7.5 out of 10

Seward Park

Ranked 28th best neighborhood in Seattle
47.5460824586798 -122.269356872928
Great for
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Shopping Options
  • Eating Out
  • Internet Access
  • Parks & Recreation
Not great for
  • Resale or Rental Value
  • Schools
  • Pest Free
  • Medical Facilities
  • Nightlife
Who lives here?
  • Families with kids
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Singles
  • Beach Lovers

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
Feb 27, 2016

"Property in high demand"

Like most others here, I’ve only been to this neighborhood to enjoy the lovely Seward Park greenspace. We did consider living here, but frankly there is so little on the market that it wasn’t worth waiting around for.

I would quite enjoy living here in the future, if the opportunity arose. Though I’d likely aim for something closer to Columbia City—both so that the real estate isn’t as extortionate, and also to be closer to the amenities near downtown Columbia City. Not to mention that the population gets quite whitewashed the closer you get to the waterfront property, as is the case with most waterfront property in Seattle.

Lastly, I’ll mention that when Seward Park gets too crowded, Genesee Park is another good option nearby. It’s a mile or so north, and has a few sports fields, walking paths, and waterfront access. In fact, I quite like to walk between the two on the Lake Washington Blvd Trail, which has more public access to the water along the way.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Waterfront activities
Cons
  • Lack of shopping amenities
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
Feb 25, 2016

"Good park with stroller-friendly path"

When our daughter was too young to walk, we would take her here often. This is because it is a nice park with a wide path good for strollers. Very smooth. They made the path wide to fit many people and flat so anyone can use it. Now we also try the trails in the middle of the park. There are some main trails and some small ones. We are trying to explore all the small trails.

Seward Park is the best place to watch the Blue Angels. The Blue Angels are American military planes that do an air show in midsummer. You should arrive early and bring many snacks and drinks, plus an umbrella to block the sun. Then sit on the north or north-east shore for the show. Avoid driving just before and after because traffic is very bad.

There is a very good playground here at the park. It has many unique and fun features. It is also a good place for swimming. However, last year there was a sewage spill nearby that caused the bacteria to grow. The swimming was closed for a short time. It reopened shortly after, but check for any closures before swimming. Normally the water is fine. The beaches are nice as well.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Waterfront activities
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Feb 20, 2016

"An oasis in the city"

Seward Park is a well-off Seattle community, just east of Columbia City. It is bordered to the east by Lake Washington, with a long shoreline road and walking path. The focal point is the enormous Seward Park, a 300 acre forested park with peaceful walking trails and swimming.

The Park:

One of the best things about Seattle is that early in it’s development, it set aside prime land for parks, and since then has invested in making them beautiful and maintaining them. Seward Park is the perfect example.

The park makes up the entirety of a small peninsula that juts out into Lake Washington. It actually almost feels like an island, because it is only connected to the mainland by a small piece of land, and is full of trees and ringed with beaches. This makes Seward Park feel miles away from the city, even though it's right next door.

There is a paved walking trail all the way around, and a few trails through the middle. It’s a perfect place for a weekend stroll or summer swim. For boats, you can hand launch at Martha Washington Park just south of Seward park, likewise at Adams Street launch just north. For motorized boats, you’ll want to head to Atlantic City Launch a couple miles south.

The Neighborhood:

The neighborhood of Seward Park is full of single-family homes, and people hold on tight to them, because it is such valuable property with the proximity to the lake and the park. You won’t find much for rent or for sale here, especially as Columbia City is quickly becoming one of the most popular neighborhoods in Seattle.

The closest areas you’ll find more rental availability are in Columbia City, particularly along Rainier Ave. Even though it’s only about a half mile away, the housing is also much more affordable. Those single-family homes with a water view in Seward Park are out of reach for most.

I’d say the only downside to this neighborhood is that isn’t really anything to it besides housing. The only amenities are a Caffe Ladro and a pizza restaurant. There used to be a PCC natural market, but it moved to Columbia City down the road

That being said, even as Columbia City is booming, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a few more shops or restaurants pop up along Wilson Ave.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Waterfront activities
Cons
  • High cost of living
  • Lack of shopping amenities
  • Longer commute to downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
Feb 17, 2016

"Perfect for walking the dog"

I love getting a steaming hot latté and taking my dog on a long walk in Seward Park on a Saturday morning. There are two main routes: around the edge or through the “Magnificent Forest” in the middle. The forest has lots for dogs to explore and smell, but I enjoy the views of the perimeter walk. If it’s particularly clear, you can see Mount Rainier on the southern part of the peninsula.

I’d highly suggest keeping your dog on a leash unless they are exceptionally well-trained, because there are too many distractions to run off and explore. There are plenty of other dogs, bikes, runners, etc, not to mention the usual birds and squirrels. The hummingbirds are especially numerous in the spring. Once we saw something that seemed to be a parrot, but when I looked it up later, it appears that it was actually a Conure Parakeet. For some reason, the park has a few that are local residents. Maybe someone’s escaped pets that managed to survive here?

You can also let your dog swim in Lake Washington, but I usually don’t if there are people swimming.

There’s nothing else in the neighborhood really, besides housing. I usually like to grab a coffee from the Tin Umbrella in Columbia City on the way. They roast their own coffee and it’s delicious.
Pros
  • Great parks
Cons
  • Lack of shopping amenities
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Beach Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
Feb 17, 2016

"Living in a runner’s paradise"

Seward Park is such a great place to run. I can’t believe it’s in the city. The park itself is a peninsula with a path all the way around. The path is a wide, paved 2.4 miles. So depending on energy levels, 2 or 3 laps around is perfect. The miles go by super quick because you have a changing lake view the whole time. Also sometimes it becomes an obstacle course when it’s busy haha.

If you’re feeling really good you can finish up by running along Lake Washington Blvd, which has a great sidewalk along the waterfront. It goes all the way to the Flying Squirrel Pizza Co—just turn left on Genessee. Not exactly the healthiest post-run meal but you can get a killer personal pizza for under $10. Plus they have salads too so you can get some leafy greens in and all that.

In the summer a better post-run option is to jump in the lake! There’s swimming on the north and the south sides of where the peninsula meets up with the land. The north part has a swimming raft in the summer that you can swim out to and jump off. It’s pretty fun. So I like to just bring my lunch and eat it after I jump in the lake following my run. It’s good for your muscles too.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Waterfront activities
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great park, great community"

Seward Park gets its name from the park that the neighborhood centers on—and for good reason too, it’s one of the biggest parks in the city! The park itself has a network of trails used by hikers, bikers, and walkers. The woodsy areas are full of trees, but open areas for picnics and an amphitheater are also present. Geographically located on a peninsula that juts into Lake Washington, the shorelines and beaches are pristine and active with beach goers.

Most of the neighborhood is a quiet residential area with historic homes and a tightly knit community of neighbors who have lived here for years—in no small part a product of the presence of some of the oldest and most active synagogues in Seattle. There are some smaller businesses that reflect the diversity of backgrounds and elasticities that have settled in here and most notable are an Asian and Jewish influence, but prevalence doesn’t mean limitation—you’ll find anything from Mexican to Greek to Indian to Thai to Somali influences in the businesses and citizenry.

Seward Park is a regular stop for public transportation, and the light rail that runs into SeaTac Airport and downtown makes this area very accessible for both residents and visitors.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
2yrs+

"Beautiful neighborhood surrounding a park"

The Seward Park neighborhood of southeast Seattle is named for Seward Park, one of the largest and oldest parks in the city. The 300 acre park is home to beautiful old growth trees, beaches, picnic areas, an ampitheater. and many miles of biking, walking, and hiking trails. The area first became a city park in 1911, and occupies all of Bailey Peninsula, jutting into Lake Washington. Although it is one of the most popular parks in Seattle, it is very spread out, so it never feels crowded.

The Seward Park neighborhood grew up around the western edge of the park. Seward Park is very diverse, with large populations of African American and Asian American residents. The neighborhood is home to the oldest synagogue in Washington, and has long been known as a center of Orthodox Jewish life. Most of Seward Park is a quiet residential neighborhood, filled with large historic homes. Most families living in Seward Park stay here for many years, and the community is very friendly. Besides beautiful homes, there are also many small shops and ethnic restaurants here. Both the park and the surrounding neighborhood are known as safe and quiet places for families, couples, pets, and retirees.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Great Blending of Old and New"

There are only a few places that can claim unique beauty in a metropolitan area. Seward Park is most known for the recreation area on the Bailey Peninsula. A gigantic area of 300 acres, with half of the acreage covered in old growth forest. So if you are curious as to how a slice of Seattle looked 250 years ago, take a day trip here.

The park features a small beach, plenty of walking/biking trails and a multitude of picnic areas. Last year our family and friends reserved a large site for the afternoon, feeling pleasantly isolated even amidst the busy weekend on the grounds.

This neighborhood is bound roughly by Alaska Street to the north, Rainier Avenue to the West, Kenyon Street to the South and Lake Washington (and the Seward Park) to the East. This place is not demographically outdated by any means. Diversity rules, as it is home to a large number of African Americans, Asians and Jews. In fact, there are a couple of old, yet active synagogues near the center of the community.

Large, historic homes can be found along Seward Park Avenue. I have had the privilege of cycling through this area on occasion, surprised by new sights each ride. Close access to Lake Washington, the park and downtown make this a desirable location for anyone.

A picture of the diversity can, of course, be found in the eating establishments. Here are a few...

Shangani Restaurant (Somali Food)
Alcatraz (Mexican)
Cafe Huongviet
King Chicken and Gyros
Thao Thanh Restaurant
Saffron

This time of year gears up for the Seafair event in Seattle (A month long celebration with various activities around the city). Seward Park holds a prominent place by hosting the hydroplane boating event. Also, viewing the Blue Angels air show from here is a coveted experience. If you own a boat and can get permission, anchoring off the peninsula amplifies the observance because the jets hover just a couple hundred feet off the water on each pass.

Transportation is strong in this locale, especially into downtown and to SeaTac Airport. Light rail started service last year and runs along Martin Luther King Jr Way, for easy access to either destination.

Whether you are spending several hours in this neighborhood or just passing through to work or another recreational destination, you will be swept up with the blends of ancient and contemporary.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Ethnically diverse
  • Waterfront activities
Cons
  • Longer commute to downtown
  • Lack of shopping amenities
  • Difficult Interstate access
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
2yrs+

"Where the City Meets the Woods"

Something like 72 languages are spoken in the Seward Park area, this ethnically diverse area is home one of the oldest synagogues in the state and host a remarkable cultural diversity. It’s one of the only places I’ve been in Seattle that seems truly diverse. However, one of its greatest treasures is the park which in 277-acres host a range of animal and plant species including an area of old-growth forests, active bald eagle nests and the barely two-year old Audubon Center.

The Audubon Center makes Seward Park not only an ethnically diverse neighborhood, but an environmental Mecca. Finished in 2008 the Tudor-style house at the entrance of Seward Park features a nature and education center that holds environmental classes for schools and underserved youths, adult bird-watching activities and a variety of other environmental projects and classes. The center itself is stunning and a great addition to the park and its many trails and paths. In almost any kind of weather you can find people walking or jogging around the paved loop which is about 2.4 miles through wilderness and by part of Lake Washington. And if after taking in all that nature wasn’t enough I recommend dining at the Flying Squirrel Pizza Company, which is a funky and fun pizza place that has a true neighborhood pub feel.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
2yrs+

"Seattle's hidden treasure with a park"

Seward Park is a home to herons, eagles, and a wooded peninsula. It is one of Seattle’s local treasures. The park itself is the peninsula, and it comes chalked full of tennis courts, fishing docks, walking trails, and a public swimming beach.

Like most out-of-the-way neighborhoods, Seward Park has a tight-knit community feel, a strong ethnic diversity and a style that mixes old charm with contemporary remodels. Houses start on the outskirt of the park. Residences run the gamut: Tudor, family, brick, stucco, mid-century and modern. Many of them are multi-storied to catch the views from the hills. There are homes in bright primary colors, and yards with sprawling rock gardens, bulging hydrangeas and rose bushes. The best recommendation is that home turnover rate is low.

The commercial section of Seward Park is small but resourceful. There’s a PCC along with some private businesses and local eateries. The neighborhood is a star attraction during the summer. People come here for Seward Park’s swimming beach and the Seafair festivities which include hydroplane races. The park is circled by a paved path, and a number of sports events are held here—from a 5K run for owners and their dogs, to triathlons and weeknight criterion bike rides. The park also has an amphitheater and hosts a number of cultural celebrations.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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