4.7 out of 10

Interbay

Ranked 60th best neighborhood in Seattle
47.6397012355946 -122.382932498257
Great for
  • Clean & Green
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Childcare
  • Safe & Sound
  • Peace & Quiet
Not great for
  • Parking
  • Cost of Living
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Dec 15, 2015
Editors Choice

"Low-lying, industrial valley with not much happening"

Interbay is an odd little neighborhood. Squeezed between Queen Anne hill on the east, and Magnolia on the west, it’s main features are the BNSF railroad lines that run through the middle of it, and the port, Smith Cove Waterway, to the south, where the big cruise lines dock.

In sum, Interbay is *between* the excitement and appeal of Queen Anne and Magnolia, not in it. True, there's a Whole Foods Market, a QFC, and a few restaurants scattered around 15th Ave (Mulleady’s Irish pub is good), but to have a night out you’ll definitely have to head elsewhere, and unfortunately none of it’s really close enough to walk to. Good thing there are so many buses going straight up to Ballard or down to downtown!

In fact, that’s probably the most appealing thing about Interbay. It’s got express buses going north-south quite frequently, since 15th is the main thoroughfare in this part of town.

As for parks, there’s the large Interbay golf course, and a few soccer fields, but that's about it. However, the Magnolia parks aren’t that far away, and Discovery Park is amazing, but if you don’t love long walks up steep hills, you’ll have to drive.

Housing has similar prices to the surrounding neighborhoods, even without the amenities, so I personally wouldn’t choose to live here. But there are some new buildings going in that offer good discounts for the first year. I looked at one that gave you one month free, plus a $500 signing bonus when you signed a year lease.

Remember that New Yorker article called "The Really Big One" that came out earlier this year about the potential for a tsunami to wash over Seattle? Get your emergency kit ready if you’re planning to move to Interbay, because it’s in the valley between two hills, much lower elevation than the surrounding neighborhoods. But hey, you only live once!
Pros
  • Large golf recreation center
Cons
  • Lacking amenities
  • Limited residential area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Feb 03, 2016

"Transportation thoroughfare"

I wasn’t aware that Interbay was considered a neighborhood until my husband and I rode our bicycles through it on our way from downtown Seattle to Ballard.

There is a pleasant paved path, called the Elliot Bay Trail, that runs morthwards from Myrtle Edwards Park on the downtown waterfront. The path then takes you past the port with the cruise ships, and into the Interbay valley. Here you take a right on 20th ave, and continue until you reach Dravus, where you cross and head north on 15th for only a minute or two.

Once you reach the northern end of Interbay, you have the option to either get on the Ship Canal Trail or the Burke Gilman Trail (on the south and north sides of the Fremont Canal, respectively). The Ship Canal is interesting due to the many boats visible from the path, which vary from industrial ships to houseboats. Alternately, you may simply cross the Ballard Bridge to go to downtown Ballard. However, a word of caution: there is no bike lane on the bridge. Your only options are to bike on the sidewalk, very carefully, or bike with traffic. Neither is ideal. Otherwise, you may walk your bike over the Ballard locks. This is now what I do, as it is infinitely more pleasant.

I can’t imagine living in Interbay, because it does not feel like a neighborhood at all. It is much more of a funnel for transportation, with the rail line, the bike/pedestrian path, and 15th Ave, which is frequented by commuter car traffic, in addition to the north/south bus lines.
Pros
  • Excellent bicyle route
Cons
  • Lacking amenities
  • Heavy traffic on arterial streets
4/5
Jan 30, 2016

"Train yard and restaurants"

The only reason I go to Interbay is for work---BNSF has a yard there. We actually take up a big chunk of Interbay with a few dozen tracks, since it’s the lowest point around and easier for the trains to get through. I’ve gone out for lunch nearby plenty of times, and there are some good ones, but they’re really spread out compared to other places in Seattle.

*Mulleady’s Irish Pub: your typical pub, good burgers. Better for after work so you can grab a brew too.
*Pagliacci Pizza: same as their pizza at any of the locations. You can get slices, which is quick and easy. I like trying the slice of the day to mix it up.
*Red Mill Burgers: Kinda cheesy diner, but the food’s decent.
*Josefinas Mexican Grill: this is probably my favorite place, but sometimes it takes too long for lunch. But if you ask the waiter to hurry they’ll usually get the food out quick enough to get back to work in time.
*Boxcar Ale House: only been here once after work, it was fine, nothing that amazing. Full of dudes when I was there though.
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Jan 30, 2016

"Unimpressive industrial neighborhood"

When searching for a condo last year, I viewed one in Interbay, and frankly I was quite unimpressed with the neighborhood. It is clearly an industrial neighborhood, with very few amenities and accommodation options. The only places I would even consider living here would be at either the far north or the far south ends of the neighborhood. This is because Interbay is comprised of the valley between Magnolia and Queen Anne hills, and the north and south ends are the only areas with any sort of view. They also have less of a claustrophobic feeling, being close to water, where the hills to either side flatten out.

I struggle to imagine how one would settle down here, it seems to me a cold and impersonal strip of land that could possibly serve as a temporary home base in a pinch, but never somewhere to buy a home. Seattle has so many wonderful neighborhoods full of personality and amenities, which Interbay simply lacks. In my opinion, Seattle would do better to just continue to develop this as an industrial neighborhood and not try to make it into something it’s not by building housing.
Cons
  • Limited residential area
  • Lacking amenities
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Dec 31, 2015

"Right in the middle. Great for commuters and growing!"

Interbay is nestled between the Magnolia Bridge and Salmon Bay/Ballard Locks, it is a fairly small neighborhood, with limited access. Originally an industrial neighborhood with lots of warehouses, the main draw to the area was the BNSF rail yard, fisherman’s terminal, and the National Guard base; all three are still in use. Developers have bought up old warehouses and lots, and new apartments are being built in their place. With two new buildings already in use and new retail such a Whole Foods open, Interbay is growing fast. Now the main draw to Interbay is the easy commute and rental value.

After pricing out Ballard, my girlfriend and I decided on Interbay, and have lived here for 6 months. The reason my girlfriend and I chose this neighborhood was because of the easy commute to downtown, the close proximity to Ballard, and rent was a few hundred dollars cheaper than living in Ballard. Originally I was concerned about the rail yard noise, but it has been a nonissue. When we’re inside our apartment I never hear it, even with the window open. I actually hear the cheers from the soccer field on the weekends more then I hear the train.

The price for a 1 bedroom, in a new modern building with amenities and a parking garage was $250 cheaper per month, plus my girlfriend can park on the street, saving more money. For most Ballard apartments we would have had to pay for parking for both of our vehicles. We did lose the walk-ability to all the bars and restaurants Ballard has to offer. But Ballard is a short drive, or in the summer a very easy bike ride with a walk across the locks.

Some of my favorite places in Interbay are:

Red Mill Burger – One of the best burgers in Seattle. Cash only and closed on Mondays, be prepared!

Interbay Golf – Walk over to the driving range during happy hour for a pitcher of beer and a large bucket of balls for under $20.

Whole Foods – I have a love/hate relationship with this high end grocery store. Yes, it’s expensive, but the food is top notch and the deli is great.

Pagliacci – Slices of pizza till 11pm

Mulleady’s Irish Pub – Nice upscale pub atmosphere.

Box Car Ale House – Dive bar, I love this place and their bar food.

Commuting to downtown is super easy living in Interbay. The D Line stops every 15 minutes and if you’re on the bus before 8am I guarantee finding a seat. There is also a bike/walking path that makes its way downtown along the water. It is just over 4 miles, a very easy bike ride.

Interbay is going through a major change. Currently there are only 2 large apartment buildings and practically zero single family homes (I consider the homes on 20th and those close to the water as part of Magnolia). According to the city there are 5 mixed use buildings with 523 rental units and over 75,000 sq ft of retail space approved for construction. So MAJOR CHANGE is an understatement – Google the “The Whole Foods effect” and you’ll understand the change that's about to happen.

So what are the downsides to living in Interbay? The things and places I can walk to are very limited, but there is much more near me than my old place in Wallingford. If you don’t own a car Interbay can be challenging if you want to venture outside of the D Line. Parking in Interbay isn’t terrible, but it’s not good. Street spots around the current buildings are filled after 5pm, but there is always parking around the QFC grocery store, until those new apartment buildings are built.

Who should live in Interbay? Renters who commute to downtown, who want to save a little money for someday buying, and still want to be close to what Ballard and Downtown have to offer.

Who should avoid Interbay? Anyone looking to buy a house. Interbay should be avoided if you desire a big social scene or a very walkable neighborhood.
Pros
  • Red Mill Burger
  • Two Grocery Stores
  • Large golf recreation center
  • Excellent bicyle route
Cons
  • Growing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
2yrs+

"Always look both ways before crossing the railroad tracks"

In order to call Interbay home you have to be a person who doesn’t mind noise because in order to live in Interbay, you have to enjoy hearing the trains. Because of the heavy train traffic, Interbay is a noisy place to call home and the trains don’t abide by a 10pm quiet time. The area is fairly industrial because of the trains and so it’s not a lot to look at when you travel through.

Like most Seattle neighborhoods the place has its uses, once marshland it’s now a place where commerce thrives by the way of the rail. However, unlike most industrial areas Interbay have many neighborhoods with homes that are modestly prices and well kept up. The area is pretty hilly, and you need to watch out for the occasional kind on a skateboard taking advantage of the steep inclines, but the area is a good place to call home, especially if you’re not put off by the noise from the railroad tracks.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Diverse Community with Eclectic Draw"

The fairly diversified community of Interbay has a little something for everyone. It’s maybe not a place to visit, maybe not necessarily a place to live, but working in the area isn’t all that bad. OK, I concede, the Interbay P-Patch is a nice little community garden, which is a feature that many other neighborhoods in the city can’t offer, so if being close to your food source is high on your list of priorities for city life, then Interbay isn’t a bad place to be. P-Patch aside, most everything else about Interbay is just a mix of industrial, warehouse, wholesale, retail, professional offices and housing, with a couple of highlighted features. Interbay is home to an Army National Guard armory, and has a golf course in its limits. Interbay’s got a group of 19th century homes that have been declared official city landmarks.

Delectably, the most interesting (or notorious) feature of Interbay is the Center for Sex Positive Culture, colloquially termed the Wet Spot. It’s a membership-only establishment and the participants are generally good neighbors, so there’s no reason to think that Interbay is anything but family friendly in that respect. Speaking of family-friendly areas, you would be advised to stop by Niko’s Gyros, where they offer a substantial children's plate and a gyro delicious enough to satisfy even the more discerning taste buds.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Railroad Takes The Gold In This Industrial Neighborhood"

The neighborhood of Interbay spans between Magnolia (http://bitly.com/cWwQE0) and Queen Anne (http://bitly.com/c3diBe). The region almost resembles the chamber separating the sides of a heart. Considering the major rail yard (Balmer Yard http://bitly.com/h5aqdt) occupying Interbay, the heart illustration stands firm when imagining the connection with blood flow. Anyway, I digress.

History

Cleared by glaciers over 13,000 years ago, Interbay has undergone many changes. Dr. Henry A. Smith (http://bitly.com/gWbjhU) happened on this ‘cove’ by way of his journeys that began in Wooster, Ohio. (http://bitly.com/i2GBt6). The cove started as a colony with hopes of growing into a major city. However, Indian War of 1855-1856 (http://bitly.com/g8mi9b) dashed that dream as settlers fled to blockhouses around Seattle to escape the impending enemy.

As the years marched on major industries, including the railroad, began to inhabit Interbay. Teeming wildlife of this salt flat gave way to the industrial revolution; even today operates on a busy production schedule. The addition of a large P-Patch and golf course have greened up the community. Pier 91 (http://bitly.com/gQtcdz) has been a successful link during World War II (http://bitly.com/eP5sOn) and present day, with automobile shipments coming and going on a regular basis.

Demographics and Income

White is the predominant demographic, by numbers; income is just a touch above the Seattle average. If it was not for the extreme southeast and northeast corners of the neighborhood, where families with average salaries of at least $90,000/year are located, the median income would be far less. Roughly 44% of the population is married. Another interesting fact: seniors are in limited supply—due, possibly, to the more industrial nature of Interbay. The population density is considerably less than Seattle’s average. Young professionals (20s & 30s) are drawn here due to close downtown (http://bitly.com/fwXJkP) proximity and a stone’s throw from active nightlife.

Culture

The railway (http://bitly.com/h5aqdt) is the Olympic gold winner for Interbay. Unfortunately, residents and businesses come up short in the standings because of the unsightly rails and decibel levels. A friend who used to live within a half mile of the tracks expressed his difficulty acclimating to the noise, especially at night. In addition, the sheer volume of the rail yard leaves little area for development.

Real Estate

Housing lies to the west, but not a coveted location by any means. The proximity to downtown Seattle and lower price tags are enough to bring people in, tolerating the misgivings of the railroad.

Local Business Tour (Restaurants, Pubs, Coffee Houses, Shops and other Amenities)

Despite the challenges of hosting a major industry, Interbay does fairly well with keeping a residential tone. The Interbay Golf Center (http://bitly.com/flWkTf) and the city's largest P-Patch garden (http://bitly.com/iiUmGQ) foster sustainable community. A couple of grocery stores boldly moved in to feed the population. Alpine Hut (http://bitly.com/gQvH3W) is the oldest bike and ski shop in Seattle, with over 40 years of family-owned servicing. Other businesses: Wild Salmon Seafood Market (http://wildsalmonseafood.com) - A family-owned seafood market that also delivers fresh shellfish and wild varieties straight to your door; Signature Seafoods (http://signatureseafoods.com) - Delivering the under-valued fish product so as to create a new market and boast of the freshest experience, from catch to your plate; and Beyond the Divide (http://beyondthedivide.com) - From branding to executive coaching, enabling your business to move to the next level of success.

Schools

Education is a piece not forgotten by Interbay. Beginning in the north: Remote Medical Intl (http://remotemedical.com) - A medical and rescue service that provides training and on-site assistance virtually anywhere; North Pacific Fishing Vessel Owners' Association (http://npfvoa.org) - Hands-on training for emergency situations involving a skipper or crew; Lawton Elementary (http://lawtonelementary.org) - A K-5 elementary focused on academic achievement and cultural enrichment; Dandelion Preschool (http://dandelionschool.com) - A childcare facility emphasizes real-life expression of emotions, conflict resolution, respect and academic achievement; and Magnolia School of Music (http://magnoliamusicschool.com) - Founded and run by Yeva Ghazaryan, an accomplished European-taught pianist.

Recreation

As far as green space, Smith Cove Park (http://1.usa.gov/fVqXgj) in the south features walking trails and family-friendly amenities. On the north side, Vertical World (http://verticalworld.com) features state-of-the-art facilities for individuals and groups seeking an outdoor-like rock climbing adventure. Crossfit (http://crossfitinterbay.com) is a scalable training regimen that is applicable to those in the military, the police force, grandparents or young mother. Denali Fitness (http://denalifitness.com) - Your neighborhood health club. Ella Bailey Park (http://1.usa.gov/en87OG) - A beautiful, newly built park with panoramic views of downtown Seattle (http://1.usa.gov/gLZpgR) and Mt. Rainier (http://bitly.com/eSQ0Zr), featuring many amenities and great views of holiday fireworks.

Medical and Wellness Facilities

Not much is here in regards to health offices. Pets have perks with Urban Vet (http://urbanvet.vetsourceweb.com), an online prescription center for animals.

Spiritual Centers and Churches

With all the clamor emanating from the railroad, residents (and commuters) still find spiritual rest among a couple of sanctuaries, namely: Quest (http://seattlequest.org) - An urban multi-ethnic congregation seeking to be an incarnational presence in a post-church culture and Magnolia Presbyterian Church (http://magpres.org) - An inter-generational congregation with a wide range of theological beliefs.

Transportation Access and Tips

Major arterial routes in Interbay include 15th Avenue West and Thorndyke Avenue West. Two major clusters of eating establishments lie in and around the Dravus Street Bridge and the Fishermen's Terminal (http://bitly.com/hwrQ7m) on Salmon Bay (http://1.usa.gov/hcRl4b). I had a meeting at the Q Cafe http://bitly.com/eNMfqM (just north of Dravus) and walked around the corner to enjoy a juicy burger at Red Mill (http://redmillburgers.com). It wasn't the most ideal pedestrian commute, but it got me there and back.

Another bonus for this neighborhood is a well-traveled bicycle route that connects Magnolia, Queen Anne and areas north of Salmon Bay http://bitly.com/feMcz2 (to the Seattle Downtown Waterfront - Belltown http://bitly.com/fF0XTC | Central Business District http://bitly.com/fwXJkP). Get ready for a thorough tour of the rail yard as you spin south on the path. The route is well marked, but does have a couple of narrow passageways with chain-link to meander the rails and locomotives.

Summary

Being sandwiched between two of the most desirable neighborhoods has its perks, especially when the only three roads connecting them pass through Interbay. This industrial strip of land may not be the first choice in Northwest living, but it carries a powerful history and strategic location for many Seattleites.
Pros
  • Large golf recreation center
  • Seattle's largest P-Patch garden
  • Excellent bicyle route
Cons
  • Noisy environment
  • Heavy traffic on arterial streets
  • Limited residential area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
2yrs+

"Industrial But Affordable Neighborhood"

Much of the area today known as Interbay was originally a marshy area of the tideflats of Elliott Bay, in the areas known as Smith's Cove and Salmon Bay. The city grew up around this area, because it is one of the few areas of the city where the ground was already level. As settlers arrived, the city moved outwards. By the end of the 1800s, soil from regrading projects to turn Seattle's hills into livable space turned this wet area into real land. Interbay also includes the valley between Queen Anne to the east and Magnolia to the west.

Since the turn of the century, the Interbay area has been known for shipping industries, including several the Fishermen's Terminal and several piers for the Port of Seattle. The neighborhood is somewhat consumed by the Balmer railway yard, and numerous railway lines and trestles run across the neighborhood from east to west. Today, Interbay is home to a diverse range of industries, shops, and homes, giving it a uniquely industrial yet homey feeling. A golf course, playfields, the P-Patch community garden, and a food bank are just some of the many occupants of Interbay. 15Th Avenue West is the main road through Interbay for those looking for shopping or dining options, although the area is quite crowded, and traffic can get bad during rush hour.

Although parts of Interbay have an industrial feel, others are quite nice residential areas, especially the parts of Interbay near Queen Anne Hill and Magnolia. These parts, however, tend to be very steep. If you get high enough on the hill on a clear day, you can enjoy a beautiful view of Puget Sound, Mt. Rainier, and downtown.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
2yrs+

"A residential neighborhood with an industrial feel"

A half dozen railroad tracks separate the east and west halves of Interbay. Residents on the extreme west side of Queen Anne border the Interbay neighborhood, along with the entire east half of Magnolia, making at least part of Interbay a nice place to live. Actually, the section of Magnolia covered by the Interbay neighborhood consists of many very steep hills, though there are some nice residential streets. A few enjoy some terrific views of Puget Sound, the downtown skyline and Mt. Rainier on a clear day.

The main conception of Interbay is the railroad yards and the very unusual location for a golf course (though not a very good one). It's also considered that the main area is 15th Ave. West which has terrible traffic most of the time, but provides an alternate route to downtown Seattle for Magnolia and Ballard residents.
2/5
2yrs+

"Consumed by the railway!"

Interbay is a neighborhood in Seattle that consists of the valley between Queen Anne Hill on the east and Magnolia on the west, plus filled-in areas of Smith Cove and Salmon Bay.

The neighborhood is bordered on the north by Salmon Bay, part of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, across which is Ballard; on the south by what remains of Smith Cove, an inlet of Elliott Bay; on the east by 15th Avenue W. and Elliott Avenue W.; and on the west by Thorndyke, 20th, and Gilman Avenues W. The Ballard Bridge crosses the ship canal from Interbay to Ballard.

Much of the neighborhood is taken up by BNSF Railway's Balmer Yard. Interbay is also home to Fishermen's Terminal on Salmon Bay and the Port of Seattle's Piers 86, 90, and 91 on Smith Cove. Its main thoroughfares are Elliott Avenue West and 15th Avenue West. The area is seemingly industrial due to what goes along with bay area living. There are a few retail businesses along 15th Avenue but intermingled with warehouses, light industrial buildings, and the like.

Just north of Dravus on 15th Avenue are the Quest Church and the nonprofit (and non-religious) Q Café, founded with funding from the church. My favorite is the bicycle and foot trail which comes north from the Central Waterfront by Belltown through Myrtle Edwards Park and continues through the pier facilities around Smith Cove. It parallels the railway tracks on their west through Interbay, ending on the west (Magnolia) side of the tracks on 20th Avenue West about three blocks south of Dravus.
Recommended for
  • Professionals

Travelling to Interbay?

Find Hotels

Best Streets in Interbay

"Queen Anne Hill neighborhood is welcoming and friendly, it's a perfect place to start a family."
47.6411603815972 -122.389985010213
"Nice street to take a stroll on"
47.6484184102874 -122.390287710745
3

West Emerson St

3.5/5
"Street borders Discovery Park"
47.6539760792557 -122.384632652615
4

West Galer St

3.5/5
"Exquisite neighborhood with million dollar homes and views of the bay"
47.6315286109659 -122.37770120019
5

24th Ave West

3.5/5
"Cute area in downtown magnolia to grab a bite to eat"
47.6484683205101 -122.387429098472
"Steep hill through a residential community"
47.6484513752805 -122.384893655804
"Main Drag Offers Lots to Do"
47.6271333257923 -122.369095525753

Unranked Streets in Interbay

47.6514467566211 -122.384675356612
"Very nice older street "
47.6447322177726 -122.385899281277
"Magnolia - a small town in a big city."
47.6529398455659 -122.389609766162

Best Neighborhoods to Live In

Best Cities to Live In

Tell everyone what you love about your neighborhood!

Leave a Review

Have a question?

How are schools? Is the area safe? What about public transit options?" Why not ask our community of locals!

Ask Now

Selling or Renting Your Home?

Maximize the selling price of your home by sharing what you love about your suburb to increase its appeal...

Leave a Review

Corporate Relocation Manager?

Enable your employees to share local knowledge in a private, trusted environment with those relocating... while building community.

Learn More