7.6 out of 10

University District

Ranked 23rd best neighborhood in Seattle
47.6608441935478 -122.308631354319
Great for
  • Eating Out
  • Public Transport
  • Internet Access
  • Schools
  • Shopping Options
Not great for
  • Lack of Traffic
  • Parking
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Singles
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Students
  • Retirees

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
May 31, 2016

"Shopping at U Village"

The U-district seems like a sweet place to live in if youre in college. Ive never lived there, but I like going to U Village, which is the shopping center nearby. They have a ton of stores and they actually provide parking! (which basically never happens in Seattle).

I like the U village because they have both outdoors gear and regular clothes stores. I usually check out Northface, Ibex, and of course the Nike Running Store (which has digital gait analysis to help you get the best shoes). Also Lululemon. People think Im joking when I say I get stuff from Lululemon, but they actually have really good running and yoga guys stuff now. A couple women I run with like to go to Oiselle, which makes womens specific running clothes. My favorite new find is Marine Layer, which is an apparel company that makes seriously the most comfortable stuff. I like it because it looks nice but also has some performance features so you can wear it hiking and stuff. Plus I always stop at Molly Moons Ice Cream afterwards. Cant resist!

Ive also been to the U District street fair 3 years running with friends. Its usually sunny and we hang out in the beer garden then walk around. Mostly its just crafts and lots of stuff for women, but there are also food trucks and artwork and stuff for your house. Just a chill way to spend the day in early summer.
Pros
  • Great mall
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5
Apr 29, 2016

"Good, cheap shows"

The U-district has some decent concert venues and nightlife, I head over there once in a while. Parking can be tough when theres a show on but just plan to walk for 10 minutes and youre all good.

The Neptune is a pretty sweet venue. It used to be an old movie theater but they converted it into a mid sized live music venue, and they did a decent job with the acoustics. The only downside is the bar. Theres only ONE bar in the whole place, and the line is usually like 30 minutes long. Ive been to a few shows there, like ZZ Ward last year, who did an awesome performance. They tend to bring in medium sized names, not just the locals, and a few that youd hear on the pop radio stations. Names like Santigold, PVRIS and Caspar Babypants. Its one of the many places run by STG (Seattle Theater group).

The Blue Moon is another classic U-District venue. Apparently theyve been around for like more than 80 years. They have something on pretty much every night so its a good fall back if your plans get cancelled. Mondays and weds are free, with stand up comedy and open mic. I cant really recommend the comedy, but the open mic has been decent the 2 times Ive gone. Other than that, they have small names and cover is always $5. Not bad. Check out the bands on soundcloud before you go though so you know what youre getting yourself into haha. Some of their stuff is pretty hard.

Drinks and food before and after the shows arent exactly cheap in the U District, but maybe a little bit less than other Seattle neighborhoods. But you obviously have to be happy being in a swarm of students haha.

Besides shows at venues, there are always tons of events happening at UW or in the neighborhood. I have a few friends who are in school there and it seems like every other weekend theres something going on that involves music, food, and sports.
Pros
  • Affordable concerts
  • A plethora of diverse restaurants
Cons
  • Limited parking
Recommended for
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Dec 22, 2015

"University of Washington and much more."

According to U.S. News and World Report the University of Washington is tied for the 52nd best school in the entire nation. More than 30,000 students are enrolled in the school, many of which call the University District home. The U Dist is as diverse as its student body, the core of the neighborhood is University Avenue, nicknamed “the Ave”, which is filled with shops and restaurants. Like most of Seattle the neighborhood is growing vertically. The area was once dominated by low budget student housing and small shops, but now new mixed use multi story building are the new norm.

The University of Washington campus is gorgeous. Forbes named it as one of the most beautiful campuses in the county. While UDub is set in an urban environment, it is surrounded by distant mountain peaks and is on the water. The cherry tree lined quad is the highlight of the 703 acre campus, a must see when in bloom.

Chances are if you’re considering living in the University District you’re either a student or school staff, and you’re a renter. Many old homes in the area have been converted to apartments and new large scale multi story apartment buildings are popping up each year. The average apartment in the U Dist starts at $1,000, but expect to pay $1,500-$1,700 for a 1 bedroom, which does not include parking.

If you’re thinking about buying a home in the U Dist I hope you have deep pockets. According to Zillow the median home in 2015 sells for $611,500, a +18.5% change, and that trend continues to grow. Plenty of home are listed over 1 million dollars.

There is a lot to see and do in the University District, while most of restaurants, shops, and bars are geared toward the student body there are plenty of must see places, a few of my favorites are:

Morsel: This small (read tiny) breakfast spot specializes in homemade country biscuit breakfast sandwiches. They’re affordable and yummy. There is always a line and they close when they sell out, which is usually before lunch time.

Agua Verde Café & Paddle Club: The UW campus is right on the water and this spot is the perfect place to rent a kayak and explore the surrounding waters of Portage Bay and Montlake Cut. Plus they have excellent Mexican food!

Farmers Market: This is Seattle largest outdoor farmers market and it takes place on Saturday, unlike every other neighborhood which does theirs on Sundays.

Husky Stadium: Construction was completed in 2015 for this state of the art football facility. It sits over 72,000, making for one of the best collegiate football experiences. Do not attempt driving through the neighborhood on game day!

The Ave: University Avenue is filled with dive bars and cheap eats and doubles as the location of the Saturday Farmers market. Great people watching and definitely a good time.

University Village: Right down the hill from the campus sits U Village a modern outdoor shopping mall filled with of mostly higher end stores. I recommend eating at Din Tai Fung – amazing dumplings.

Burke Gilman: This trial is a 27 mile bike and foot path that cuts right through the U Dist. In the summer it’s filled with joggers and cyclists and is the perfect way to pedal to other Seattle neighborhoods.

---

Are there any downsides to the U Dist? Yes. Everything is geared toward the student body so if you're not in college you probably don't want to live here. Street parking is terrible, if you have a car and don't have your own designated parking spot you're going to have a hard time finding a spot. Ultimately the University District is perfect for students who want to live close to campus. There are some great spots to visit and soak up the collegiate culture.
Pros
  • A plethora of diverse restaurants
  • Active nightlife
  • Diversity
  • Bicycle friendly
  • Tons of fantastic affordable restaurants
Cons
  • Limited parking
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
  • Not great for non-students
  • High homeless presence
Recommended for
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Dec 11, 2015

"Diverse with good public transit to downtown"

I lived in the University District during college from 2001-2005, and have visited numerous times since for the occasional coffee meeting, event at University of Washington, night out, or Husky game pre-funk.

There are literally great restaurants everywhere, many very affordable -- since there is a lot of students, super expensive restaurants in this area don't do so well.

University Ave is full of college dive bars, perhaps none better than Earl's -- a longtime favorite for Long Islands.

Great access to freeways (I-5 and 520) as well as easy buses downtown (70, 71, 72, 73)
Pros
  • Tons of fantastic affordable restaurants
  • Diversity
  • Fairly affordable
Cons
  • Limited parking
  • Not great for non-students
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Dec 11, 2015

"A city of students"

The U-District is fiercely part of Seattle’s identity. At the same time though, with the enormous University of Washington (UW) campus and surrounding student housing, the neighborhood is almost it’s own city, with nearly 45,000 students.

Located in North Seattle, it rests on the east side of I-5, north of both Lake Union and Lake Washington. To the North is the quieter Ravenna neighborhood, and to the east are a few more residential neighborhoods.

The campus:
A lot can be said for the campus itself, which is open to the public. The best spot is probably the steps leading from Red Square to Rainier Vista, which on a clear day showcase Mt. Rainier, always snow-covered and towering above the surrounding Cascade Mountains. The main library is also open to the public, and the second floor reading room is absolutely stunning, with sky-high arched ceilings. Some say it looks like the Great Hall in Harry Potter.

In fact, much of the University of Washington’s campus was designed and built during Seattle’s “forgotten” 1909 World’s Fair. Everyone remembers the 1962 World’s Fair, when the Space Needle was built. But the 1909 “Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition,” hosted at the UW campus itself, also had a significant impact on the design of our city.

Football:
You can’t live in Seattle for long without hearing about UW football games. They’re held in the Husky Stadium, the largest structure at UW, which is on the Eastern edge of campus, next to Lake Washington. You’ll know there’s a game when everyone’s dressed in purple, and traffic (including boat traffic!) is backed up for miles.

Housing:
As you’d expect, housing is filled almost exclusively by students. Though there are plenty of apartments that aren’t *technically* only for students, you may be the only non-student in the building. That’s why lots of grad students and UW employees live in Ravenna or other nearby neighborhoods, for a quieter scene.

Medical Care:
One of the best-known features of the University of Washington is the medical school. With hundreds of doctors graduating from the highly ranked school, many of them end up working at the UW Medical Center itself, which includes every kind of specialty you can imagine.

Food & Activities
All the students means that there is tasty, affordable food! You can walk down University Way and find dozens of options. The Neptune also has fun shows for smaller, lesser-known artists. I recently saw ZZ Ward there, and the sound was great (not always a given in smaller venues).

It’s college, so there’s no shortage of bars. There’s always one within stumbling distance, with the majority being on University Way. But one thing for all ages is the annual summer street fair. Spanning almost a mile, this big event has hundreds of food, art, clothing, and music vendors.

Also, technically just outside of the U-District boundaries, but still considered part of the neighborhood, is the University Village Shopping Center. This mostly-outdoors mall is surprisingly upscale for being next to a University, and has a few trendy restaurants as well.

Conclusion:
The University District is the obvious place to live if you’re a UW student. But for everyone else, be prepared to be surrounded by thousands upon thousands of students!
Pros
  • A plethora of diverse restaurants
  • Active nightlife
  • Diversity
Cons
  • Not great for non-students
  • Limited parking
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"Seedy, with a side of not-quite-so-seedy"

Outside of campus itself, the U District is centered on University Avenue, more commonly known as "The Ave." During the day it's a fun row of shops, and at night there are plenty of little restaurants to enjoy. But the street (and most of the streets surrounding it) are pretty dingy, and seem to attract a lot of the city's homeless. Police presence is pretty good, though.

The university hospital, right next door, is very good. Their labor/delivery unit especially was great for the birth of our first child.
Pros
  • A plethora of diverse restaurants
  • Active nightlife
Cons
  • High homeless presence
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
  • Limited parking
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"To The University District With Love"

The University District is home to the Dawgs, otherwise known as the University of Washington (UW). Businesses and student housing abound, as one would expect around a world renowned campus.

It's hard to know where to begin with such a large, densely populated area. The neighborhood spans west to east from Interstate 5 to 20th Ave NE, except on the main campus. The northern and southern boundaries are NE 65th St and the waterfront of Portage Bay and Union Bay, respectively. Several areas can be highlighted in this student collective. However we'll start with the most traveled, the main campus and "The Ave" (University Avenue NE).

The UW campus occupies the southwest portion. Students have the privilege of walking through an area resembling a nature preserve to attend classes. Heavy foliage borders the northern edge, with generous pines and other varieties interspersed throughout. There is quite a network of roads and pathways weaving between structures and buildings. Red Square and Drumheller Fountain are gathering areas between and after classes. Be careful driving through campus, not only due to immense foot traffic, but because roads may not lead where you would expect. The central academic area is contained between 15th Avenue NE and Montlake Blvd NE, with structures spilling over to the south and southwest. The intramural and sports facilities are to the southeast, with Husky Stadium towering near the water.

Moving on to University Avenue, otherwise known as "The Ave", brings the heart of business and social establishments. Places like the Blue Dog Kitchen, Varsity Theater, Dante's Bar and Night Club, The Wannabee, Big Time Brewing, Jewel of India, and many others. There are more independent coffee shops along here and around campus than you could visit in a month. There is no shortage of things to do, especially at night. My wife and I, while on a Sunday night date, had to leave downtown Seattle to come here just to find good restaurants that were open, with a wide variety of eats.

Looking beyond, more businesses line NE 45th St (The main east-west arterial), including the Blue Moon Tavern. This tavern is a Seattle icon and a hotbed for social craziness. Trabant Coffee and Chai is a very spacious coffee house closer to campus with good coffee and fast wi-fi. Also nearby are a movie theater, Trader Joe's, Performance Bike Shop and the list goes on and on. The UW Tower (Tallest building in the area) is along 45th as well. The largest video store on the West Coast, Scarecrow Video, stands on Roosevelt Avenue. If you can't find it on Netflix or at Blockbuster, Scarecrow will have it.

The UW police station and a superb bike shop, Recycled Cycles, are hidden down on Boat Street by the Lake Washington Ship Canal. The bike shop is unique, in that it offers bins of used components and parts for the cyclist on a budget. The Burke-Gilman bike trail passes just north of here, so the shop often attracts people in the middle of their ride (including Yours Truly).

There is easy access to downtown via the University Bridge. The Montlake Bridge heads towards Highway 520 or Capitol Hill, and 45th and 50th Streets can access Interstate 5. Another arterial route is 15th Avenue, which runs north-south.

The University Village Shopping Center is on the northeast side of campus, with attractive "open-air" stores. The streets directly north of the university are lined with Fraternities and residential housing, filled mainly with students and faculty. More housing lies to the northwest, though not quite as serene (especially on the west side of Roosevelt Way).

Ravenna Park, or half of it, lies in the U-District to the north. It is a 50 acre park with a wooded ravine and several amenities, including a play area, tennis court, wading pool, paths and sporting fields. Another "park" lies on the west side, next to the interstate. The University Playfield, as it's called, is around three acres and features a play area, tennis court, and sporting fields.

Some events that mark the neighborhood's uniqueness are the street fair in May and farmer's market. This was the first market to hit Seattle, which continues to be the largest local farmers event.

Even though the University District predominantly contains students, many in the Seattle community flock here for its diverse options in restaurants, music venues and small businesses. I personally have spent many hours in this neighborhood, including time spent writing reviews.
Pros
  • A plethora of diverse restaurants
  • Active nightlife
  • Bicycle friendly
Cons
  • Limited parking
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Youthful spirit, youthful residents"

University District is a diverse and vibrant neighborhood in all respects, but as the neighborhood’s name may suggest, it leans heavily toward accommodating the college-age residents. Centered on 45th Ave NE (colloquially referred to as nicknamed “the Ave”) and University Way NE, there is no shortage of restaurants, bars, theaters, coffee shops, book stores, and shopping. University District is not surprisingly home to the University of Washington, and the district is largely an extension of the campus. Constantly sporting events to celebrate, the neighborhood is focused on socializing. Husky Stadium is located on the south side of the neighborhood, right on Lake Washington. The Ave is rife with things to do- Finn MacCools, an Irish pub, is a popular hangout with Happy Hour, karaoke events, and a trivia night. Portage Bay Café is always full for brunch on the weekends, and Dick’s Drive In is a Seattle staple. There are also many ethnic restaurants, including Shultzy’s Sausage, the very highly regarded Thai Tom, and Mamma Melina Ristorante. The neighborhood is a very convenient residential area, as public transportation is readily available all over the district. There is also a wide variety of shopping, including a year-round farmers’ market, multiple record stores, and several boutiques.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
2yrs+

"It’s Where the College Kids Live"

From the moment I moved to Washington State I wanted to live in the U District, but as I grew mature that dream changed. The area has a lot of college kids, duh, I mean it is where the University of Washington’s main branch is located and the reason the area is called the amply named U District. The down side of an area housing a campus and its young students and the fact that the average age is around 20 and that will never change. So if you’re past those college days you feel old walking the streets after a while.

There aren’t a lot of condos in the area; in fact the area mostly has apartments and houses that are used as rentals for the students. The Ave area is kind of rundown and that’s where the crime seems to be happening these days. There’s the U-village area that’s newer and safer but probably pretty boring. And the U-village area can have terrible traffic through Montlake. I would probably advise staying away from the U-district.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
2yrs+

"Bustling college town on a larger scale"

The University District, also known as the U-District, is the home of Seattle's University of Washington. Students, numbering nearly 40,000, easily outnumber non-University affiliated residents of the University District, making the U-District a college-centered area of the city. If you visit the University District, you'll find the area overrun by college students at nearly any time of the day or night, giving the area a young vibe. There is plenty of housing around the U-District, particularly apartment buildings and large homes that are typically rented to groups of students.

Three miles north of downtown Seattle and just off Interstate 5, main roads through the University District include NE Ravenna, NE 45th Street, Roosevelt Way NE , Brooklyn Avenue NE, 15th Avenue NE, and University Way NE. The University District is bordered by Lake Washington to the south, providing students and others in the UW community with easy access to water activities.

You'll find plenty of shopping and inexpensive dining options, both on "The Ave" (University Way NE) and at the University Village shopping center. As you might expect, the U-District is home to dozens of cafes, hip coffeehouses, and college bars. Thanks to its proximity to UW, the University District is also home to many outdoor events, public art installations, and theaters, as well as the Burke Museum and Henry Art Gallery, both located on the University of Washington campus.

Parking can be expensive, especially on the campus itself, though street parking is readily available further from the campus. Traveling from elsewhere in the city to the University District is easy thanks to its location along Interstate 5; the area is also served by many bus routes.
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"The U-District has Something Fun for Everyone!"

The U district in Seattle is one of the more fun places in town to hang out. It has great restaurants of every type, and entertainment is available in the form of night clubs with great music and interesting movie houses. University of Washington is a great school, and it's main campus is located here. Libraries, ethnic grocery stores, boutiques, and bookstores line the blocks- there's something for everyone. The cost of everything from housing to a glass of beer also seems more friendly than in other neighborhoods in Seattle.I frequently take out of town guests to wander around the U-District for something of local Seattle flavor.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Something For Everybody"

Seattle’s University District (or U-District) is buzzing hub of activity with something for everyone. With University of Washington, it’s Medical Center/Hospital and University “Ave” at it’s heart, the U-District features all kinds of activity 24 hours a day. The “Ave” has all kinds of retails stores, theaters and great restaurants, coffee shops and bars.

The neighborhood to the north is calm, fairly quite for an inner city neighborhood and has some nice parks. Ravenna Park is the largest park in the northern park of the neighborhood which has a baseball diamond, a large playground, a vast grassy area and a set of trails that lead southeast to Cowen Park.

The U-District’s western edge runs along Roosevelt and features some nice restaurants and bars. There is also some good shopping in Roosevelt Square, including a Whole Foods.

The area near the university and the “Ave” can be full of panhandlers and junkies at night, but it’s pretty well policed and very safe. The neighborhood is much calmer and absolutely safe. The park has it’s share of nightly residents and is probably best left alone after dark.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Student city with its ups and downs"

I spent some of my best years living in this neighborhood! I can't help but feel nostalgic every time I drive by and see the herds of college students on the streets. But then, I realize that I'm getting too old to keep up with this neighborhood...

As a college neighborhood, the U-district is amazing. There is always something going on. Rent is affordable, although the living establishments aren't always the best. School is walking distance, and public transport is pretty amazing for Seattle. We have one of the nations top hospitals around the corner, the IMA, Gasworks, and a ton of other perks. There are great CHEAP places to eat and cute retail stores. College pubs and bars abound in this neighborhood as well. A few of my favs are the College Inn for a low key night with friends or Earl's if you're in the mood for stiff drinks and a party. Oh, I miss the good ol' days.

But then there's the noise. And the drunken college students. And the bears that get shot, and the people that get shot. The homeless people and sex offenders. Plus a lot of cell networks get really bad reception in a lot of the UW areas (e.g. T-mobile).

Overall, I guess the U-district is kind of...bi-polar. There are lot of goods and a lot of bads. I guess it depends on what you are looking for in a neighborhood. But I had a lot of fun living here, and it really wasn't as bad as I might make it sound :/ I still work around here, so I hang out in the area quite a bit, and really do miss living here sometimes.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
2yrs+

"College student haven"

This is a community that is always in motion, just like any college town. The residents here, for the most part, are a lively mix of students, faculty, and employees of the University of Washington.

Life in the U-District (as it’s commonly called) ranges from multi-story gracious homes on shaded avenues with green meridians, to condominiums, apartments, and well-worn bungalow homes that are temporary residents to cycles of students. There is also a Greek system here, nestled in across the street from the north entrance of campus.

The University District is flanked by the greenbelt of Ravenna and the open shopping center of the University Village. The main collegiate attraction here is University Way, aka, The Ave, which has the standard-issue array of cheap eats and international fare, used bookstores, unique boutiques, cafes, music stores and plenty of curiosity shops.

Students stock up at the University Book Store, which is also a popular venue for author readings. From spring through fall, there’s a Farmer’s Market on the north end of University Way.

The U-District is beautiful and bucolic in the fall, and famous for its cherry blossoms in the spring.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles

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Best Streets in University District

"Fresh out of construction"
47.6612101608849 -122.295466581591
2

Memorial Way

3.5/5
"Welcome to the University of Washington"
47.6597774081032 -122.30973753406
"Waterfront views and a great vegan meal"
47.6516146635505 -122.313984928478
"Great access to the U "
47.6531265806053 -122.312733934453
"Seattle's Infamous "Ave""
47.6604283571815 -122.313154532615

Unranked Streets in University District

"17th Avenue NE in Seattle, Washington"
47.6693543688929 -122.309613586441
"Peaceful and convenient living"
47.6643414268351 -122.314222085669
"Great for walking or jogging. The side streets are where the action is though."
47.6701575999281 -122.309775760789

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