7.5 out of 10

East Queen Anne

Ranked 25th best neighborhood in Seattle
47.6353359317219 -122.3506971401
Great for
  • Clean & Green
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Peace & Quiet
  • Safe & Sound
  • Parks & Recreation
Not great for
  • Pest Free
  • Childcare
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Parking
  • Cost of Living
Who lives here?
  • Families with kids
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
Apr 03, 2016

"Super steep and quiet"

East Queen Anne is probably my least favorite part of Queen Anne Hill. There's nothing really wrong with it, it's just not awesome. The hill gets so steep on the east side that part of it is not developed, it’s just a green belt full of trees and bushes. That sounds nice, but in reality there is a homeless population that camps there and throws their garbage. This only really affects the homes that are right on the edge of the greenbelt, and honestly they probably don’t care because their view to the east of the mountains is so epic.

The neighborhood above the greenbelt to the top of the hill is small houses and low rise apartments. They’re pretty nice, it’s just harder to get to stuff from here because of the greenbelt. There are some walking bridges that cross the greenbelt, but no roads. You have to drive around. There’s also no parks, which is crazy for Seattle. The greenbelt isn’t a park, and you can’t go in it.

For nightlife you only really have access to the bars at the top of the hill, which aren't bad. Other than that, there’s no other close downtown area, so you’d have to go to Fremont or Lower Queen Anne, which each probably take a half hour or more to walk to. So if you want a busy nightlife, this probably isn’t the best neighborhood for you. Better for people who like quiet time.
Cons
  • More expensive housing
  • Highway corridor dividing neighborhood
3/5
Mar 27, 2016

"Beautiful but overpriced and surprisingly isolated"

I thought that East Queen Anne could be a pleasant place to live, being geographically close to work in South Lake Union. But it turns out that it’s an oddly isolated neighborhood, being split in two by Aurora. If you lived close to the top of the hill, of course you’d have easy access to the business area there, including all of the restaurants and shops. But getting public transit to work (South Lake Union for me) can be a challenge. You have to either walk down the side of the hill to one of the bus stops at Aurora, or catch a bus down and around the hill. Neither is ideal, and it turns out that simply walking there is nearly as quick (which is not quick at all).

Plus, there’s the fact that housing is incredibly expensive in this very desirable neighborhood. I see many reviews here that say it is a good neighborhood to raise a family, but currently I’d have to disagree. This is probably true if you managed to buy your home a few years ago when housing prices were down. But at the moment, with housing prices at an all time high, there are very few families (particularly those with children) that could afford to buy a home here. Even modest 2-bedroom homes are nearly $1 million, and it only goes up from there. Part of the reason is that most of the property here has a stunning eastward-facing view. Those that face southeast may even have a view of Mt. Rainier. Beautiful, but you’ll pay dearly for that beauty.
Cons
  • More expensive housing
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jan 19, 2016

"Queen Anne - An Oasis in the City"

I moved to the top of Queen Anne (south side, right across from old Queen Anne high school) back in 2007 after I graduated and it was the most ideal situation and place to live for a recent college grad.

First let me start off by saying that this is no longer an affordable place to live (like much of Seattle) unless you really have a great job or a fortunate financial situation. Back in 2007 rent was nearly 1/2 of what it is currently here. If you want to live in this part of Queen Anne now expect to pay between $2-$3k per month for studio or 1 bedroom (or maybe 2 bedroom in an older building). Anyhow, if you can afford it you'll be pleased with the area. My friends and I used to call it an Oasis in the city. The hill getting up Queen Anne is quite steep. If you're driving on a rainy day, and especially if you have an older car, you may experience skidding up the hill especially when trying to climb the hill in stop and go rush hour traffic. I experienced this on a regular basis with my older SUV...even with new tires. And on the off chance there's a snow day, forget about it. Your car isn't going anywhere. In fact, most of the time the city will shut down Queen Anne Ave which is the main street going up and down the hill and buses won't even make the attempt. The benefit of this though is that the top of Queen Anne is largely cut off from most of the rest of the city...you'll pretty much only find residents on top of the hill which gives it a quaint smaller town feel even though you're walking distance from downtown. Walking to any bar or restaurant in lower QA is very easy as well. And while I lived there we had season tickets to the Seattle Super Sonics (Seattle's old NBA team) and we walked to EVERY home game at Key Arena from our house which was awesome.

You don't have to travel off the hill for entertainment either as there are a bunch of very nice bars and restaurants along Queen Anne Ave. They're mostly old houses that have been converted to commercial buildings but it gives the Avenue a nice charm!

Within walking distance are some of the best parks Seattle has to offer. Kerry park (or postcard park) is a quick walk away and features amazing views. As you can imagine from the nickname Kerry Park is where they take the majority of the Seattle post cards that you'd see at the airport or anywhere else. In fact, the majority of the south end of Queen Anne is filled with amazing views just while walking along the streets and neighborhood. If you're a biker or runner, this will also be a paradise as the streets all feature great views and plenty of sidewalk room to run on.

The cons, other than price, are that no major highway other than highway 99 even come close to Queen Anne and getting from i-5 to Queen anne in rush hour can be a nightmare. They are, however, widening the main street (Mercer) from I-5 to queen anne and adding some new lanes... so this should help out.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • Proximity to downtown
  • Excellent cafes
  • Good parks
  • Great nightlife
Cons
  • More expensive housing
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
  • Highway corridor dividing neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Dec 10, 2015

"Two distinct neighborhoods: on the hill, or on the lake"

East Queen Anne is really two neighborhoods just north of downtown, divided by Aurora/Highway 99. West of Aurora is truly “on the hill,” and there are lots of single-family homes and small apartment buildings, which is popular for young people, professionals, and families. East of Aurora, you’re closer to Lake Union, and it feels like another neighborhood altogether, rather than part of Queen Anne. Here you’ll find bigger apartment buildings, a few single-family homes, and some houseboats on the lake. There are fewer families here, and more professionals. Like all of Seattle, rent is climbing steadily, and this is a very popular neighborhood at the moment. Amazon employees especially like the housing east of Aurora, because it’s a straight shot to the Amazon “campus” in South Lake Union, and more affordable than living directly in South Lake Union neighborhood itself.

Food:
If you’re on the west side of Aurora, you’ll find lots of shops and restaurants lining Queen Anne Avenue. It’s very quaint, especially when they put the Christmas lights up. But if you find yourself further East, there’s not too much close by. I lived just South-East of the Aurora bridge, and the closest eating places were in Fremont, where there’s plenty of great options. However, there is one place on Dexter worth mentioning. The Swedish Cultural Center does an amazing pancake breakfast the first Sunday of every month. For $9 flat (including tax and tip) you get all-you-can-eat homemade pancakes with lingonberry jam and whipped cream, plus ham, coffee, and juice. All served by smiling Swedish-American volunteers with a live Swedish band playing on a stage in the background. It’s extremely popular for all ages, especially families, and you’ll likely have to wait in line to find a seat at one of the communal tables.

The view:
The wonderful thing about being on a hill is that most residences have a view. In this case, the view is looking East, and you can see the Cascade Mountains and Lake Union. Not bad at all. This is a big draw for many people.

Transportation:
Parking is ok--I managed to find street parking for free regularly, though sometimes I'd have to walk for 10 minutes to get home. There’s a great bike lane down Dexter that heads downtown, where you can join the crowds of people biking from North Seattle during the sunny months. If you prefer to take a bus, there are plenty of them that head downtown via Aurora until quite late. The only downside can be getting to bus stop, as Aurora has limited access points. And walking down the east side of Aurora at night can be slightly nerve-wracking, as there are some shoddy hotels, and more than once I’ve come across people doing drugs under the overpasses, where you have to walk to cross Aurora (don't try to run across all the lanes!). But overall, I felt very safe living in this neighborhood and never had any problems. Lastly, Fremont is within walking distance if you don’t mind a steep hill. This can be a good option for a casual night out with friends, as there’s not too much happening on Queen Anne hill itself.
Pros
  • Swedish Pancake Breakfast
  • Proximity to downtown
Cons
  • More expensive housing
  • Nonexistent Nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
Nov 17, 2015

"Beautiful, but Boring"

East Queen Anne is high-priced and family-friendly. The residential streets look like something out of Disney cartoon - every house seems to have a ridiculously large and vibrant streetside garden. These people's landscaping bills must be higher than my rent...

Queen Anne Ave is the aptly-named main strip here. It's lined with cute shops and many good-but-not-great cafes and restaurants. To be fair, there are some real gems, like How To Cook A Wolf (upscale Italian joint) and LloydMartin (Chef Sam Crannell's ever-changing menu is well-reviewed and deserves every bit of praise it gets), but the good food won't come cheap. This is three-dollar-signs-on-Google territory, people.

Also, there's a middle school and a K-8 catholic school right on the other side of Queen Anne Ave, so there are always kids running around, further reinforcing that family-friendly image.

The biggest knock on this part of town is the very thing that makes it so appealing to families: despite it's proximity to downtown, there's not much in the way of late night entertainment and drunken fools just trying to have a good time (though Nana's does offer bowling ball-sized margaritas). Lower Queen Anne is a bit better off in this regard, and there's also a thriving bar/club scene nearby in Capitol Hill, so head a little south and maybe east if that's what you're most interested in.
Pros
  • El Diablo's Mexican Mochas
  • Those aforementioned Nana's magaritas
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Nonexistent Nightlife
  • More expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
2yrs+

"The Calmer Part of the Queen Anne"

Everyone has been to the Queen Anne area, even if you didn’t know it. East Queen Anne isn’t the party capital of the entire Queen Anne area – it’s the offshoot with a calmer vibe and a good stretch of Lake Union to call its own.

Nestled in the area is Anne Playfield which is also referred to as Little Howe Park, this area of East Queen Anne provides a space for the residents of the area to enjoy the neighborhood. It has a half basketball court, a wading pool (which looked kind of dirty when I was there so I do not recommend dipping one or all of your toes in it. There’s also a play area, space for soccer as well as baseball and restrooms so you don’t have to run junior home in between sliding and swinging.

Public transportation is the area is great and any of the buses in the area can get you all around Seattle. This little piece of Queen Anne is pretty cool to visit.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"If It Is Good Enough For Tom Hanks..."

You may remember the 1993 film, "Sleepless in Seattle" (http://imdb.to/eJHnz8), with Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. His houseboat, depicted in the movie, is a couple of hundred yards from Westlake Avenue. My son and I ventured within a few feet of the dwelling to snap a photo of this Seattle icon. Take caution, however, when seeking out this Hollywood landmark, because it is not exactly "tourist friendly". We had to get special permission from a guy cleaning boats to approach the area. Nonetheless, we met our goal and went our way.

East Queen Anne stretches longitudinally from Queen Anne Avenue to either Lake Union (in the north) or Aurora Avenue. Latitudinally, it spans from Queen Anne Drive (except a sliver stretching north to the Aurora bridge) to Ward Street.

History

Turn back the clock to November 1851, just after the Denny Party landed at Alki Point in West Seattle. One year later, David Denny claimed 320 acres of land between Puget Sound and Lake Union, of which East Queen Anne is comprised. It was not until 1885 that Queen Anne coined its name, following the pattern of housing architecture which began to dominate the landscape.

Demographics and Income

A predominantly white neighborhood, not evolving much, ethnically, since it was founded. Roughly half the inhabitants are single—32% are married. A small percentage of children (7.7%) reside with these couples, unlike the strong family demographic carried here a few decades ago. High income singles and Dinks (Double income—no kids) flock here for urban proximity and attractive domiciles. The median age, according to Zillow (http://bitly.com/dWpMaJ), is 39 years old. The average income, not surprisingly, is above the Seattle average. One would need a deep paycheck to afford the mortgage on one of these houses (take a drive through, and you’ll see what I mean).

Culture

A trendy, can-do attitude community, proud of its heritage and filled with forward-thinking men and women. These residents come to define the well-to-do young professional image. Two main differences between East Queen Anne (EQA) and Lower Queen Anne (http://bitly.com/hPfYct) are the population densities and noise levels. EQA is further removed from high volume streets, providing for a richer retreat and more land space, with the exception of the Lake Union coastline.

Real Estate

Home sizes prove an interesting trend, as a good number of condos have been constructed in recent years, dropping the square footage averages considerably. Homes that are owned boast large floor plans and high price tags, despite the plummeting values during the recession. As mentioned, the Queen Anne architecture provides a local feel—second-to-none.

Local Business Tour (Restaurants, Pubs, Coffee Houses, Shops and other Amenities)

Good eats at The Five Spot (http://bitly.com/fV4tE1). An inviting venue (rotating art exhibits and great decor) serving meals throughout the day. Enjoy a tasty brunch here, enveloped in professional and friendly service. It's on the hill and parking may be limited, but it is worth the effort.

For the mecca of dining within Seattle, visit Canlis (http://canlis.com) which is nestled near Queen Anne Drive and Aurora Avenue. The food is only one dimension of this eating experience. The architecture and layout of the facility is, by itself, worth five stars. Another dimension is what your eyes behold through the windows. Great views of Lake Union and panoramas of the city. The restaurant is family owned and continues to enchant Seattleites and tourists. Make sure you budget for this experience, as it is quite expensive. Other less exotic eating establishments are: Olympia Pizza (http://olympiapizzaonqueenanne.com) - Boasting homemade dishes that have been feeding Queen Anne and downtown Seattle for over 30 years; Ototo Sushi (http://ototosushi.com) - A Japanese restaurant, priding itself on its unique menu creations that are true to the Japanese culture; Orrapin Thai Food (http://orrapin.com) - Freshly prepared Thai dishes, unparalleled ambiance, and over 15 years of service; and How to Cook a Wolf (http://bitly.com/gtivl1) - Italian inspired dishes using simple ingredients.

Night life is no challenge with Hilltop Ale (http://seattlealehouses.com/hilltop) and Bricco Della Regina Anna (http://briccoseattle.com). An ale house and Wine bar, respectively, for social and romantic outings.

A place to restock your tea basket is Teacup (http://seattleteacup.com). A retail store selling every imaginable tea, which even hosts tastings. If coffee is your fancy, then try these venues: El Diablo (http://eldiablocoffee.com) - Experience a wide variety of blends, eats and pastries and Twirl Café (http://twirlcafe.com) - A coffee house with a learning environment for kids.

Now that the food/drink establishments are covered, what about other types of businesses? Here’s a few to whet your appetite: Eat Local (http://eatlocalonline.com) - Local ingredients are used to cook meals, from scratch, which are then frozen with dry ice and shipped; Queen Anne Dispatch (http://queenannedispatch.com) - A family owned clothing and shipping store; Museum Quality Framing (http://mqframingstore.com) - One-stop shop for a variety of picture framing; All the Best Pet Care (http://allthebestpetcare.com) - Healthy pet nutrition since 1985; and Boat Electric (http://boatelectric.com) - Handling the electrical and comfort side of life with heating and cooling solutions.

Schools

Building into elementary children appears to be a passion of EQA, and that is further evidenced at the Seattle Country Day School (http://seattlecountryday.org) - A place for children with extraordinary curiosity, which provides a healthy framework for intuitive learning. Other learning centers for young minds include: The Play Space (http://dropoffplayspace.com) - A warm, natural environment inspired by waldorf; Sweet Pea Cottage Preschool of the Arts (http://sweetpeacottage.org) - Connects educators and youth with artists from a wide range of traditions; and John Hay Elementary (http://bitly.com/gcW0j6) - An environment that challenges, supports, and instills creativity in the learning process.

Recreation

On clear days (rare to Seattle), venture to Bhy Kracke Park (http://bitly.com/eMeXiQ). If you can't remember the name, just ask anyone nearby for the park with a great view. Gaze at the panorama and enjoy the creative genius of this space. Parents, don't worry about the kids getting bored. A small play structure and area were not overlooked that broaden the appeal of the community's only park. If conditions favor a leisurely walk to Lake Union (http://bitly.com/fNGouo), make sure to study Google Maps to locate the best place to cross Aurora Avenue. Generally, the best option is the path from Galer Street. Otherwise, you will be heading further south beyond the neighborhood to reach your destination.

Medical and Wellness Facilities

Medical resources do exist to administer basic health services, but those with further complications will need to be transported south to the major hospitals. What can be counted on in EQA is: Swedish Physicians (http://bitly.com/ieZiBQ) - A number of services available including family medicine, pediatric care, immunizations and more; Queen Anne Acupuncture (http://queenanneacupuncture.com) - Clarissa Helton, providing quality care in a relaxed environment; Cake Skincare (http://cakeskincare.com) - Skin treatment and waxing studio with licensed esthetician, Katrina Rising; and Queen Anne Chiropractic Center (http://queenannechiro.com) - Family owned and operated by the Gibson’s, with over 20 years in the business.

Spiritual Centers and Churches

Locals of EQA will need to cross to “the other side (of Queen Anne, that is)” to attend a church or spiritual center, unless, of course, they would like to attend one of these: Bethany Presbyterian Church (http://bethanypc.org) - A congregation 600 strong, with a blend of traditional and contemporary worship styles; All Saints Church (http://believedoubtseek.org) - Filled with people who are seeking to grow as Christ-followers, with a heart for others around Seattle to embrace the same ideal; and Queen Anne Baptist Church (http://bitly.com/gH2puS).

Transportation Access and Tips

Living in the eastern half of Queen Anne brings perks to those who work downtown. Catch public transport to get to the office without fulfilling the title of Tom Hanks' film title. Making the trek to Interstate 5 can be hairy, especially during morning and evening commute times. Highway 99 may save the day, within reason, for traveling north-south.

Summary

Even with such outstanding amenities, the residential sector remains strong. Rest assured that landing an attractive vintage house is completely possible, complete with suburban-like peace and tranquility. This portion of Queen Anne will continue to remain a strong contender in lovely urban existence. However, research is vital for choosing a home, as all of Queen Anne boasts similar candor. If decision making becomes too intense, then add the Sleepless movie to your cue and enjoy a circa 90s scope of the area.
Pros
  • Excellent cafes
  • Family-friendly
  • Good parks
  • Great nightlife
  • Proximity to downtown
  • Unique dining choices
Cons
  • Highway corridor dividing neighborhood
  • High traffic volumes on arterial streets
  • More expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
2yrs+

"Beautiful and Historic Residential Neighborhood- Great for raising kids!"

East Queen Anne is one of the best residential neighborhoods Seattle has to offer. Though it's a bit pricey compared to other communities around the city, if you can afford it living in East Queen Anne is well worth it. The area of East Queen Anne known as a community of young professionals raising kids, and there is plenty for your children to do here, including the East Queen Anne Playground and Wading Pool. The parks in this area and in neighboring Magnolia are well-kept and beautiful.

Located on Queen Anne Hill, East Queen Anne refers to the section of the hill that is bounded by Queen Anne Drive, Queen Anne Ave, and Ward Street. Cutting through the middle are several major arterials, including Dexter Ave N along the north edge of the community and Boston, 5th, and Taylor cutting through the center of the district. If you're looking to live here, move to the area of East Queen Anne that is North of Aurora Avenue North – many residents of Queen Anne don't consider anything East of this boundary to be part of the hill.

Those on the top of the hill will find breathtaking views, not to mention easy access to downtown for shopping, sightseeing, or working. The community is very walkable, though many residents do their shopping elsewhere. There are plenty of restaurants, especially on Dexter Ave N. Although East Queen Anne is home to some apartments and condos, it is known for its original historic homes, which give a relaxed feeling to the area. Many streets in this area of the city are tree-lined, with gardens creeping up to the sidewalks.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
2yrs+

"Beautiful upper-middle-class neighborhood"

Beautiful homes, breathtaking views, top-rate amenities, easy access to downtown - what's not to love, except the price tag?

Just walking through the neighborhood gives a sense of what makes Seattle one of the most beautiful cities in America: flowering trees and gardens line the sidewalk, with restored original houses giving character and comfort to every block. Well-kept parks, schools, and churches all provide places to get to know your neighbors. And Queen Anne Ave provides terrific shopping and eating opportunities.

The only drawback is the price. Even in this recession, houses run well over half a million. And this is one of the few neighborhoods I've seen where the European cars outnumber all others by about three to one.

Still, if you can afford it, you won't find a better place to live!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Travelling to East Queen Anne?

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Best Streets in East Queen Anne

"Costly and in the heart of Seattle"
47.6348720853139 -122.354410573291
"Much a-do about Morgan"
47.6426619402403 -122.35075328077

Unranked Streets in East Queen Anne

"Great, Quiet Location"
47.6346064737754 -122.353196963101
"Pleasant and Active"
47.6334781670156 -122.351992914449
"Nice area with plenty to keep you occupied"
47.6342198405356 -122.347256799225
"Not so sleepless in Seattle"
47.6389010173928 -122.342464884741
47.6340465392918 -122.348344621636

Boston St

3.5/5
47.6382602456657 -122.352149136789
"Crockett, another nice link on the hill"
47.6374042701136 -122.347932083719

Halladay St

3.5/5
"Great Street for Athletic Kids"
47.6422592782122 -122.348257865343

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