6.9 out of 10

Pioneer Square

Ranked 37th best neighborhood in Seattle
47.5994046883709 -122.333688007783
Great for
  • Eating Out
  • Nightlife
  • Internet Access
  • Shopping Options
  • Public Transport
Not great for
  • Cost of Living
  • Parking
  • Childcare
  • Lack of Traffic
  • Schools
Who lives here?
  • Singles
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
Apr 03, 2016

"Quickly changing scene"

Pioneer Square is not somewhere I spend a ton of time, because there aren’t any good music venues here, unless you count Wamu Theater where a lot of huge names end up. They’re usually too pop music-y for me though (like One Direction).

But the neighborhood can be chill for a happy hour or pre-show drink. I like Good Bar for happy hour, they have really good food and the drinks are consistent. I went to Cowgirls Inc one time and it was horrible. Only acceptable to people who are too drunk to notice how sleazy the place is. It’s basically a strip club pretending to be a sports bar.

For clubbing, there’s Trinity Nightclub which does house music with live DJs. There’s definitely a different crowd here than the people going out on Capitol Hill. I’m not a fan but I think people go here for the huge dance floor in the main room, and the fact that this part of town is more laid back than Cap Hill. There's also a bigger variety of ages. Cap Hill is all 20-somethings, Trinity has people in their 30s and 40s too. There used to be another dance club next door, Volume, but they just closed.

The Pioneer Square scene is definitely changing to be more sports and classy restaurants, and it doesn’t seem like dance clubs fit in that well.

Also, I play guitar, and it can be hard to find a good guitar shop with people you trust working there. But I’ve been to Emerald City Guitars in Pioneer Square a few times and I’ve been really happy with them. They definitely know their stuff and they’re fair with prices.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
Feb 28, 2016

"Food, beer, sports"

I only really go to Pioneer Square to go to Mariners baseball games in the summer. It’s been kinda cool to see this neighborhood changing so much over the last couple of year though. Seems like every time I go there there’s a new pub or restaurant. It’s really turning into an interesting neighborhood—in a good way.

The Mariners play at Safeco Field. You’ll know you’re there when you see giant 100-foot posters of baseball players on the stadium. Haha. I like going because it’s the kind of thing that most people can go to, because it’s affordable and usually not sold out, so you can get a bunch of friends together and have a good time. Not like Seahawks where tickets are crazy expensive and can be hard to get. For Mariners games I like to get some friends together and just hang out in the beer garden the whole time.

Games can last a long time so afterwards we usually like to grab a snack before heading home. The only part that sucks is that this stadium is kinda far from the main Pioneer Square area. It takes 10-15 minutes to walk there afterwards, but it’s not that bad. Way better than trying to find parking—after a game gets out you can just walk past all the cars stuck in the gridlock. Haha!

If you don’t feel like walking that far you can go to the Pyramid Alehouse, but it gets slammed because it’s so close to Safeco. There’s also Jimmy’s on First and The Hawks Nest, which both have the same problem. So after a game we’ll usually just walk all the way up to Pioneer Square and then we have tons of options.

Some good ones are:

* Central Saloon: Your typical pub grub old dive bar. Not sure why I like this place but it has character.

* Quality Athletics: Probably my favorite spot right now, it’s a sports bar but classier than most. Got a good vibe to it. And in the summer their rooftop garden is off the hook!

* The Lodge Sports Grille: This one’s good too for before/after a game. It’s got an older style with wood and antlers and all that stuff. A little bit of an older crowd than at Quality Athletics. But they have TONS of beers on tap.
Pros
  • Mariners games
Cons
  • Limited parking
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Feb 10, 2016

"Charming with a vintage feel"

Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood is all old-school charm. Wander down the cobblestone streets and pop into local shops and restaurants while taking in a laid-back Seattle experience, still close to the water. Stop by famed local Chef Matt Dillon's "London Plane" for an atmospheric lunch, or sip cognac alongside Duck Fat Fries at the best named bar in town, "Damn the Weather." Though it can get a little shady at night, during the day Pioneer Square is a fun place to meander in and out of shops, stop for a beer, and pop away from the bustle of downtown while still enjoying the laid-back, cultured Seattle experience. Definitely worth an afternoon!
Pros
  • Funky Bars
  • Independent Spirit
  • Low-Key vibe
  • Amtrak station
  • History
  • Interesting landmarks
  • NFL Football stadium
  • Diversity
Cons
  • Limited parking
  • homeless
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Jan 06, 2016

"Still Historic, but more new attractions coming daily"

Seattle’s oldest and most historic neighborhood is evolving into a hub for sports, food & drink, and historic attractions. The completion of CenturyLink Field in 2002 ushered in an era of growth and change to the neighborhood. In the last few years new apartments, restaurants, and bars have changed the atmosphere for the better. Pioneer Square isn’t the seedy neighborhood it once was, but it still hasn’t completely lost its character; especially at night.

Not very many people live in Pioneer Square, even after the completion two new multistory apartment buildings in the last year; The Nolo and The Wave buildings. Rent starts around $1,500 for a studio and that does not include parking. Garage rates are probably close to $200 a month for renters. There are condos and lofts in the area. Most of those are in historic buildings, and those rarely hit the market, when they do the units move fast.

Living in Pioneer Square would be great for young professionals who enjoy watching sports, an active nightlife, and don’t mind urban inconveniences; such as lack of parking, homelessness, and gritty streets. The area is on the upswing, and with the soon to be completed Light Rail connection to Capitol Hill and the University District it will only become more desirable.

Besides watching a game some of my favorite places are:

Tat’s Delicatessen – the most popular of the pioneer sandwich shops. Try the Tatstrami.

Delicatus – a classic deli with a modern twist. Get the Mudhoney.

Rain Shadow Meats – butcher shops and deli. Amazing butcher counter and sandwich selection.

The London Plane – head here for brunch! Great ambiance and delicious food.

Intermezzo Carmine – beautiful space, serving Italian food.

The neighborhood is evolving and with it so many new restaurants, shops, cafes, and bars are opening. It is a great place to visit, but I’m certain I would not want to live here.

I can think of several downsides to living in Pioneer Square. For me it would have to be the homeless, the uncleanliness, and the crowds. Pioneer Square has one of the largest homeless populations in the city, which makes the neighborhood feel less safe at night. During sporting events 80,000+ people make their way into the neighborhood, bringing noise and trash with them. Some people might love the action in the neighborhood during game day, but I don't think I would like it.

On non game days the neighborhood has a totally different personality. My girlfriend and I wanted to try a new place for dinner and drinks and wound up in Pioneer Square. We discovered that many of the popular spots on the weekends close early on weekdays because there just aren't crowds to keep them busy. The area was eerily quiet.

In closing, Pioneer Square is great to visit. It's rapidly changing with new restaurants, bars, and more opening each month. Living options are limited and not for the faint of heart.
Pros
  • restaurants
  • Amtrak station
  • History
  • Interesting landmarks
  • NFL Football stadium
Cons
  • homeless
  • Limited parking
  • Can be crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Dec 01, 2015

"History, diversity, and constant change"

Pioneer Square is probably the best representation of Seattle in a few blocks. It’s a jumble of the past and present, mixed wealth and poverty, and a living history of immigration and race relations.

Location:

Located just south of downtown, to the west is the (still industrial) waterfront, and to the East is I-5 freeway and the International District. It’s southern edge abruptly ends at the sports stadiums and rail/bus stations.

History:

Officially the “oldest” part of the City of Seattle, it’s got an intriguing history. The area was originally a mud flat, under control of the Duwamish people. But when white settlers arrived and began building European-style buildings, they soon encountered an unpleasant problem. When the tide came in, it would push the sewers back up the drains and make things….er….unpleasant. So the city built holding walls bordering each street, filled it in, and declared a new ground level for the city. The original street level is now known as the underground.

Underground:

There are still several places in the underground that are accessible, like the Kraken Congee Asian restaurant. The architecture is fun, and don’t worry, they fixed the plumbing problem.

The basements of many buildings are the underground as well, such as in the Seattle Impact Hub, a co-working space I’ve worked from for about a year. The Impact Hub is a good example of where Pioneer is heading now. The neighborhood was formerly filled with warehouses and empty buildings, but now chefs, galleries, and businesses are snapping up anything available in what’s becoming Seattle’s hippest neighborhood.

Food:

Being just north of the sports stadiums, it’s a popular place for upscale restaurants, like the London Plane and Radici. If you’re into older, more historical spots, you can visit two of Seattle’s oldest pubs, the Central Saloon and the J & M café. Both are low-key, dark, Euro-style pubs, in contrast to the minimalist, airy, new places. I personally like La Bodega, which is a hole-in-the-wall place with Dominican food. There are a few seats, and a summer patio, but it’s mostly take-out.
Just East of the neighborhood is the International District, where a lot of people go for lunch, because they have so many amazing, affordable restaurants.

Culture & Current Events:

All the newcomers mean that the people who were already living here are getting displaced. Which is a very sensitive topic in the neighborhood right now. Host to several homeless shelters, Pioneer Square is a place that has historically been welcoming to all sorts of people, from every background and income level. But that’s changing. This is a condensed version of what’s going on in Seattle overall. In Pioneer Square it’s just more visible, where, for example, you may see a tent pitched in front of a restaurant with $40 dishes.

Transportation:

Just to the south-east of the neighborhood, you’ll find two transportation hubs. One is the bus station for Bolt Bus and some local buses. The other is the light rail station and Amtrak, which brings in commuters from outside of Seattle. Pretty convenient if you work in Pioneer Square, but if you don’t, it can take a bit of effort to transfer to another type of transportation. The Greyhound station is also a 10 minute walk away.

If you’re driving, finding parking can be tough, but there are a few garages. Street parking in the evening is usually decent, just DO NOT try to drive to Pioneer Square on a game day.

Activities:

Besides the Century Link Field, where the Seahawks and Sounders play, there are a few fun little spots nearby. As a local, I like the underground tour, and the (free) Klondike Gold Rush National Historic “park,” which is actually a museum. For parks, you can enjoy your lunch at the waterfall garden park on 2nd & main. In the summer, Occidental Square is fun—they just added lots of activities like ping pong, a giant chess board, and a kids mini-library. You’ll see all sorts of people there, which, in my opinion, is the best thing about Pioneer Square. I hope it stays as diverse as it is now!
Pros
  • Diversity
  • History
Cons
  • Limited parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"The Original Seattle Downtown With Secrets In Its Basement"

If you were a tourist to Seattle about 100 years ago and had someone direct you to the town center, they would have brought you to Pioneer Square. Before you tipped them and sent them on their way, they would have been sure to point out the tallest building west of the Mississippi, Smith Tower.

Now, fast forward to 2010 and keep the same scenario. Smith Tower would still look impressive, but its glory would quickly fade as the 76 floor Columbia Tower comes into view to the northeast. Quite a few of the buildings look similar as they did in the last century, but Qwest Field (to the south) would certainly be a surprise.

The boundaries of the neighborhood generally extend from South Royal Brougham Way north to Cherry St. From west to east it stretches from Puget Sound to 4th Ave, except above Yesler where it reaches to the interstate. The neighborhood area is somewhat fluid as there is debate over where the edges of the community fall.

Let's start our tour of Pioneer Square from the south...

As I mentioned, it's hard to miss Qwest Field, home of the Seattle Seahawks Football Team. The stadium and northern parking lot account for several city blocks. Major thoroughfares extending from the south (Looking West to East) are Alaskan Way, the Viaduct, 1st Ave South, and 4th Ave South. Occidental Ave South runs north/south along the west side of the stadium, connecting South Royal Brougham Way to South King St. Anything west of Alaskan Way and the Viaduct is industrial. There are some businesses that run along Occidental, many being sports-related. The Triangle Pub off of 1st Ave South is a very large place to grab a pint and good food. Make sure, however, you avoid coming here before or after game time or you could be waiting awhile for your seat.

North of the stadium parking lot is where urban living kicks in. The historic King Street Train Station is to the east. Quite a few coffee shops and restaurants greet you in the first city block, mainly drawing business off travelers and sports fans. Some of these venues include Zeitgeist Kunst & Kafee, Cafe in the Court, Tiki Bob's Cantina, King Street Bar & Oven, Starbucks, Tully's and Beba's Deli.

Moving now to the area between South Jackson and South Main St, you encounter the beginning of Pioneer Square-esque landscape with a jaunt down the historic Occidental Avenue pathway. It might feel as if you just stepped back into the 1920's for a few minutes, especially with the art galleries on the west side of the street. Again, quite a few venues in this chunk of the neighborhood, but one that I especially like is Elliot Bay Books & Cafe. A delightful place to go when you want to go unnoticed for a time. Browse the generous book supply upstairs, then descend to the basement for a quality cup and pastry. They might even let you take that enticing book to the cafe (Because you're surely not going to buy it with a price of $75).

The next section is the hot spot. You now enter more green space with Occidental Park on the west side and Waterfall Garden Park (The former site of the original UPS facility) on the east side. These two areas are a breath of fresh air for any professional, tourist, family, etc. Sit and listen to the soothing, yet powerful 20 foot waterfall or just pick a spot to read that expensive book you threw on your credit card (You felt bad returning it, so you just bought it). Just a couple of days ago, President Obama visited and had lunch at the Grand Central Bakery on 1st Ave South. Head west past the Alaskan Way Viaduct and encounter the Port of Seattle. Anything that comes in or out of the city is monitored here. Note to cyclists: On the far east side, towards the interstate, you'll find Bikestation Seattle, where you can securely store your bike while downtown.

Now, head up to the section of Pioneer Square between South Washington St. and Yesler Way. In addition to numerous companies and small businesses, you'll continue to find great places to eat like New Orleans Creole, Last Supper Club, Merchants Cafe, and Tat's Delicatessen. Does your sweet tooth like to lead you, then step in Cow Chip Cookies to savor their mouthwatering creations. Looking to the east side features the Pioneer Square Community Association, where you can get connected to local neighborhood folks and events. Evidence of Seattle's Judicial System become evident with various law-related establishments.

The last section of the neighborhood is from Yesler Way to roughly Cherry Street (Which runs diagonally from 1st Avenue to I-5). You'll notice the architecture becomes less early 20th century and begins to blend with the modern. This is especially true as you head to the northeast towards the King County Jail. If you're called to jury duty, you would report to the municipal court near 5th and James St. Look up, because you're in the shadow of the tallest building in Seattle, the Columbia Tower. Heading southwest, away from the justice area, you'll come to the region that houses the Smith Tower and a cluster of restaurants. One place of interest here is the Underground Tour where you can go back in time by actually venturing underneath the streets to see evidences of the old Seattle. Essentially, the modern downtown as we know it has been built upon this older area. So, for three hours, you'll be whisked to different secret locations to hear secrets about the past. One final place that may interest you is the Vashon Passenger Ferry Walk and Pier 50 to take you to West Seattle or Vashon Islnd. You'll need to cross Alaskan Way on Yesler to access this.

Well, I hope that has given you some idea of the Pioneer Square experience. The best way, of course, is to just submerge yourself in this rich neighborhood and see what you run into. It is difficult to describe the experience in writing, so get your map and walk the streets of this place that has so many hints of the Emerald City's childhood.
Pros
  • NFL Football stadium
  • Amtrak station
  • Interesting landmarks
Cons
  • Limited parking
  • Can be crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Action Hub"

Pioneer Square is where commerce, culture, and high-tech companies live. Cafes, bars and galleries all occupy this little area offers something for everyone to see, if not purchase. This is where the Underground Seattle tour begins, which will pair your group up with a guide to see the original main streets of Seattle—hidden beneath the ground level of the modern city. Pioneer Place Park is the main respite offered to people who need fresh air and a change from the stacks of brick, mortar, glass, and concrete. The Park also houses some pieces pertinent to Native culture, including a Tlingit totem pole.

Safety is a semi-concern in Pioneer Square. During daylight hours, you’re pretty safe regardless. During nighttime hours, the homeless population is attracted to the area for social services offices that are located here. If you plan to visit the trendy nightclubs and bars, you might feel safest to travel in a group.

Pioneer Square is a hub of activity and a central point in the Seattle area, and as such has a transportation system in place which is better than other areas. That said, there are condos in the area to be had, but they’re definitely on the expensive side. You should really, really want to live in pioneer square before you consider looking.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
2yrs+

"Lots to Do in Such a Small Area"

Pioneer Square is essentially a tiny plaza that packs in a lot to do and see. A great retro clothing store called Diva Dolls lives on Cherry St & Yesler Way where the staff treats you like you’re the most important customer they’ve ever had and the clothes look like you can step out in them and head straight to a USO dance or at least head over to the Last Supper Club, a hot nightlife spot.
Walk a little ways down 1st street and you can browse a multi-level antique store which has so many items and rooms you feel like you’ll never see everything before they close for the night. A lot of tourist attractions call the Square home and this is where you can take in the Underground Seattle tour which shows the left over dwellings of the original Seattle before a big earthquake buried it.

For those of people looking for more than a historic tour Pioneer Square the nightlife is big and bold. There’s a host of bars and nightclubs to choose from like Trinity Night club with its three different dance rooms, the Triangle Pub and Tiki Bobs Cantina, to name only a few. You’ll defiantly never be bored at Pioneer Square.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
2yrs+

"Historic shopping district with a ton of character"

Pioneer Square is the oldest neighborhood in Seattle. Once the heart of the city, the Pioneer Square area burned to the ground in the Great Seattle Fire of 1889. After the fire, the area was rebuilt with stately buildings of brick and stone, many of which are still standing. Soon after it was rebuilt, the street level was raised by one story. If you want to see the old storefronts, take the popular Seattle Underground Tour. Pioneer Square is also home to Smith Tower, which was the tallest building west of the Mississippi when it was built in 1914.

Located just to the southwest of the downtown business core, Pioneer Square is roughly bounded by Alaskan Way S. to the west, 5th Avenue on the east, South King Street on the south and Yesler Way to the north. Today, this historic district is home to restaurants, coffee shops, art galleries, and nightclubs. If you're in search of a one-of-a-kind gift or a hidden treasure, Pioneer Square is the place to shop. There are also plenty of green spaces, including Pioneer Place Park, home to an iron pergola and a Tlingit totem pole.

Although it has a bit of a rough reputation because of the large homeless population congregating here to make use of the many social services here, the Pioneer Square neighborhood is quite charming, with a lot of character. Long known as "Skid Row," where vice has long been tolerated, in recent decades the area has witnessed a resurgence, with classy bars and galleries moving in. You may not feel comfortable walking alone here at night if you're not used to the city, but the area is quite safe in the daytime.

Though Pioneer Square is a great shopping area, I wouldn't recommend living here. There are no single-family homes, only condos, and they are typically some of the most expensive per square foot in the entire city. Because the area is easily accessible by public transportation, I recommend living elsewhere in the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
2yrs+

"Day or Night Entertainment"

Pioneer Square now sits directly on top of the old city of Seattle. Destroyed by fire in 1889, city planners decided to build up, which solved quite a few plumbing and sanitation problems, too. Now the charm of Pioneer Square lends itself to the beauty of the architecture, unrivaled by the new skyscrapers that adorn the rest of the skyline; the greenery of the surrounding park; the vast assortment of shops, restaurants and services; and the amazing network of clubs in a 5-block radius. Not to be missed by tourists or natives. The homeless population does tend to concentrate in the area and is constantly being cleaned up, but the area is still relatively safe.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
2yrs+

"Lots of shopping and coffee choices"

Pioneer Square is located at the south end of Downtown Seattle and just north of Safeco Field and the Qwest Field. The area is home to many of Seattle’s oldest historic buildings and hosts many of Seattle’s best art galleries, nightclubs, and restaurants. There are so many unique and eclectic shops in the area, that you can easily lose a day just snooping around the boutiques. Pioneer Square is an urban explorer’s dream.

Of course, when in Seattle it is a must to drink coffee and you will never run out of your share of places to find a cup a java. From Tully’s Coffee at 408 2nd Avenue or 625 5th Avenue South, to numerous Starbucks’ on 1st, 2nd, and 5th Avenues, to my personal favorite Seattle’s Best at 621 2nd Avenue, Seattle boasts java. Since it does rain nearly everyday, coffee is a must on the dark and blustery morning commute to work.

Pioneer Square contains only condos, so if you are in the market for a home with a front yard, move on and out. There are approximately 175 condos in Pioneer Square with more potentially being built. The average selling price for a condo in Pioneer Square is approximately $485,000. The average price per square foot was $386.

Pioneer Place Park is at the corner of James Street and 1st Avenue. The iron pergola that sits in this brick park is a landmark in Seattle. It was originally built to greet visitors to the 1909 World’s Fair, and heralded the way into a public comfort station. The park is also home to a Tlingit totem pole. Just behind the park is the Pioneer Building, headquarters of the Underground Tour.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles

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Best Streets in Pioneer Square

"2nd Avenue S in Seattle, Washington"
47.6005346265573 -122.331572484412
2

Cherry St

3.5/5
"Cherry Street Living- it's ALL about Seattle!"
47.6042129595571 -122.330316976299
3

Yesler Way

3.5/5
"Got to stay here!!"
47.6017190372207 -122.332734636507

Unranked Streets in Pioneer Square

James St

2.5/5
"Rags to Riches"
47.603482635612 -122.329698115331
47.5970964020763 -122.333267207306
47.5964674453392 -122.334799781474
"A little bit of history!"
47.5982889543848 -122.333288533947

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