ajadedidealist

  • Local Expert 22,528 points
  • Reviews 55
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 1,552
  • Discussions 56

Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Pleasant, bucolic West Village Street"

This charming, tiny street in the heart of the West Village packs a lot of attractions in its narrow frame. While the street is by no means crowded - rather, like many streets in the area, it features historic town houses (although the ones here are slightly more modern, reminiscent of Lower East Side tenements rather than the 19th century brick of elsewhere in the Village) and a dearth of chain stores - it nevertheless offers plenty of dining and shopping choices. On the street itself, you can check out local favorite Cornelia Street Cafe, nearby Home - with an excellent wine list - the Pearl Oyster Bar if you're feeling decadent, or Sushi Mambo if you're in the mood for some Asian cuisine. A wealth of other restaurants, including Burrito Loco, Tio Pepe, and Risotteria, are all a few moments away, right off the street itself. With the Akira Ikeda art gallery located right on Cornelia Street, and the IFC film centre around the corner, culture vultures will find more than enough to keep them occupied here.
Pros
  • Cute street
  • Restaurants
Cons
  • Small
  • Tucked away
  • More modern (but still reasonably historic) buildings
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Absolutely gorgeous"

The tree-lined streets of this historic, bucolic block are among the city's most scenic. With elegant brownstones and red-brick townhouses, this largely residential street manages to combine a village-like feel with the vibrancy of The Village. Spend the afternoon sitting with friends on the iconic stoops of Perry Street, then head to nearby Bleecker or Hudson Street to visit a French bistro or lively cocktail bar. Try the trendy Italian Spasso, on Hudson just off Perry, or nearby Casa La Femme for delectable Moroccan fare. If you're in the mood for a night out, head to the other room (no capitals), a comfortable yet stylish bar right on Perry Street itself. Other recommended venues on or near Perry Street include the art gallery and cafe Doma, popular brunch spot Extra Virgin, and restaurant St. Ambrosius. While this area can be pricey, even for New York City's high standards, it's nevertheless one of the most pleasant spots in New York: a perfect balance of beauty and activity
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Great restaurants
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Expensive
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Good for discount shopping...and not much more"

Want a discount on a radio or TV monitor? Then you've come to the right place - West 27th Street is full of discount outlets and chains, including a branch of the Payless shoe store and a Sleepy's mattress stop. But if you're not bargain-hunting, there's little to do here, although tourists may be drawn to the raunchy-but-interesting Museum of Sex further east. Dining options are pretty limited around this parts: chains, Asian take-out, and happy-hour-joints abound, although a recommended option for those looking for something with a little more personality is Rooftop Garden Bar at 230 Fifth Avenue, which offers stunning panoramic views of the Empire State Building and the rest of downtown New York. The Fashion Institute of Technology is here, attracting an arty crowd, but the neighborhood doesn't have nearly the boho cachet of the blocks surrounding parts of the NYU campus. This area is serviceable, but in a city with so much character, it seems a bit basic and lacking in personality.
Pros
  • Fashion Institute of Technology
  • Schools
Cons
  • Dead at night
  • Nothing to do
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Pleasant part of the UES"

While not as cozy as Carnegie Hill, this stretch of the Upper East Side is nevertheless pleasant and comfortable. Home to a number of good, popular restaurants further east, such as Mediterranee, Orsay, and the charming tea house Alice's Tea Cup a couple of blocks south, this district is family-friendly but nevertheless sufficiently "adult" to provide some entertainment for the grown-ups, in the forms of a couple of more upmarket bars like Vino, as well as more relaxed places like watering hole Phoenix Park. However, the area is primarily residential, and real night owls might want to consider a place further downtown.

Medical facilities are particularly strong here, with Sloan Kettering Cancer Hospital, one of the nation (if not the world's) best cancer research centres, and New York Presbyterian Healthcare Centre, and the Hospital for Special Surgery. Hunter College is also close by for those wishing to enroll or even take courses on a by-interest basis, while nearby high schools include St. Vincent Ferrar and Talent Unlimited High School, and the prestigious Catholic Dominican Academy.
Pros
  • Medical care
  • Landmark buildings
  • Very quiet and pretty especially near Madison and Fifth Avenue
Cons
  • Expensive around Fifth, Madison, and Park Aves
  • No real nightlife scene
  • Primarily residential though more commercial between Third and Lex
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Heart of NYC Shopping"

Eat your heart out, Gossip Girl! Few visitors to New York, particularly those with a fashionable bent, will escape the city without a visit to Fifth Avenue in the 50's, home to some of the most elegant design houses in the world. From Bergdorf Goodman to Saks Fifth Avenue, Bendel to Armani and Prada, this district is filled with high-end labels taking up some very high-end real estate. The area lights up at Christmastime as stores strive to outdoor each other with elaborate window displays (although pedestrian travel can verge on the unbearable). Head further east, however, and the vibe gets more relaxed. While Sutton Place all the way to the East marks one of the city's most prestigious old-money enclaves, 56th Street between these two poles of elegance is more relaxed, with local restaurants, shops, cafes, and galleries. The original P.J. Clarke's on 55th and 3rd has been made venerable with age.
Pros
  • Shopping
  • Sutton place
  • Luxury apartments
Cons
  • Expensive
  • limited nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Good for U.N. types"

Less crowded with shoppers and out-of-towners than the East 30's, and less sedate than the East 50's, this district is perfect for well-heeled, international diplomatic types looking to live around the U.N. The atmosphere is cosmopolitan yet subdued - there are plenty of elegant cocktail bars here, but few raucous dive bars. If you can wrangle an invitation, visit one of the elegant, London-style clubs for Manhattan's elite - the Yale Club and Harvard Club are two favorites. Also worth a look is the Yacht Club and the Algonquin Hotel - former home of the Round Table at which famous wit Dorothy Parker presided. Further east there's a wealth of restaurants and clubs catering more specifically to the U.N. set. Recommendations include the Overlook Lounge, laid-back Ben and Jack's Steak House, and charming Catalyst, a bookstore and cafe for all the neighborhood's bibliophiles. Elegant yet not snobby, and closer to the theatres and concert halls of midtown than the Upper East Side, East 44th Street is a fine choice for a couple or family (the United Stations School is very nearby!). Grand Central Terminal makes for easy transportation.
Pros
  • Good restaurants and bars
  • U.N. proximity
  • Good school
Cons
  • midtown can be noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Good family area"

Like much of the Upper East Side, East 78th Street works best for families. Its nightlife is limited to a few frat-boy and preppy pubs on 2nd and 3rd Avenue (often visited by finance-dads seeking to recapture their glory days over beer pong), while playgrounds (in Central Park) and good schools (Chapin, Brearley, Birch Wathen Lenox, etc., all nearby) abound. While the restaurants and cafes around Madison Avenue give the adults something to do - there's great shopping here, especially for haute-vintage aficionados (Michael's and Encore, both on Madison and 77th, are dream-spots for fashionistas looking to buy second-hand), as well as fine established UES restaurants like Candle 79 one block north. Lexington Avenue is also a lively "hub" for this area, with All Soul's Church serving as a social focal point for many of the families in the area. Not great for 20-somethings looking to party, but for well-heeled older couples looking to start a family, this is a great place to settle down.
Pros
  • Safe
  • near great schools
  • Quiet
Cons
  • not many bars
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Gorgeous New England Street"

A bit removed from the town's commercial center, which is based around Water Street, this elegant residential promenade passes through the central campus of prestigious red-brick-and-ivy Phillips Exeter Academy, one of the best (some would argue the best) schools in the country. Yet this is decidedly not a "campus" street - there are in fact relatively few commercial buildings on the street: rather, the street is lined with gorgeous, 19th century houses (one of which, Browning House, an Academy Property, is a dead ringer for Disneyland's Phantom Manor). While many of the houses here are faculty or student housing, there are a few available for non-affiliated families, and these are all eminently worthwhile. With the exception of a glut of pedestrians holding up traffic at 8 am when students file across the street to their classes, the Academy presence is rarely problematic for residents, and for families with children, the location can in fact be a great boon for parents looking to send their children as "day students."
Bucolic charm, historic pedigree, and five minutes' walk to shops and restaurants? This street is a New England paradise.
Pros
  • Gorgeous houses
  • Near great school
  • quiet
Cons
  • 5 minute walk to cafes, etc
  • expensive
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Decent, convenient street"

Less picturesque than the historic, colonial heart of Exeter, Railroad Avenue can at times feel a bit depressing, especially when compared the the town's lovelier centre. Conveniently located next to the Downeaster Amtrak Rail Service (which is regular, but not often enough for the noise to be too annoying), the area around the train station is home to Romeo's, one of the town's more popular pizzerias (on Lincoln Street) as well as to a general store that also operates an authentic, down-home "truck style" cafe (expect coffee served in mugs, seats at the counter, and plenty of pie). Walk closer into town along Lincoln Street and the buildings steadily grow more historic. A popular bakery here is worth a stop for some delectable cakes and biscuits. But for livelier activity, and more New England charm, consider living closer to the centre of town, although such quaintness comes with a price tag.
Pros
  • Convenient transport
  • Usually quiet
  • Inexpensive
Cons
  • Noisy railroad
  • Not much to do
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Standard LES Street"

Like its neighbors Orchard Street and Ludlow Street, Elridge Street is a "standard" Lower East Side Street - pleasant, if not beautiful, with remnants of the Lower East Side's historic tenement culture alongside a wealth of more contemporary cultural outfits: poetry readings, literary cafes, galleries, and bars. Lively but not overcrowded, this street is home to the Museum at Elridge Street, an insightful look into the Jewish history of the region, as well as to a number of Chinese restaurants - a spillover from nearby Chinatown. Visit Best Fuhzhou, Prosperity Dumpling, or Hing Shing Seafood store for a nice meal or take-away, or party the night away at Inhibit Karaoke Lounge. The blend of LES and Chinatown culture makes for a lively, if sometimes noisy, street culture. The north end of the street has less of a Chinese influence, and is home to the James Fuentes, Woodward, and Lmak Projects art galleries.
Pros
  • lively
  • proximity to fun
  • The museum
Cons
  • busy
  • noisy
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A mixed bag"

Clarkson Street has good bits and bad bits. When it's nice, it's really nice: the eastern end of the street, where Clarkson turns into Carmine Street, is home to charming cafes like Tanti Baci and Cafe Espanol, plenty of green space at the James J. Walker Park, art galleries like Gran Enzo Sperno, and plenty of boutiques and chocolatiers. The prestigious City as School is here, as is the Carmine Street Pool. But while proximity to the West Side Highway is a plus for plenty of athletes, who use the running and bike paths obscured from traffic by a wall of foliage, on Clarkson Street the atmosphere gets a bit sketchy: this place is home to Mystique Gentleman's club, a seedy strip joint, Hot 97, the hip-hop radio station that has seen shootings and violence as late as 2006, and a pornographic video/gaming store - none of which are places many New Yorkers would feel comfortable walking past on their way home at night. A great street - but make sure your building is on the eastern side of it.
Pros
  • Good schools
  • Park
  • HIstorical
Cons
  • sketchy
  • near a strip joint
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Attractive Greenwich Village Neighborhood"

With its Greek Revival house (one of which was the home of Dirty Dancing star Jennifer Gray), Bethune Street is a classic example of the quiet, tree-lined historic streets that are characteristic of this neighborhood. Its historic pedigree is impeccable: famous art photographer Diane Arbus committed suicide on this street at number 77, a former artists' colony, and Kurt Vonnegut's character Howard Campell (from novel Mother Nights) also lived on this street. Today this street is peaceful and pleasant, with plenty of greenery near Beeker Playground and the Hudson River Greenway, which also offers a bicycle path and river views. While this street's not known for its lively nightlife, there's nevertheless plenty to do: visit nearby Bank Street Theatre for some off-off Broadway productions, or dine at the charming vinoteca Entwine, Mexican Tortilla Flats, or charming French bistro Le Recette. Just avoid the party-hardy crowd of the nearby Meatpacking District!
Pros
  • Near green spaces
  • Beautiful homes
  • Historical
Cons
  • Not much nightlife
  • Sleepy
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nondescript"

Not as historic or as pretty as the West Village, not as lively as Chelsea, West 15th Street is a largely commercial area with little distinctive character or charm. It has its perks - it's close to several 14th Street/Union Square subway stops for a variety of subway lines - and the convenience of Union Square, with its myriad cafes, bookstores, and record shops (not to mention a pleasant picnicking park). But West 15th Street itself is little more than a basic shopping destination. Nearby high-street options include Pier 1 Imports, Foot Locker, Urban Outfitters, and Staples, while dining choices tend to be of the equally chain variety: there's a Subway, and a nearby Starbucks. Further west, however, choices get more interesting - visit the Chelsea Market for some local finds, or try trendier dining options like Le Gamin Cafe, La Taza Deora, or the Chelsea-fied Vynl. Avoid the Port Authority building at night - it's a bit sketchy.
Pros
  • lots of shopping
  • Chelsea Market
  • good transport
Cons
  • boring chain stores
  • crowded
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Tiny but trendy"

This short stretch of Tribeca, located just steps from the Washington Market Park and Tribeca Performing Arts Centre, is dense indeed when it comes to attractions-per-foot . With an easy-to-reach subway stop (serving the A,C,E,F,N, and R trains), it's ideal for active types looking to get in and out of the city centre at a moment's notice - but the attractions here are numerous enough to entertained even the most seasoned New Yorker. Visit galleries like Ethan Cohen Fine Art, Artflag, Pelavin Editions, or nearby Michael Perez Gallery, or indulge in the cafes a mere stone's throw from the street. Nearby dining options include health-fan-favorite Viet Cafe, laid-back Gloria's Restaurant, Dean's Pizzeria - for those who prefer their pies upmarket - Zutto Japanese, and trendy speakeasy-style bar Hideaway. While the area's dense, it's not crowded - these bars are populated without there being ten-mile-long queues: the area's bars have a largely well-heeled, yet "local" feel: a perfect balance of elegant and comfort.
Pros
  • Lots of bars
  • Art galleries
  • Publics transport
Cons
  • it's small
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A street trying to find its place"

After the devastating attacks of 9/11 nearly ten years ago, Vesey Street - one of the streets adjacent to the World Trade Centre city - was decimated right along with the centre itself. But just as reconstruction of the trade centre site has at last begun, with a new tower in the works, so has Vesey Street worked to build itself up again. There are a few restaurants in the vicinity - Au Mandarin provides quick and simple delivery for office workers looking to eat in - and offices like Verizon and American Express are located here. Regardless, however, this street is somewhat dismal and depressing, even for a commercial street, given its location and the still largely-empty construction site: a literal void in the centre of downtown Manhattan. Tourists may wish to visit Ground Zero - although for some New Yorkers the idea of turning this painful memory into a tourist attraction is an anathema - but unless you're working here, there's little to bring you in this direction.
Pros
  • An important site for many tourists
Cons
  • Near Ground Zero
  • not much there
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The edge of Chinatown"

Just south of Confucius Plaza, Division Street marks the gradual merging of Chinatown proper with the housing projects and low-income-developments that dot the very eastern section of the Lower East Side. Division Street is just a stone's throw from the lower/middle-income development Knickerbocker Village. It's not exactly ugly, although it's a far cry from the charming historical town houses of Greenwich Village. Yet Division Street, as its name implies, suffers from being the border of two neighborhoods. There's not much to do here, although the Museum at Elridge Street is an insightful look into the history of the Lower East Jewish community. Dining options are plentiful in Chinatown - Fuleen Seafood is right on Division Street itself - or try some non-Asian dining on the eastern end of the street at Bacaro or Les Enfants Terribles. Seward Park is the area's closest patch of greenery, and is of a relatively decent size.
Pros
  • Interesting museum
  • Cheap
  • proximity to Chiatown
Cons
  • not much flair
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Lively for 20-somethings"

Dominated by the campus of NYU, which is dotted all around this area, the small, little-known Great Jones Street is an ideal destination for artistically-inclined 20-somethings, whether NYU students or no, looking to get involved in the city's hipster-lite nightlife. With a massive NYU development at one end of the street, Great Jones Street is not the place to go to if you want to avoid noise or fake-IDs, but there's plenty of options if you're willing to join in the fun: check out the oddly named Chinatown Brasserie, or go low-key with the West 3rd Common. Le Basket is also popular for its French delicacies. One of the city's most popular brunches is at nearby Five Points, so gear up for an afternoon of mimosas and lox. There's also an enormously high number of art galleries, craftsmen, and vintage boutiques on the block, including Michael Andrews Bespoke and retro-types' dream Screaming Mimies, delivering high-class vintage gear. A lovely, lively street.
Pros
  • lots to do
  • bars
  • cobblestone streets
Cons
  • NYU scene
  • noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Scenic SoHo Street"

This scenic slice of SoHo, with picturesque red brick town houses and plenty of green foliage, is among downtown's more pleasant streets. With its wooden facades - home to plenty of arty boutiques and all-organic restaurants - it is a welcome respite from the all-too-modern concrete blocks that fill up some nearby streets. There's plenty to do and see here: the Thompson Cafe is a popular spot for locals to drink lattes or cappuccinos and people-watch, while the French-Moroccan Country Cafe is an elegant piece of cross-cultural fusion. Shops and boutiques along this street include the delectable Kee's Chocolate, the Meg Cohen Design Shop, L'Artisan Parfumeur, Cartesian Graphics, and more. The end of the street provides some welcome parkland in the form of Juan Pablo Duarte Square, but the major attractive of this charming, if pricey, street is its "village" feel - it combines the elegance of New York's best with some much-needed peace and quiet in the big city. At least until the lights go off...this area's nightlife can prove hectic if unmanaged.
Pros
  • Good people watching
  • a lot of history
  • lively nightlife
Cons
  • crowded at night
  • Noisy
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Stuck in the Middle"

Not quite the posh tree-lined enclave of the Upper East Side, not quite the buzzing commercial area of midtown, the East 50's are one of the rare parts of New York City to lack a distinct neighborhood character. Around 5th Avenue, the area is gorgeous and elegant - here is the shopping capital of the world, where Bergdorf's and Bendel's are populated by an international jet-setting (and jet-shopping) elite. But head further east and the landscape changes, transforming into a largely sedate area filled with office buildings and their attendant amenities (plenty of Starbucks and sandwich delis). By the time you reach the East River, however, you've found your way to another up-and-coming neighborhood: the stunning river-views in these modern developments have attracted a number of young professionals drawn by the low prices and picturesque panoramas, and the far East 50's have a decidedly "young" vibe. Hit up some up-and-coming-bars like the River Club, Mimi's, Travis, and the perennially popular Le Perigourd, popular with the uber-posh old money Sutton Place set located just a few blocks to the north.
Pros
  • Pretty
  • varied
  • good public transport
Cons
  • No single neighborhood "feel"
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Midtown East"

Just one block south of the crowded, cramped 42 Street, here on East 41st Street the density has already dissipated. Grand Central, for easy transport access, is but a short walk away, as are the oft-packed theatres of Midtown and Broadway. But this street, largely commercial, is far calmer. The vibe here is "seasoned professional" rather than "eager tourist," and the restaurants, cafes, and nightlife reflect the needs of the white-collar workers who spend their days at the Art Deco office skyscrapers that are so common in this part of midtown. Popular eateries in this district include popular Mexican restaurant Sinigual Contemporary, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, and the Tuscan Cibo. If you head even further East, close to the river, you reach the picturesque Tudor City development, a quiet, middle-class village in the heart of an otherwise buzzing commercial area. One of the rare really residential parts of Midtown, it's ideal for diplomats or other international types looking to be close to the U.N.
Pros
  • busy
  • lively
  • pleasant
Cons
  • mostly commercial
  • not much to do
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"The lost neighborhood"

The West 40's have Broadway, theatre, and pizazz. The West 20's have the haute-elegance of Chelsea. But somehow the West 30's have managed to skip neighborhood categorization altogether. This area is an eclectic collection of streets that never seems to find its character. Crowded, tourist-driven, and at times sketchy (the area around Penn Station and Madison Square Garden, while less dotted with sex clubs and strip joints than it used to be, still has a decidedly lascivious feel), this area doesn't have much to offer besides easy Long Island transport and the big-budget MSG entertainment. There are a few restaurants in this area - Garage Cafe and High Line Cafe are some examples - but they are, alas, vastly outnumbered by the chain fast food joints. Not a place to wander alone at night, although the area is more creepy than it is dangerous proper.
Pros
  • Transportation
Cons
  • Crowded all the time
  • Noisy
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small Chinatown Street"

While more famous streets like Canal, Mott, and Mulberry Streets are immediately associated with Chinatown, few have heard of Howard Street, a tiny street just north of Canal. But for potential movers into the Chinatown area, Howard Street represents a relative hidden gem - a quieter back-street in a neighborhood not often known for its peaceful ambiance. It's a bit of a hub for clothing stores - there's an American Apparel and a Vogel Boots on this block - although the restaurant choices (many good ones, most of them Chinese or Asian-fusion) tend to cluster on nearby streets. Also located near here is the Museum of Chinese America, a worthwhile tourist destination for anyone with a special interest in the subject. It may lack the liveliness and character of Canal Street, but for some, particularly potential residents, this may in fact prove preferable. Transport is easy - the Canal Street subway stop is a stone's throw away.
Pros
  • Quiet (for Chinatown)
  • Near public transportation
  • Some stores
Cons
  • limited dining on street
  • may be inaccessible for non Mandarin/Cantonese-speakers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Typical UES Street"

As with much of the Upper East Side, East 74th Street passes through a variety of iterations as it stretches east from Central Park. West of Lexington Avenue you find the "Upper East Side" proper, with grand mansions, elegant boutiques (and even a hint of haute couture on Madison Avenue), and the doormen-attended co-ops lining Park Avenue, one of the city's oldest and most prestigious districts. Go further east, however, and the vibe is more laid-back and approachable - the eastern stretch of E 74th Street is home to casual, preppy, even a little dive-y (ironically) sports bars and places like Iggy's Karaoke (on 72nd). If Madison Avenue is staid, 2nd Avenue is decidedly laid back. "Posh" venues include Italian restaurant Caravaggio, located in a townhouse between Madison and Fifth, as well as Cafe Boulud, located two blocks uptown, but further east you'll find more relaxed eateries like JC Mellon's and Mezza Luna. While the eastern stretch of this street may not be as swank as Park Avenue, it's certainly nice enough - with a young professionals vibe that may suit some better than the staid family-feel of the UES proper.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Good restaurant scene
  • Near good schools
Cons
  • street changes character as you go further east
  • Expensive to live here
  • Quiet
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Comfortable family area"

Neither too trendy nor too downmarket, too busy nor too quiet, too artsy nor too bourgeois, the West 80's represent one of Manhattan's few truly balanced areas. While many family-friendly areas are either so dull and residential as to be unliveable, or gather their "safe" atmosphere by raising prices to the level of over the top exclusivity, the Upper West Side is family-friendly yet unpretentious, with a thriving restaurant scene that, though tables may not be booked months in advance, nevertheless offer good and often great food for reasonable (for New York) prices. Some family-friendly restaurants on or around West 85th Street include the relaxing brunch place Popovers, hearty Italian trattoria Nonna's, and Bar Luna, although Celeste is another popular choice. There's plenty of greenery around - with Riverside Park on one side of this not-too-long crosstown street and Central Park on the other. Pet owners will be glad to hear that it's also near the 87th Street Dog Run in Riverside Park, a popular community meeting point. This lively neighborhood is a must-consider for New York families looking for a comfortable place to put down roots.
Pros
  • great restaurants
  • family-friendly
  • parks
Cons
  • not trendy
  • limited nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A cultural nexus"

If your idea of fun is going out every night to a play, classical or jazz concert, or civilized meal, then East 62nd Street might just be your ideal New York City street. Catering to a more mature crowd than do the dive bars of the East Village, the meat markets of SoHo and the Meatpacking District, but nevertheless attracting a less staid set than the elegant Upper East Siders, this district is ideal for older men and women of means (it ain't cheap) who enjoy the lively spirit of this crowded district even as they want easy walking access to all New York has to offer. Lincoln Square and Water Reade are two of the city's best art-house cinemas (while Lincoln Plaza is one of the city's largest for blockbusters), while Lincoln Square and the Time Warner Centre between them offer a host of nightly cultural activities - from dancing in summertime's Midsummer Night's Swing to the New York City Opera. Excellent dining choices - often on the pricier, more-established - end of things abound: try the pizzas at Fiorello's, and don't skimp on the excellent bread basket at Josefina's.
Pros
  • Cultural activities
  • Liveliness
  • Lincoln Centre
Cons
  • expensive
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Tourist Central"

The West 40's are a curious collection of streets in Manhattan. On the one hand, they're jam-packed with tourists (and the attendant ills - crowds, noise, backed-up streets) staying at any one of the number of midtown business and leisure hotels located in this district. They're far from charming - no pre-war co-ops, Art Deco skyscrapers, or tree-lined brownstone streets here - and yet somehow West 40th Street has a certain charm. Is it the proximity of Broadway, which even in the most "touristy" shows still preserves a degree of energy unseen in most other theatre districts of the world? (Nearby theatres include the New Amsterdam, New Victory, New 42nd Street, and Foxwoods Theatre, among others) Is it the presence of the faded grandeur at some of the most elegant gentlemen's clubs (as in London-style clubs, not strip joints) of yesteryear, like the Algonquin? Is it the collection of dark-wood steakhouses - alongside chain restaurants like Red Lobster unheard of elsewhere in New York? The juxtaposition of the derelict Port Authority with the lively Times Square? Good, bad, or ugly - (and usually all three at th same time), there's something special about this area.

You just might not want to live there.
Pros
  • Broadway shows
  • "standby" clubs and restaurants
Cons
  • Tourists
  • Port authority
  • neon everywhere
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"The beginnings of Chelsea"

While the rumblings of Chelsea only really get started in the West 20s, West 18th Street is nevertheless a lively commercial area stretching out from popular arty hangout spot Union Square. The NYU vibe is still in full force here (as opposed to the largely gay, late-20's population that dominates Chelsea), with a number of studenty, divey joints to accompany the elegant restaurants and chiseled-abs-nightclubs that begin to proliferate in greater measure a few steps further north. Check out Del Posto for a hearty Italian meal, or begin to enjoy the Chelsea feel with higher-end La Gascoigne or Eighteenth and Eighth Restaurant. Meanwhile, NYU students have a wealth of cheaper eats to choose from, including outlets of all the major fast food chains, a number of local pizzerias, and popular Thai Galanga Gardens. Hudson Square Park provides a welcome splash of greenery in an otherwise dense urban area. There's a wealth of good shopping here - mostly chains like Urban Outfitters appealing to hip 20-somethings
Pros
  • Lots to do
  • mixed scene
  • Nightlife
Cons
  • crowded
  • loud
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"A pleasant park"

Located in Greenwich Village, Abingdon Square Park is one of those valued, all-too-rare patches of greenery in the urban jungle that is New York City. Only a quarter acre (1000 sq. m) in size, the park is nevertheless pleasant for a morning coffee or afternoon wrap. The street surrounding it, large Abingdon Street, is well-located in the heart of the West Village - a location filled with trendy boutiques, arty galleries, and vegan, gluten-free, and otherwise hyper-healthy eateries. Recette is one popular French bistro in the neighborhood, while other locals swear by the vaguely named "The Place." (Cafe Cluny is also popular). Nightlife tends to be civilized - bars and pubs like the Tavern on Jane are the norm, rather than the dive-y joints of the East Side or the crowded meat market clubs of the Meatpacking district. Ideal for sensible singles looking to combine character with quiet, or for young families not ready to give up a world of granola and free-range eggs ust yet.
Pros
  • park space
  • good location
  • restaurants
Cons
  • quiet
  • not trendy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Check your street number"

While the houses on the eastern end of this slender Greenwich Village Street are beautiful in the traditional Greenwich village manner - nineteenth-century brick, wrought-iron balustrades, trees shading these out-of-the-way blocks - the charm factor of the neighborhood drops precipitously as you head further west, approaching the blare and bustle of the West Side Highway (although cyclists will find much to enjoy on the riverside bike path - if they can brave the traffic and find a way across!) . In the eastern end of the street, you're near the popular (and historic) Cherry Lane Theatre, lovely dining venues like the Cornelia Street Cafe, Snack Tavern, and the Hudson Clearwater Restaurant, the scene dries up just a few minutes' walk west. Overall this is a great street if you're in the "Greenwich Village" part of it, but gets less pleasant the closer you are to the highway. It's still only a few minutes' walk of a difference overall, though - so even at its worst Morton Street has a fabulous location.
Pros
  • nice cafes
  • historic charm
  • Beautiful homes
Cons
  • near West Side highway
  • noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Small bustling street"

In the heart of the city's bustling, downtown financial district, this tiny street flows easily into some of its larger neighbors, among them William Street and Water Street. This largely commercial neighborhood attracts a number of banking and other companies; on or nearCedar Street, you'll find the Jennifer Temps temping agency, the famous Cryos sperm bank, China American Insurance, the American International Group, and Harold T. Marcus and Company. As you might expect, the vibe here is largely office-based - there's little dining or night-life here, but plenty of delis and lunchtime takeaways. Aside from the expected chains like Chipotle, there's the vegan-friendly Just Salad and the aptly named Financier Patisserie, as well as a couple informal work-lunch and happy-hour joints: check out Ise Retaurant, Sophie's, the Italian trattoria Harry's Italian. The Pearl Street diner is a popular joint for locals. a fine place to work
Pros
  • Offices
  • Near waterfront
  • Location
Cons
  • Not much to do
  • limited nightlife
  • limited dining
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Charming Greenwich Village Stret"

This picturesque street in the heart of Greenwich Village has been popular with artists and filmmakers alive, and is still a popular filming location for NYC-based dramas, among them Law & Order, The Job, Autumn in New York, and Wait Until Dark. The period red-brick houses, with wrought-iron balustrades and charming verdant ivy, are some of the most beautiful in Manhattan, rendering this historic neighborhood one of the city's most scenic. Luckily, scenic doesn't entail stagnant: there's plenty to do here in the heart of the West Village. Pay a visit to the homes of jazz age mayor Jimmy Walker and novelist Sherwood Anderson at numbers 5 and 12, respectively (though don't ask to go inside!), or check out Edgar Allan Poe's old haunt: the Trinity Parish Cemetery. Locals as well as tourists will find much to keep them here: while the street itself is largely residential, nearby side-streets offer plenty of dining and nightlife fare. Visit nearby Japanese restaurant "EN Japanese Brasserie," or have an old-fashioned romantic date at the Lelabar. Out of the Kitchen is another popular choice among locals.
Pros
  • Gorgeous
  • historical legacy
  • Location
Cons
  • a bit quiet
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"TriBeCa Standard"

Leading into TriBeCa's main recreational park, the Washington Market Park, with its charming gazebo and tennis/baseball facilities, Reade Street is a pleasant enough stretch of TriBeCa. The feel is classic TriBeca - arty in a minimalist, loft-studio fashion that doesn't seem to have gone out of style since the early 90's, but without the relentless come-and-go trendiness that dominates so many of Manhattan's neighborhoods. The Meatpacking District may have come and gone, but among a certain set, TriBeCa abides. The area around Reade Street itself is home to a number of attractions, among them a fair few art galleries: visit KS Art on Leonard Street or SoHo photo gallery on White Street . For a quick coffee, visit the Espresso Lounge, or grab tea at the Chinese Pak Tea House, washed down with a scrumptious pastry from TriBeCa treats. For a more substantial meal, try any one of the Asian restaurants on the block (there are many, representing a variety of countries), or down a delicious dollar taco at perennial favorite Taco House. Easy subway transfer from Chambers Street
Pros
  • galleries
  • cafes
  • lively
Cons
  • noisy
  • not so trendy
  • pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Spot of Green in Tribeca"

Manhattan can be a busy bustling place - an urban jungle rather than a verdant one. So the few acres of green parkland spread out over the city can often feel like tiny refuges: escape from the hustle and relentless energy of the big city. St. John's Park in the heart of Tribeca is seemingly one such place. This tiny stretch of greenery is relatively large - but while it's pretty to look at, it's less pleasant than it could be; the streets surrounding the park have been transformed into a circular road leading to the Holland Tunnel, cutting pedestrians off from the inner circle. However, while the parkland can only be viewed from a relative distance, there are other attractions in the area: the district is filled with arty boutiques like Wetlands and the Behr Thyssen Gallery, as well as a number of trendy dining joints. Hit up the relaxed Moomah Cafe just over on Hudson Street, on the other side of the Park or visit the upscale Brandy Library Lounge one block south of Ericcson. Not terribly much to do - but a pleasant enough place.
Pros
  • Proxmity to park
  • Galleries
  • TriBeCa
Cons
  • Can't really use park
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Something's fishy here"

While the South Street Seaport no longer emits the same wafting smell of fresh (mostly) fish that it once did, Front Street nevertheless isn't quite the charming historical street it could b, given its location to the Seaport, as well as other historical areas like Wall and Pearl Street. It's an efficient commercial street, with several high-rise office buildings looking out over the water, as well as a couple of hotels. Dining is largely limited to business-friendly takeaways, such as Starbucks and a local sushi joint, although nearby South Street Seaport offers plenty of fine restaurants (if you enjoy seafood, that is). While it's interestingly located and perfectly decent, overall there's little to particularly this area. If you work here - fine - if you don't, there's little reason to come here. But nearby South Street Seaport is nevertheless a highly worthy touristic destination
Pros
  • Offices
  • Good location
  • near south street seaport
Cons
  • not much to do
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Charming Brooklyn Heights"

With its tree-lined streets and period wrought-iron balustrades, Brooklyn Heights seems more like New Orleans than it does New York City. The most elegant of Brooklyn's many, myriad neighborhoods, Brooklyn Heights is an upscale district for the family-oriented New Yorker looking to balance proximity to New York's central attractions with a bucolic, peaceful environment - a relative rarity in hustle-and-bustle Manhattan. Yet while peace and quiet is certainly Water Street's strong suit - it looks over a pleasant patch of greenery, leading to stunning river views of Manhattan beyond - it has plenty to offer by means of local amenities for when you're not in the mood to drive across the Brooklyn Bridge. Enjoy a delicious chocolatey treat at Jacques Torres Chocolate or the Amandine Bakery, or dine friendly at Ignacio's pizzeria. If you're looking for an upscale romantic night out, hit The River Cafe, one of the city's most delightful restaurants, with stunning views very nearly matched by a terrific pan-American menu. With a number of galleries, among them the DUMBO arts centre, to choose from, this street is an ideal family nest for an artistically-inclined menage.
Pros
  • gorgeous
  • great food
  • great views
Cons
  • expensive
  • hard to get to
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mount Sinai Neighborhood"

East 105th Street is a mixture of two worlds. Just north of the elegant tree-lined streets that make up Carnegie Hill, one of New York City's smartest (and swankest) family neighborhoods, East 105th Street hasn't quite been subsumed into either Spanish Harlem or Harlem proper. The vibe is very much dominated by nearby Mount Sinai, whose myriad doctors, nurses, attendants, and patients all make up the bulk of the area's dining and nightlife scene even as its long-term residents are largely composed of middle-class locals, many of whom represent the southernmost reaches of Spanish Harlem (the El Barrio Museum, a paean to American Hispanic culture, is on this street). Dining here is largely Hispanic-inspired as well - try nearby La Fonda Boricua and El Caribeno, as well as the El Paso Tacqueria, for burritos and tacos far more authentic fare than you'll find elsewhere in the city. Nightlife is limited, although there's a steady supply of happy-hour venues for exhausted doctors; try Milk Lounge for one such outing. Much cheaper than the rest of the UES, while still conveniently located (a subway at 103rd street for the 6-train).
Pros
  • cheap
  • great Mexican food
  • lively
Cons
  • not very aesthetically pleasing
  • busy
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"Heart of the Upper West Side"

Sandwiched between the Museum of Natural History (and its attendant Rose Planetarium) and Riverside Drive Park, West 78th Street can seem like a paradise for kids. Steps from Collegiate School, one of the best K-12 private boys' schools in Manhattan, as well as from the Tecumseh Playground and, of course Central Park, this street is an ideal family neighborhood. Yet it's far from quiet. The bustling tourist trade around the Museum of Natural History keeps things lively, as does the burgeoning restaurant scene, which while not "trendy," nevertheless is more active than in other similar "family-oriented" neighborhoods. Try the colorful Nice-Martin, a French restaurant that eschews dark wood and Parisian zinc in favor of a brighter decor reminiscent of the South of France, or have a family brunch at the Amsterdam Avenue outlet of Upper East Side brunch standby Sarabeth's. Isabella's Restaurant, on Columbus Avenue, also offers a highly tasty brunch. Public transport is highly convenient, with a number of north-south subway stops on 79th Street, and the crosstown bus on 78th/9th.
Pros
  • lots for kids
  • museum
  • parks
Cons
  • not much nightlife
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"A mix of feels"

The Upper West Side north of 96th Street but south of the Columbia campus is a somewhat peculiar, highly distinctive area. The feel of the Upper West Side (middle-class/laid-back, family friendly, filled with charming family-owned bistros and trattorias, plus plenty of organic grocers) begins to meld with the campus feel of Columbia: cheap dive bars, studenty "arty" cafes, and an overall much younger feel. This small street begins to reflect this change in feel. Brasseries like Alouette represent a classic "Upper West Side" feel (as does the requisite neighborhood Whole Foods), and Regional Restaurant offers an elegant mimosa brunch, but already evidence of the Columbia bubble has begun to creep in: Cafe Viva Gourmet Pizza-Pasta is an inexpensive student-style takeout joint, while nearby Lenny's Bagels and Malecon offer hearty, good food at college-student prices. The proximity of charming Riverside Park, with its adjacent 19th century buildings on Riverside Drive, is another plus.
Pros
  • lots of dining
  • good bars
  • lively
Cons
  • not so charming
  • busy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Ideal family neighborhood"

With tree-lined green streets and charming brownstone town houses, this street - starting at Carnegie Hill and making its way east into Yorkville is an ideal, if somewhat pricey, neighborhood for families. The westernmost parts of the street (i.e., Fifth, Madison, and Park Avenues) are on the swanker side: the co-ops and brownstones here are very expensive, but Carnegie Hill is the closest thing New York City has to Disneyland: from old-school bookstores like The Corner Bookstore on Madison Avenue, to the playground at Hunter College High School, to high-end children's clothing sellers like Jacadi, Bonpoint, and Magic Windows (not to mention fantastic family-friendly eateries like Island, Bar 92, Bistrot de Nord, and Table d'Hote, all on or just off Madison Avenue), this is a paradise for parents. (The proximity of schools like Hunter, St. Bernard's, Spence, Nightingale, and - in the east - Chapin and Brearley doesn't hurt). While the further east you go, the less expensive (and oh-so-precious) the neighborhood becomes, Yorkville still has a lot to offer: buy organic groceries and tasty takeaways at the Vinegar Factory, or take the family to a day at the pool at the Asphalt Green. Or enjoy a picnic on scenic Carl Schurtz Park.
Pros
  • great family neighborhood
  • schools
  • lovely restaurants
Cons
  • dead at night
  • expensive
  • staid
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Heart of Hamilton Heights"

Located way up in Hamilton heights, West 150th Street isn't exactly an area that comes to mind when considering the variety of options available in New York City. For all too many New Yorkers, the city ends at 125th street, and the over one hundred blocks to the north are easily dismissed as "slums" or "out of the way". This is less true now than ever, as housing costs are skyrocketing and new northbound neighbors are ever more gentrified. While West 150th Street is far from charming - a conglomeration of modern tenement-style houses and gas stations - it's not blighted, either, and in fact represents a reasonably safe, if slightly unfashionable, family neighborhood for would-be Manhattanites lacking the funds to move closer to Central Park. Restaurants and nightlife scenes here are relatively basic - a few "locals" combined with plenty of fast-food chains - but there are worse places to live in Manhattan.
Pros
  • cheap
  • family-friendly
  • quiet
Cons
  • far out
  • not much to do
  • limited dining
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Family-friendly Yorkville Street"

An ideal family neighborhood, this stretch of street through Yorkville is located close to a number of desirable spots, including posh girls' schools Chapin and Brearley (both around East End Avenue), the shopping centre of East 86th Street, with its myriad chain stores and cinemas, and the charming Carl Schurz Park, located near Gracie Mansion along the East River. The buildings here may not be as swank as they are in Carnegie Hill, or along Park Avenue, but these brownstones and reasonably small brick apartment blocks, are perfectly serviceable. The area has a comfortable "neighborhood" feel, with plenty of coffee shops, diners, frozen yogurt shops, and a few standout restaurants, such as French Quatorze Bis on 79th Street and Demarchelier on 86th.
Pros
  • good restaurants
  • near good schools
  • lots of shopping
Cons
  • not as pretty
  • not much nightlife
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Charming colonial street"

Water Street - Exeter, NH
The centre of this small town, Water Street is popular with students, parents, and tourists alike, although the somewhat over-the-top "Ye Olde" feel may isolate some locals, Filled with charming craft shops and refurbished eighteenth- and nineteenth-century buildings, this street is extraordinarily picturesque. Stop by popular eatery The Baker's Peel for a fresh-from-the-over breakfast, indulge in delicious sandwiches alongside students at The Green Bean, or spend hours on the free wireless at "bakery." If nature's by your thing, head down to the banks of the lake, and enjoy a glimpse of the Academy's famous crew team practicing by the boathouse. For a swank romantic meal out, the Inn by the Water is a gourmet's paradise with stunning river views, although for a more affordable shot at the same view, Penang Tokoyo has a more laid-back (largely studenty) atmosphere. Nightlife is largely limited to the Ioka, a renovated music hall that is now a combined cinema-events hall.
Pros
  • Gorgeous
  • lots to do
  • good food
Cons
  • A bit touristy
  • expensive
  • no nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Commercial Street"

While locals might find the emphatic historical charm (and inflated touristic prices) of the city's main street a bit twee, they often flock to the attractions along this busy highway. While the strip-mall feel is decidedly less charming than the atmosphere city's colonial centre, it's nevertheless a very useful street - one of the town's few local grocery stores, the organic take-out venture Off the Vine, provides excellent soup, salad, sushi, and groceries, while the enormous Stop and Shop is home to the town's only Starbucks. While this area is functional more than aesthetic, it's nevertheless a good place to shop at "local" rather than "proud Academy parent" prices. Plenty of chain restaurants, including Denny's, have outlets here, as do a number of the town's delivery pizzerias. There's also a Staples, a sport shop, and plenty of similarly useful stores. Pad Thai, just at the beginning of Portsmouth Avenue, is very popular with students and locals
Pros
  • lots of shopping
  • not so "cute"
  • cheaper
Cons
  • not particularly attractive
  • no nightlife
  • limited dining
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"historic downtown street"

Baxter Street is famous among New York historians (and armchair historian) as the site of the Baxter Street Dudes, a teenaged street gang that ran the Grand Duke's Theatre with an iron fist. Today, Baxter Street is a curious blend of SoHo, Chinatown, and Little Italy. While the street is a stone's throw and a corner away from one of the city's most mouthwatering restaurants, former speakeasy (and Sex and the City set) O'Neals Grand Street, it's also home to a mix of Asian and old-school Italian restaurants: the Vietnamese New Pasteur stands alongside the traditional Forlini, nearby the Museum of Chinese in America vies for your attention alongside the Most Precious Blood Church, consecrated to Neopolitan patron Sn. Gennaro (of the feast day festivities). While there's little that's "trendy" here - you're more likely to sit next to geriatrics than Gen X-ers, this historical street is nevertheless a welcome, if somewhat cramped and crowded, reminder of old New York.
Pros
  • Chinese food
  • italian food
  • Historical
Cons
  • limited nightlife
  • Dirty
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Classic Murray Hill"

Much has been said in recent years about life in Murray Hill While the Murray Hill nightlife scene may be tempting to recent graduates, who want to recapture the fraternity life after coming home from swank finance and banking jobs, for plenty of twenty-somethings and older residents alike the scene can be sterile - a collection of upper-middle-class prep school types who prefer knocking back shots in semi-dive bars like Margarita Murphy's or 515 or pubs like Patrick Kavanagh to the city's trendier cocktail joints. If beer pong doesn't sound like your idea of fun, there's little to do in this neighborhood - just and a couple of basic restaurants with an All-American/sports theme, like the cholesterol-busting Duke's New York or Black Sheep (although the occasional vegan can scrounge out some sustenance at Josie's East Side). You'll be able to eat and drink in this neighborhood, but the venues by and large lack the charm that seasoned New Yorkers have come to expect from their locals.
Pros
  • College scene
  • Lots to do
  • Everyone knows each other
Cons
  • Noisy
  • crowded dive bars
  • like a frat party
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A bit dull"

There's nothing particularly wrong with East 37th Street - a collection of increasingly modern high-rises just south of post-collegiate party town Murray Hill - but there's not terribly much right with it either. This neighborhood seems to have curiously forgotten to acquire a "scene" - striking in a city where every patch of land becomes a TriBeCa or a NoLiTa, or another trendy acronym. Rather, this part of Midtown East is terribly basic - you can find basic wings-and-sports bars like the Rodeo or the slightly more interesting Mad Hatter's Saloon, watch sports at McCormacks, or dine at basic Japanese, Italian, and French restaurants, but it all feels very by-the-numbers for this often vibrant city. (Although Turkish Kitchen, on 3rd Avenue, is a charming and homey exception.) The only real entertainment in this area is the Kips Bay Cinema, located at the street's Eastern end. While the high rises in this district may offer tenants stunning city views, unfortunately there's really not much to see here.
Pros
  • Skyscrapers
Cons
  • not near anything
  • Dead at night
  • Nothing to do
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Arty downtown street"

Any self-respecting intellectual in New York City probably associates at least one venue with Crosby Street: the Housing Works bookstore. More intimate than The Strand, this charity used-bookstore also hosts a number of literary events, including readings and speakers (the cafe is also a prime spot to meet other would-be-Ginsbergs scribbling away at their novels). But this street has far more to offer than lattes and literature. It's a gorgeous, period street that offers a wealth of stunning, if pricey, lofts overlooking the numerous cafes, bars, and boutiques dotting the sidewalk. Check out nearby Amarcord vintage fashion, and pick up an amuse-bouch at Balthazar Bakery. Popular dining spots include two French bistros: Sur La Table and l'Orange Bleue. While the place can fill up on weekends with camera-sporting tourists, it's a pleasant - if pricey - location during the week, when the buzz is only mild (and still just enough to be trendy)
Pros
  • gorgeous street
  • great shopping
  • incredible lofts
Cons
  • expensive
  • tourists on weekends
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Pleasant downtown street"

Located along the side of Sarah Roosevelt Park, across from Forsythe Street, Chrystie Street is a rarity in New York City: an urban street located along a patch of green. While the green in question may be relatively small, it's still quite a bonus in a city not known for its wide open spaces. Chrystie Street is also easily accessible by public transportation: the F train is a step away at 2nd Avenue and East Houston, while the Grand Street subway stop (at Chrystie Street) services the B and D trains. (Frequent travelers to the Boston or DC area will be pleased to note that Chrystie Street is also about five minutes from the Fung Wah Bus). The street itself is relatively quiet, although a quick walk towards the bottom of the Bowery yields a wealth of trendy cocktail bars, although Home Sweet Home on Chrystie Street itself is a nice local cocktail bar. Other streetside eateries include the wildly popular Sammy's, and the low-key Freeman's! But this street is far quieter than others in the Bowery area, which - combined with its park proximity - makes it better-placed for families than some of the other LES streets.
Pros
  • easy transport
  • bars and nightlife of LES
  • park
Cons
  • smelly
  • Sketchy at night
  • Still, the Bowery demographic lingers
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Arty, elegant, but still funky neighborhood"

Anyone who still associates the Lower East Side primarily with tenements and immigration will be surprised to see the changes that have been wrought on the so-called "LES" over the past few decades: this isn't your history class's Lower East Side. While the district's ethnic, working-class, and Jewish roots are still partially evident: there are still the weekend sales of cloth and linens at Orchard Street, and the occasional pastrami sandwich is to be had at one of the neighborhood's holdout delis (or Norfolk Street's Remedy Diner). But kosher delis are far less common on the ground than trendy cocktail bars: Norfolk Street's The Back Room, a 1920's-style "hidden" speakeasy is emblematic of the realm, as are more visible next door neighbors The Tonic and Nurse Betties. Likewise, Norfolk Street is short on tenement housing, but long on style: the Blue Condominium at number 105 is one of the city's most prestigious addresses, with an architecturally inventive blue-glass building that plays host to several of the city's arty intelligentsia. Not as inexpensive - or as homey - as it used to be, but the LES still manages to maintain a decidedly authentic vibe.
Pros
  • great bars
  • arty
  • nightlife
Cons
  • expensive
  • not authentic LE
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"HIghlight of Great Barrington"

While this street is technically not the city's main thoroughfare, it might as well be. Lined with gorgeous historic buildings and home to some of the city's greatest restaurants (grab a bite to eat at Martin's Cafe for a long, luxurious brunch or breakfast, enjoy pub-style fare and rich desserts at 20 Railroad Street, or go upscale with splendid Italian Allium (formerly Verdura). Nearby club Helsinki, located in the gallery mall parallel to Railroad Street, has great jazz, and the cinema is intimate and warm: a perfect small-town venue. There are also a few boutiques and shops, mostly with a souvenirs/"outdoorsy" theme (ie, mugs with moose and bears painted on them, adarondacks-style flannel), although this street is also home to a toy store and Crystal Essences, an incense-scented New Age book and crystal/incense/etc stop. Hit up nearby Baba Louie's for out of this world sourdough pizza. The highlight of any visit to picturesque, charming Great Barrington.
Pros
  • Great restaurants
  • Gorgeous buildings
  • charming shops
Cons
  • Small
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Crowded Chelsea"

Right in the heart of this once-great neighborhood, whose swish black-turtleneck elegance has rather declined with time, West 20th Street is a veritable cacophony of New York culture. Trendy gays in line at fading nightclubs, over-eager twenty-somethings from the suburbs, and a fair few tourists all mingle in this crowded nightlife scene. While nearby Gotham Comedy Club, Joyce Theatre, and similar venues provide a cultural outlet, the scene here is largely bar and club based. Check out the Chelsea Wine Cellar for a slightly posher night on the town, or get drunk and dance all night at the seedy 40/40. Star Lounge Chelsea has a long pedigree; the Chelsea Hotel once hosted the likes of Dylan and Hendrix. That said, however, you may find the meat market and shots-downing a bit scuzzier than you'd like. Hit up some of the more low-key restaurants, like The Basil, a popular Chelsea Thai, the hilariously named Cafe Grumpy, or do some shopping at the Hell's Kitchen Flea Market, one of Manhattan's few remaining finds. Transport is at 18th Street for the 1 and 2 trains, or at 23rd for the F and M.
Pros
  • lots to do
  • busy
  • once fashionable
Cons
  • crowded
  • seedy
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Heart of SoHo"

This attractive, historic street in the heart of SoHo has plenty of attractions on offer for the savvy culture vulture. With the attractions of the SoHo Playhouse and the National Theatre Workshop right on the street, and a number of trendy boutiques and galleries like Compleat Sculptor and Frog Designs, this area is a pricey yet elegant slice of downtown culture. Hit up one of the well-known bars in the area, such as Greenhouse New York, City Winery, and Club Shelter. Transport is easy from here - just take the A, C, or E trains to Spring Street and walk 30 seconds north. The scene here can be snobby and exclusive, but it's far less "current" than some other areas - the elegance is more likely to be Upper East Side than Williamsburg, despite the downtown address. Vandam Street may no longer be the place "of the moment," but for those in the know, it's still a place to see and be seen.
Pros
  • attractive, a street you'd want to live on
  • good quite street in a great location
  • SoHo Playhouse on this black
Cons
  • gets shady toward the west side
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Downtown Thoroughfare"

Stretching from the Meatpacking District in the north all the way down to Tribeca, Hudson Street is one of downtown's biggest (and widest) streets - somewhat jarring in a section of the city known more for its winding side-streets and cobblestoned blocks of townhouses than for its boulevards. Yet Hudson Street is a useful place - if not the city's most charming. Boutiques and counter-cultural bookstores are in short supply here (although Cherry Lane Theatre is a short walk away), but there is a thriving restaurant scene. Check out Le Petite Abeille, a tiny French bistro, or go for an equally low-key romantic dinner at Little Owl or a trendier night out at Centro Vinoteca nearby. There's also an equally lively bar scene, although it lacks the real character of some more "neighborhoody " places (the Barrow Pub being an exception) Plenty of delis abound if you're just looking for a lunchtime snack...
Pros
  • Bars
  • Restaurants
Cons
  • wide, noisy street
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Garment District"

Not really a residential area, West 37th Street lies in the busy heart of the Garment District, a once-thriving neighborhood that now exists more as an afterthought for wholesalers and a few inventive Halloween-costume-makers. While fashionistas can still get their designer duds tailored and fitted here, the liveliness and sense of style that once dominated the scene here is not quite evident in the Garment District of today. Dining options here are limited - although the Dining Club of New York is located here. If you're not a member, though, stick to one of the several decent-to-good Indian restaurants lining this strip, among them Kashmir and a Touch of India. Transport is easy here - just take the A, C, and E, train to Penn Station, or the 1, 2, 3 , B, D, F, M, N, Q, or R trains to Herald Square. But while shopping might bring you to the area (conveniently, too), there's little to make you stay.
Pros
  • Garment district
  • Getting clothes tailored
  • transport
Cons
  • Not really residential
  • not much to see or do
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Steps away from the U.N."

Just a few blocks south of the United Nations, this street gets increasingly residential as you head towards the East River, with the western end of the street clustered with office and commercial buildings. The atmosphere is laid-back, with plenty of preppy bars to appeal to the Murray Hill set, (check out Better Burger and Margarita Murray's or two places to reminisce with old Deerfield buddies), as well as slightly classier venues designed to appeal to the diplomatic types hanging about the UN, such as the Wharf Bar and Grill. The atmosphere here is, by and large, not family-friendly, although the United Nations International School is popular with diplomats' kids. Rather, you're more likely to find young twenty-somethings who all know (and have hooked up with) each other, living on a cushy combination of finance-job bonuses and parental support. It can be fun, for those into the lifestyle, but those seeking either Old World elegance or arty bohemia would be advised to look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Cheap pubs
  • Laid back, neighborhood feel
  • Proximity to the U.N.
Cons
  • Loud
  • Not quite trendy
  • Not scenic
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Increasingly popular family neighborhood"

East Harlem has become increasingly gentrified over the years, especially on those streets adjacent to or near Central Park. Just north of the park, East 111th street is an "up and coming" neighborhood for middle class families looking for access to Upper East Side amenities - like schools, parks, restaurants, and playgrounds - at decidedly not-UES prices. Located a block from a metro stop (the 110th Street and Lexington Avenue stop, served by the 4,5, and 6-trains), this street is a couple of stops away from the heart of Manhattan, making it an excellent choice for the morning commute. The nightlife and dining scene on this street reflects the area's origins as Spanish Harlem: check out Amor Cubano on Third Avenue, or walk down the street to low-key Samana. Of course, chain options like Domino's Pizza and KFC also abound, as they do in most NYC neighborhoods. Not the most charming place to be, but overall, East 111th St. offers good value for money.
Pros
  • cheap
  • good transport
  • close to park
Cons
  • not as charming
  • little nightlife
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The other side of midtown"

While the touristy heart of midtown - along 5th Avenue - is bustling with out-of-towners, especially during Christmastime, this part of East Midtown is surprisingly staid. It's not quite the Upper East Side, with its pre-war co-ops and picturesque brownstones, but it's nevertheless a pleasant area, a combination of swank residential areas (such as Sutton Place, nearby, one of the city's most prestigious addresses), the beginnings of the diplomatic/UN scene that really starts to thrive in the East 40's, and a number of office buildings. This mix of residential and commercial renders the area a lively one, although families will be pleased to learn that East 54th Street is near two well-regarded schools: the HIgh School for Art and Design and the Cathedral School. Transport is also good here, with the E and M trains stopping at Lexington Avenue and 51st Street, and the 4 and 6 trains stopping at 51st Street. Check out legendary diners PJ Clarke's and Johnny Rocket's for some relaxing grub, or head upscale at one of the city's most famous Chinese eateries, Shun Lee Palace on 55th Street.
Pros
  • Elegant but not stuffy
  • Mix of commercial and residential
  • Lively
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Busy
  • Less pretty than UES
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"New York's Strongest"

Worth Street's alternate name "Avenue of the Strongest," refers to the city's Department of Santitation which should tell you all you need to know about the eclectic charm - or lack thereof - of this street. While little is actually wrong with Worth Street, it's largely dull and clerical for those who don't work there; it's home to the headquarters of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation at Number 125, the Department o Health and Mental Hygeeine, and the Department of Sanitation, as well as the New York County Supreme Court and Daniel Patrick Moynihan Courthouses. All useful places to visit when in need, no doubt,but hardly the basis on which the next trendy neighborhood is predicated. With the exception of a few fast-food joints like Subway, there aren't too many places to eat (although Compose is the closest thing you'll find to a "nice" night out, and has a good reputation), so come stocked up on sandwiches if you have an appointment in the neighborhood
Pros
  • Useful buildings
Cons
  • Not particularly interesting
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Great UES Street"

Snaking away from Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue, East 91st Street is located in tantalizing proximity to the Guggenheim, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jewish Museum, Cooper-Hewitt, and other popular Upper East Side tourism attractions. Closer to Central Park, the street's western section has a decidedly more upmarket character - tree-lined streets of brownstones, elegant cafes like the perennial popular UES bruncherie Island (only tourists go to Sarabeth's next door), and the oh-so-French Bistro de Nord. The nightlife is minimal, and mostly revolves around elegant dinners. Head further east, though, and you end up in a bizarre combination of frat house and prep school dorm. The bars in the East East 90's, especially around Lex and 3rd, seem to cater to a decidedly preppy clientele: great if you want to play beer bong, not so much fun if you took calculus in high school. Butif you can afford it, Carnegie Hill in the East 90's is one of the city's nicest family neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Expensive
  • Great dining
  • Near museums
Cons
  • Some seedy bars further east
  • 5 blocks away from both crosstown buses and subways
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Iconic"

Crowds of tourists and terrified prospective applicants notwithstanding, Harvard Square has somehow managed to retain its distinctive intellectual-youth-cool vibe. While you may never get to live in vicinity unless you get the fated acceptance letter (or just teach there), it's unlikely that you'll be young and fun in Boston without getting sucked into Harvard Square's orbit. The area is designed as a paradise for young people - the Harvard Campus is surrounded by a wealth of cheap, arty eateries, not to mention the Harvard Coop, a Mecca bookstore-cafe for laptop-carrying students looking to wolf down a sandwich over an essay on Heiddegger (got a great selection as well!). Head to any of the boutiques and novelty shops to pick up fun gifts, or wolf down a sandwich at one of the cafes that come and go in the area. Or, if parents are paying, head to Brattle Street and eat at the legendary Casablanca Restaurant before checking out vintage cinema at the Brattle Street theatre. While the vibe can be snobby when it comes to non-Harvard students, don't take it personally - they've probably been up all night studying Heiddegger (and drinking shots)
Pros
  • great cafes
  • great nightlife
  • cheap
Cons
  • snobby if you're not a Harvard student
  • touristy
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"One of the country's nicest street"

As a student at a nearby New England boarding school, I always found that one of my favorite weekend pastimes was escaping "off-campus" to Boston, about an hour away by train. Inevitably, I would find myself wandering to Charles Street, one of the most scenic and charming streets not just in Boston proper, but arguaby in the United States. At its best in spring, when the blossoms on the trees lining these period streets begin to bloom, Charles Street is gorgeous all year long, with sedate brick buildings and plenty of European-style outdoor cafes. Check out arty Room with a Vieux antiques for a few household set pieces, then hit up breakfast at any of the local cafes, or lunch at Artu on Charles Street, the lower-key Beacon Hill Bistro, Toscano Restaurant, or Figs pizzeria. With marvelous access to public transport, and moments by foot from the charms of Beacon Hill, Charles Street is Boston's premier destination
Pros
  • Great cafes
  • Beautiful
  • Great shops
Cons
  • Quiet
  • Expensive
  • Staid
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The perfect blend of country and cosmopolitan"

Like many of the charming towns that line this part of the Berkshires, Lenox is at its best when combining two worlds - the gorgeous pastoral quietness of the East Coast countryside with the exciting, always-novel artistic legacy of the Berkshires. Lenox has it all. A participant in the annual Tanglewood Music Festival, as well as home to one of the country's best summer stock companies, and within easy reach of cultural events like Jacob's Pillow, Lenox has all the benefits of city life - from fine dining to great nightlife - without ever sacrificing its historical charm. The Red Lion Inn, a slightly pricey but very much worth it hotel and restaurant, is the must-try place in this town, although other options include the Bistrot Zinc and the Church Street Cafe. While public transport can be difficult in this part of the Berkshires - often involving several bus changes - those with a car will find getting around easy. Good nearby schools include Berkshire Country Day and the artier Bard at Simon's Rock.
Pros
  • gorgeous
  • great culture
  • Great restaurants
Cons
  • complicated public transport
  • expensive
  • a bit out of the way
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Where Bankers Dine"

While much of the area surrounding Wall Street is taken up by the offices of the nation's financial elite, John Street offers more accessible fare in the form of some of the neighborhood's best restaurants and bars - even bankers have to eat, right? - including a branch of the city's Gallic standby Les Halles. While the prices are likely to be high - and the atmospheres designed to be conducive to shmoozing - the restaurants have nearly uniformly high quality and impeccable service to match their swank but serious clientele. Check out the low-key John Street Bar and Grill for some simple cuts of steak served right, hurry through a five-minute lunch break with the tasty salads at Toasties,or get spicy with Maggie's Cajun! While bars, clubs, and music venues are at a minimum here - the entertainment is strictly designed to cater to the lunch hour - the food in this area is a vast step up from the wraps and lunch carts that dominate much of midtown. But what can you expect in a town where the bankers are kings?
Pros
  • Good restaurants
  • Near Wall Street
Cons
  • Expensive
  • no nightlife scene
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Beginnings of Columbia Territory"

Rendered uncommonly short by Riverside Drive and the housing developments off Amsterdam, this Upper West Side side street marks the beginnings of "Columbia" territory, the district of cafes, bars, and bookstores dominated by the hip, intellectual clientele of Columbia University, students and professors alike. Tourists will be pleased to note that it's also the location of one of NYC's few Hostels, the Broadway Hotel and Hostels off Amsterdam. Restaurant and dining options here are plentiful and cheap, if not always of the best quality: check out favorite Mexican joint Mama Mexico, get creative at Indus Valley, or just tuck into a big slice of pie at popular Metro diner. Plenty of take-out, pizza, and bagel venues also abound. While the nightlife in this area tends to cluster further north, closer to the campus, West 101 street is nevertheless a short walk away from the livelier part of Morningside Heights, while still maintaining a reasonable veneer of quiet and calm. Proximity to two of the city's nicest parks - Central and Riverside Drive - also helps. An affordable location for students or young professionals.
Pros
  • Cheap eats
  • Near parks and gardens
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Columbia crowd (could be a positive)
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Carnegie Hill Highlight"

For those who can afford its spotless pre-war co-ops, Carnegie Hill is the ideal family neighborhood. This charming enclave of Old World sidewalk cafes and niche boutiques still gathers regularly for "neighborhood" events, like the annual Christmas party at the neighborhood Corner Bookstore (which still boasts a hand-chosen stock and a local inquisitive cat), or weekly brunches at haute-diner Three Guys or nautical-themed upmarket Island. The area has much to recommend it, from the incredible restaurants (in addition to Island, Bistro de Nord on Madison and 93rd Street and the adjacent Vico's are two other recommendations) to the proximity of some of the city's best schools (Spence, Nightingale, and St. Bernard's, while the East End Avenue schools of Chapin and Brearley are just a short walk away) and places of worship (the synagogue on Madison and 87th, Heavenly Rest Church on 90th and Madison). East 90th street falls in the heart of Carnegie Hill, although it gets steadily more laid-back as it heads further east, towards the Asphalt Green sports centre and bicycle path. While night owls might decry the cozy atmosphere of this street and neighborhood, families with children (and spare dough) will find the ideal NYChome here.
Pros
  • Great schools
  • Great dining
  • Great neighborhood feel
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No bars/nightlife
  • A bit cliquey
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Small West Village street"

Tucked away just south of West Houston Street, this sleepy street is well-placed conveniently between two subway stops, Spring Street for the A,C, and E trains, and Houston Street for the 1 and 2 trains. Also located near a number of municipal buildings, among them the U.S. Small Business Small Business Administration and National Archives, this area can feel a bit soulless, especially given the look and layout: a number of unattractive, boxy administrative buildings dominate this street, rather than the charming brick townhouses for which must of the West Village is known. There isn't much to do here - the area is primarily composed of offices - although those with a sweet tooth might want to supplement their rendez-vous with the National Archives with a trip to the Jacques Torres Chocolate Haven (although there's a wealth of standard fast-food and bagel-options as well for the less choosy). King Street is, overall, a primarily functional commercial area, albeit one with fewer culinary and nightlife options than elsewhere in the city. Its location, however, makes it a convenient commuter destination.
Pros
  • Proximity to subways
  • Proximity to municipal buildings
Cons
  • Not attractive buildings
  • Fast food chains
  • No nightlife
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Comedy Central"

West 26th Street's main draw for many New Yorkers is its stand-up and comedy legacy: this downtown street is home to the famous improv troupe Upright Citizens' Brigade, while three blocks down you can head to the Gotham Comedy Club on 23rd. Hudson Guild Theatre also makes its home here. But while these individual venues draw a crowd, the atmosphere overall is somewhat bleak - the area's known for its discount sales more than for its high-end bar scene, and the combination of grim architecture and a lack of an arty nightlife scene can render this neighborhood a bit depressing. There are a few restaurants scattered around 8th avenue, among them Asian standbys Song Kran and Koofoo, but they tend to be fairly standard fare, with little innovation or destination potential. Head down here for some comedy or low-budget theatre, but don't expect to stay much beyond the post-theatre menu.
Pros
  • Comedy clubs
  • Inexpensive
  • Theatres
Cons
  • depressing
  • minimal dining scene
  • not really a family area
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet authentic space in the heart of gentrification"

While much of the East Village nowadays is dominated by the spectre of NYU - a hoarde of pieced, spiky-haired, androgynous artsy types looking to spend money in dives reformulated to handle a wealthier, more commercial crowd, there are a few enclaves within the gentrified streets where an authentic, family-friendly feeling takes hold. Here, the cafes are real cafes, rather than glorified NYU cafeterias, the bars are real bars, and - perhaps most importantly - the community gardens are real community gardens. East 2nd Street is within a stone's throw of the Peace Garden, Kenkleba House Garden, Peach Tree Garden, and charming Peretz square - four welcome patches of greenery in an otherwise bleak cityscape. Also nearby is the famous Nuyorican Poets' Cafe, which - while its lacks some of its "unknown" cache, is still alternative and authentic enough to have avoided ever going mainstream. Culinary options near here include laid-back joints such as Cafe Hade Bade and Wally's Pacific Catch. Or leave the East Village behind altogether and check out bona fide Lower East Side vibes south of nearby Houston Street (including a pastrami sandwich at the famous Katz's Deli).
Pros
  • laid-back
  • authentic
  • family-friendly
Cons
  • quieter than the rest of the East Village
  • less trendy
  • far from public transport
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Thespy Hub of the West Village"

While some of the streets of the tree-lined, charming West-Village can seem a bit twee, with their Georgian townhouses and leafy overhead, Barrow Street - by contrast - maintains a clear sense of historical charm. Home to a number of artistic ventures, including the famous Barrow Street Theatre, the Barrow Street poetry journal/centre, and the nearby Cherry Lane Theatre, this area is an ideal venture for the savvy theatregoer looking for something beyond the blockbusters of Broadway or the avant-garde experimentalism of the outer boroughs. It's also a paradise for foodies: while Barrow Street itself has few restaurants, side-streets offer a wealth of options (rendering Barrow Street more pleasantly quiet than its neighbors) including Yakiniku Takashi Restaurant, the charming Petite Abeille Bistro, and new American Commerce Restaurant. Or head to the Barrow Pub to drink a pint with the locals. While the area can be a bit touristy, it's far less so than midtown, and while its vibe isn't quite alternative, it's nevertheless pleasantly artistic.
Pros
  • Theatres
  • Beautiful
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Touristy
  • A bit too quiet
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Still elegant after all these years"

In a city where streets go in and out of fashion like skirt silhouettes, it can be hard to get attached to any one neighborhood. Luckily, Chelsea seems to have survived the malestrom of in-and-out and, like the Upper West or Upper East sides, established for itself a perennial reputation. More upscale than the gay scene around the West Village, which attracts its fair share of tourists and out-of-towners, this slice of Chelsea is also straight-friendly, with a collection of nightclubs, bars and restaurants that cater to the well-heeled of every orientation. This street in particular offers a wealth of options. Dining choices include the laid-back Italian Algreghetti Restaurant, and more definedly Chelsea-style Atelier du Chocolat and Restivo restaurant. When it comes to nightlife, choices include the standby Barracuda Bar and Highpoint Bar and Bistro. Transit here is largely good, with a number of metro and bus lines, although the further West you go, the less convenient things tend to be, as a general rule.
Pros
  • Bars
  • Restaurants
  • Still trendy
Cons
  • Noisy and busy
  • Expensive
  • Somewhat ossified social scene
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"More authentic East Village vibe"

Sometimes, it feels like the whole north section of the East Village has become little more than a de facto NYU campus: a collection of cheap kebab shops, seedy dive bars, and arty open mike nights subsidized by a bunch of pink-hair fauxhemians spending their termly allowance. This can be a disheartening prospect, especially for those who remember the area before it became palatable to Broadway. East 4th Street may not be a revival of the East Village proper, but at least it's less touristy than the collection of streets around Astor Place, where overpriced T-shirts and jacked-up watery cocktails are the norm. Ventures like La Mama experimental theatre and the Nuyorican Poets' Cafe still offer some interesting reminiscences of the days when the EV was arty, while the eateries and nightlife maintain a slightly older clientele than the sloshed teenagers dotting the normal NYU dives. Try nearby Death and Company for a spooky edge on the traditional cocktail, or hit up the In Vino Wine Bar and restaurant for a more traditional vintage.
Pros
  • Great nightlife
  • Fewer NYU Students
  • Great restaurants
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Crowded
  • Trendy
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Hidden Gem"

You might be forgiven if, upon coming to Waverly Place, with its beautiful Georgian brick buildings and quiet tree-lined promenade, you think you've stepped into the 19th century. There's something of Edith Wharton's New York in this idyllic side-street off Washington Square. Though prices are similarly elevated - we wonder if Wharton's Lily Bart could have afforded some of these stately townhouses - if you can afford it, Waverly Place is one of the city's loveliest spots. A stone's throw from the greenery of Washington Square Park, Waverly Place is also within easy access of the artier scene of Astor Place and the East Village. Bridging the elegant gentility of the West Village with the faux-trashy vibe of the East, this street has plenty of delights of its own. While it's mostly residential, locals can nevertheless enjoy a drink at Murphy & Gonzalez or dine at Babbo. Pop into the Washington Square Hotel for a posh drink - but be sure to keep an eagle eye on your tab!

At night the place can get inundated with students from nearby NYU however, destroying the idyllic vibe - so don't get too attached to the peace and quiet!
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Quiet
  • overlooking the park
Cons
  • Expensive
  • watch out for all the students
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

""Forget it Jake, it's Chinatown""

While Mott Street and Canal Street get the big mentions as thoroughfares of Canal Street, the much-overlooked Bayard in fact offers much more authentic charm, especially when it comes to eating and drinking. Avoid the faux-Vuitton-selling touts on Canal Street and head to this street, nestled in the heart of the Chinese community of New York. While non-Chinese speakers (or non-Chinese folks of all description) might find the place inaccessible for the long-term - although the more intrepid NYU students are increasingly seeking out Chinatown as the next trendy-but-cheap paradise - it's nevertheless an ideal day trip, with eateries like the Nice Green Bo Restaurant, Shanghai Cuisine, and Old Shang Hai Deluxe offering meals to tourists and locals alike at prices far better than can be found on the district's main thoroughfares. Or cook on your own: be sure to pick up plenty of spices at Hon Man's Chinese herbs. And don't forget to pick up dessert at the Chinese ice cream parlour nearby! All in all - an ideal vantage point from which to explore one of the city's most dynamic neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Cheap
  • Great food
  • Less touristy
Cons
  • Hard for non-Chinese to live there
  • Crowded
  • Noisy
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Da-Dum!"

If you've ever seen Law and Order, you've probably heard of the Tombs, the macabrely named jail block that houses prisoners awaiting arraignment. The Egyptian mauseoleum-like structure dominates much of White Street, giving the place a somewhat depressing feel (although The Tombs has plenty of historical cachet for the interested tourist: plenty of famous criminals, from John Lennon's assassin to Puff Daddy, have been arraigned here). The rest of this street is similarly downbeatt, with a branch of the New York City Rescue Mission sharing the street with the Civil Municipal Court building. While the street shows some signs of stirring the old bohemian life that dominated this area once (the Mudd Club was one such club immortalized in the songs of the Talking Heads), they're somewhat few and far between: the Flea Theatre is on this block, as is the artsy/trendy eatery Cucina E Vino Petrarca. While this is far from the next up-and-coming district, its combination of arty holdovers and downmarket grit might be a welcome relief for those sick of the East Village's prepackaged bohemia.
Pros
  • Historical legacy
  • Theatre nearby
Cons
  • Presence of The Tombs
  • Depressing Architecture
  • Minimal nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A tourist destination, mostly"

Every tourist should take at least one jaunt down to the south side of Manhattan. Whether you're hitting up the nearby Ellis Island Immigration Museum, with its testament to the stories of thousands of hopeful immigrants arriving in search of the American dream, of walking through Battery Park, this part of the city represents the real "old New York" that seems sometimes to have been swallowed up in the metropolis. The area is well-served by public transport, including the Staten Island Ferry (itself a prime New York City tourist destination, and one not well-enough appreciated), but it's far from residential: the street consists mostly of chrome-and-glass office buildings and plenty of quick-n'-cheap dining options (Dunkin' Donuts, Au Bon Pain, etc.) Fraunces Tavern is the only place of note nearby, and that's known for its historic pedigree (where Washington said goodbye to the troops) more than for its culinary fare. But tourists should be pleased by the wealth of historical sites in the area, and as far as office-streets go, its a perfectly pleasant place to work! Just wear a scarf in winter: the water renders this area very cold indeed!
Pros
  • Near public transport
  • Near historical sites
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • No dining scene
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"If you can deal with the cable-cars"

While Roosevelt Island used to be available only to those hardy travelers able to bear the heights and vertigo of the cable-car over from 57th Street, the island today is accessible by more modern means: the F-train stops here. But Main Street, a tiny road that serves as Roosevelt Island's main thoroughfare, still feels more like a small town than like part of the heart of the metropolis. Residents here, who tend to be middle-class (though the construction of some luxury buildings is bringing in a yuppie boom), have a distinct way of life - the island has its own newspaper, library, general store and buses, just like any small town. It's an ideal location for family life - and a great getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city. But trendy types and night owls might find the area isolating: Main Street's culinary options are limited to a single diner, a slightly more upscale bar and grill and a since-closed-down pizzeria (plus, naturally, a Starbucks). While the transport links make it more viable than it once was, it's still less than ideal for those who anticipate frequent nights on the town.
Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Quiet, leafy
  • Neighborhood feel
Cons
  • Isolated
  • No dining life
  • No nightlife
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Gentrified area"

Ever since Bill Clinton moved his post-presidency offices here, East Harlem has been undergoing a quiet sort of boom. While this neighborhood has never attained the trendy prestige of a NoLita or a Meatpacking District (or even a Williamsburg), East Harlem has nevertheless gentrified into quite an attractive family area, especially at or below 110th street - the delineation of Central Park. While the area has a historically black and Latino population, today the area is filled with a mix ranging from Middle Eastern immigrants to WASP families seeking cheaper rents to budget in that third or fourth bedroom. Dining options here lack the variety of some formerly-ethnic neighborhood, although the street is lined with stalwart options like the Ricardo Steak House and La Corsa Pizzeria. Its major selling point, however, is not dining or nightlife scene (the latter is even more sedate) but its ideal family location: just a few blocks north of charming upscale Carnegie Hill, this street is within easy walking distance to Central Park, as well as the 6-train transit lines, as well as near amenities like Mount Sinai Hospital.
Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Near parks and gardens
  • Safe
Cons
  • Not much nightlife
  • Slow restaurant scene
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The heart of the Bowery"

Grimy and grungy, the Bowery has still managed to maintain some of its gutter-cache over the years. While gentrification (not to mention a bunch of lamp stores) have lifted the place from its derelict roots, the Bowery nevertheless has a distinctively authentic feel. The authenticity is, of course, studied: the Bowery is far less "downmarket" than the South Bronx, but when compared to the skyrocketing rents and cutesy brunch bars that have afflicted East and West Village alike, the gradual cleaning-up of the Bowery seems less severe. Rivington Street in particular has a storied history: it was the site of the first settlement house in New York, the University Settlement House (which now provides community support services), and today is home to a number of bars, restaurants, and clubs. Popular dining-out options here include Schiller's Restaurant, Sugar Sweet Sunshine, and musician Moby's recent vegan venture. But bars and galleries are more de rigeur here than fine dining: check out CV for music and dancing, or hit up the artsy scene at performance/community centre ABC No Rio.
Pros
  • Music
  • Restaurants
  • Has the ambience of old world New York
Cons
  • More expensive than it was
  • Crowded all the time
  • Dirty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Tribeca Hideaway"

This tiny street tucked away in the riverside corner of Tribeca is an ideal location for fitness buffs. Just steps away from the West Side Highway - with its bike paths, pedestrian walkways, outdoor cafes, and beautiful trees (the noise and grime of the cars are almost completely obscured by a makeshift "hedge'), this street has parkside credentials while still maintaining its downtown vibe. Surrounded by galleries (including one, Michael Perez, on the street itself), Harrison Street is distinctively "artsy" while still feeling very much liveable, in contrast to other downtown streets. Head to locals' delight "Peace and Love Cafe" or splurge at The Harrison Restaurant. Mary-Ann's Tribeca Mexican is another outlet popular with locals. The street is physically beautiful, with a number of tenements and townhouses that look distinctively "historical," as opposed to the modern monstrosities found in some parts of the city - Harrison Street, with its greenery, cafes, and townhouses, feels in many ways like a village rather than a city, and is ideally suited to those looking for the perfect melding of village and urban life.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • art galleries
  • Proximity to the river parkway
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Not a big nightlife scene
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Oh-No Lita!"

NoLita was trendy once. A tangle of streets located just to the north of tourist-magnet Little Italy, NoLita was a hidden gem of a neighborhood - filled with minimalist-designed loft buildings, artsy coffeehouses, and bars where those "in the know" drank until morning. Today, however, NoLita has lost a bit of its charm. It's no longer New York's next big thing, but it doesn't have the same depressing has-been feel of the Meatpacking District. Somehow, between gentrification and the shame of becoming outre, NoLita has become rather nice. It has a distinctively "downtown" feel (think SoHo or Tribeca rather than the West or East Village - not bohemian but nevertheless artsy and sophisticated). Prince Street in particular isn't known for much (beyond being the home of Rupert Murdoch), but it's a great place to live nonetheless. There's an enormous cluster of inexpensive, interesting restaurants, especially around LaFayette Street (try Cafe Fallai, or the Savoy Restaurant if you're feeling luxurious), and the nightlife scene has managed to outlast its trendiness, combining New York elegance with a more laid-back vibe. If this area is a has-been, we're happy to be out of style!
Pros
  • Great dining
  • A nice mix of trendy and laid-back
  • gorgeous street
Cons
  • Crowded
  • Big tourist presence
  • Not the next big thing anymore
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Boho Charm"

While much of the West Village has been so gentrified that the neighborhood has come to resemble the Upper East Side much more than it does its downtown neighbors, Carmine Street still maintains some of its old-school - and Old World - charm. From record stores to funky bookshops, Carmine Street, despite its relatively small size, seems to have it all. Check out the House of Oldies, a bona fide record store focusing on 50's and 60's soul, R&B, and bluegrass, located between Bedford and Bleecker Streets. Or get your left-wing conspiracy-nut on at the humorously named Unoppressive Not-Imperialist Bargain Books, a political and activist bookstore. Or think about redecorating at 20's themed antique shop The Lively Set, peopled by celebrities as well as mere mortals looking to add a sconce or two to the bathroom. Dining options in this district are plentiful; check out popular Market Table, or head to lesser-known but still worthwhile venues like Mas Farmhouse and the laid-back Blue Ribbon Bakery and Cafe.
Pros
  • Interesting shops
  • Historical
  • Restaurants
Cons
  • Crowded
  • touristy
  • Expensive!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"The closest thing you'll find to a college campus in NYU"

If you're an aspiring filmmaker, a postmodern performance artist, a would-be storyteller, or a collector of indie music records (or if you just go to NYU), MacDougal Street is the place for you. A quick look at the sheer number of restaurants, bars, and delis swarming the street as it winds up to Washington Square Park should be the first indication that you've entered hard-core student territory. While this can in many ways be a boon - inexpensive, varied eats and plenty of lively nightlife seem to follow wherever students rest their heads - more established professionals may want to think twice before settling down plop-in-the-middle of the latest Tisch nightlife scene. But even snobby foodies may want to give these diamond-in-the-rough joints a try. Taste the tantalizing Mediterranean fare at Mamoun's Restaurant, or head upscale at the Minetta Tavern. Cheaper venues for takeaway or a chow-down are also plentiful in the area. If you're an extroverted student (or still wish you were one), few streets could be better-suited for you - but professors may want to look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Bar scene
  • Lovely restaurants like La Lanterna Cafe and the cheap and cheerful Mamoun's Falafel,
  • Small boutiques and stores abound
Cons
  • Crowded
  • Large student population
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Character-rich Old World neighborhood in trendy Downtown"

At first glance, East 18th Street seems to have it all. It's far north enough to avoid the raucous antics of the NYU students largely populating the ever-less-edgy East Village, but it's still only a stone's throw from Union Square, one of the city's most pleasant commercial meccas - with an annual Christmas bazaar, a farmers' market, and plenty of record and used-book stores dotting the side streets in the area. Part of East 18th Street constitutes Stuyvesant Town, the sometimes controversial rent-controlled development by the river, but more charming are the streets west of First Avenue, which combine unobtrusive modern buildings with tenement-style brownstownes, and are lined with plenty of leafy green trees, lending the street a more relaxed character than some others nearby. This family-friendly area has more nightlife near Union Square, with low-key venues like the Old Town Bar and Restaurant sharing space with posher Blue Water Grill and Union Square Cafe. Further east you'll find affordable "local" places like Pete's Tavern and the Sunburst Espresso Bar. This combination of trendy and laid-back makes East 18th Street an ideal place for families.
Pros
  • Quiet,
  • Family-friendly
  • Near Union Square
Cons
  • Not trendy
  • Not beautiful
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A charming street"

While the Upper West Side seems to vary in character avenue by avenue - changing from the staid, Old World beauty of the Riverside Drive buildings to the chaotic shopping frenzy around Broadway to the quiet 19th century parkside buildings - the Upper West Side in the '80's nevertheless has some consistent selling points. Located steps from the Natural History Museum and Rose Planetarium, two of the city's biggest tourist draws, West 80th Street has a livelier character than some of its neighbors, and is filled with upscale (but affordable) restaurants, bars, and cafes. Try the splendid Brazilian Calle Ocho on Columbus Avenue between 81st and 82nd Street, or stay on 80th Street itself with the Cava Wine bar. Amsterdam Avenue between 80th and 82nd street, in particular, is a hub of activity, with plenty of eateries to suit every taste and budget. Park lovers will be pleased to note that West 80th Street is bookended by two of the city's nicest - Central Park and Riverside Drive, meaning that wherever you live, you're never more that a five to seven minute walk from green space. An ideal family neighborhood.
Pros
  • Lots of restaurants
  • Proximity to parks
  • Near public transport
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Blurry Hill"

As a recent satirical youtube video made clear, Murray Hill has been taking on a new name for itself in recent years. An extended college dormitory (in which everybody seems to know, or at least be Facebook friends with, everyone else) for wealthy (independently or no) twenty-somethings who prefer i-banking to Williamsburg organic farming, Murray Hill has been somewhat taken to task for its dive bar culture, rowdy apartment blocks, and the number of post-beer-bong blackouts taking place on these city streets. For those just getting out of college looking to party with like-minded graduates, Murray Hill can be a dream: its close, even cloistered, culture requires little adjustment from the all-night-parties and hook-up-gossip of college. For everyone else, however - including artsier types - Murray Hill can quickly devolve into a nightmare of drunken antics in the corridor, vomit on the doorstep, and an evening drink at pubs like The Hill and Rodeo taken over by large groups downing shots. If you want the party to continue forever, head on down! Otherwise, think twice - or invest in ear plugs!
Pros
  • Fun atmosphere
  • Plenty of bars
  • Community feel
Cons
  • A bit young-slanting
  • Noisy, busy
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The other 42nd Street"

Celebrated in song and dance, 42nd Street is often portrayed as New York City's biggest neon jungle - a playground of "little nifties from the fifties" and "indiscreet" ladies from further uptown. But this is only partly true. While the stretch of 42nd Street running West from 5th Avenue is certainly filled with enough gaudy lights and glitzy signs to warm even the most cynical New Yorker's heart, the part of 42nd Street that heads from 5th Avenue to the East River is much more sedate and infinitely more "liveable." A largely commercial area with plenty of aesthetically pleasing, upscale office buildings, East 42nd Street is dominated by a few major buildings, among them Grand Central Station (a pleasant place to pass through even for those who aren't traveling, due to its wealth of dining options in the Concourse and its Christmas bazaar), the shimmering, iconic Art Deco Chrysler building, the United Nations, and the New York Public Library, an imposing turn-of-the-century building located in pleasant Bryant Park that is among the city's must-sees for any tourist. But even further east, this area is well worth visiting, as the office-y area gets a slightly swanker character due to the presence of the diplomatic community around the U.N. Check out Liati's Cafe for a quick takeaway lunch to break up the work-day, or celebrate after a hard day at the office at Cecil's, both located on 42nd Street.
Pros
  • Great touristy buildings
  • Calmer than Midtown West
  • Nice office area
Cons
  • Not really residential
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Not quite the Great White Way"

While Broadway may conjure up images of high-budget shows and queues of tourists, West Broadway has a long way to go before it reaches the glitz, gaudiness, and glamour of its midtown counterpart. This street, running from Tribeca to Houston Street, has a distinct downtown vibe. An area less frequented by tourists than the eternally-swamped West Village, the parts of Tribeca bordered by West Broadway are far less "trendy" than they were in their '90's heyday, but still maintain a unique minimalist charm not found elsewhere in New York. The nightlife here is constantly happening - if catering to a more mature, well-established set than the blaring pubs of the East Village: check out bars like the Bubble Lounge, Tribeca Tower, Anotherroom Inc, and Canal Room - four of many located along this street. Diners will also be pleased to note the preponderance of good, edgy restaurant fare - from locavores' paradise Churrascaria Plataforma and Cercle Rouge to laid-back Trigo. While night owls should flock to this evergreen location - not dulled by the vagaries of "in" and "out" that so crippled the Meatpacking district - those seeking peace and quiet might want to move elsewhere.
Pros
  • Restaurants
  • Bars
Cons
  • Noise
  • Price
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A tourist attraction"

Originally known in Dutch as Parelstraat, Pearl Street today has a rich history rooted in centuries of Dutch and colonial English tradition. Meandering along what was once the shoreline of the East River (later evened out via landfill), Pearl Street is home to a number of buildings tourists will no doubt be keen to see: Fraunces Tavern, where George Washington gave his famous speech to the troops, is still operating today; likewise, the turn of the century hexagonal State Court Building at number 60 is famous for its Romanesque portico, and is a must-see for architecture buffs. The biggest attraction, of course, may be the Brooklyn Bridge, which is crossed by thousands of interested tourists each year.

For residents, Pearl Street may not be so intriguing. Pearl Street is a largely commercial, somewhat bland area with minimal nightlife and restaurant scenes. (The Pearl Street Diner, a standard New York style coffee shop, is the unofficial hub on the street.) While it's worth seeing as a tourist, New Yorkers looking to live or work in a spot that encapsulates New York charm may want to look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Historical buildings
Cons
  • Bad restaurant scene
  • Charmless
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Ideal location for culture vultures"

In the city that never sleeps, West 60th Street and its environs at time appear to be the most awake of all. While more residential neighborhoods of the city can feel like a village-within-a-metropolis, the urbane elements of New York are all constantly at play here: shoppers can head to the sleek chrome-and-glass Time Warner Building, where luxurious brands like Whole Foods and Sisley have made their home alongside edgy new restaurants and a purpose-built jazz centre, while fans of the arts have their work cut out for them: Lincoln Center is home to some of the city's best music, art, dance, and cinema. Even fitness freaks will be pleased to note that West 60th Street is bounded by two of the city's best outdoor spaces: to the east, there's lush central Park, while the west leads to the bicycle path that heads down West Side Highway (and its attendant basketball courts, jogging track, and cafes that line the riverside park.) The area is also home to branches of a number of universities, including Fordham and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. While, with the exception of Gabriel's, most dining options lie a block or two further south, this still constitutes less than a two-minute walk for your average New Yorker. With this much culture in a few-block radius, why ever even cross the park?
Pros
  • Tons of culture
  • Proximity to parks
  • Proximity to Time Warner Building
Cons
  • Lots of university campuses
  • Noisy, busy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Heart of the West Village"

While the West Village's gentrification shows no signs of slowing - prices at the upscale eateries and bespoke boutiques are as high as ever - this neighborhood is nevertheless one of New York's most aesthetically pleasing (just ignore the tourists). With tree-lined streets of brick town houses and winding alleyways, the West Village feels less like a teeming metropolis than like a quaint New England town. Adding edge to the area, however, is the neighborhood's vibrant gay scene - camper, friendlier, and less exclusive than the trendier LGBT nightclubs of Chelsea. West 10th Street in particular serves as a kind of cultural hub for the area; it's home to the popular charity bookstore Housing Works, which also hosts readings by up-and-coming writers, as well as to popular Smalls Jazz Club (the low key jazz-pub Fat Cat on West 9th is also within a stone's throw). Dining opportunities here are plentiful - from trendy Bobo and Cafe Codensa to more laid-back Chow Bar and Agave, the latter of which is a particularly good brunch options. Rejoice, fitness gurus - the long, winding street is also home to one of the city's most scenic bike lanes.
Pros
  • Good dining scene
  • Cultural activities
  • Energy
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Touristy
  • Crowded/noisy
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A typical college town"

A tiny cluster of streets and red brick buildings, Durham is - like nearby Exeter - defined by its academy. Less upscale and picturesque than Exeter, which makes a roaring tourist trade off proud parents looking to invest in a piece New England memorabilia - Durham has a grittier, more functional feel. Its enormous campus dominates the town, which has little besides standard college-student joints.

It's likely that non-drivers visiting New England will end up in Durham; the University bus network - WILDCATS, which heads to Portsmouth, Newington, and other regional centres, is based here - as is the non-UNH-affiliated bus company. (Durham is also a stop on the Downeaster train, which connects Portland, Exeter, and Boston, among other New England towns). Tourists visiting New England without a car should thus expect to end up here for at least one lunchtime, a lunchtime that would be well-served by visiting the authentic, Old World Three Chimneys Inn, although Young's Coffee Shop may be just fine for budget travelers.
Pros
  • University scene
  • Plenty of transport
Cons
  • Small
  • A bit run-down
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"charming seacoast Nexus"

If you believe that the historic charm, quaint boutiques, and cobblestoned streets of old New England are gone for good, then you clearly have never visited Portsmouth, New Hampshire. With its red brick town centre - complete with 19th century churches - and picturesque rural outskirts, Portsmouth is one of the nicer towns on New Hampshire's Seacoast, with a wealth of cultural and culinary options. A hub of activity for residents of New Hampshire's Seacoast, Portsmouth is home to the Strawberry Banke Museum, a relic of colonial times, as well as to The Music Hall, a 900-seat theatre known for its cinema (including live televised opera and ballet), orchestral performances, and independent film screenings. Portsmouth is also home to a number of phenomenal restaurants, including the kitschily-decorated, all-day-breakfast venue The Friendly Toast and the slightly more upscale Flatbread Pizzeria, popular with locals and out-of-towners alike. The one negative of Portsmouth is its location; it lacks a railroad station, which means that transport to rail networks is limited to an irregular bus service to Durham (which is on the Downeaster). But for car-owning families, getting out of town shouldn't be a problem.
Pros
  • Gorgeous historical buildings
  • great restaurants
  • cultural hub
Cons
  • No train station
  • Pricier than elsewhere
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Must-see tourist destination"

One of New York's historic streets, filled with landmarks, Chambers Street should make the Top 10 List for any prospective visitor to New York. Visit the charming 19th-century castiron building at 105-7, designed by John Kellum in 1857, as well as the tall Renaissance revival Broadway Chambers building at 277. Also be sure to check out 274 Broadway, built in the style of an Italian palazzo in 1846. Formerly a department store, the building was later used as the offices of the New York Sun, and is currently the New York State Office Building. Stop by to enjoy the greenery in front of City Hall Park, one of the city's more charming "mini-parks", and don't miss the Beaux Arts Masterpiece at 31 Chambers Stree: the Surrogates' Court. With stunning statues representing Justine, Authority, Law, and Philosophy, the building is a must-see (and must-photograph). The area is less appealing for residents, however; its restaurant and residential building offerings are minimal, and much of the street is taken up by municipal buildings. New Yorkers, therefore, may only end up on Chambers Street if they have legal business to attend to - a pity, as it's one of the city's most picturesque.
Pros
  • Gorgeous historical buildings
Cons
  • Not really residential
  • No restaurant scene
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A lovely cross-section of New York"

While many of the Upper East Side's streets become increasingly less pleasant as you head towards the East River, the East 60's are a notable exception. While the area noticeably changes - as is the case throughout the East Side - it nevertheless remains charming. While East 64th Street between Fifth and Lexington is perhaps one of the "poshest" districts in New York City, with white-glove doorman buildings (co-ops so exclusive that even New York's finest often find themselves rejected), head furthest East for an area that - while it lacks real "neighborhood" definition, is nevertheless a perfectly pleasant middle-class family area. Notable places to go in this area include Alice's Tea Cup, a tea house with a large selection of flavors in a whimsical Lewis-Caroll atmosphere (there's a few in the city), trendier Jojo and Accademia dell'Vino, and Primola. Indeed, this street is notable for the sheer number of restaurants located along it - a rarity for New York's side-streets. It's also home to the Rockefeller University campus.
Pros
  • Good eats
  • Safe area
  • Shopping on Madison
Cons
  • Very pricey
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"One of the most gorgeous towns in the Berkshires"

Whether you're a retiree looking to get away from it all, a family seeking a second home for summertime, or a singleton hoping to put down roots, Great Barrington is one of the most scenic towns in the Berkshires, if not in all of America. With a charming, eminently walkable historical district - filled with some of the best dining outside of New York (Allium - formerly Verdura - on Railroad Street is truly exceptional, as is the delectable Babalouie's Pizza and standby Martin's Cafe) and an artsy, slightly bohemian community feel (come to the Berkshires in summertime for a number of highbrow cultural festivals, including theatrical Summer Stock and dance fest Jacob's Pillow). The town is well-stocked with cultural offerings of its own - including live jazz at the Helsinki Cafe, plenty of cinematic venues, and more. A short drive or walk outside of the centre is Guido's - an enormous organic food store that sets the standard for all locavore produce (and a good place to stock up on free samples). Parents will be pleased to note that the Great Barrington area is home to the highly regarded Simon's Rock Early College Programme, as well as Berkshire County Day school.
Pros
  • Great artsy scene
  • Gorgeous town
  • Amazing dining
Cons
  • No train connections (Amtrak)
  • A bit pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Charming New England town"

Most famous as the home of centuries-old preparatory boarding school Phillips Exeter Academy (also one of the town's major employers), Exeter is a town of extraordinary contrasts. The town center - quite near the school's vast and leafy campus - is a tourist's dream, with plenty of charming shops, restaurants, and gift stores. Yet a few miles away, beyond the sight of many tourists (often proud Academy parents) trailer parks proliferate, and at times the tensions between town and gown can be palpable. That said, Exeter is a gorgeous place to visit or live, although long-term residents may feel frustrated at the lack of significant nightlife and the early closure (8 pm) of most cafes in the area. The town's best restaurants include The Exeter Inn (a pricey but charming choice - somewhat less Old New England since the renovation), Inn by the Water, and the cheaper Penang Tokyo, beloved of Academy Students. Walk along the town's less scenic Portsmouth Avenue to shop at lower prices (and hit up the town's only Starbucks, hidden at the Stop and Shop at the end of the avenue). Public transport isn't the best, here - the Downeaster train to nearby Durham (and its vast network of buses) is the only way to get around the region if you miss the scare weekdays-only buses (the Downeaster train also gets you to Portland, ME, and Boston, MA); most residents will need a car, although the town itself is quite walkable.
Pros
  • Charming
  • Historical legacy
  • Phillips Exeter Academy
Cons
  • Small
  • Town-gown divide
  • A bit remote
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Something for everybody!"

Whether you're looking to spend a quiet family holiday on the beach or dance the night away at one of Fire Island's famous GBLT nightclubs, Fire Island - located off the southern coast of Long Island - has something for you. Each of the island's seventeen communities (each quite isolated from the others, due to the lack of transit infrastructure and paved roads on the island) has its own distinctive flair, from the gay-oriented tourism of the Pines and Cherry Grove to the anti-tourist vibe given off by Point O'Woods (which only offers leases to families with children, and doesn't allow visitors) and Davis Park to the family-friendly areas of Ocean Beach Village, the island's main tourist site, and Kismet. Try some of the fantastic seafront seafood restaurants, or get daring at one of the island's many nude beaches. While some parts of Fire Island are notoriously unfriendly to tourists, they can be great hideaway communities for those looking for traditional village life and the "away from it all" attititude it entails
Pros
  • Big gay scene
  • Lovely seaside
Cons
  • Unfriendly areas
  • Hard to get around
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Middle America in NY"

With its row of chain restaurants and requisite gas stations every five seconds, Hicksville, NY, can at times feel more like (a New Yorker's perception) of "real" America than Long Island. Filled with malls, big box chains, and restaurant franchises, Hicksville is a perfectly decent and well-stocked town (although it's far from walkable - it seems to be composed of highways) that nevertheless could use a bit more flair and individuality. On the plus side, Hicksville is located a convenient drive away from the shores of Oyster Bay. The Millridge Inn in nearby Jericho, a five-minute drive from the Hicksville Train Station, is perhaps the best place to eat in town: it offers pricey but delicious Ye Olde Americana fare, and the adjacent "Millridge Village" with its quaint candy and toy stores are a perfect way to spend an hour or two with a child in tow. Also worthwhile is the local steakhouse. But if you're looking to live somewhere that has its own individual character and flair, while still being within commuter distance of New York, you might want to look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Near NY
  • Near the shore
Cons
  • Chain stores
  • Boring
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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""Going out of business""

If you've ever been to the chaotic, frenetic side-streets of midtown Manhattan, you've probably seen plenty of stores, mostly electronic stores, with giant "Clearance Sales: Going Out of Business" signs. No need to rush in - most of these stores have been "going out of business" for decades, and have since been making a fortune off unsuspecting tourists clamoring in to get the best deal possible. (This is also an issue with some of the "antique" stores in the area, which tend to sell glossy, made-in-China knockoffs). For prospective shoppers, therefore, West 46th Street and its environs are far from pleasant. However, West 46th Street's redeeming feature is its restaurant scene. Between 8th and 9th Avenue, in the heart of Hell's Kitchen, West 46th Street is home to "Restaurant Row" - a diverse range of restaurants from over 11 countries, including the piano bar Don't Tell Mama, Japanese Sushi of Gari, pub O'Flaherties, Italian Bistecca Fiorentina, the Firebird, and more. Reasonably priced, with some of the best taste in town, these restaurants are also within easy walking distance of New York's vibrant, energetic theatre scene, with Off-Broadway to the west and Broadway to the east.
Pros
  • Proximity to theatres
  • Restaurant row
  • Cheap prices
Cons
  • Crowded and noisy
  • Knock-off goods
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"One of the most architecturally interesting streets in NYC"

Located in Lower Manhattan, Lafayette Street is one of the city's most appealing for architecture buffs, with a wide variety of 19th and early 20th century buildings. Tourists and visitors alike should head to the Public Theatre (once the Astor Library) with its Romanesque arches (it's worth a look in any case - the theatre is often innovative and edgy, and Joe's Pub, located in the building, is home to a number of excellent cabaret acts). Another treasure is the Commercial Romanesque Schermerhorn Building, built in 1888, as well as the Gothic firehouse (1896) located at the corner of Lafayette and White Street, which now serves as the Downtown Community Television Center. Colonnade Row, an 1830's Greek Revival building, is another highly worthwhile destination, as is the famous Puck Building (used as the location shot for Grace's office on NBC sitcom Will and Grace). The neighborhood itself is also worth visiting. An upscale shopping district, known for its excellent selection of antiques, LaFayette Street is also home to a number of good restaurants, including the Chinese Red Egg and Italian "SPQR." While pricey, the shops and restaurants in the area deliver high-end value.
Pros
  • Gorgeous buildings
  • Antique shops
Cons
  • Expensive
  • "cold," not family-friendly
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"More than just the bull and bear"

Even if you're not a New Yorker, you're probably intimately familiar with the connotations of Wall Street. A place where bankers and traders meet to put their nose to the grindstone, move around other people's money, and morph into the "fat cats" that "real America" is so fond of mocking. But while would-be residents may want to look into a more livable area, tourists and workers alike should certainly give this historic street a go. Named for the old city boundaries of New Amsterdam, Wall Street is filled with stunning examples of Gilded Age architecture, and is one of the rare sections of New York City that has maintained its pre-20th century character. That, along with the New York Stock Exchange, render Wall Street a must-visit location for tourists. New Yorkers may want to take a gander and hit the (4,5,2,3, J, or Z - there's a lot of lines) subway: Wall Street has a booming shopping and restaurant culture. While most of these places are aimed at businessmen looking for working lunches, try neighborhood favorite Delmonico's or upscale chain Cipriani for an enjoyable night out. Wall Street is also home to some great high-end shopping, including Tiffany's & Co, Tumi, and Thomas Pink.
Pros
  • Historic sites of interest
  • Great transportation
  • Beautiful buildings
Cons
  • Not livable
  • Limited restaurant scene
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Run-of-the-mill"

Nestled between the college-town bohemia of Morningside Heights and the more staid, family-friendly atmosphere of the Upper West Side, the West 90's can often seem a bit dull. The area around 95th and 96th street is more functional than charming, with plenty of cross-town and uptown/downtown transport links (especially on Broadway), and a number of convenient discount stores. What the district lacks, however, is charm. Unlike further down south, where heavy 19th century architecture and brownstones prevail, this area is filled with modern, often depressing-looking buildings rendered more depressing by neon storefronts. (Go further west, however, and you'll find some lovely buildings around Riverside Drive and West End Avenue). Food here tends ot be cheap and cheerful - visit the excellent Gennaro Restaurant on Amsterdam Avenue for lovely, slightly-higher end Italian food, or head over to one of the fine Indian restaurants in the neighborhood, including Tandoori or the Ayurveda Cafe.
Pros
  • Relatively inexpensive
  • Good transport links
  • Cheap eats
Cons
  • Not much character
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A cross-section of Brooklyn"

Stretching 10.2 miles long, Bedford Avenue - Brooklyn's longest street - is far more than just the hipster mecca many critics make it out to be. While it's true that Bedford Avenue's Williamsburg section may well be the world's hipster capital (although gentrification and rent rises may have pushed the truly "ironically poor" hipsters out to Bushwick and Red Hook), Bedford Avenue continues for miles past Williamsburg, passing through Greenpoint, Sheepshead Bay, Flatbush, and other neighborhoods before finally reaching Midwood. In doing so, Bedford Avenue plays home to a number of cultures and architectural styles, from detached homes in Midwood to staid, Upper-east-Side style brownstone townhouses in the Crown Heights region. Nearly all of New York's rich diversity is on offer here; a street full of Hasidim can give way to a few block of Russian or Polish restaurants - a few streets later and the area is African-American or Hipsanic. Such a variety of cultures gives this street a truly vibrant nightlife scene, as ethnic restaurants and "scene" bars dot the area. (It's worth saying, however, that the character of Bedford Avenue changes over the course of its ten miles, so check out the Streetadvisor Revies of its various cross-streets to get a narrower focus on your area). Fitness fans will be happy to know that the street south of Grand Street is equipped with a bicycle lane.
Pros
  • Lots of restaurants
  • Diversity
Cons
  • Too long to have a unified feel
  • Hipsters in Williamsburg are over
  • Rents have risen
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Charming Upper East Side street"

Take a walk down East 74th Street and you'll find yourself in one of the most beautiful areas of Manhattan. Staid brownstones, tree-lined streets, and charming side-street cafes dot this family-friendly area, which reaches from Central Park and the elegant shopping boulevard of Madison Avenue all the way to the East River. It's excellently located near a number of good schools, among them the Lycee Francaise of New York, private Birch Wathen Lenox, Buckley, and Hewitt School, all of which are located within a few block of 74th Street (also a mere stone's throw, in the early '80's on East End Avenue, are Chapin and Brarley). This street is also fantastic for foodies. Nearby restaurants in the street's western area include charming Italian Via Quadrone, the high-end Cafe Bouloud, popular Candle Cafe, while head further east to sample ethnic delights at Persepolis Restaurant and A La Turka Turkish. While nightlife here is relatively subdued (2nd Avenue offers a few preppy dive bars in the area, including the eclectic Iggy's Karaoke on 75th and 2nd), it's nevertheless a pleasant, if expensive, family-friendly area. The best transport is the 6 train on Lexington Avenue and 77th Street
Pros
  • Near good schools
  • Good restaurant scene
  • Beautiful
Cons
  • Quiet
  • Expensive to live here
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Oh-so "trendy""

Like elsewhere in the Meatpacking District, briefly a clubbing mecca for the Samanthas, Carries, Charlottes, and Mirandas of this world, Gainsevoort Street has very much come and gone. The depressingly warehouse-like architecture of the area, the overcrowded yet self-consciously minimalist clubs and bars - they may still be full now, but they're more likely to be peopled by out-of-towners on a Sex and the City Tour (pre-planned or otherwise) than by Sarah Jessica Parker herself. That may be too harsh an assessment for Gainsevoort Street - after all, the street itself could be considered beautiful (by some) for its authentic historical buildings (the fact that they were, by and large, slaughterhouses notwithstanding), and there are plenty of bars and shops that are, though lacking in true "street cred", nevertheless pleasant enough (among them the Tanuki Tavern, Hudson Bar and Books, and the Tavern on Jane). Restaurants like Spice Market, Fig & Olive, and Buddha Bar are also worthwhile choices. But overall, the combination of a slightly-seedy slaughterhouse atmosphere with past-its-prime clubbing outlets render this street a has-been.
Pros
  • Interesting historical buildings
  • Lively
Cons
  • It's over.
  • Tons of tourists
  • Nightclub crowd
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"More than just the Seaport"

Home of the famous "South Street Seaport," with which South Street is inexorably linked, this small street on the southeastern boundaries of Manhattan is home to one of New York's most delightful historic sights. While, tragically, much of the seaport - particularly the old Fulton Fish Market - has been transformed into a rather one-note, if well-designed, shopping mall, the historic character of the seaport remains, and is worth a visit by tourists and locals alike. Nineteenth-century (and earlier) ships still bob in the harbor, while the mercantile buildings along the seaport itself are a rare unsullied reminder of another age. The deck views of the East River are also stunning, and well worth a picnic in warmer weather. The area's a tourism and commerce centre rather than a residential one, however, and if the crowds of tourists showing up don't deter you from setting up full-time shop here, the pungent smell of fish (though diminished since the market's closure) may well do so. Even locals, however, might want to head down here in the summer, where the art nouveau Spiegeltent, a seasonal circus-tent music venue, plays host to such in-style acts as Vienna Teng and Duncan Sheik. Head to some of the restaurants in the area for top-quality Atlantic seafood. Try The River Cafe or Bridge Cafe.
Pros
  • Great fish restaurants
  • Interesting cultural events in summer
  • Interesting maritime museum
Cons
  • Smells fishy
  • A touristy centre
  • The boring shopping centre
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Increasingly happening area"

Like much of the Lower East Side, particularly the stretch near The Bowery, Broome Street is at once happening, about-to-happen, and already-happened. The immense history of this downtown district makes it one of the prime NYC destinations for tourists interested in New York's past: a legacy of tenement buildings and multinational waves of immigration. Today, however, this once-destitute immigrant neighborhood has been so gentrified by bars, slam poetry festivals, and trendy eateries that "old New York" is far from recognizable. The narrow, brick tenement-style buildings that stand on this street have now been dominated by artsy storefront designs and glittering marquees. That said, a few local tailors, laundromats, and other "neighborhood" amenities still remain, along with a large number of Chinese restaurants, a reflecting the historic immersion of this street into the large Chinatown district. But the biggest draw on this street nowadays is its bar scene, with standbys like the Broome Street Bar, Goldbar and The Randolph at Broome attracting a well-heeled crowd easily capable of affording the area's rent hikes. Tourists may be disappointed not to see echoes of turn-of-the-century New York, but trendy types know that yesterday's slum is today's $2300 studio.
Pros
  • Happening bar scene
  • Historical legacy
Cons
  • A little sketchy at night
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Cant give it anything less"

I must be a bona fide "true New Yorker." Even with all the problems involved in living in New York City (and believe me, there are many), I can't bring myself to give the city anything less than five stars. While some "world-class" cities fail to live up to the hype (most notably London, which I can argue from experience is one of the least pleasant, least efficient, overrated places on the planet), New York does all that it promises and more. From the thriving, pulsing energy of midtown - where teenage girls with three dollars in their pocket still move to the Big City and sing at open mic nights hoping to catch a break - to the charming, sedate neighborhoods of the Upper East Side, New York City has a wealth of neighborhoods and atmospheres.

Having grown up (partly) in New York, I can attest that there are few places better to grow up (if private school is an affordable option). I learned about colors from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, my field trips were to St. John the Divine and the Museum of Natural History, and I played in the Ancient Playground in Central Park. I grew up in the family-friendly, community-driven neighborhood of Carnegie Hill, which still maintains the close "community" feel today.

That said, New York is expensive, and at times, downright unlivable. Combining federal, state, and city taxes with ever-rising rents and transport fare hikes and the rising cost of health care can make even a lawyer or banker in NYC feel like he's living hand-to-mouth. While New York has far more "free" or cheap cultural events than many other cities, and a huge range of dining options that encompasses the cheap as well as the Alain Ducasse, living here still requires a huge sacrifice when it comes to that monthly rent check.

But with theatre, museums, art, libraries, restaurants, and of course that all-pervasive New York energy (we're friendly, really!), it's worth every penny.
Pros
  • The energy
  • Everything's here
  • Best food in the world
Cons
  • It's bloody expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Proximity to East Village, but not pleasant in and of itself"

While Union Square is one of the city's nicest spots, with its farmers' market, generous splash of greenery, and nearby wealth of bookstores, cinemas, and clothing stores, its southern border becomes far less pleasant the further east one goes. While around and below Astor Place, the endearingly gritty-gentrified feeling of the East Village prevails, with some of the city's best low-cost (but rising) dining, far less scenic is East 14th Street. A major transport street, with numerous bus and subway stops, this wide thoroughfare is filled with cheap neon-signed fast food joints and corner-store pharmacies, a far cry from the flea markets, boho theatres, and falafel restaurants available a few blocks further south. As a convenient, well-lit way to walk from the East Village into Union Square at night, it's a worthy option, but it is far less of an attraction as a destination in its own right. If you're looking to purchase or rent in the area, consider heading further south - East 10th, 9th, or 8th Streets are good options, as are the cafes lining avenues A, B, and C. That said, if you're looking to buy electronics, the stretch of 14th Street just east of Union Square has a number of appliance and electronic stores.
Pros
  • Easy transport
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • Unpleasant, crowded
  • Noisy, busy
  • Lots of scuzzy chains
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Perfect Street for Culture Vultures"

While midtown has long been thought the province of tourists and businessmen, the amenity-rich rental buildings and condos dotting the city's Art Deco landscape are increasingly becoming an option for well-heeled New Yorkers valuing location and culture over square footage. Far from family-friendly - the area is filled with blaring sirens, the mobbing of tourists, and is located near few of the city's great schools - midtown is nevertheless becoming a choice for older, established singletons and empty-nesters (including more and more seniors) seeking the convenience that midtown affords. 56th Street is one such option. Located just a block from the major transport thoroughfare of 57th street (easily walkable, but far from the noise), 56th street is located a stone's throw from Carnegie Hall, many of the city's Broadway and off-Broadway theatres, and a number of museums, including MoMa and the Museum of Art and Design. Culinary aficionados, too, will be delighted with the sheer amount of choice on offer here: among the city's best restaurants are Italian high-end Trattoria dell'Arte, the elegant Eastern-themed cafe at Hotel Meridien, and of course, the renovated Russian Tea Room, which may have lost its former status but is still a destination in itself. Whether you're a tourist looking for a day out, a businessman scouting a new office location, or an empty-nester or senior looking to live in a bustling, convenient area where cars are far from a necessity, 56th street is a well-worthy option.
Pros
  • Great nightlife
  • Varied restaurant scene
  • Thrilling energy
Cons
  • Not family-friendly
  • Noisy, busy
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"The heart of midtown"

Tourist trap or the city's essence? Thriving midtown Manhattan, especially around the Theatre District, embodies New York both at its worst and at its best. On the one hand, the area is loud and noisy, often so crowded with tourists that the characteristic New York speed-walk becomes impossible. On the other hand,there's something quintessentially "New York" about the hustle and bustle of the area, including its innumerable sights and attractions. West 53rd Street is home to MoMa - New York's avant-garde modern art museum, as well as to the taping of several popular late-night talk shows, including the Late Show with David Letterman, for which tourists may want to queue up for a ticket. This isn't really a livable area - most of the buildings are shops and office buildings, and restaurants cater to a business-lunch crowd more than to couples of families, but it's one of the most worthwhile destinations for tourists and New Yorkers looking for a "cultural" day out alike. In the evening, head to one of midtown's numerous theatres - recent "hit" shows include The Merchant of Venice, starring Al Pacino as Shylock, and the revival of A Little Night Music, currently starring Bernadette Peters and Elaine Stritch.
Pros
  • Great theatre scene
  • Museums
  • Bustling energy
Cons
  • Noisy and busy
  • Overpriced
  • Not livable
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Less exciting than its neighbors"

While Avenues A, B, and C are filled with culinary delights, hole-in-the-wall dive bars, and boho hangouts, Avenue D is far less exciting. Neither gentrified nor truly counter-cultural, Avenue D is largely known for the Riis Houses, a large public housing project named for photographer Jacob Riis, known for chroncling the plight of the urban poor. Other public housing projects in the area include Baruch House, La Guardia House, Lillian Wald House, and more. While Avenue D is by no means unsafe, it's nevertheless far from the pseudo-poor hipster ambiance of much of the Lower East Side. Amenities are few and far between in this area, with the Dry Dock Pool, a community swimming pool, being the only one of note. A few restaurants are scattered through the area, including the Chinese New Chinatown Restaurant and Mexican Joselito Restaurant, among others, but they tend to be less innovative (and less expensive) than the creative outlets found elsewhere in Alphabet City. Overall, Avenue D is a fine choice for low-income families - it's conveniently located within walking distance to the East Village and is served by the M14 bus - but is not necessarily a desirable location in and of itself.
Pros
  • Cheap
Cons
  • Few amenities
  • Less safe
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The last bastion of creativity"

A recent return trip to the East Village provoked, alongside a sense of nostalgia, a sense of extreme disappointment. Restaurants I had once loved and recommended to friends as a prime example of what "real" New York was like - hidden, inexpensive holes-in-the-wall serving phenomenal food from unlikely cultural fusions - had jacked up their prices; "bohemian" hideaways were now filled with established thirty-something couples brunching and discussing kitchen renovations (The cost of a studio on East 10th street? $2395, well on par with UES rentals). The East Village, while its relative lack of aesthetic charm still suggests some grittiness, has officially become gentrified. That said, if you head a bit further east, Alphabet City still offers some of what the East Village proper has finally given up for good: fabulous culinary options, an authentic neighborhood feel, and rents that don't rival the Upper East Side. A thriving Puerto Rican community gives the East Village a genuine family feel that other nearby avenues lack - with everything from two community gardens to an authentic "punk squat". Sports fans will appreciate the avenue's painted bike lane, one of the city's best outside of the West Side Highway. With charming restaurants and a laid-back feel, Avenue C is one of the last remaining "bohemian" spots in Manhattan...for now.
Pros
  • Realer than the East Village
  • Great restaurant scene
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Bound to be gentrified within a year or two
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"How Brave Are You Feeling?"

Hipsters may have rehabilitated Williamsburg and Park Slope, but they've got a far bigger challenge on their hands in the form of Bushwick. While many Brooklynites, including artsy types seeking low-income housing, have made valiant efforts to sing the praises of Bushwick as the "next big thing," the area is unfortunately still a casualty of urban blight; for many, the area is still synonymous with drug and gang violence (especially around Troutman Street). That said, going to (or even living in) Bushwick is not an automatic ticket to Danger-ville. The urban renewal going on in Bushwick at the moment may yet gentrify the area in the manner of other, similar, Brooklyn neighborhoods, and the most hardcore hipsters will swear by the underground cultural and artistic events dotting the scene. If you're willing to risk a mugging or two, and intrigued by the prospect of genuine bohemia, then by all means, give Bushwick a chance, but families with children who can afford other options may wish to look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Up-and-coming artsy scene
  • inexpensive rent
Cons
  • Far away
  • home to a number of housing projects
  • not extremely safe
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Edgier than the East Village"

The further East you go in downtown Manhattan, as a general rule, the further you'll get into bona fide bohemia. This is a bit of an overstatement, of course, as very little of Manhattan is truly "bohemian," these days (even Brooklyn's by and large highly gentrified), but certainly the cafes and shops of Avenue B, in the heart of New York's "Alphabet City," are far less over-priced and more "neighborhoody" than the chic fare on offer in Greenwich Village. That isn't to say Avenue B doesn't have its share of gentrification, of course. Former women's Settlement House "Christadora" is now a condominium, and Iggy Pop is no longer titling albums after the area. But that said, there's plenty to see and do here. Fantastic, affordable ethnic finds like Casimir (where you can see and be seen with arty celebs), and the popular Zum Schneider Biergarten dot the landscape, as do standbys Buenos Aires and the Serbian Kafana - each reflecting an element of New York's diversity. Lovers of greenery will be gratified; the area is nearby not only Tompkins Square Park, but also the charming, tiny Avenue B community garden, a testament to the area's eclectic spirit.
Pros
  • Great restaurants
  • Near parks and gardens
Cons
  • Difficult transport links
  • A bit gritty
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"The heart of the East Village"

While much of the East Village has fallen prey to the Bridge and Tunnel emo set - with underage Goths in dark eyeliner and white face paint raiding once-great record stores (while several of the St. Mark's Street alternative clothing vendor standbys have gone under) - parts of this area maintain its bohemian charm. It's less the anarchic artistry of Rent, however, that makes this area still viable, than a quieter, funkier charm. The East Village, with its Ukranian population and selection of affordable, kitschy boutiques and flea market-style shops, has some of the city's best shopping and dining, and nowhere is this more evident than off the beaten track, on East 5th Street. A stone's throw from your doorstep, you'll have access to one of the city's best Moroccan restaurants (cafe Mogador), an outstanding Indian restaurant (Banjara), French (Chez Jules), and Ukanian (Veselka), all priced well under average for the admittedly upscale city. The area is not the most white-glove in the world, but it's certainly safe and has a welcoming community feel - a far cry from the heroin addicts and crack junkies that used to roam the streets. Sometimes gentrification can be a very good thing indeed.
Pros
  • Amazing restaurants
  • Welcoming atmosphere
Cons
  • Not nearly as edgy as it wants to be
  • Near Touristy St. Mark's Place
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Alphabet City Eclecticism"

The western beginning of "Alphabet City" the stretch of four north-south city blocks in Lower Manhattan, east of the traditional "numbering" system, Avenue A (memorialized in "Rent" as metonymy for East Village bohemia) has a long history of alternative culture and activism, mostly reaching a crescendo in the New York artistic culture of the 80's and 90's, where the region was a collection of slam poetry cafes, writers' watering holes, and drug houses, although the 90's saw the area experience massive gentrifications, and you're more likely to find a family brunch in plenty of former flop houses than you are to meet a drug dealer on the tree-lined streets. While the area's less gentrified (and expensive) than, for example, the West Village, it's reasonably safe, and Avenue A in particular is known for its varied and dynamic nightlife and restaurant scene, with such culinary options as the delicious Yuca Bar, semi-outdoors Sidewalk Cafe, still-going boho hangout Odessa Cafe, and low-key Porchetta LLC. The presence of Tompkins Square park nearby provides for some leaves and greenery, however limited, but overall this is still a neighborhood for the outgoing night owls, not babes in arms.
Pros
  • Great restaurant scene
  • Great nightlife
  • Historical legacy
Cons
  • Not totally gentrified
  • Noisy, busy
  • Still a bit grotty
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Confusingly located, bohemian vibe"

Your average logically-minded out-of-towner might assume, quite rationally, that West 4th Street is - according to New York street-naming conventions - located immediately west of East 4th Street. Your average logically-minded out-of-towner, however, would be wrong. This quirkily located (running into West 10, 11, 12th, and 13th streets) diagonal street is as eclectic in its layout as it is in its atmosphere. The historical centre of the Greenwich Village scene of artists, writers, and other assorted bohemians, West 4th Street today is home to a number of historic sites of literary, artistic, and musical interest, including the former sites of Bob Dylan's hangout venue Gerde's Folk City, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney's Whitney Social Club, where artists like John Sloane, Edward Hopper, and Isabel Bishop premiered their work, and Eugene O'Neill's famous watering-hole the Golden Swan. Also worth seeing is the "Peace Church," the marble Washington Square Methodist Church famous for its role in pacifist campaigns during the 1960's, as well as for its support of other more radical activists, including the Black Panthers. Today, the street is perhaps best-known as a tourist destination (although it's far from "touristy" in the Times Square sense), and while it's perfectly pleasant for a stroll or for entry into the West Village, it no longer possesses the same free-wheeling spirit that may have inspired Bob Dylan's "Positively Fourth Street." It's a worthwhile destination, however, and like the rest of the West Village, a fine, if pricey, choice for families looking to bring culture to their family life.
Pros
  • Tons of historical buildings
  • Pretty
  • Bohemian legacy
Cons
  • Hard to find
  • A bit crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A quirky character-rich street on the Upper West Side"

While most streets in Manhattan's uptown are numbered, not named, this stretch at the westward end of East 84th Street has an eclectic charm all its own. Named for the American Romantic scribe responsible for such grisly tales as "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "The Tell-Tale Heart" (and the poem "The Raven," which he finished on an Upper West Side brownstone on the street now named for his success), Edgar Allen Poe Street is a leafy, quiet street of brownstones conveniently located near the charming Riverside Drive park, a few steps from the convenient shopping center of Broadway. Night life options are limited here, however, and while the Upper West Side has plenty of dining options overall, those on Edgar Allen Poe Street are limited to the predictably overpriced Edgar's Cafe, a pleasant salad-and-sandwich shop with prices raging around the $10-mark for enormous portions of admittedly high-quality lunch fare. While all but the most die-hard fans might find that the novelty of the street's namesake wears off after the first couple of visits, families and those looking for peace and quiet might well appreciate the street's comfortable, not-at-all-Gothic atmosphere.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Quiet, leafy
  • Near Riverside Drive
Cons
  • Limited dining
  • Limited nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The Other Park Avenue"

When most people - New Yorkers and out-of-towners alike - think of Park Avenue, they're as likely as not to think of pearl-clad poodle-clutching ladies who lunch, wealthy society dames enjoying a life of leisure on the Upper East Side. But if Park Avenue (north) is quiet and idyllic, then Park Avenue South is fast-paced and exciting. A neighborhood made up largely of offices, stretching from Union Square to Grand Central Terminal, this thriving street is home to the husbands of those lunching ladies (and wives of lunching husbands). With a number of bars, hotels, and innovative upscale restaurants, mostly catering to a professional clientele, this stretch of Park Avenue offers the excitement and energy that uptown Park Avenue largely lacks, as well as a host of architecturally stunning Deco buildings. While prospective home-owners or renters are unlikely to find much on offer here, those employed in the area are lucky enough to have access to a number of the city's best-kept secrets, including Houston's Restaurant, I Trulli (on 27th Street), and the French standby Les Halles. Hotel 31, Hotel Giraffe, and plenty of other accommodation options are on offer here for savvy tourists and buisiness-trippers alike.
Pros
  • Exciting work neighborhood
  • Plenty of business-lunch and -dinner venues
  • Proximity to transport
Cons
  • No residential feel
  • A bit impersonal
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Conveniently located family area"

Reaching from the south stretch of tony Carnegie Hill into more laid-back Yorkville, East 88th Street is defined in large part by its proximity to East 86th Street, the chaotic nexus of big-box chain stores and brand names that forms one of the largest shopping areas on the Upper East Side. Located a few blocks uptown, East 88th Street manages to avoid in large part the noise and stress of its southerly neighbor, while still reaping the benefits of proximity to major express subway stops and crosstown bus lines, not to mention a wealth of Best Buys and Barnes and Nobles. While nightlife here tends to be just as quiet as it is elsewhere on the Upper East Side, East 88th Street and its environs offer some good dining-out choices, which tend to fall on the eclectic and inexpensive side of the spectrum. Notable restaurants include Cafe D'Alsace on 2nd Avenue, constant standby Elaine's, known more for its scene than for its food, and plenty of takeaway pizza, Tex Mex, and Chinese food. The area's proximity to several of the city's best private schools, including CHapin and Brearley (both all-girls) make it ideal for families, although the quiet nature of some of East 88th Street's blocks can be discomfiting for those used to doormen and buzz.
Pros
  • Near 86th Street amenities, but quieter than the main thoroughfare
  • Relaxed dining scene
  • Nice brownstones
Cons
  • Minimal nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"New York's Community Center"

On a bright midsummer afternoon, it can feel like all of New York City has chosen to come out and play in the leafy expanses of Central Park. While other parks, such as Riverside Drive or Carl Schurz, have their own neighborhood clientele, Central Park - given its convenient location - is by far the largest and most populated in Manhattan, frequented by tourists and locals alike. But, unlike many parks, Central Park offers more than just green lawns and bucolic charm. Nature-lovers can learn about the park's flora and fauna at Belvedere Castle; families can picnic on Sheep Meadow or rent boats (remote controlled or row-boats) at the lake. With "literary walks," plenty of playgrounds (including the Ancient Playground, located next to and inspired by the Metropolitan Museum, and one of the best kids' haunts in the city, and the stunning rocky wilderness around Hector Playground further south), and even an ice skating rink in the winter, Central Park has it all. That said, there's a few drawbacks to the place: with the exception of street-vendor hot dogs and pretzels, filling food is a rarity in the park, and only the pricey Boathouse offers sit-down fare. But the restaurants off Fifth and Central Park West tend to be generally of a high standard, and if all else fails, the park is always a perfect place for a picnic.

While the park is generally safe, it's worth avoiding at night, where the darkness and seclusion of the area make it a target for criminal activity, as well as some gay cruising in the Bramble area.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • central to everything
  • classy neighborhood
Cons
  • limited dining
  • dead at night
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Non-descript downtown street"

If you've ever had to sort out a visa or other passport issue, you may well have come down to Varick Street and spent hours in waiting rooms at the Varick Street Immigration Court. Outside of issues of legality and border control, however, Varick Street has little significant to offer. It's by no means an unpleasant street - on the contrary, it's a perfectly scenic downtown street running through Tribeca and the West Village, well-located near a variety of "neighborhoods," each with their own lively restaurant and bar scene. But Varick Street seems to be "always a bridesmaid, never the bride" when it comes to the attention lavished on its neighbors. It's always in proximity to the Next Big Bar Street without ever attaining that honor.

In many ways, this is quite a good thing. Given the relatively small size of New York City's downtown, the bars and clubs of other downtown areas are but a five minute walkaway. But Varick Street itself benefits from this tiny distance, making it an eminently more livable street (especially on a Friday and Saturday night at bar closing time). Just don't get into any trouble with Immigration!
Pros
  • Quiet, but near plenty of downtown shops and bars
Cons
  • Relatively monotonous
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The beginning of downtown"

The first of the "named" streets in Lower Manhattan, West and East Houston Streets mark the end of midtown and the beginning of downtown proper. And every part of West Houston Street's character seems firmly rooted in this tentative downtown vibe. From art house aficionados' paradise the Angelika Film Centre (not to mention the equally popular Film Forum) to kitschy standbys like Katz's Deli, West Houston Street seems to have it all. It's not particularly charming or pretty; the wide avenue renders the short buildings squat rather than quaint, and it's slightly too busy for its size - but nevertheless, Houston Street maintains the exciting feeling of finally being "downtown." The restaurant scene here is consistently strong, with the Japanese Ushiwakamaru, the family-run Italian Arturo's, Mexican El Paso, and brunch-outlet Jane all making inroads on the West Houston street dining scene. Nightlife is mostly concentrated off the street itself, although Madame X nightclub is located nearby, and the vibrant downtown drinking scene is but a few footsteps away!
Pros
  • Proximity to restaurants
  • Proximity to bars
  • Bohemian vibe
Cons
  • Far from midtown
  • Less pretty than other streets
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"It's a miracle to get through it..."

While out-of towners might only know about 34th Street due to its association with heart-warming Christmas film "A Miracle on 34th Street", New Yorkers and those in-the-know associate the street less with Christmas cheer than with Christmas terror: a glut of chain stores and department stores (including the famous Macy's) crowded with New Yorkers and visitors alike, rushing, pushing, and shoving to throw the last 20% coffee grinder or remote control into their shopping bags. That said, much of these negative stereotypes - however true - apply less to East 34th Street than they do to its westward neighbor (the area concentrated near Herald Square and Penn Station is particularly bad). Further East, rather, 34th Street leads into the mostly quiet residential neighborhoods of Murray Hill and Kips Bay, two affordable middle-class family neighborhoods that make up in livability what they lack in other amenities, such as a vibrant nightlife scene or a variety of restaurants. That said, the foodie scene has some standout joints, including Villa Beriula Restaurant, Gigi Cafe, and the vegan Franchia Teahouse and restaurant, all located on 34th Street itself. While the area isn't exactly overflowing with charm, it's far more livable than Herald-Square horror stories have given it credit for.
Pros
  • It's not West 34 Street
  • Affordable family neighborhood
Cons
  • Little nightlife
  • Isolated from the rest of NYC
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Work and play on Murray Street"

Given Murray Street's proximity to the Financial District, it seems reasonable to assume that the amenities of this street lie in work, not play. Certainly, the street is conveniently located for would-be financiers, and the restaurant scene, though copious, tends to be focused on places for business lunch, not brunch with the kids. That said, Murray Street's fantastic location makes it an ideal, if unorthodox, choice for families. Not only is the street located right near Stuyvesant High School, one of the city's most prestigious exam-entry public schools, but it's also in close proximity to a number of parks, including the scenic revamped West Side Highway, which offers fitness buffs one of the city's longest and most stress-free bike paths, heading up to 79th Street along the river. The street itself is host to a respectable variety of cuisines, including the Indian Express, Delizia Uno, Muscle Maker Grill, 17 Murray Street Restaurant, and a number of office-friendly take-aways and delis with delivery service, although you might want to head further north into the West Village for more inventive dining. If you're looking for amenity-rich real estate, however, the high-profile 50 Murray Street is offering luxury apartments for rent at astronomic prices - perhaps a sign that this neighborhood is taking on a more residential tone.
Pros
  • Near West Side Highway Park
  • Near Financial District
  • Near Stuyvesant
Cons
  • Limited nightlife
  • Limited dining scene
  • Noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"U.N. in N.Y.C."

Making its way towards the city's unofficial diplomatic village, East 37th Street's character is largely defined in terms of its proximity to the U.N. The crowd here is international and cosmopolitan - sophisticated enough to enjoy a drink or two, but hard-working (and often old) enough to want to be in bed by midnight. This gives rise to a curiously mature bar and restaurant scene scene, with old standbys like the Rare Bar and Grill, the kitschy-but-established Duke's New York, the Silver Leaf Tavern, and the bar at the Kitano - places that, while by no means "trendy," nevertheless draw a consistent crowd. Proud parents will celebrate the proximity to the prestigious United Nations School, while foodies will enjoy the cheap, trattoria-style dining that fills this neighborhood, including Sarge's Deli and Josie's East Side. The area may not be the most happening in town, but it's a well-situated family and young couple neighborhood that's particularly convenient for diplomatic- and U.N.-types.
Pros
  • Proximity to the U.N.
  • Laid back, neighborhood feel
  • Cheap pubs
Cons
  • Not quite trendy
  • Not scenic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The heart of Hell's Kitchen"

Recently gentrified, this sometimes-scenic side street snakes its way from the Theatre District through Hell Kitchen, shifting in character from quiet blocks of brick townhouses to rowdy restaurant rows with equal measure. While twenty years ago, this stretch of Hell's Kitchen might have been considered dangerous, today the grit is good-natured, and you're unlikely to worry about any theft on top of the rising restaurant prices. Food here is still some of the city's best and cheapest, though, with a wealth of restaurants representing what seems to be each and every one of the city's ethnic groups. From the famous actors' hangouts Sardi and Joe Allen, with its steaks and informal cast parties, to old-timers burger haven Frankie and Johnnies to newer, edgier fare like Brazil Brazil and Spice Fusion, this street has it all. The grit and glamour alike of New York City's theatrical scene is alive here, from the starving artists of Hell's Kitchen to the considerably better-fed ones pictured in caricature at Sardi's. This might not be the best place to bring the family for a Sunday brunch, but for an exciting slice of New York City nightlife, or for an affordable artsy area to live that doesn't require three subway lines to get into Manhattan, this street is ideal. Plus, for tourists and military fans alike, the nearby U.S.S. Intrepid ship, located off a pier at West 47th Street, is one of the city's best museums.
Pros
  • Tons of restaurants nearby
  • Proximity to the theatre district
  • Proximity to the Intrepid
Cons
  • Busy and crowded
  • A bit touristy
  • Only recently gentrified
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Often overlooked slice of Old New York"

Running along the Eastern edge of Lower Manhattan, Cherry Street seems like a time machine into a bygone age, a Lower East Side all but lost to trendy cocktail bars and open-mic slam poetry nights. There's no sign of a Williamsburg-esque renewal here; Cherry Street is one of the few New York streets to retain tenement housing alongside plenty of public-housing options, making the area a surprisingly affordable one. That's not to say Cherry Street is dangerous, however, although it's far from pleasant - the occassional scent of urine seems to be a fixture near the hulking overpass. There's not much on here; a few community centres and a grocery store or two are all that's available for the social butterfly, along Corlears Hook Park is present enough, and the East River Bikeway is a free gym for sports fans. When all's said and done, however, it's price - rather than charm - that render Cherry Street an option for the potential home-buyer or renter, although its lack of bohemian pretension and loud bars might make it particularly appealing for quiet and at-homey types.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Grand, but a tad grandiose"

While the stretch of the Upper East Side north of 86th Street has the quirky charm of a Parisian side-street, with wood-paneled bistros, established "local" patisseries, creative boutiques, and a healthy supply of posh children's outfitters, the southern stretch of the Upper East Side is another beast altogether. Here, you're more likely to see one of the major fashion houses of the world than you are to come across an independently-owned boutique, and charming brownstones have been replaced in large part by sullen white-gloved doormen. This is one of the most elegant and exclusive areas in Manhattan, with brand names to match: the Carlyle, Yves St Laurent, and Clyde Chemist - the world's most expensive local pharmacy. There's plenty on offer here: Via Quadronno, between Madison and 5th, is one of the city's best kept secrets for Italian restaurants, while proud parents will be pleased to know that posh private schools Buckley, Birch Wathen Lenox, and the Catholic Domincan Academy are all within easy walking distance. Yet if you're looking for a more "neighborhood" friendly-feel, you might want to try heading further north or east.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Bucolic charm in the heart of NYC"

This tree-lined row of period brownstones is among the most scenic areas in the city. Running east from the Old World family neighborhood of Carnegie Hill, with its mom-and-pop ice cream parlours, boutiques, and low-key restaurants, to the more affordable area of Yorkville, East 94th Street has much to offer for families seeking an ideal area in which to raise children. The city's best schools - among them Chapin, Brearley, Nightingale, Spence, and St. Bernard's - are all located in the area, as is the popular Hunter Playground on Madison Ave and 95th Street. While dining and shopping options are mostly limited to the pricey patisseries and European restaurants on Madison Avenue, or the big box retailers in the Lexington and 86th Street areas, East 94th Street nevertheless provides a wealth of culture around 5th Avenue, where the street ends near some of the city's best-loved museums and, of course, it's most famous park. Transport can be found on the 4-5-6 trains on Lexington Avenue at 96th Street, frequent up- or downtown buses on almost all avenues, and the 96th Street crosstown bus,
Pros
  • Beautiful historic buildings
  • A peaceful neighborhood feel
Cons
  • A limited restaurant scene east of Madison
  • No nightlife scene
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Major crosstown Street"

The point at which the grid system starts to get complicated, West 14th Street stands between midtown proper and the West Village, incorporating elements of both neighborhoods. On the one hand, West 14th Street is near a number of attractive Village locations - from Greenwich Avenue's neo-quaint tea house Tea and Sympathy to the taverns and bars dotting trendy Jane Street - on the other hand, the street itself is more likely to play home to discount big-box retailers and Century 21s than it is to host arty boutiques selling handmade crafts. This is convenient for the frequent shopper, of course, but what it gains in convenience it loses in charm. West 14th Street is very much a commercial location: you can find anything from clothing to electronics here, and get around quite easily due to the high transport links. It's not, however, an extraordinarily livable area. If you're looking for charm and comfort, head further south and further west,
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"West Village Charm"

Located just off busy Greenwich Avenue, Jane Street is filled with charming brownstones and colorful shops, giving the area the flair of Old World Charm with some decidedly New World innovation. From faux-classic bistros like Tartine and The Corner Bistro to up-and-coming nightclubs like Employees Only - a madhouse of a lounge, Jane Street and its surrounding area may well have it all. Tavern on Jane is the equivalent of this areas "local," a laid-back gastropub with a neighborly clientele. But with the West Side Market only a few steps away, eating out may seem like less of an appealing option than dining in on the latest trendy foodstuffs, from bok choy to arugula and endives. Despite the glut of dining and clubbing options in the area, however, this is still at its core a quiet, tree-lined street, as appealing to families with kids as it is to fashionistas. One of the city's hidden gems
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"East River Enclave"

While the "numbered avenues" of the Upper East Side aren't known to be as elegant as their westward neighbors, York Avenue - the short thoroughfare running from 91st Street to 59th Street - marks a return to elegance. With attractive period buildings and a wide variety of up-and-coming restaurants and shops, from nearby Vinegar Factory to The Ethiopian Restaurant (yep, that's its name!), this avenue may not have the cache of Madison or Fifth, but it's nevertheless a highly pleasant place to live. A number of new apartment developments offer stunning riverside views at low (mostly rental) prices, while the area also plays host to some of the city's best schools, such as Brearley and Chapin. Excellent for families with children, the area is also home to Asphalt Green, one of the city's best sports and community centres. Nearby Carl Schurtz Park also provides residents with a quieter, river-front alternative to Central Park - with a strong neighborhood/community feel, dog runs, playgrounds, sports courts and more. An ideal place for a family on a budget looking for a comfortable and charming neighborhood.
Pros
  • close to good private schools (Chapin, Brearley), etc.
  • Affordable rental buildings with good amenities
  • Affordable, family-owned restaurant scene
Cons
  • Few period/aesthetically pleasing houses
  • Far from the subway
  • Sporty/preppy bar scene
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living