as you like on the fast food favorites.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to 183
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • Very far from downtown
  • Desolate, dirty streets
Recommended for
  • Singles
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"No Reason to Live Here"

There tends to be a general consensus when advising people about moving to Montopolis... don't do it. Yes, housing is cheap with few going above the price of $60,000 and some renters paying as little as $250 a month, but there is a dead obvious reason for that; nobody wants to live here. One, it is right next to the airport, so your days and night would be filled with having to hear the roaring sound of low flying airplanes. Two, the sketchiness of the neighborhood is very hard to ignore. The typical street scene are tiny decaying houses that are slowly falling apart with piles of junk laying out in the front and back yards.

There are a couple of parks, but they have definitely seen better days. Also low on the scale is the lack of nightlife that Austin is so well known for, especially if inside the 183 loop, which Montopolis is. The only creative space the area has to offer is Coronado Studio, which is a screenprinting studio that targets the local Latino population. Behind the many depressing abodes and mobile homes closer to the airport is a cluster of warehouses, which adds to the neighborhood being unpleasing to the eyes. Like some other high crime and poverty stricken neighborhoods in and around Austin, there is an attempt to revitalize this community, but results are coming about much more slowly here than in other places. At the end of the day, there is going to be little demand and effort in areas next to an airport and under major highway crossings.
Pros
  • Super cheap housing
Cons
  • Next to airport
  • High crime
  • Dirty
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Nature Close to the Urban Sprawl"

The only thing that this neighborhood, if you can call it that, has to boast about the is the nearby McKinney Falls State Park. There are very few restaurants, shopping options or even houses in this region of the metropolitan area, but that may just be some people's cup of tea. With Highway 71 serving as the northern border, residents can easily access the rest of the city of Austin via this route. Each house has large plots of land, which is where some heavy financial investment may come into play, but it also prevents much of a social life if you are a young student or professional looking to have nightly fun in the Live Music Capital of the World. This part of town is best left to families or older individuals that are looking to settle down with some peace and quiet.

Those who favor vast spaces, tons of animals and love gardening, then McKinney is a piece of heaven on Earth an it can provide the best of both worlds. To the west the glare of Austin's downtown lights can be seen while to the east and vast sky of stars hangs overhead and the sounds of wild animals can be heard. Whether you want to go hit up the town on Friday night or want to go camping out in the wilderness, this neighborhood provides easy access to both sides of the economic and social chain. If you want to take full advantage of this setting, try to obtain a property as close to the state park as possible since the stretch that's closer to the I-35 and Hwy 71 intersection kind of defeats the purpose of moving here.
Pros
  • Natural Beauty
  • Peace and quiet
  • Access to both urban and rural areas
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • Not suitable for young singles
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diamond in the Rough"

In the triangle formed by Airport Blvd., Springdale Rd. and Manor Rd., the MLK neighborhood is another surviving epitome of East Side Austin. It has a former reputation of being a run down crime ridden neighborhood, but efforts have constantly been made to change that and many are jumping ship to these streets for the cheap buying and rental prices. The average house in the area goes for around $110,000 while most rental prices fall below $600. Very few apartments are in the area, but instead lines of bungalow type houses that can be irresistible to anyone who is found of such architecture and scenery.

What MLK lacks in nightlife it makes up for in neighborly spirit as this is the place to get to know and become friends with those who live next to you. Those who do want a little more excitement have plenty of bus stops and easy bike routes to use to go closer to campus or Downtown. Many mosey into this community to take advantage of the large golf course that lays along E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and there are two public parks, one with a recreation center, where residents can leisurely enjoy the outdoors. About half of those that live here live below the poverty line, but that does not seem to dampen spirits. Those who are looking for east side charm at a cheap price can easily enjoy living life in this community.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Firendly Neighborhood
  • Easy access to other east side neighborhoods
Cons
  • Some poverty
  • Little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Low Key and Close to the Good Stuff"

As much as it pains many to admit, straying away from the trendy neighborhoods can save a renter or home buyer some pretty pennies. Manchaca provides a more neighborly, low key alternative to the expensive hustle and bustle places, but its still within close range to many o the popular spots like Downtown, Zilker Park and South Congress. It is filled mostly with moderate sized single family homes, but the prices at which they are listed are a steal, making this neighborhood one of the smartest financial investments one could make when choosing a place to live.

Given that Manchaca is three or four miles from the downtown area, there is no issue with parking as it so often is in other parts of the city where it seems that half your day is spent looking for a spot to keep you four wheels. Some rush hour traffic feed into the area from Hwy 71, but that is the height of any congestion. A surprisingly high percentage of young college graduates live in this community and they coexist well with the resident families who live there for the affordable real estate and high quality public schools and the easy access to the St. David South Austin Hospital. Should you decide to live here and have the inkling to hang out in some trendy eating spots and party it up within Austin nightlife, a quick drive or bus ride north will put you in the middle of it all.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Peace and quiet
  • Close to SoCo
Cons
  • Some traffic from 71
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"A Work in Progress"

What is often described as a dumping ground on the east side, the residents of Johnston Terrace are taking efforts to revitalize the cultural vibrancy of the area. Home to houses, warehouses and art studios, there is plenty of room for creativity, but first an overhaul on condemned properties and getting the local schools back in swing are required. This weirdly shaped polygonal community set between Airport Blvd. and Hwy 183 is a work in progress for those who see the potential in this east side neighborhood. The local real estate is some of the cheapest in the city with mortgage prices going as low as $90,000. Many residences are wooden single family houses and mobile homes that provide shelter for the working class that dominates the community.

Bolm Rd. is the main thorough street as it connects Airport and 183 as well as provide entrances to the well hidden and dead end dirt roads that back up to the studios and warehouses. There is not much to offer in terms of nightlife as most of the activity is closer to the I-35 corridor and there are few restaurants within the immediate area. One of the public schools due to lack of district funding has been closed down, so families will have to have their children attend the nearest schools in neighboring areas. Johnston Terrace still fits the stereotypical artist environment with cheap wooden or tin studios that the starving creative types are still able to afford. It is best, though, to keep studios and cars locked as anything valuable will indeed get stolen.
Pros
  • Studio space
  • Cheap rent
Cons
  • Dump ground
  • Closing school
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"A Shopping Haven Away from South Congress Ave."

Not as trendy as the North Loop and Hyde Park communities due south, Highland is a shopping haven for almost every need. The Highland mall has department stores for those looking for brand clothing and the immediate areas around the mall are small strip center offering a variety of goods and services. Jerry's Artarama is the city's favorite art supply store while theaters like the Galaxy Highland and the House of Torment showcase frequent performances and film screenings. Austin Community College also has a campus located in this neighborhood and Kick Butt Coffee offers local java, open mic nights and martial arts. A good selection of Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern and Mexican restaurants offer visitors an eclectic local taste.

Farther away from the congested I- 35 and Highway 290 are rows of residential spaces that include both single family houses and apartment complexes. Both sale and rental prices are within mid range, making the Highland neighborhood suitable for single professionals as well as some families that do not have too tight of a budget. Buses frequently stop by the Highland Mall, making it extremely easy to go in and out of the neighborhood. This is also a convenient are to live in should you want to travel outside the city as the Greyhound Bus Station is on Koeng Ln. between I- 35 and Airport Blvd. Though kind a little out of the way of much of the Central Austin activity, Highland has its own culture and nightlife to share with anyone that passes through or decides to park themselves.
Pros
  • Close to I-35 and 290
  • Great for shopping
Cons
  • Some traffic on I-35 and 290
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"High Traffic and Crime"

Just like Georgian Acres on he other side of the interstate, Heritage Hills offers nothing special and is like the other bland northern Austin suburban neighborhoods with the exception of high crime activity along E. Rundberg Ln. Though Austin has an overall low crime rate, it is considered unwise for anyone to walk out at night along this street. A mix of industrial warehouses and low grade apartments, the physical and social landscape of Heritage Hills is very desolate and makes one wonder how something so depressing can actually exist within the Austin city limits.

Being in direct contact to both 183 and I-35, the traffic in that feeds into the neighborhood can best be described as horrendous. This mixed with the poor and generic choices in dining and the only available shopping at the local Walmart makes this one of the least desirable communities to live in whether or not it was part of Austin. Rent is dirt cheap due to the extremely low demand among individuals to live in this area and one can only guess the quality of the properties that are listed. If a simple piece of advice were to be given, it would be to not even for a second consider living or even visiting this area of town. There are so many more neighborhoods that better celebrate the weird spirit that is Austin and at an affordable price, offering nightlife and spectacular food. You would be hard pressed to do worse in this city than you would Heritage Hills.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • High traffic
  • Desolate
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Slightly More Expensive Hyde Park"

Think of an upper scale Hyde Park where college graduates have spent some time growing up and are able to financially accommodate more square footage. Set between the University of Texas campus and Hyde Park, this is the perfect spot for professors or groups of students renting a space together in this beautiful green neighborhood that is just west of I-35 and east of Avenue H. The tree lined streets are perfect for morning jogs and bike rides and the numerous bus stops make traveling in and out of the area a breeze. Surrounded by Upper Boggy Creek, the campus, North University and Hyde Park, this community has easy access to all the best nightlife and restaurants while also maintaining a sense of peaceful isolation.

The Hancock Shopping Center has one of the most popular H-E-Bs in the city as well as a 24 Hour Fitness and Mission Burrito while several blocks south the Hancock Golf Course and Recreation Center. Buying a house is on the expensive side as the average price exceeds $300,000, but smaller properties can be rented and for affordable prices if split between several people. Depending on where in the neighborhood you decide to live, you may hear the occasional noise from the interstate and the University of Texas stadium, but these are usually not bothersome enough to deter renters and buyers. The easiest way to cross I-35 is by taking E. 38th 1/2 St. and Red River St. is the quickest route to campus. With constant social activity in every cardinal direction, but far away enough for some general peace and quiet, few have been disappointed with the Hancock community.
Pros
  • Green and clean
  • Social scene
  • Close to campus
Cons
  • Buying is expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nothing Special in a Special City"

Even in its residential areas, a city like Austin is expected to have an abundance of communities that scream funk and celebrate all that is beautiful and unusual. Well, there is nothing special about Georgian Acres as you would expect with such a name. The houses and street look like any other suburbia that is out of place and out of mind. Such a low demand in this neighborhood has made the real estate cheap, but there are plenty of other place within the live music capital of the world where you can get more property bang for your buck.

One of the major downsides of Georgian Acres is the high level of crime on Rundberg Ln., but this does not turn too many heads as the overall crime rat in Austin is extremely low. The southern border of the neighborhood is Hwy 183, putting it far out of reach of the cultural and financial centers of the city, but the easy access to 183 and I-35 make commuting rather easy, yet still timely. N. Lamar has its share of restaurants and shops, but overall the social activity in Georgian Acres is severely lacking. Head a mile or two south where you can get you hands on some better property in a better location at around the same prices.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • No social
  • Very far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"All Shopping"

The Gateway neighborhood is North Austin is hardly considered a community as you will not find a single house there. It is strictly a shopping and business district tucked away within the triangle formed by the intersecting Hwy 183 and Hwy 1, catering to the purchasing needs of the surrounding neighborhoods. There are no parks, but large scale gyms for individuals to obtain their daily workout routine and a large number of restaurants in the immediate area, most of which are large nationwide chains. Those who are visiting this area of the city can also stay at one of the several hotels that are set within this off the beaten path financial district.

The Gateway Shopping Center contains a Whole Foods Market and the Regal Gateway Stadium which features many movie screenings and Arboretum Crossing holds another collection of chain stores and shops. This area of town appears to resemble any other suburban shopping center as there a very few things present here that are unique to only Austin. The northern half of the Gateway neighborhood between Hwy 360 and W Baker Ln. are numerous professional buildings, many of which belong to research and information technology firms, hence it makes sense that one of the main streets is called Research Blvd. While a place to obtain your grocery and shopping needs, do not ever expect or hope to live within this highway triangle.
Pros
  • Shopping
  • Many restaurants
  • Hotels
Cons
  • No housing
  • Very far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"South Austin Charm"

Garrison Park is a healthy mix of suburbia, resale shops and restaurants that well suit those who are looking to raise a family in one spot for many years to come. W. Stassney and William Canon both serve as the neighborhood borders and have an adequate number of restaurants for those who like to go out and eat. Between these two major avenues is an intricate network of streets with single family homes and apartment complexes. S. Manchaca Rd. on the west end is lined with numerous thrift shops as well as both public and private schools. Garrison Park is a functional miss match of both urban and suburban appeal.

To further ad to the local benefits, the housing in this are is very affordable with house selling prices staying within the $100,000s and rent prices seldom exceeding $850. The actual Garrison Park has a community pool, which comes in handy during Austin's hot summer days and there are a higher number of automotive shops encircling the neighborhood. The landscape is bordering that of the western portions of Austin where the hills become higher and the limestone begins to show itself. There are few bus stops and routes that extend to this community, but the vast majority of residents already own a personal vehicle. For both single professionals and families, Garrison Park is a peaceful yet active suburb that serves many purposes beyond simply providing a physical shelter.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Many restaurants
  • Family friendly
Cons
  • Will need own car
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Peace and Quiet Within Easy Reach of Austins Nightlife"

Galindo is a modest urban neighborhood that is family friendly and within close range to SoCo, South Lamar, and the Greenbelt. The are lacks in local nightlife, restaurants and bars, but the dynamics if this community make up for it in providing adequate public schools and a well kept park and recreation center. Galindo has the advantages of a suburban neighborhood, but is a short bus or car ride the more eclectic and jumping parts of town. Railroad tracks form the western border and along the rails are several warehouse spaces, but they do not overwhelm the landscape, which has been kept moderately green.

The majority of resident spaces are apartments or high rise condos with some patches of single family house throughout the streets with the average rental prices being close to $850. The local population is a mix of different ages and lifestyles ranging from single professionals to students to families with young children. Galindo is nothing to spectacular, but it is also nothing too boring either considering the interesting spots are within easy reach of this neighborhood. Residents have the advantage of being close to Hwy 71, which allows for an easy commute in and out of the city, but it can also become bothersome during rush hour when traffic begins to feed into the neighborhood. Galindo is a wise choice for those who like peace and quiet during the day with the option of walking or viking over to the city's hopping streets.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Peace and quiet
  • Close to Hwy 71
Cons
  • Little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Just Another Industrial Suburban Neighborhood"

If a cheap mortgage was the main determinant in choosing a neighborhood, then Franklin Park would be one of the top prizes. If factors such as culture, nightlife, food and shopping are added to the pool, then this southeast Austin community just does not measure up. Over half the area is filled with steel and concrete warehouse spaces that make the scenery less than visually pleasing and even the residential areas have few options for grocery shopping and the like if they want to stray away from I-35. What seems to be the only benefit of this neighborhood is the cheap real estate, with housing prices as low a $100,000, but many who relocate to Austin are willing to invest a few more bucks for the sake of being close to lively culture.

There is one public school and public park and those who need medical care have to travel to either I-35 or Hwy 71. All in all this community comes across as desolate and boring, not accurately representing the lifestyles that Austin has to offer. A fair description would be naming Franklin Park a lower scale version of the South Austin neighborhoods on the other side of the interstate. The public transportation in this neighborhood is somewhat pitiful, hence residents most often need a vehicle to travel outside these streets since it would be less than advisable for anyone to cross these sections of Hwy 71 and I-35 on bike. If you are moving to Austin and want to truly experience Austin, then avoid this neighborhood as there are plenty of other spots where you can get more bang for your buck.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to major highways
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • Desolate warehouse landscape
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"For the Rich in Taste and Pocket"

Below the Greenbelt and amongst the hills in southwestern Austin, East Oak Hill is filled with upscale homes surrounded by the greenest landscape with towering views to match. To live here, however, requires a hefty paycheck and a taste for luxury as homes go for a minimum of $240,000 with the cheapest rent over $1,200. While other Austin neighborhoods have streets jam packed with small house after small house, these sparsely place winding avenues are filled with large than life mansions with generous amounts of yard as well.

This west end neighborhood was indeed built for the well to do family since outside of the abundant green areas are numerous childcare facilities and fitness studios. Off the path of any city nightlife, residents enjoy the most peaceful of days and nights, isolated by hills, dense brush and curving streets. While the nearby shopping options fit the basic needs, they lack the original style and weirdness that characterizes Austin since the only nearby shopping options include large chains like Target and Walmart, both at the nearby Hwy 71 and S. Mopac Expressway intersection. Suited for only the financially blessed families and executive professionals who like their does of the outdoors, younger professionals and students will find no place in East Oak Hill. The majestic hills are best left to the wealthy in the Lone Star capital city.
Pros
  • Green and clean
  • Mansions
  • Extreme peace and quiet
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • No Austin weirdness
  • Expensive to rent and buy a home
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Different Face of Austin"

Directly south of Highway 71 where Austin turns into South Austin and the urban turns into the suburban, East Congress is half industrial warehouses and half residential area. Properties between 71 and Sheraton are large scale lots that house everything from concrete staining to plumbing supplies. Southbound between there and E. Stassney Ln., however, is almost entirely residential houses aside from the couple of remaining restaurants that remain this far south on S. Congress Ave. East Congress is considered plain compared to the more centralized Austin neighborhoods, but offers affordable living for families that do not want to be too close to the ruckus that Austin nightlife brings.

For the young, single and creative residents, however, this neighborhood has little to offer unless they are that desperate for cheap rent, for which they can turn to East Austin neighborhoods. Highway 71 acts as a large concrete barrier between the area and the typical Austin funk, but at the same time offers an easy route in and out of the city. The public transportation in East Congress is less than ideal, but does exist. Most residents, however, have to use a personal vehicle to get to where they need to go. Battle Bend Park is the only public green space in the area, but the industrial backdrop makes it less than appealing to the eye. Even when preferring the suburban Austin avenues, individuals and families can do better than this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • Close to Hwy 71
Cons
  • Industrial area
  • Almost no nightlife
  • Few restaurants and shops
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Affordable and Pleasant Living Near St. Edwards"

Not all college students in Austin go to the University of Texas, and those that attend the Catholic campus to the south do well living in the Dawson neighborhood just across the street on South Congress Ave. Below the hustle and bustle of the SoCo area, Dawson is a slightly quieter, but still energetic neighborhood with affordable rental rates with the average being around $700. Highway 71 borders the neighborhood to the south and offers easy transit in and out of the city going east or westbound. East Oltorf serves as the northern boundary of Dawson, providing a convenient separation from the overrun hipster and tourist nights and weekend a few blocks north, but does not prohibit easy entry for those who wish to explore in the SoCo streets.

The majority of houses predate the 1950s and are of small size, coming in a variety of unconventional colors. Residents are of mixed ages compared to other Austin neighborhoods that tend to have a defining age trend. Dawson is also home to the city's busiest H-E-B, which is located at he corner of E. Oltorf and S. Congress Ave., so residents should choose their grocery shopping time carefully. Though not as dense as it is several blocks north, S. Congress Ave. has its healthy share of favorite restaurants and bars that offer a hefty dose of local nightlife. Head over to the 04 Lounge or the Crow Bar for some good dive bar drinks and down and dirty live music that can only be found in Austin or spend time at the Garden District Coffeehouse for sipping java outdoors. It is hard for St. Edwards students or any local period to do better than Dawson. Just be cautious about rush hour traffic feeding in from Highway 71.
Pros
  • Next to St. Edwards University
  • Close to SoCo and Downtown
  • Decently priced real estate
Cons
  • Traffic from Hwy 71
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Neighborhood of Welcoming"

With the wall of welcoming on the outskirts of the shopping area, Crestview is a wholesome neighborhood that still juts the funkiness that is Austin, TX. Filled with post World War II homes, this community offers a mellow environment in which residents can kick back and live life peacefully while within easy reach of all the awesome things Austin has to offer. The new Metro Rail Red Line goes right through the area, which in addition to bus routes and bike rides makes commuting to the University of Texas and Downtown an easy task. West Anderson Ln. serves as the northern boundary, which has the majority of shops, restaurants and leisure activity. Planet Fitness offers a spot to workout for a very cheap monthly membership fee and La Casita serves affordable breakfast tacos just down the block.

The home prices are mid-range, averaging about $200,000 and $950 for monthly rent. Crestview is suitable for families with schools and learning centers nearby, but a high percentage of residents are single professionals in their twenties and thirties. The population is actually a preferable blend of different ages and the location of the neighborhood is far enough off the beaten path to enjoy quiet days while also just a short drive away from high activity near the University of Texas campus. Being in close range of 183, 290 and I-35 makes traveling in and out of Austin via Crestview a breeze and an is ideal for anyone that has to make a long commute to work.
Pros
  • Family friendly neighborhood
  • Peace and quiet
  • Near major highways
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • Lacking some nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"The Center of it All"

Downtown and its 6th Street is to Austin what Bourbon Street is to New Orleans, filled with rich history but congested with over priced bars and drunk frat boy tourists. Weekends in this area of town are jumping with activity from the lone star happy hours to the prize of local music acts. The downtown area is also the home for major historic buildings, including the Texas Capital Building. The blocks surrounding Congress Ave. have the historic Paramount Theater and Alamo Drafthouse as well as the Austin the top rated hotels in the city.

Due to Downtown being a major tourist destination, the local real estate consist entirely of high rise condos and apartments that are high in price and in demand, but more expensive properties still exist elsewhere in Austin. Top notch museums like the Austin Museum of Art, the Austin Children's Museum, the Mexic- Arte Museum and the Arthouse dot the grey urban sprawl and the lake is just a short walk away. Unless you prefer to be in the center of everything that is cheap advertisement and coercing alcohol consumption, then Downtown is a great place to visit, but not live. The noise of rowdy intoxicated tourists can easily become old when trying to fall asleep. Hence, this area of town is highly unsuitable for families and elderly looking for some peace and quiet.
Pros
  • Tons of nightlife
  • Art venues
  • Many of restaurants
Cons
  • Too much traffic
  • Noisy tourists
  • Expensive shopping and food
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Major Highway Crossover"

Coronado Hills is the site of two major highways crossing over one another and aside from having low cost real estate and Nelson Field, a sports stadium, there is nothing too spectacular about this neighborhood. It looks like any other suburban community and has nothing distinctive about it. If you were to be brought only to this area, you would never guess that it was in fact part of the Austin Metropolitan Area. Traffic noise can be heard from the houses during rush hour and public transportation is scarce.

There is no nightlife and every property basically blends in with each other. The streets are absent of young single professionals and are filled with the elderly and children. Homes average around $150,000 and the rental costs are under $800. Considering how many other more interesting neighborhoods exist with cheaper housing costs, those looking to relocate to Austin can do a lot better than this small concrete box cut community.
Pros
  • Cheap rent
Cons
  • Highway noise and traffic
  • No nightlife
  • Nothing special
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Graduates Neighborhood"

A North Central Austin neighborhood, over half of Brentwood residents are between the ages of 25 and 40, making it the ideal settle down place for single professionals who have already graduated from college. Home prices for both renters and buyers are within mid range pricing compared to the Austin area with the average selling price being around $200,000 and rent being a little over or under $800. Though mostly occupied by young graduates, the Brentwood neighborhood is also suitable for families as there are numerous public schools and medical facilities to upkeep both physical and mental health.

The majority of restaurants and bars are along Burnet Rd. and N. Lamar with residential streets laying between the main avenues. The North Village Shopping Center has a yoga studio, drum shop and florist shop while W. Anderson Ln. has a coffee shop with an outdoor stage and the Bass Emporium among other unique spaces. With easy access to 183, 290 and 2222, residents can travel in and out of the neighborhood with ease and the bus system allows young graduates to meander to the downtown area.
Pros
  • Away from downtown noise
  • Good neighborhood for graduates
Cons
  • Far from dowtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Eclectic Community South of the Lake"

Between South Lamar and South Congress, Bouldin Creek contains everything unique and spits on the notion of containing remnants of large chains. Though some portions of the neighborhood have fallen victim to gentrification, most streets maintain the old time Austin charm with the majority of houses dating back to the 1940s. Catering to a younger hipster crowd, there is an abundance of coffee shops and trendy stores, though one may find the general attitudes among frequent visitors a bit much to take. S. 1st runs through the heart of the community and along with S. Congress is the main center of social and professional activity. Due to all this activity, it can be difficult to find a parking spot and your house will most likely have a stranger's car in front of it on a daily basis.

Bouldin Creek real estate is within mid range in costs for both buyers and renters. Those with a budget can easily solve the problem by renting a property with multiple roommates. The public transportation is highly efficient compared to many other areas of town and residents have easy access to the nightlife that is on S. Lamar, S. 1st and S. Congress. The lake and downtown are within walking distances and the northern end of the neighborhood is home to many artistic and cultural centers including the Long Center of Performing Arts. One of the downsides of living in Bouldin Creek, however, is how overcrowded it can get from visitors during the holidays and festivals such as Austin City Limits and South by Southwest.
Pros
  • Old charming houses
  • Access to nightlife
  • Close to the lake and Downtown
Cons
  • Can get overcrowded
  • Lack of places to park
  • Over- bearing hipster attitudes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Enjoy Everything Green"

Barton Hills has the best there is to offer in urban greenery. It is home to Zilker Park that contains Barton Springs, the Greenbelt goes through the whole length of the neighborhood and easy access to the river makes the community a dream come true for any outdoor enthusiast. There is without doubt no better place to live during the beautiful Austin spring days. Barton Springs is the perfect early evening or weekend swimming spot and Gus Fruh has the perfect stone structures for climbers. Along the length of the Greenbelt are trails that give the devotional jogger the workout he or she needs each day.

The housing prices range are within the upper $300,000s with rental prices exceeding $1,000, making this urban neighborhood a very wealthy one. Given that the parks are such a popular place for both residents and visitors, the public transportation is frequent and timely, allowing easy access to Downtown. Barton Hills also draws a crowd exceeding 70,000 during the Austin City Limits music festival, which is held every September in Zilker Park. Though the houses are within close distance to all the activity, the winding pattern of the residential streets help to create a level of isolation from too much unwanted noise, though it sometimes just cannot be avoided. Due to the area's importance in the city's tourism industry, the level of security is high and the crime rate very low.
Pros
  • Short ride to Downtown
  • Beautiful
  • Perfect place for the outdoors type
Cons
  • Expensive place to live
  • Shopping and restaurants limited
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"West Side Paradise"

Barton Creek Square is where one with a wealthy income can find upscale housing along beautifully forested streets within close range of the Green Belt and the Barton Creek Wilderness Park. Filled with newer and larger homes, the real estate prices range from $170,000 to $800,000 depending on condition and size. Those who wish to dine out can do so along the S. Mopac Expressway and the S. Capital of Texas Highway, but most of the area is purely residential, isolated from all hustle and bustle. Though not too far from Austin's economic and cultural centers, the population density of the neighborhood qualifies is as a suburban area.

The local crime rate is one of the lowest in the city and the population is one of the wealthiest in both the city and the country. Residents are of mixed ages ranging from retirees to upper- middle class students to families. The shopping options are plentiful with houses being within close range of Barton Creek Square and Westbank Market, and those who want to enjoy the river only need to take a short drive along the S. Mopac Expressway. Due to its suburban setting, this neighborhood lacks the bus stops that many inner city communities have, but almost every resident can afford and has their own personal vehicle. Barton Creek Square is the ideal spot for those who can afford prime real estate and wish to enjoy it.
Pros
  • Upscale housing
  • Natural beauty
  • Isolation
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
  • Lack of public transportation
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or