mchurchw

  • Local Expert 4,406 points
  • Reviews 15
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
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Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Everything Youd Expect From The Center of a Big City -- And More!"

This is the center of a vibrant and thriving city. As in most large cities, you'll find all of the staples here, including office towers and government buildings. Portland State University (PSU) lies near the south end of Downtown, though this certainly isn't a college town. Downtown is also home to Portland Art Museum and several concert halls. A waterfront park and several other nice green spaces provide a little break from the urban high-rises. There's always something fun going on here, and everyone seems to have their own favorite downtown spot to hang out.

As you might expect, it's expensive to live in Downtown Portland. You'll find expensive high-rise condos and apartments here, though what you lack in space you'll make up for with convenience. However, be warned: downtown Portland is surprisingly sleepy at night. For better nightlife, check out the Pearl District.

It is easy to get downtown with buses or light rail trains, and downtown Portland lies within Fareless Square, which means MAX rides are free. Street parking is metered, and not all apartments include a parking space, so it's best to ditch your car if you plan to live here long-term. You won't need it anyways.
Pros
  • Great restaurants
  • Lots to do
  • Public transportation
Cons
  • Expensive to live here
  • Sometimes seems to lack nightlife
  • Noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Popular Close-In Portland Neighborhood"

The neighborhood of Northwest Portland offers easy access to downtown and the Pearl District, and has historically been very popular. It's easy to commute from NW Portland elsewhere in the city. Parking can be tough, so taking public transit to get here is a very good option.

Those looking to move here will find many beautiful, mid-sized older homes, along with apartments and condos, mostly in older buildings with a few newly constructed buildings mixed in. Rent tends to be very expensive here. Residents range from upper-middle-class professionals who can afford the nicer homes to college students in tiny studio apartments.

If you're looking for apartments, don't be surprised to see some advertised as the 'Alphabet District,' though you're not likely to hear the name elsewhere. This official name for the district comes from the fact that the streets run alphabetically in the Northwest, from Burnside to Wilson Street.

Most of the shops and restaurants can be found along NW 23rd and 21st. You'll find lots of great bars and trendy shops, along with a Trader Joe's and Cinema 21, a popular artsy movie theater. The area around 23rd avenue is known as Nob Hill. These areas are very trendy, and you'll see plenty of hipsters and college kids hanging out here during the day.
Pros
  • Trendy shops
  • Easy commute
  • Beautiful older homes
Cons
  • Parking
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Upscale Neighborhood With Convenient Location"

Sabin's Northeast Portland location means that it is close to everything. Just east, you'll find the popular Alameda neighborhood, while the Alberta arts district lies to the north. An easy commute to downtown, it's close to freeways, making it easy to get anywhere in Portland from Sabin.

The neighborhood itself is an older, established neighborhood with a great small-town feel. Walk along Fremont Street to enjoy a number of coffee shops, bars, restaurants, and shops, or spend an afternoon tending to the community garden. Take the kids to Vernon Tank playground after they get out of school at nearby Sabin Elementary School. 15th Avenue, another popular shopping area, features a natural grocery store and a pizza place.

Homes in Sabin are old and beautiful. Most homes date to the first few decades of the twentieth century, with only a little newer construction mixed in, along with a couple of duplexes and townhouses. The nicest homes tend to be in the Southeast section of the neighborhood (roughly the parts south of Prescott and east of 15th) though overall Sabin is considered a very upscale neighborhood.

These elegant homes feel comfortable and livable. Sabin residents take pride in their community and seem to be very eco-conscious. There's even a neighborhood Tree Walk you can follow to check out the beautiful trees that grow here.
Pros
  • Close to everything
  • Small-town feel
  • Nice homes
  • Sabin community garden
  • Tree Walk
Cons
  • Can be expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Several Very Different Areas Near the River"

A long, narrow neighborhood south of downtown Portland, South Portland is between Interstate 5 and the Willamette River, stretching four miles along the west bank. This neighborhood has many names, and you're likely to see many of these still in use, as many residents feel that 'South Portland' is too inclusive to accurately describe their neighborhood, which is actually a collection of several very different areas.

The South Waterfront area, which is actually near the north end of the neighborhood, has a lot of areas under construction, and is linked with Oregon Health & Science University with a unique aerial tram. Also in the north end of the neighborhood is Lair Hill, which was originally an ethnically diverse area, though much of this was demolished decades ago. The Corbett area is in central South Portland, while Terwilliger is south of that, and Johns Landing is at the southern tip, filled with condos offering river views.

Though the area is difficult to summarize, many blocks are in the process of converting from industrial to residential spaces. There are also a number of healthcare offices along the river, and a number of excellent green spaces. Along the east side of the neighborhood is Macadam Avenue, which offers many stores and restaurants. Traffic along this road can be a problem, as it leads to the Sellwood bridge and tends to back up during rush hour.
Pros
  • Convenience
  • Willamette Park
Cons
  • Not a very cohesive neighborhood
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Beach Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Trendy and Hip Downtown Area"

Portland's Pearl District is one of its most popular neighborhoods, and for good reason. It's right in the center of Portland, surrounded by China Town, Downtown, the Willamette River, and the trendy Goose Hollow neighborhood. This is the best that urban living has to offer. Enjoy an easy commute via streetcar, MAX light rail, bus, or bike to work and play.

The Pearl District used to be an old area of warehouses and railroad yards, until it underwent redevelopment in the 1990s. Now, it still offers that historic charm, but nearly every block has been revamped to draw residents and tourists. There are plenty of new condos and loft-style apartments opening, and today the Pearl is considered one of the trendiest areas of the city. Many of these buildings offer historic features and gorgeous views of the river. Expect top floors to go for premium prices because of the improved views.

Expect busy streets lined with galleries, boutiques, and coffee shops, including a great mix of independent stores and popular chains. My personal favorite is Powell's Books, a bookstore that is unimaginably expansive.

A great example of urban renewal, this hip, thriving neighborhood seems to change every time I visit. If you want to live right in the heart of Portland, consider the Pearl.
Pros
  • Great arts scene
  • Shopping and restaurants
Cons
  • No houses
  • Noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Huge, Expensive Homes Without a Lot of Character"

Northwest Heights is known for miltimillion dollar homes on a steep hill offering expansive views. It's very hilly, with hardly a straight road anywhere in sight. Few people have reason to visit this area of the city unless they know someone who lives here, making it feel very secluded. Within the neighborhood itself, there are no shops or commercial areas. Nearby Forest Park, however, lies directly to the east and offers many acres of hiking and jogging trails, and is a popular destination for people coming from all over the city.

It's very quiet here, which you may enjoy if you're trying to get away from the noise of downtown, but also tends to give off the feeling that there's not much of interest happening here. The neighborhood feels consciously upscale. You won't see an unkempt lawn or beater car anywhere. Residents here are upper-middle-class to upper class, and they know it. The area isn't very diverse, and is filled with college-educated, white-collar families with kids. If you don't make six figures, it's easy to feel out of place, even if you're just driving through on the way to the park.

There are lots of cul-de-sacs filled with newer, larger homes, nearly all built in the 1990s. It can be a bit 'cookie cutter' so if you're looking for a a neighborhood that feels a bit more individualistic, check out some of the city's older neighborhoods, filled with unique historic homes full of charm.
Pros
  • Forest Park
  • Gorgeous homes
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Feels a little boring
  • Expensive
  • Too removed
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Diverse But Rundown Residential Neighborhood"

This triangular-shaped neighborhood occupies an area of Southeast Portland south of SE Powell Boulevard and north of SE Foster Road, which runs at a diagonal to Portland's street grid. Though surrounded by major streets, this part of the city seems to have been largely forgotten, falling into disrepair over time.

The neighborhood has a reputation for being ethnically diverse. It currently has large populations of Russian, Ukranian, Vietnamese, Hispanic, and Chinese immigrants. As real estate prices rose in the rest of Portland, Foster-Powell attracted a number of young families and other first-time homebuyers. While this has led to many improvements, some parts of the neighborhood are still in transition. New residents seem to have breathed new life into the community, and many are pushing for positive change here, particularly with regards to traffic and crime.

There is easy access by car or bus, though Foster-Powell is bounded by major roads that are not ideal for cyclists. If you're looking to move here, stick to the center of the neighborhood rather than the outskirts, which are more commercial in nature. Residential streets mostly contain homes built at the turn of the last century, with a few newer apartment buildings mixed in.
Pros
  • Diverse
  • Affordable
  • Some nice home styles
Cons
  • Can be rundown
  • Crime
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Lot of Fun For Tourists and Locals Alike"

Old Town Chinatown is in the heart of the city. The oldest part of downtown, this historic district was originally settled by Portland's Chinese residents. Now, it is home to a diverse range of people and businesses.

Among Old Town Chinatown's many landmarks are the Classical Chinese Garden, Oregon Jewish Museum, and Portland Saturday Market. As you might expect, most of the restaurants are Asian, although there's also a surprising offering of cuisines from all over the world. Don't miss a trip to the famous Voodoo Doughnuts while you're here! Chinatown is home to galleries, popular bars and nightclubs, and beautiful historic buildings with cast iron details.

This is a popular destination for tourists and those in search of nightlife. It gets crowded on the weekends; if you love that atmosphere, be sure to visit then, but if not, stick to the weekdays when it's less crowded.

If you're looking to live here, you'll find plenty of apartments and small condos, and they tend to be more affordable than in other parts of downtown. Residents of Old Chinatown enjoy easy access to the best of Portland. However, it can be a little noisy, and the area has historically not been the safest after dark, so I'd rather live elsewhere and come into Old Town Chinatown for an enjoyable visit. It's easy to get here via bus, MAX light rail, or Amtrak, making a great day trip.
Pros
  • Tourist attractions
  • Diverse stores and restaurants
  • Public transportation
  • Saturday market
Cons
  • Traffic
  • Can be too touristy
  • Crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Anchored By The Mall -- Has Every Chain Store Imaginable"

When people think 'Lloyd,' they think 'Lloyd Center.' This is a neighborhood anchored by a huge mall. It's got all of the movie theaters and chain restaurants and clothing stores you could ever need. That's not to say that the Lloyd District has nothing else to offer. There are plenty of local businesses here, as long as you don't look for them at the mall.

The area has plenty of nice hotels and huge office towers, along with a convention center. If you plan to live here, it will be in a high-rise condo or apartment building. What you lack in space you'll make up for with convenience; the neighborhood is accessible via bus and MAX light rail. You can definitely live here without a car; it's just a free, quick train ride to get to downtown.

The area gets busy, especially during rush hour commutes, whenever there's a big event at the Rose Garden Arena or the Convention Center, or during the holidays. The are is constantly buzzing with tourists and suburbanites who have come here to do their shopping. The downside is that Lloyd feels like it could be anywhere, that is, there isn't much that screams 'Portland' here.
Pros
  • Lots of stores and restaurants
  • MAX light rail
  • Convenient location
  • Entertainment
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Congestion
  • Less green
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Feels Like a Charming Small Town"

Southwest Portland's Multnomah neighborhood is a charming and quaint community that feels very much like a small town. Because Multnomah is also the name of the county, many residents say that they live in the Multnomah Village area.

Multnomah Village serves as the heart of this community, where residents can find locally owned shops and restaurants. This is a great place to spend an afternoon looking for gifts or souvenirs, especially during the holidays. There are several historic buildings in Multnomah, including a Masonic Lodge that's now the Lucky Labrador Public House (a very popular pub), an old school that's now an art center, and the popular Marco's Cafe, housed in a turn-of-the-century building.

Balancing out these fun commercial areas are plenty of green spaces. Families love Gabriel Park, which offers many acres of trails, playgrounds, and sports fields. You'll also see many flyers around the neighborhood for classes at the Southwest Community Center, Sprout Academy preschool, and Multnomah Arts Center.

Most of the houses here were built following World War II; there are also a number of condos, townhouses, and apartments built in the 1990s and 2000s. Homes tend to be surprisingly affordable here. If you want a very walkable neighborhood, stick to the streets closest to the Village center, which tend to be the most pedestrian-friendly.
Pros
  • Lots of green spaces
  • Affordable homes
  • Community spirit
  • Unique stores
Cons
  • Parking can be tough at the Village
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Family-Oriented Neighborhood With Comfortable, Small-Town Feel"

The Sellwood-Moreland neighborhood is in SE Portland, between the Willamette River and the neighborhood of Eastmoreland. Most people just call this place Sellwood. This popular neighborhood feels less chic and artsy than comparable Portland neighborhoods, but still feels very friendly. There are lots of local shops here, giving it small town feeling. Overall, Sellwood feels like a livable community and a great place to walk around.

Many residents of the Moreland part of the neighborhood have a strong sense of pride, and definitely don't want to be grouped with neighboring Eastmoreland. Moreland feels self-sustaining, with homes that are more reasonable in size when compared with the expansive houses in Eastmoreland.

The streets of Sellwood are quiet and tree-lined, making it a great family neighborhood. In addition to a number of great coffee shops, Sellwood is particularly well-known for antique shops. Some of Portland's best restaurants and bakeries can be found along the quaint neighborhood streets of Sellwood-Moreland, too.

There's plenty to do outdoors in this neighborhood. Sellwood Riverfront Park is a great place to enjoy the Willamette River. On the west side of the neighborhood, Sellwood Park has fields for every sport imaginable, while Sellwood Pool is a great place to take the kids in the summer. There's even a casting pond and a historic amusement park.

Residents here seem down to earth but not very diverse. Housing options are mostly well-kept older homes, with a few townhouses and apartments mixed in. Nearly all the homes here were built before the 1930s

If you're looking to move to Portland, I highly recommend the Sellwood neighborhood. Homes here are still affordable, and it's a great place to raise a family.
Pros
  • Great parks
  • Local businesses
  • beautiful homes
  • Old fashioned vibe
Cons
  • Can be expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nice Residential Neighborhood in Close-In SW Portland"

South Burlingame occupies the area between Interstate 5 and the Riverview/Greenwood Hill cemetery, not quite all the way to the River. This is an oddly shaped neighborhood with lots of curvy roads. Some people call it Fulton Park, which actually lies to the north, just over Interstate 5.

Burlingame Park is nice, but most of it is right along I5, which makes it noisy. Visit nearby fulton Park instead. There are major roads through the area, including SW Terwilliger Boulevard and Taylors Ferry Road, making for an easy commute, though this also means a lot of traffic and noise during rush hour.

While the neighborhood is mostly residential, there are some nice businesses here. Tryon Creek Bar & Grill is popular among the college-aged crowd, while the Market of Choice is frequented by locals. A large funeral home occupies the southeast section of the neighborhood, but other than that, there aren't any major commercial developments in South Burlingame.

Houses are set along quiet residential streets. There are tons of trees here; residents seem to love their landscaping. Homes are mid-sized and well-kept, and the area seems very laid back and homey. South Burlingame appeals to families and others who prefer a suburban neighborhood.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Convenient
  • Parks
Cons
  • Noisier than other SW Portland neighborhoods
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Blue-Collar Residential Neighborhood"

Just south of SE Division Street and east of I205 lies Powellhurst-Gilbert. Often this neighborhood gets grouped with the neighboring Lents or Pleasant Valley areas, and the exact north and south boundaries are not clearly defined, so what lies in the neighborhood depends on how you define it.

Most residents seem to be families with young kids who enjoy the area's nice schools and parks. Bordering the east edge of the neighborhood is Powell Butte Nature Park, a great place for an afternoon stroll. There are also several smaller parks contained within the neighborhood itself.

It seems pretty average or maybe a bit more blue-collar than the rest of Portland's residential neighborhoods. Most of the homes are modest but well-kept, single story homes lining wide streets. Though there aren't any sidewalks, you're likely to see kids playing or riding their bikes, as many of Powellhurst-Gilbert's neighborhood roads don't see too much traffic.

There are a few older apartment buildings and mobile homes, and the busier streets have some rundown strip malls. There are a few major routes through the neighborhood, such as SE Powell Boulevard and SE Holgate Boulevard, as well as a couple of major north-south arterials. If you're looking to move here, choose one of the quieter, interior streets of the neighborhood.
Pros
  • Nice parks
  • Lots of families
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Some busy roads
  • A bit older and rundown
  • Crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Beautiful Residential Neighborhood With Nice Green Spaces"

Though technically just to the west of the West Hills, Sylvan-Highlands is still a very hilly neighborhood; you won't find a straight street anywhere. Also, there aren't sidewalks along many roads, and residents are very dependent upon their cars, which tend to be high-end luxury models. There are very few businesses in Sylvan-Highlands itself, so expect to hop in your car if you want to go anywhere.

Not very diverse, Sylvan-Highlands is mostly home to well educated, upper-middle-class families. There are lots of kids in the neighborhood, giving it a very family-focused feeling. Homes here are expensive, and newer than those in most comparably-priced Portland neighborhoods; this isn't the neighborhood for you if you're looking for a historic home with a lot of character. If you are set on living here but can't afford homes in the center of the neighborhood, check out the western edge, where there are a few new condo, townhome, and apartment developments.

Sylvan-Highlands seems very green. Just to the east lies Washington City Park, with the Zoo, Arboretum, and Rose Garden. The Northwest corner borders Willamette Stone State Heritage Site, and the beautiful Forest Park is also nearby. Within the neighborhood itself is the large Mt. Calvary Cemetery. All these open spaces give Sylvan-Highlands a quiet and relaxed feeling.
Pros
  • Lots of green spaces
  • Beautiful views
  • Convenient to downtown
Cons
  • Not very diverse
  • Not pedestrian friendly
  • Few businesses in neighborhood
  • Expensive homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful Upscale Neighborhood Filled With Expensive Homes"

In Southwest Portland, the Southwest Hills refer to the neighborhoods perched atop the West Hills, or Tualatin Mountains. This neighborhood feels classy and expensive, and seems like a beautiful place to live, if you can afford it.

The Southwest Hills area of Portland is home to some of the largest, most upscale homes in the city. Depending on which part of the neighborhood you are in, your home may offer a glimpse of downtown Portland, Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams, or Mt. Saint Helens. As you'd expect, these homes are inhabited by married professionals with college educations and the sort of white-collar jobs that enable them to afford to live here. There are a few scattered apartments and condos for those who are set on living in Southwest Hills but can't afford the expansive homes this area is known for.

Residents of Southwest Hills enjoy access to beautiful parks. The neighborhood is very close to Washington City Park, which is where the Oregon Zoo, Arboretum, Rose Garden, and many other city landmarks are located. Southwest Hills itself is home to Council Crest Park, which offers stunning views and a great place to lay in the grass and relax.

Though there are a few schools in and around the neighborhood, most of the kids seem to go to private schools. Residents here tend to keep to themselves, and don't spend much time in the neighborhood itself, instead preferring to jump into their luxury cars and drive elsewhere in the city. Because the area is so hilly, with so many winding roads, it is not ideal for pedestrians. However, it is very close to downtown for an easy commute -- you won't even have to hop on the freeway!
Pros
  • Amazing homes
  • Great views
  • Convenient
  • Lovely environment
Cons
  • Hilly
  • Not pedestrian friendly
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet Homes Surrounding College"

North Portland's University Park neighborhood is named after the small private Catholic college, University of Portland. About 3,000 students attend the campus, found near the south end of University Park. UP does have some impact on the neighborhood, as can be expected.

However, University Park is definitely not a college town. Unless you drove right past the campus, you may not realize that there's a college here. What it does give the neighborhood is a young, vibrant feeling. While the college is in the south end of the neighborhood, most of the businesses are gathered along the northern border, Lombard Street. This area has definitely improved in recent years, though some blocks are still trashy strip malls offering fast food and payday loans.

The majority of residents are college students, though many professors and other professionals also live here. From young married couples living in their first house, to college kids living in dorms, to families with kids who live in mid-sized, historic homes, University Park is home to a diverse range of people who will make you feel at home.

The area also shares its name with a nice park, known for grassy fields and nice, newer playgrounds, making it a popular gathering space for college students and families alike. Many residents are active, outdoorsy people; you'll see plenty of people walking their dogs, biking, or jogging.
Pros
  • Feels young and vibrant
  • Affordable homes
  • Quiet
  • Safe
Cons
  • Some rundown areas with strip malls
  • Not a lot of restaurants and stores
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Nice Residential Neighborhood With Great Park"

Southwest Portland's West Portland Park neighborhood surrounds a park of the same name. West Portland Park Natural Area, as it is officially called, is a large wilderness area with plenty of trails to explore. There are also several other nice green spaces in the neighborhood, including Holly Farm Park, which has a skate park. Thanks to these open spaces, West Portland Park feels more suburban than other areas of Portland, making it a popular option among families looking to raise their kids away from the hurried downtown core.

This neighborhood lies at the very south of the city, just south of I-5. The northern part of the neighborhood is known to residents as Capitol Hill. There, you'll find an Islamic Center, Islamic School, and Mosque, along with the Capitol Hill Library. This part of the neighborhood feels distinct from the rest of West Portland Park.

The typical West Portland Park resident is a college-educated, married couple with kids. Homes are expensive, though there a number of apartments for those who are searching for affordable housing near West Portland Park. The areas immediately surrounding the park, in particular, are fairly upscale residential streets. For less expensive housing, look north of the park.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Green spaces
  • Natural settings
  • Relaxing
Cons
  • Houses can be expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet, Family-Focused Residential Neighborhood"

Parkrose Heights is a Northeast Portland neighborhood located just south and east of I84, north of NE Halsey St, and east of NE 122nd Street. This is a quiet and unassuming residential neighborhood offering a convenient commute thanks to its location along major thoroughfares.

Some streets feel quiet and suburban, while others -- particularly in the north and east sides of the neighborhood -- are decidedly urban. Knott Park, in the center of the neighborhood, is popular among families. Most of the neighborhood's businesses are located along Halsey Street, the southern boundary. There's also hospital in the southwest corner of the neighborhood.

Parkrose Heights is home to families and a sizable number of retirees, in part because there are a couple of large nursing homes here. Other residents include a mix of renters and homeowners; both tend to live in the neighborhood for a long time. Parkrose Heights is filled with modest, affordable homes built in the 1950s and 1960s. The North end is seen as more upscale and wealthier than the south end, though there seems to be little difference to those just driving through the area, and you'd have to be very familiar with the neighborhood to notice.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Nice park
  • Near I-84 and airport
Cons
  • Not much to do here
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Huge, Amazing Park -- Live With This Urban Forest In Your Backyard!"

Linnton is a small community located between two of Portland's most beautiful spaces. With Forest Park to the South and the Willamette River and Sauvie Island to the north, this is an ideal location for those who want to live out in the country, but need a reasonable commute to urban Portland.

The neighborhood has strong community pride, in part because over the past few decades they've had to fight off several waves of urban development encroaching on this beautiful rural space. So far, the community has kept out development of the waterfront, and the area remains a beautiful oasis.

This definitely isn't an urban neighborhood by any stretch of the imagination; expect to get in your car even for a quick trip to the grocery store, as there really isn't anything within walking distance.

Residents of Linnton include artists and families drawn here because of the proximity to Forest Park. This giant park offers hundreds of miles of trails. It's easy to forget you're in the middle of the city while running, biking, or hiking in the middle of Forest Park. This urban forest might be my favorite place in all of Portland. Linnton residents are lucky to have this park right in their backyard.
Pros
  • Forest Park
  • Get away from urban Portland
  • Community pride
Cons
  • Car dependent; nothing nearby
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Urban Neighborhood Defying Easy Definition"

Southeast Portland's Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood is located south of SE Hawthorne Boulevard, north of SE Powell Boulevard, and between SE 30th Avenue and the Willamette River.

This is an area that defies easy definition. Most residents don't recognize this name, as the neighborhood is actually comprised of several smaller neighborhoods. For example, in the center of this area lies Ladd's Addition, a lovely historic area recognized by its X-shaped street grid. Towards the north of the neighborhood is Hawthorne Street, which anchors the popular Hawthorne District, where you'll find plenty of shopping and dining options. The riverfront, meanwhile is home to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, or OMSI. This area is filled with tourists, while other parts of Hosford-Abernethy, home to cute cafes and quirky shops, are hidden gems known only to locals. Overall, the neighborhood seems very pedestrian-friendly, and many of the residents commute by bike.

Because of this mix of different neighborhoods, Hosford-Abernethy seems like it could be whatever you want it to be, whether you're after quiet residential areas or a bustling commercial center. Homes in the neighborhood are as varied as the residents; you'll find beautiful examples of historic architecture, all the way up to modern condos and apartments.

This is a neighborhood whose atmosphere seems to change block by block. Some homes are modest and affordable, while others are rundown, and still others are amazing, well-kept historic homes on tree-lined streets. There are also a number of apartments and condos, making it affordable for new residents to move here. Homeowners and rentals, families and singles, you'll find it all in Hosford-Abernethy.
Pros
  • Lots to do
  • Pedestrian and cyclist-friendly
  • Beautiful historic homes
Cons
  • Doesn't seem to be a cohesive neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Fun, Historic, and Affordable Urban Neighborhood"

Portland's Hollywood District, one of the most popular areas of Portland, offers a great mix of commercial and residential areas, drawing a young and hip crowd to its urban environment. This neighborhood lies just North of I84, roughly between 37th and 47th. Major roads through the neighborhood include Halsey, Broadway, and Sandy.

This Northeast Portland neighborhood is known for its historic, 1920s-era Hollywood Theatre. The surrounding commercial area draws residents from all over Northeast Portland. It's easy to get here by public transit, including the MAX light rail, though parking can be tricky. The commercial areas of Hollywood offer everything imaginable, from McDonalds to small local cafes and bars.

If you're looking to move here, expect lots of tiny studio apartments; many of the original 1920s-era homes in the neighborhood have been split into rentals. Along the residential streets in Hollywood, you'll find tree lined streets and charming, well-kept historic homes with lots of character. The South side (below Broadway) tends to be more affordable, and you'll find more apartment buildings there, mostly built in the mid-20th century.

This area is ideal for those who want a budget-friendly urban lifestyle. Hollywood has some urban crime, but feels very safe during the day, and even late at night if you're with a crowd.
Pros
  • Great stores and restaurants
  • Beautiful historic homes
  • Convenient
  • Organic food
Cons
  • Some urban crime
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Affordable Neighborhood With Good Access to Shopping"

With SE Holgate to the South and SE Powell Blvd to the North, between SE 28th and SE 39th, lies Creston-Kenilworth. This neighborhood is hard to summarize in just a few words. It feels very family-friendly, whether you're looking to raise your kids in an exciting urban environment or a laid-back community. It has a bit of a small-town feel, but with easy access to everything Portland has to offer.

The neighborhood was first settled in the 1890s, and many of the homes date to this era, along with a number of newer houses and apartment buildings. There are plenty of affordable rentals here, if you're looking to move into the neighborhood. Many of the apartments are located along the busier roads, offering easy access to shopping and public transportation.

There are several nice, older parks here, including Kenilworth Park and Creston Park, which has a pool and a dog park. Tree-lined streets give Creston-Kenilworth the atmosphere of a quiet neighborhood, even along busier roads. There is lots of shopping, especially to the Northeast, where businesses are mostly contained in strip malls. Unfortunately, some of these areas have experienced some crime over the past few years, though the neighborhood still feels very safe for families, especially during daylight hours.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Laid-back residential neighborhood
  • Two parks
Cons
  • Some problems with crime
  • Lack of entertainment
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Modest Residential Neighborhood"

Brentwood-Darlington lies on Portland's southern edge. The area is also known as Errol Heights, which actually includes a much larger swath of Portland. It feels like an average, unassuming residential area, home to middle-class families.

The neighborhood is home to a number of schools, including an alternative middle and high school, in addition to the Brentwood-Darlington Community Center. There are also several nice parks, including Brentwood City Park (a popular dog park), a community garden, and the Errol Heights Natural Area, a fun place for hiking and picnics.

Brentwood Darlington attracts families who enjoy the comfortable, laid back feel of the neighborhood. Homes here are modest, though many are set on large lots. Most were build in the mid 20th century, though there are also a few newer developments and apartments. The houses here are very affordable when compared with neighboring areas. The downside is that some streets feel a little dangerous to walk, especially after dark.

Parts of Brentwood feel more urban, while others are almost rural, depending on how crowded the homes are on a particular block. There are a few scattered businesses, but for the most part residents drive elsewhere in Portland for shopping and dining.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Dog park
Cons
  • Some problems with crime
  • Not much to do
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Fun, Relaxed Neighborhood Near College"

Southeast Portland's Woodstock neighborhood is, as the name implies, a liberal and somewhat 'hippie' part of the city. It's known best as the home of Reed, a private liberal arts college, though the college campus is actually in neighboring Eastmoreland. Many of Woodstock's residents are students or professors there. The typical Woodstock resident is a college-educated professional.

One of the city's older neighborhoods, many of the homes date to the 1880s, particularly in the northern part of Woodstock. The southern area has some newer homes, mostly build in the 1950s, along with a few newer developments. Several beautiful, older homes in the neighborhood have historic landmark status, while others are more modest. This feels like a comfortable older neighborhood, with a family-friendly feel. Woodstock's residential streets feel peaceful and quiet, even though they are close to everything urban Portland has to offer.

Most of the businesses in Woodstock are located in the Woodstock Village Center, which is on Woodstock Boulevard between 39th and 52nd. There, you'll find a community center, library, churches, restaurants, stores, and services, in addition to some condos and apartment buildings. All of the businesses here are locally owned; you won't find a McDonalds or Starbucks anywhere.
Pros
  • Woodstock Village Center
  • Cute stores
  • Good for families
  • Pretty homes
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"This Amazing Park is a Hidden Gem"

Woods Memorial Park lies in what most Portland residents recognize as the neighborhood of Crestwood. This area of Southwest Portland, located just east of Interstate 5, boasts plenty of expensive homes inhabited by older professionals looking to get away from the hustle and bustle of Portland.

Woods Park, officially known as Woods Memorial Natural Area, is a huge and beautiful wilderness area. This is a great place to go hiking or have an afternoon picnic to get away from it all. There are many miles of trails through native vegetation, over creeks, and in a natural setting where you're likely to see many kinds of wildlife. If you spend a lot of time here, you might even spot an elk. Though the park is little-known to people who don't live in Southeast Portland, it's definitely a hidden neighborhood gem.

If you live here, expect to hop in your car if you need a little urban living. There are few bus stops, except on the main roads surrounding the neighborhood, and very few businesses within the neighborhood itself. While ideal for those who are searching for an oasis close to downtown Portland, it's less ideal for those who want to surround themselves in urban life on a daily basis.
Pros
  • A quiet getaway from urban Portland
  • creek
  • Isolated park
Cons
  • You need a car
  • Not much to do
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Up-And-Coming Historic Neighborhood"

Most of the businesses are on Columbia Boulevard (home to the Humane Society), Lombard Street, and Dekum Street, which offers one of my favorite blocks in the city, home to a coffee house, a brewery, and a pizza restaurant, among many other great locally-owned businesses. Be sure to visit the Firehouse, which offers wood-fired pizza.

Woodlawn is very diverse, with high numbers of African-American and Hispanic residents. Like other neighborhoods in this part of the city, Woodlawn can be described as up-and-coming; many new businesses have opened in the past five years. Homes here tend to be small bungalows and are relatively affordable, especially when compared with neighboring areas of the city. You'll find a few newer homes mixed in with homes built in the mid-20th century. These homes are set along quiet streets, and are mostly well maintained.

Towards the north end of the neighborhood is Woodlawn Park, a large triangular park that used to be the home of a train station. Woodlawn Elementary School is also located towards the north edge of the neighborhood. Unlike surrounding neighborhoods, many of Woodlawn's streets are not set on a perfect grid. Instead, they run at a 45 degree angle, making for some tricky intersections as you try to navigate through the neighborhood. Many residents commute by bike, so be sure to watch for cyclists as you cross these tricky intersections. You'll soon learn the diagonals, making commuting anywhere else in Portland easy.
Pros
  • Great businesses
  • Affordable
  • Historic
Cons
  • Streets can be tricky to navigate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Tiny Residential Neighborhood in NE Portland"

Woodland Park is a tiny neighborhood between I84 and NE 102nd Ave, just north of NE Halsey Street, in Northeast Portland. All you'll find here are homes – there are no parks, schools, or businesses of any kind, which is the most significant drawback of living here, though there are plenty of amenities in neighboring communities.

There's a hospital just across 102nd, and a few restaurants and grocery stores on the other side of Halsey, but it's only truly walkable if you live on the outskirts of the neighborhood, where you'd have a short walk to bus stops and businesses. It seems like most residents are ready to hop in their car even just for a quick trip to the nearby grocery store.

Although statistically this section of the city has a bit higher crime than elsewhere, Woodland Park itself seems very insulated, especially once you start driving down the residential streets in the interior of the neighborhood. These streets really have a 'neighborhood' feel to them.

Homes here are set off a few winding roads. They tend to be older, and some appear more well kept than others. Home to just a few dozen houses, this is one of Portland's smallest neighborhoods. Houses are affordable here, and tend to be occupied by families. It seems like families tend to move here and stay for quite a few years.
Pros
  • Quiet residential streets
  • Affordable homes
  • Seems insulated from outside world
Cons
  • No parks, schools, or businesses
  • Higher crime rate
  • Some homes look older, not well kept
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Average Suburban Neighborhood; A Bedroom Community for the Rest of Portland"

While close to both the Portland International Airport and the Columbia River, it's not so close to either that they dominate the landscape of the neighborhood. The major feature of Wilkes is Interstate 84, which turns westward to run through the neighborhood. As a bedroom community for those who work in downtown Portland, Wilkes offers easy access to shopping and dining.

This Northeast Portland neighborhood has less defined borders than most other Portland neighborhoods, so if you're looking at a house or apartment advertised as 'Wilkes', be sure that you know exactly where it falls. According to some, it stretches all of the way to the Columbia River, while others say the cutoff is NE Sandy Blvd. No matter whose definition you follow, Wilkes definitely lies east of I84 and west of the city of Gresham.

Wilkes is a residential area, with homes mainly built in the 1960s and 1970s. This average, older community has quite a few retirees. There don't seem to be too many kids here, though it feels family-friendly. There are several nice parks here, including Wilkes Park. On the downside, the area is known for having a bit higher crime than other parts of Northeast Portland.
Pros
  • Easy access to I84
  • Near airport
Cons
  • Higher crime rate
  • Low walkability
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Diverse Urban Neighborhood With Charming Homes"

This dense urban neighborhood is very diverse, and in particular has a large African American population. Although it's not as 'trendy' or 'hip' as neighboring communities, it is still a very convenient and comfortable urban neighborhood with a lot to offer.

Alberta Park, which offers an off-leash dog area, is in the northeast corner of the neighborhood. Vernon Elementary School is just south of the park. Alberta Park trail, which circles the park and school, is a popular trail for joggers and dog walkers.

The popular Alberta Street, along the south edge of the neighborhood, is home to a number of popular eateries. Killingsworth Street, running through the center of the neighborhood, also offers a number of restaurants. These areas are easily walkable from the rest of Vernon, which makes living here convenient.

Homes in the area are cute, older houses, with a few apartments, townhouses, and condos thrown in. Many were built in the first decades of the twentieth century, with a smattering of newer construction. Housing here is affordable, drawing many young families and first-time homeowners to the neighborhood. Depending on the area, it may not be quite as safe as other neighborhoods, but many see Vernon as an up-and-coming neighborhood that will continue improving as time goes by.
Pros
  • Alberta park
  • Convenient
  • Charming houses
  • Affordable
  • Diverse
  • Near Alberta Arts district
Cons
  • Some crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Trendy and Hip Urban Neighborhood"

This Southeast Portland neighborhood lies between Stark Street to the North and Hawthorne Boulevard to the South. It is sometimes known by the name Belmont, after the road that passes through the center of the neighborhood.

This is a popular and trendy neighborhood boasting a number of unique cafes and shops. Belmont serves as the center of Sunnyside, both geographically and commercially. My personal favorite here is Saint Cupcake, a cupcake boutique. You're sure to find your favorite hangout after spending an afternoon strolling down this comfortable urban street. Other popular shops are located in the south end of the neighborhood, along Hawthorne Boulevard.

Homes here are large Victorians that have been lovingly restored. You'll find a lot of charm and personality here. Think brightly colored Victorian homes with vegetable gardens planted out front and car-free residents who bike everywhere. This urban neighborhood is inhabited by a diverse group of artsy and offbeat professionals, giving it a very funky atmosphere.

Because the neighborhood is so popular, home prices tend to be expensive. If you really want to live here, check out the apartment buildings and condos scattered throughout the neighborhood, which offer all of the fun of living in Sunnyside without the high purchase price.
Pros
  • Great cafes, restaurants, and businesses
  • A lot of personality
  • Adorable homes
  • Close to Laurelhurst Park
  • Convenient
Cons
  • Can be loud on weekends
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Offers a Prison, Homeless Camp, and Not Much Else"

Most people have no reason to stay in Sunderland for any length of time. Few people actually live in Sunderland, other than those in the Dignity Village homeless settlement or in the prison located in the northern part of the neighborhood.

A large portion of the neighborhood is occupied by the Riverside and Broadmoor golf courses, and there's another large golf course just off the east side of the neighborhood, in neighboring East Columbia, Portland. To the east of Sunderland lies Portland International Airport. The very northern edge of the neighborhood, which is NE Marine Drive, borders the Columbia River and offers a couple of marine-related services and restaurants. Other than that, the neighborhood doesn't have much to offer.

The South end of the neighborhood is bordered by Columbia Boulevard and Lombard Street. If you must live in Sunderland, find a house in the southeast section of the neighborhood, which is the only part of the neighborhood where you'll find actual housing, in the form of a small handful of modest homes. That's also where the few businesses and restaurants of Sunderland are located. Really, though, you shouldn't live in Sunderland, unless you want to live a stone's throw away from the prison.
Pros
  • Golf courses
Cons
  • Prison
  • Homeless camp
  • Very few homes and businesses
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"High Crime Neighborhood Near the Airport"

Sumner is a Northeast Portland neighborhood near the airport. It has historically been a low-income, high-crime part of the city, and for the most part, it is still like that.

Portland International Airport lies directly to the North and Northwest. As you get closer to the airport, commercial developments become sparser, and the area takes on a decidedly industrial tone. Most retail stores, restaurants, and other businesses are on, and south of, Sandy Boulevard, which cuts through this neighborhood east-west. I205 is either in the center of the neighborhood or its eastern boundary, depending on how you define the neighborhood.

This blue-collar neighborhood has affordable housing, mostly older houses with a few apartments sprinkled in. It seems like most residents are struggling families that can't afford to move to nicer areas of Portland. Areas of Sumner can be fairly high crime, though it's a little better on the west side of I205 than areas immediately across I205 to the west. It doesn't feel safe to walk around Sumner, especially at night and along streets close to the freeway.

Overall, it doesn't seem like this neighborhood has a lot going for it. There aren't many businesses, and few green areas. The bottom line? If you can afford it, there are better areas of Portland to call home.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
Cons
  • No green areas
  • Not a lot of commercial development
  • Industrial areas and airport
  • Crime
  • Traffic
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Affordable Housing, Convenient and Near Lloyd Center"

Sullivan's Gulch is a Northeast Portland neighborhood just North of I84. This is a densely populated neighborhood known for convenience. I84 offers access to the MAX light rail system; there are also a number of buses circling Sullivan's Gulch. Shops and cafes line Broadway, which forms the northern boundary of the neighborhood. There's also a Fred Meyer that takes up a large portion of eastern Sullivan's Gulch.

The popular Lloyd District lies just to the west of Sullivan's Gulch. Lloyd Center Mall is a great place for shopping and dining, and also offers several large movie theaters, in addition to anything else you could need that isn't found in Sullivan's Gulch itself.

This compact neighborhood is well established, with a mix of large older homes on tree-lined streets, quirky vintage apartments, and newer condos and apartment buildings. This dense neighborhood is known for affordable housing thanks to the relatively large number of apartments available here.

If you want to live in an urban neighborhood in the center of everything, Sullivan's Gulch may be right for you. It doesn't offer the green spaces or small-town feel of neighborhoods that are further from the city center, but for many young urban singles and couples, Sullivan's Gulch is just right.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Near Lloyd Center
  • Lots of shopping and dining options
  • Convenient
Cons
  • Few open green spaces
  • Noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Grungy Industrial Neighborhood With Little to Offer"

St. Johns is a small neighborhood located at the tip of the peninsula between the Columbia River and Willamette River. Its geography gives it an isolated feeling, as it's difficult to get to other Portland neighborhoods from here.

Considered one of Portland's most diverse neighborhoods, you will see many immigrants and minorities here. St. Johns has historically been a lower income, blue collar neighborhood, and that hasn't changed much over the decades. Today, it's still one of the city's poorest neighborhoods.

Businesses are concentrated in the southeast corner, along Lombard Street. Though residents call this 'downtown St. Johns,' there's really not much to see here, although there are two nice theater pubs and a few other restaurants. The peninsula is known more for green spaces than shopping opportunities; there are many parks and natural areas within the neighborhood.

The northern end of the neighborhood is much more industrial, with huge warehouses and parking lots. As a resident, there's really not much reason to travel that far north into St. Johns unless you work there.

As a pedestrian, St. Johns is less than ideal. Some places feel dangerous, especially at night. Though there is public transit, it takes quite a long time to reach downtown from the far reaches of St. Johns.

Nearby St. Johns Bridge, which gave this neighborhood its name, is now actually considered to be in the neighborhood of Cathedral Park. If you like this part of the city, I suggest living in neighboring Cathedral Park, just to the south, instead.
Pros
  • Near Cathedral Park
  • Less Expensive
Cons
  • Far from freeways
  • Few businesses
  • Poverty and crime
  • Not as safe as other neighborhoods
  • Not close to downtown
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful, Convenient Residential Neighborhood"

South Tabor is named after Mount Tabor, an extinct volcano lying directly north of this neighborhood. Just north of the neighborhood's northern boundary, SE Division, lies Mt. Tabor City Park. This park is popular among hikers, bikers, and joggers. Though it tends to get a bit crowded during the summer months, all of this activity doesn't seem to spill over into South Tabor much, leaving its southern neighbors free to enjoy their quiet neighborhood.

Warner Pacific College, along the northern boundary of the neighborhood, is a small religious school. Other schools in the neighborhood include Atkinson Elementary, Kellogg Middle School, and Franklin High School.

The restaurants and other businesses of South Tabor are concentrated along the outer edges, particularly along SE 50th ave to the West, Powell Blvd to the South, and SE 82nd ave to the east. South Tabor is known for a diverse array of restaurants; everything from seafood to Ethiopian food can be found here. While these streets are located within easy walking distance of the residential parts of South Tabor, I wouldn't recommend walking here, as they are major streets that don't feel safe for pedestrians.

The houses here are set into large lots. These modest family homes are affordable when compared with other Portland homes, and there are plenty of rentals too. This is a great option if you are a first-time homebuyer or want a nice family home in a comfortable neighborhood.
Pros
  • Mt. Tabor Park
  • Friendly neighbors
  • Restaurants
Cons
  • Heavy traffic along outer edges
  • Not very walkable
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Quiet, Established Residential Neighborhood"

An affluent neighborhood just south of I84 in Northeast Portland, Russell is known as a quiet residential community. Most areas are suburban, though a few of the busier streets feel more urban. Quiet and unassuming, Russell appeals to those who don't need a 'hip' or 'trendy' address, but do need a neighborhood with easy access to everything they need.

Residents here are dependent on their cars, though there are some nice shopping areas along Halsey Road and 122nd, including some great restaurants. Neighborhood streets are safe for walkers, though I wouldn't try to walk along the major thoroughfares, which are too busy.

There are several nice parks here, including Thompson City Park and John Luby Park. Glendoveer Golf Course is located just south of Russell.

Settled in the 1950s and 1960s, Russel is inhabited mainly by older married couples, with or without kids. It seems family-friendly; you're as likely to see kids riding bikes as you are to see retirees out for an afternoon walk. This older, established neighborhood has many old-timers; people don't seem to move out of Russell once they are here. Residents tend to be established professionals who can afford to own a home here; there isn't much in the way of apartments or rentals.
Pros
  • Good access to major streets
  • Feels established, comfortable
Cons
  • Not a lot of affordable housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Quiet and Historic Residential Neighborhood"

Northeast Portland's Roseway neighborhood is a nice and historic residential community. Popular among families, it feels like a nice place to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

There are two large parks in the neighborhood. Glenhaven park offers sports fields, playgrounds, picnic areas, and a skatepark, while Wellington Park has a brand new playground and soccer field along with lighted pathways for walkers, joggers, and bikers. Rose City Golf Course lies just to the south of Roseway. With plenty of green spaces around, this feels like a very comfortable and relaxed neighborhood.

The Historic Roseway Theater on Sandy Boulevard has recently been revamped, mixing art deco architecture with the latest high-tech offerings and making it a popular date-night activity. Sandy Boulevard, which cuts through this neighborhood diagonally and serves as a community gathering space, also offers a number of coffee shops, restaurants, bars, and shops.

Homes here tend to be small or mid-sized and tend to be affordable when compared with surrounding Portland neighborhoods. Expect quiet streets filled with well-kept and colorful older homes. Nearly all of the houses here were built in the first half of the 20th century, with very few newer houses mixed in. Many residents choose Roseway because it feels like the classic and traditional white-picket-fence suburban neighborhood.
Pros
  • location
  • parks and people
  • Roseway theater
Cons
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Beautiful Residential Neighborhood And Amazing Rose Park"

Rose City Park is a turn-of-the-century neighborhood and park in Northeast Portland. Many of the original homes are still standing, and nearly all of the houses here were built in the 1930s or earlier; there's been almost no new development in Rose City Park since the 1970s. What this means is beautiful, historic homes along streets lined with old growth trees.

This neighborhood is best known as the home of Rose City Park. This expansive park helped earn Portland its nickname 'City of Roses.' It is simply amazing! There are a number of other parks in Rose City, in addition to the western edge of the Rose City Golf Course.

The businesses are nearly all located along Sandy Boulevard, which cuts through this neighborhood diagonally. Sandy Boulevard is also home to a large statue of George Washington.

Typical residents of Rose City Park are professional couples in their 30s or 40s with kids. They tend to be a little more affluent than average Portlanders, but not hugely so, though many do send their kids to private schools. Rose City Park has long been known as an overpriced neighborhood, though in recent years real estate prices here have dropped dramatically, making it much more affordable to move here.
Pros
  • Beautiful historic homes
  • Rose City Park
Cons
  • Expensive houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"This SE Portland Neighborhood is a Mixed Bag"

Richmond, in Southeast Portland, is hard to classify. Lying between Hawthorne Street to the North and Powell Boulevard to the South, within its borders you'll find a little bit of everything, from a rundown strip mall aesthetic to fancy galleries to quiet residential streets, and everything in between.

The northern edge of Richmond is in the trendy Hawthorne district, and offers a number of small shops, restaurants, and coffee shops. Other parts of Richmond are home to strip malls and other signs of suburban sprawl. Between these two extremes lies Division Street, an up-and-coming area with unique businesses housed in unassuming storefronts and warehouses. Restaurants in Richmond tend to be diverse; a favorite among locals is the Thai restaurant Pok Pok.

Richmond Elementary School, which houses Portland's Japanese Magnet Program, is located in the neighborhood. Known for second language education, it has a high number of English language learners. This is not a neighborhood school; as a magnet school, it brings in students from all over Portland.

The residential streets of Richmond offer a mix of expansive and modest homes, nearly all built many decades ago. Homes vary considerably, from colorful well-kept historic homes to smaller, plainer houses. Prices here tend to be average, and the homes tend to look fairly average on the outside; you won't see manicured lawns, but few of the homes seem unkempt. Typical residents include families and singles in their 20s and 30s, giving Richmond a young, urban feeling.
Pros
  • Hawthorne District
  • Diverse range of restaurants
  • Artsy areas
Cons
  • Some rundown areas and strip malls
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful Neighborhood That Feels Like a Great College Town"

This fun Southeast Portland neighborhood is named for Reed College, a small liberal arts college located here. Students attending Reed tend to be friendly, artistic, and a bit offbeat, giving the neighborhood a lively feeling. Overall, the Reed neighborhood feels educated, community minded, and green.

The campus itself offers lush green fields and historic brick buildings. It's a great place to take a walk or enjoy one of the many shows and other community events hosted by the college.

The Reed neighborhood definitely feels like a college town, but not in a bad way. There are plenty of restaurants, coffee shops, and bars with lots of character. Spend an afternoon strolling down the main streets of Reed to enjoy its small-town feel. Residents of Reed tend to be very eco-conscious; typical residents pick up their groceries daily at Trader Joe's.

Though there are plenty of college students milling about, this is also a safe and family-friendly location. Many professors and other professionals live here because they want a fun, hip place to raise their kids. Schools here are considered very good, and offer a number of interesting programs that draw students from all over the city, such as the Tucker-Maxon School (focusing on children with hearing loss) and Cleveland High School, known for its International Baccalaureate program.

Homes here are beautiful and well-kept. Expect to see lots of colorful houses along tree-lined streets. There are also plenty of older apartment buildings, which are popular options for Reed students. The neighborhood is also home to lots of interesting community gathering spaces, including parks, Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, and a community music center. It's easy to see why Reed is one of the most coveted neighborhoods of Portland.
Pros
  • Great schools at all levels
  • Great parks and other green spaces
  • Friendly neighbors
  • Close to interesting neighborhoods
  • Trader Joe's
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Gritty Residential Neighborhood In Transition"

Portsmouth, a neighborhood in North Portland, is named after one of the major streets running through the area. Young couples and families call this neighborhood home. While it's still at the beginning of its transition and there are still some rough areas, as with most urban areas of Portland, it's been called an up-and-coming North Portland neighborhood.

The population as a whole is young and diverse, with many immigrants from a wide range of places. There are lots of kids in Portsmouth, who attend the two elementary schools and a middle school in the neighborhood. Families living here also enjoy the many parks in and near their neighborhood. There aren't many major stores in Portsmouth itself, though nearby neighborhoods offer a full range of stores, restaurants, coffee shops, and services.

The railroad runs along the western edge of Portsmouth, and areas near there tend to have a gritty, rough feel. Other parts of Portsmouth feature urban and suburban streets lined with modest homes and apartment buildings. Many residents of Portsmouth move here because rent is lower than elsewhere in Portland.

Although it's historically been a low income, somewhat rundown area, in recent years parts of Portsmouth have become much better, and there are now several residential areas that offer a beautiful, safe area to raise a family.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Nice parks
  • Variety of people
Cons
  • Far from downtown
  • Some sketchy areas
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet, Family-Focused Neighborhood With Lush Green Parks"

East Portland's Pleasant Valley is a quiet, family friendly neighborhood with well-kept homes tucked around amazing parks, making it ideal for parents looking for a spot to raise their kids with easy access to the outdoors.

Pleasant Valley offers plenty of lush green spaces. Depending on how you define the borders of the neighborhood, Powell Butte Nature Park either falls in Pleasant Valley or in neighboring Powellhurst Gilbert.

Leach Botanical Garden and the Lakeside Gardens, two of the city's most unique parks, are located within the Pleasant Valley neighborhood. Both are amazing places to spend a quiet afternoon. On summer weekends, there are nearly always weddings happening at both locations, which offer picturesque backdrops for any special occasion. Pleasant Valley also has Springwater Corridor, part of the 40-mile loop for bikers and joggers, a very popular way to commute throughout Portland.

There's a Fred Meyer at the north end of the neighborhood, and a few scattered stores and services in the rest of the neighborhood. There is also easy access to major roads including I-205.

Typical residents are professional couples in their 40s with kids. There is also a sizable population of retirees here. Other than that, however, Pleasant Valley doesn't seem to be too diverse. Homes tend to be newer than in many other areas of Portland, and they tend to be expensive.
Pros
  • Parks
  • Beautiful homes
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Not very diverse
  • Expensive homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Average Suburban Neighborhood With Beautiful Rose Garden"

Piedmont is located just east of Interstate 5 in North Portland. This is a great location for those looking to commute downtown or to Portland's trendier neighborhoods, as it offers easy access to freeways, and runs alongside the MAX light rail line.

Within the neighborhood itself there are a number of grocery stores, coffee shops, restaurants, and other businesses. Locally acclaimed businesses include New Seasons Market and Eddies Pizza. A lot of locals also hang out on nearby Mississippi Ave, home to many more shops, bars, and restaurants. Piedmont is also home to Peninsula Park, one of Portland's oldest park and the home of the rose garden that helped earn Portland its nickname 'City of Roses.'

It's been described as an 'urban village,' though parts of Piedmont seem more suburban to me. The neighborhood was originally built in the 1920s, and many of the original houses remain today. Some parts of Piedmont offer beautiful and well-kept historic homes, while other streets are lined with modest houses that seem a little rougher.

The campus of Portland Community College is nearby, so there are quite a few college students living in Piedmont, giving the neighborhood an invigorating feeling of constant change. Other residents of Piedmont include old-timers, young families, and singles in their 20s and 30s. This working-class suburb offers affordable housing to those who want easy access to everything the city has to offer.
Pros
  • Beautiful older homes
  • Afforable
  • Diversity
  • Rose Garden
Cons
  • Some areas seem a little rough
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Residential Neighborhood Next to the Airport"

East Portland's Parkrose neighborhood was once a small farming suburb, but now it is anything but. With major roads and proximity to the airport, it is a busy residential neighborhood.

The Parkrose neighborhood is home to Portland International Airport, which means that parts can be loud and filled with traffic. Look for a house south of Sandy Boulevard, which runs through the center of the neighborhood, if you want a little more peace and quiet. I-205 and I-84, along with several other busy roads, also run through the neighborhood.

On the plus side, you're close to shopping and other businesses, making living here convenient. Parts of the neighborhood also have a very family-friendly feel, particularly near the community garden or Senn's Dairy Park, a nice smaller park with a newer playground. This is definitely a neighborhood whose character changes block by block.

Homes here tend to be affordable because of their proximity to the airport and also because of the distance between Parkrose and the city center. It's not ideal if you're looking for peace and quiet, but if you want easy access to amenities – and especially if you take public transportation to get there – Parkrose might be a good compromise.
Pros
  • Access to businesses, airport
  • Affordable homes
  • Public transportation
Cons
  • Traffic
  • Airport noise
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Between the Industrial Areas of the Wilamette and the Trendy NE Portland Neighborhoods"

Overlook, on the east shore of the Willamette, is a neighborhood set in between the industrial areas of Portland along the Willamette and the fun, popular parts of North and Northeast Portland.

Park of the neighborhood includes Swan Island, which used to be a separate island but was long ago connected with landfill, making it part of the mainland. The Swan Island area of Overlook is now a manufacturing area with a decidedly industrial feel.

The rest of the neighborhood has an entirely different atmosphere. This safe, charming neighborhood offers a wide variety of housing, from expansive Victorian homes to newly-built condos. The neighborhood has recently seen an influx of new residents as it becomes seen as a more desirable neighborhood, and that has driven up real estate prices, although Overlook is still more affordable than neighboring North and NE Portland areas.

Historically, Overlook was a Polish neighborhood, and it's still home to a huge Polish festival each year, in addition to a Polish library. Overlook Park on Interstate Avenue is a nice, good-sized park popular with families. There are several other good parks in the neighborhood, too. Another popular gathering spot is Overlook House, a historic home that now serves as a community center. There are several MAX light rail stations in and near the neighborhood, making for an easy commute downtown. Within the neighborhood itself, plenty of local restaurants give Overlook a great locally-focused atmosphere. Safe for families, Overlook Park is a beautiful, comfortable-feeling neighborhood.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • Community vibe
  • Public transportation
Cons
  • Some industrial areas
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Friendly Neighborhood with Amazing Park Surrounding a Volcano"

This neighborhood's best-known feature is Mt. Tabor Park, a huge park on the site of an extinct volcano.

This incredibly popular park features picnic areas, sport courts, and miles of paved and unpaved paths. If you visit on a weekend during the summer, it's not unusual to see weddings taking place here. Climb up Mt. Tabor (a short and easy hike) for stunning scenic views. Once at the top, you'll find plenty of runners, dog walkers, cyclists, and birdwatchers enjoying the summit; it does tend to get crowded on sunny summer days.

Just south of the park lies Warner Pacific college, a small religious college. On the western slope of Mt. Tabor is Western Seminary, another religious school. This Southeast Portland neighborhood is also home to Mt. Tabor Middle School, a highly rated school with high test scores.

The Hawthorne district offers a number of bars, restaurants, cafes, and shops that give the area a lot of local color. There are tons of great coffee shops in the neighborhood; on rainy days, stake out a table to people watch or get some work done on your laptop. Everyone seems to friendly in Mt. Tabor, even the baristas.

Homes surrounding Mt. Tabor tend to be on the pricier side because this neighborhood is considered desirable. This is a popular neighborhood for families and singles who love the outdoors. Strolling the tree-lined streets, you're bound to see plenty of dog walkers, bicyclists, and moms pushing strollers. You'll find that residents tend to be artistic, locally conscious, and full of personality.
Pros
  • Schools
  • Great local cafes
  • Friendly neighbors
  • Mt. Tabor Park
Cons
  • Park can be crowded during summertime
  • Pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Family-Friendly Suburban Neighborhood"

Mt. Scott-Arleta is a neighborhood in Southeast Portland. Those living in Mt. Scott include young families and singles, with most residents in their 20s and 30s. Though the neighborhood isn't very diverse, it has a very welcoming feel.

The Mt. Scott Community Center, located right in the heart of the neighborhood, offers a pool, roller skating arena, and lots of other family-friendly activities. It's located right in Mt. Scott Park, which has lush lawns, a canopy of trees, and a great playground. Rain or shine, take the kids here for an enjoyable day.

Mt. Scott is home to a number of locally-owned cafes, bakeries, bars, and other small businesses frequented by those who live in the neighborhood. These tend to be located on the outskirts of the neighborhood, particularly along 82nd Ave (the eastern boundary of Mt. Scott) and SE Foster Road (which is along the north side). The center of the neighborhood offers a few businesses, but it's mostly occupied by the park and residential streets.

The residential streets feature large trees lining rows of beautiful older homes. Some streets are decidedly suburban, while others feel more urban. Homes here tend to be less expensive than in comparable Portland neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Welcoming feel
  • Community Center
  • Locally-owned cafes
Cons
  • Not very diverse
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Rough Around the Edges Suburban Neighborhood"

Montavilla might seem like a great name for a stately Italian mansion, but this area of Portland is anything but. Montavilla has been known as a high crime area for several decades. Though the neighborhood has made strides over the past few years to address problems such as prostitution and other crimes, it still has a ways to go.

Montavilla, considered an abbreviation for Mt. Tabor Villa. The nearby Mt. Tabor, which is actually a volcano, is home to a popular park for hiking and cycling. Other bright spots within the community include the Montavilla Farmers Market and the Community Center, which has a pool. There are also a number of new businesses that have recently opened in the neighborhood. The section of 82nd Avenue from Powell to Glisan is particularly well-known as the home of many of the city's Chinese-owned stores and restaurants.

Though the neighborhood has its challenges, it also offers affordable housing. New residents tend to be young urbanites moving into their first home. Housing tends to be smaller, older homes, along with a few duplexes and apartments. While some of the streets through Montavilla are considerably rundown and plagued by crime, other residential areas are nicer. If you choose your home wisely, you may find yourself living in a cute, older home on a tree-lined street. Looking to move to Montavilla? Talk to your new neighbors to find out what the street is like, since this neighborhood tends to change significantly from block to block.
Pros
  • Mt. Tabor park
  • Affordable homes
  • Community center and pool
Cons
  • Crime rate
  • Neighborhood feel changes by block
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Quiet, Family-Focused Suburban Neighborhood"

Mill Park, in Southeast Portland, is named after a park of the same name. Mill Park has many open spaces with paths for running, biking, and walking, but don't expect a lush green forest. It's a great place to take the kids for an afternoon, or to get in your morning exercise, but it doesn't offer much in the way of natural areas to explore.

The Mill Park neighborhood is also home to several other parks, along with the East Portland Community Center, giving families plenty to do here. This family-friendly neighborhood also offers Mill Park Elementary and Floyd Light Middle School, which parents seem to rate highly. All of these amenities give Mill Park a family- and community-focused feeling.

This community has nice residential areas, while offering easy commutes to other parts of town, since it's located near major thoroughfares.

Typical residents include families with kids and young couples. Mill Creek offers a wide range of housing options, including modest houses and apartments, making it popular among first-time homebuyers or those who still rent, but want a little more space than they'd get in closer-in neighborhoods. With affordable housing and a quiet, laid-back feel, Mill Park feels like a good place to settle down.
Pros
  • Parks
  • Family friendly
  • Affordable houses
Cons
  • Not a lot of shopping or dining
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful Residential Area With Many Amazing Parks"

The Southwest Portland neighborhood of Marshall Park offers plenty of green spaces. In addition to the namesake park located within the neighborhood itself, Marshall Park is also home to Jensen Natural area, with Maricara Natural Area just off the southeast corner of the neighborhood, and the very large Tryon Creek State Park just off the southwest corner.

Marshall Park is a great place to hike, with miles of trails cutting through the wilderness. Marshall Park sits within a canyon created by Tryon Creek, and features a waterfall, amazing stone bridge, and lots of other natural features to explore.

This is a strictly residential community; there are no stores or restaurants within Marshall Park itself, though residents don't seem to mind the lack of commercial development.

Homes surrounding the park have a decidedly suburban feeling. This sparsely populated neighborhood leaves plenty of land between neighbors, and seems worlds away from the denser urban communities closer to the city center. Because of the amount of space between homes here, it doesn't seem like the type of place where neighbors know each other. Typical residents are wealthier than the average Portland resident, since homes here tend to be pricy. Marshall Park appeals to professionals with kids and to older couples who prefer a more rural neighborhood.
Pros
  • Lots of green spaces
  • Very quiet
Cons
  • No shopping/dining options
  • Expensive houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet Neighborhood For Professionals Who Want to Escape the City"

Southwest Portland's Markham neighborhood has a decidedly suburban feeling. This is an ideal location for parents looking to raise their kids out of the hustle and bustle of the city, but who still want easy access to everything the city offers.

Markham offers plenty of green spaces to get away from it all. Take a hike in Marshall Park or explore the wilderness of Maricara nature reserve. What it doesn't offer is the easy access to shopping, restaurants, and other amenities that residents of more urban areas of Portland take for granted. However, if you don't mind driving to these activities, they're just a short drive away.

Residents tend to be older, well educated professionals and retirees who are a bit better off than the average Portland resident. Expect higher home prices than elsewhere in the city. There aren't any apartments, and the few homes that are for rent are extremely popular, making for higher rental costs. Residents tend to be those who have decided that getting away from the city center is worth the higher costs.

This laid-back neighborhood is a great option for professionals who work in the city but prefer to live in a less urban environment.
Pros
  • A quiet escape from the city
  • Lots of green spaces
  • Laid-back feeling
Cons
  • Higher home prices
  • No commercial area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Very Quiet Neighborhood With Lots of Green Spaces"

Maplewood, along Portland's western edge, is known as a quiet residential neighborhood with a suburban or even rural feeling.

Residential streets are set along rolling hills, with lots of curves and dead ends giving this neighborhood a quiet and relaxed feeling. Within Maplewood itself, expect to see lots of suburban streets lined with homes, parks, schools, and not much else. Nearly rural, it feels worlds away from downtown Portland.

The only commercial spaces in Maplewood are along the outer edge. Instead, the community's main attractions are parks and the Maplewood Elementary School, which parents seem to love. April Hill park, a hidden gem, offers a playground, fields, and trails around Woods Creek. Several other small parks give Maplewood plenty of green spaces to be enjoyed by the public. Maplewood is also within easy driving distance of downtown Portland, though without much as far as public transportation, it can seem worlds away for those without a car.

This established neighborhood has a family-friendly feel. Residents tend to be established professionals with kids. They have their pick of housing styles, from historic to newer construction. Homes tend to be set back from the road on larger lots, giving neighbors plenty of space between each other. Choose your house wisely; some of the homes in the hills have picturesque views.
Pros
  • Very quiet
  • Family friendly
  • Parks
Cons
  • No shops or restaurants
  • Lack of public transportation
  • Residents tend to keep to themselves
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Average Suburban Neighborhood With Great Parks"

Unlike the name suggests, Madison South is actually in Northeast Portland. It's between I-84 (to the South) and I-205 (to the East) and Sandy Boulevard to the North and West.

There are some unusual natural areas here, including Rocky Butte, a volcanic area popular among climbers, and the Grotto, a beautiful botanical garden and shrine run by the Catholic church. Rose City Park is also here, so there are plenty of green spaces to be enjoyed by those who need to get away from the urban environment for a while.

The MAX light rail station at NE 82nd Ave makes it easy to commute downtown. However, most Madison South residents do own their car and rely on it daily; unlike more urban areas of Portland, it is not common to see people commuting by bus or bike. Other Madison South residents work at the Banfield Pet Hospital headquarters, which is here in the neighborhood.

The residential areas of Madison South are spread out and suburban. This is a pretty average, family-friendly community. Most of the homes were built in the 1940s and 1950s, with a fair number of newer houses too. It's a little more worn than comparable Portland neighborhoods, which means that homes are a bit more affordable, making it popular among first-time homebuyers.
Pros
  • Unusual natural areas
  • MAX station
  • Affordable houses
Cons
  • Car dependent
  • A little worn
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Residential Neighborhood, A Bit Rough Around The Edges"

Lents in SE Portland is known as an old and diverse neighborhood. Home to immigrants from many countries, the community has long had a reputation as being a bit lower class.

When the I-205 freeway was built, it split this already established neighborhood in half. Powell Blvd, Foster road, and 82nd Avenue all pass through here, along with the MAX train. While this means easy commutes to elsewhere in the city, it also adds noise and plenty of people commuting through Lents without stopping.

Lents Park is a popular spot in this neighborhood. This large, older park offers plenty of amenities, including fields, baseball stadium, trails, picnic areas, and a playground.

If you're looking to live in Lents, expect a mix of suburban and urban spaces, from modest homes to tall apartment buildings. It's popular among young couples and others looking to buy their first house, since many houses sell for under $200,000, almost unheard of in most other Portland neighborhoods.

Although this neighborhood has historically been a bit ignored by the rest of the city, it has been the focus of recent attention by the city of Portland. It has been deemed an Urban Renewal Area, which has brought new homes and businesses to the area. Though it still has a reputation of being a bit rough around the edges, is it really a diamond in the rough? Only time will tell!
Pros
  • Lents Park
  • Affordable Housing
  • Lots of major streets for commuting
Cons
  • Bad reputation
  • Lack of commercial areas
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Upscale Residential Neighborhood Surrounding Amazing Park"

Laurelhurst is an East Portland neighborhood of beautiful historical homes along winding roads surrounding the park that gives this community its name. Most of the homes here were built in the 1910s through 1920s; the park was constructed around the same time in an effort to make this neighborhood appear high-class.

Historically, Laurelhurst was known as an upscale, elite development; originally, apartments, hotels, and commercial buildings weren't allowed here. Today, there is still very little in the way of retail shops or restaurants. At the center of the neighborhood, you'll find Coe Circle, best known for its World War I memorial, a golden statue of Joan of Arc. Laurelhurst is also known for Laurelhurst Theater, a historic art deco theater.

This is a great place for families and those who love the outdoors. The beautiful tree-lined streets provide the perfect opportunity for an evening stroll. Laurelhurst Park at the center of the neighborhood is a large, popular park where you'll find plenty of activities. Widely considered to be the city's most beautiful park, a favorite attraction is a pond that is home to ducks, turtles, and plenty of fish.

Today, many of the original houses remain, giving this area a comfortable and established feel. Homes range from cute small bungalows to grand architectural marvels with expansive lawns. Housing tends to be expensive here, due to the picturesque nature of the neighborhood and the lack of apartments or condos.
Pros
  • Great reputation
  • Beautiful homes on tree-lined streets
  • Laurelhurst Park
Cons
  • Not very good access to downtown, retail shops
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Historically African American Neighborhood Becoming Gentrified"

One of the city's most ethnically diverse neighborhoods, since the 1940s the Northeast Portland neighborhood of King has been known as a predominantly African-American neighborhood. Historically, this stems from policies whereby African Americans were not allowed to buy houses outside of this area.

In part because of these policies, King still has a high population of minorities, although parts of the neighborhood are now becoming gentrified, with new residents and businesses replacing the old. New residents tend to be young, mostly white singles who are attracted to the area's urban character and proximity to Alberta Street shopping. Despite this influx of new residents, older residents still tend to consider King to be an African American neighborhood.

NE Alberta Street, the neighborhood's main commercial area, is home to restaurants, galleries, and stores. It's a rapidly changing community whose future remains to be seen, though many Portland residents consider it an 'up and coming' neighborhood.

The residential areas of King are best described as a 'mixed bag,' with everything from rundown apartments to well kept, larger homes. Housing prices vary significantly; it's possible to find a house for substantially below the Portland average, although there are also some nicer and relatively expensive houses in the neighborhood.
Pros
  • Lots of new businesses and restaurants
  • Urban character
  • Affordable housing
Cons
  • Traffic and noise
  • Some rundown areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Urban Neighborhood With Great Bars and Restaurants"

Eastern Portland's Kerns neighborhood is fairly close-in to downtown, and is an urban area mixing both commercial and residential buildings. It's mostly inhabited by young singles who want to live close to downtown, though there are a number of families and older professionals living here too.

Just South of I84, Kerns is cross-crossed by several major streets, including Glisan, Sandy Boulevard, and Burnside (which forms the southern boundary of the neighborhood). This makes for an easy commute to most areas of the city. It's also one of the most walkable neighborhoods, with easy access to everything residents need.

Most of the homes in Kerns are large, older homes with plenty of historic charm. Over the years, a number of these have been converted into apartments, and they are joined by newer condo and apartment buildings, providing a wide range of housing options that makes living in Kerns affordable.

There are several nice schools and parks in the neighborhood. For popular restaurants, visit 28th Avenue. Catch a movie at the classic Laurelhurst Theater on 28th and Burnside. Along both 28th and Burnside you'll find some of the best bars and restaurants in town, including a number of microbreweries. If you want to live in a lively, active neighborhood with lots to do, Kerns might be right for you.
Pros
  • Convenient
  • Diverse array of people
  • Friendly neighbors
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Feels Like A Small Town In Transition"

Kenton, in North Portland, began as a company town inhabited by meatpackers. After it was annexed by Portland, it became home of the city's main stockyards and the center of its livestock industry. Right on the harbor of the Columbia River, Kenton lies between I5 to the east and Lombard Street to the South.

Kenton is best known as the home of Portland International Raceway and the Expo Center. Another landmark is a large Paul Bunyan statue, which is near the Kenton/Denver Avenue MAX light rail station. Another attraction is Kenton Library, a public library branch that just opened a year or two ago.

While the area used to have tons of factories and other industrial areas, it has evolved over the decades. Now, the streets have a lot of life, with many small local businesses and restaurants occupying storefronts along Denver Avenue.

Some of the older homes in Kenton are still a bit rundown, though there are beautiful homes just a block or two away, giving this part of Portland the feel of a small town in transition. It seems like the neighborhood could become hip, if you give it a decade or two, but it's still not quite there yet. Affordable houses and committed residents may breathe new life into this old company town. Could this be the next up-and-coming Portland neighborhood?
Pros
  • Expo Center and Raceway
  • Nice new library
  • Lots of new businesses
Cons
  • Some rundown areas
  • Still in transition
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Historic Neighborhood With Beautiful Homes"

Northeast Portland's Irvington neighborhood, one of the older residential areas of the city, is home a number of large, beautiful houses. The entire neighborhood is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the picturesque homes in this middle- to upper-income neighborhood have large yards rather than the typical city-sized lot.

This is a great location if you think it's important to live in a prestigious or historic Portland neighborhood. With a good mix of rentals, especially towards the southern half of the neighborhood, it can be affordable if you're willing to settle for an apartment or a house that needs a little work.

If you can't afford to live here, you can still pretend at the yearly house tour offered by the Irvington Community Association. Officially known as the Irvington Historic District, the homes on this tour are some of the oldest and nicest in Portland.

The grandest homes tend to be along the northern edge of the neighborhood. Like any historic neighborhood, the area has experienced a few slumps over the decades, and this seems to have mainly hit the south side of Irvington. While most of the original homes are still standing in the northern part of the neighborhood, the south side has more restaurants, bars, cafes, shops, and services, along with newer housing and apartment buildings.

Although most residents commute via car, the area also has good access to public transportation, including the bus system and MAX light rail, accessible just outside the southern edge of the neighborhood. Residents enjoy several beautiful older parks, including Irvington Park, where you can picnic under a canopy of huge older trees.
Pros
  • Beautiful historic homes
  • Prestigious reputation
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • Expensive houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Young, Hip Neighborhood Full of College Students"

This young, hip neighborhood is an urban area mixing residential and commercial streets. If you're in your twenties and want easy access to lots of restaurants and coffee shops, Humboldt may be right for you. Humboldt has many bus lines, and most of the streets have bike lanes, making it a popular area for students who regularly commute to other parts of the city. Most residents don't have cars; those that do still tend to use bikes or buses for their daily commute.

Some Portlanders consider Humboldt and neighboring Boise to be a single neighborhood. The 'Boise' part of this neighborhood is home to Mississippi Ave, a destination for popular coffee shops, bars, and shops. They're all independent; you won't find a Starbucks anywhere. Locals spend a lot of time in this part of the neighborhood, and you're sure to find your favorite gathering spots in no time. N. Killingsworth Street is another great place to find things to do in the neighborhood.

The Humboldt area is best known as the home of Portland Community College. Because of this, many of the neighborhood's residents are college students. It's also home to Humboldt Elementary and Jefferson High School, so this community definitely has a younger feel. Many professors also live in the blocks surrounding the college, though, so there's definitely a good mix of age ranges.

Many of the homes in this neighborhood are brightly colored, giving residential streets a funky and artistic vibe. Others are more traditional, with beautiful well-kept gardens. There are also modest homes that are a bit more unkempt; these are mostly inhabited by students looking for inexpensive off-campus housing.
Pros
  • Lots of great local shops
  • Bus and bike friendly
  • Portland Community College
  • Affordable
  • Cute homes
Cons
  • Can feel a bit young
  • Not car friendly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Mostly Residential Area Home To OHSU And Nice Parks"

Homestead, located in the West Hills of southern Portland, is best known as the home to Marquam Nature Park. This is a great area for hiking. Offering a unique mix of outdoorsy and urban activities, hikers love the Marquam Trail, which crosses urban areas on its way to downtown. SW Terwilliger Boulevard is another popular pathway for hiking, walking, running, and cycling. Another popular outdoor area is Duniway Park Lilac Garden, a beautiful place to exercise or relax.

The rest of the neighborhood is mainly residential, with a few important exceptions. Oregon Health & Science University (a medical university) and the Portland VA Medical Center are both here, in the part of the neighborhood many residents refer to as 'pill hill.' These are connected to the South Waterfront area by a unique aerial tram, which is recognizable to anyone who's traveled down I5 frequently.

A bonus for those living in the area is that they, too, can take the tram from South Waterfront up to the Homestead neighborhood. While there aren't many businesses in Homestead itself, a short tram ride to South Waterfront gives residents access to many restaurants, shops, and cafes, in addition to the waterfront.

You're bound to see lots of runners and dog walkers using Homestead's wide sidewalks. Homes in the area are set on winding streets, some of which can be fairly steep. Secluded homes and plenty of trees give Homestead a quiet, relaxed feeling.
Pros
  • Marquam Park
  • Lots of trees
  • Aerial Tram
  • Beautiful views
  • Convenient location
  • OSHU
Cons
  • Few businesses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Beautiful Upscale Neighborhood Near Washington Park"

Hillside is a beautiful neighborhood in Northwest Portland. One major benefit of this neighborhood is its close proximity to Washington Park, which offers numerous attractions such as the Rose Garden, Arboretum, Zoo, and Japanese Gardens. Another beautiful area next to Hillside is Forest Park, noted as one of the most amazing parks in the country. Hillside itself is home to Pittock Mansion, a huge historic home offering public tours.

While these areas are popular among tourists, they never seem busy or crowded, and the residential areas of Hillside are very quiet. Expansive homes on wide, tree lined streets make this a popular neighborhood for professionals. Because real estate prices are on the higher end – many of the houses here cost over a million – residents tend to be fairly wealthy. The homes tend to be large and well kept, with colorful yards and gardens.

The hill provides amazing views, which tend to be of green spaces rather than buildings. There aren't many coffee houses, restaurants, or shops in Hillside itself, though all of these are easily available in neighboring areas of the city. Walking down the hill to the popular Nob Hill neighborhood is easy, but you'll want to use public transportation or a car to get back up the steep hill. In addition to the tourist attractions, Hillside is also home to Hillside Community Center, a former school designed by a famous architect.
Pros
  • Amazing views
  • Beautiful homes
  • Washington Park
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Family-Friendly Suburban Neighborhood With Lots of Parks"

Hillsdale is a Southwest Portland neighborhood with a decidedly suburban feel. It feels quite far from downtown, though it's just a short drive away.

Hillsdale is home to a newer public library branch that is especially popular among families, along with Wilson High School. One of the community's landmarks is Baker and Spice, a local bakery that is a great place for meeting up with friends. Other stores include a Fred Meyer and a coop grocery store. For a fun night out, check out the McMenamins Hillsdale Brewery. During the summer months, the Hillsdale Farmers Market is a popular attraction.

The neighborhood can be walkable depending on where you live. Parts are too hilly to make walking convenient, and some streets lack highways. It's easiest to walk if you live near the commercial areas, which tend to be in strip malls concentrated along certain streets of Hillsdale, particularly on Capitol Highway.

The neighborhood offers plenty of parks. Runners and cyclists love George Himes park, while runners enjoy the trails stretched along SW Terwilliger Boulevard. Dog owners frequent Hillsdale Park, while parents prefer the playground at DeWitt Park. Just south of Hillsdale is the expansive Gabriel Park.

The winding, laid-back residential streets of Hillsdale give it a relaxed, suburban feeling. Established neighborhoods with older homes are occupied by retirees, professionals, and families who want a small-town suburban neighborhood with all of the amenities offered by big-city Portland. Many of the homes on top of the hill offer great views of Portland.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • Lots of stores and restaurants
  • Good variety of parks
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Quiet and laid-back
  • Not very walkable
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Suburban Neighborhood With Good Mix of Commercial and Residential Areas"

Hazelwood is an urban and suburban neighborhood on the East side of Portland. There are both residential and commercial areas. On the MAX line, it's easy to get anywhere else in the city from Hazelwood, making it popular for professionals who work in other parts of Portland.

Hazelwood is known for medical facilities, which include the fairly large Adventist Hospital and a number of doctors and other medical offices. As far as shopping, retail businesses are concentrated in Gateway Shopping Center and Mall 205. Easy access to shopping and dining makes this a popular area of the city. There are also a number of parks in the area, providing a good balance with the relatively crowded commercial areas.

Residents of Hazelwood have their choice from condos and townhouses, modest ranch-style homes, and some larger houses. Most of the houses were built in the 1950s through the 1970s, while the apartments are newer developments. Many are on quiet, tree-lined streets, though some of the apartments are located in busier areas of the neighborhood, such as on 122nd Ave or Burnside Street. Because Hazelwood is fairly far from downtown Portland, homes tend to be more affordable than similar houses in 'close-in' neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Public transit
  • Close to hospital, medical offices
  • Lots of shopping and dining options
Cons
  • Further from city center
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet Residential Neighborhood With Great School And Many Parks"

Southwest Portland's Hayhurst neighborhood is a quiet residential district. This suburban neighborhood has some parts that seem downright rural, with plenty of old trees and open green spaces. It's certainly not city living, through it offers an easy commute to areas of Portland that offer a more urban feeling. If you work in Portland but don't want to live in the center of the city, Hayhurst may be right for you.

Hayhurst is home to Alpenrose Dairy, a historic dairy farm also offering a baseball park and Dairyville, a replica of an old-time frontier town. Visit Alpenrose for a fun day with the kids and to pick up organic milk in old-fashioned glass bottles. Pendleton Park, also in the neighborhood, features the Vermont Hills Community Garden. There are several other parks in this neighborhood too. Hayhurst School, the local elementary school, is located next to Pendleton Park. It is highly rated and known for strong academics and high test scores.

Because of the school and the wealth of parks and other community spaces, Hayhurst is popular among families. You're bound to see kids riding bikes and parents out and about with babies in strollers. Residents tend to live in Hayhurst for many decades. Those living in Hayhurst enjoy beautiful homes set on large suburban lots in established neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Quiet neighborhood
  • Lots of parks
  • Great school
Cons
  • Car dependent
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"An Island in the Columbia River"

Hayden Island, located in the Columbia River that divides Washington from Portland, is a relatively isolated neighborhood centered around marine activities.

To get to the island by car, take the northernmost Oregon exit on Interstate 5. If you plan to work or shop off the island, keep in mind that this section of I5 tends to get very crowded during rush hour, so it can take a while to get off the island.

The east end of the island is the most developed. It is home to Jantzen Beach, a retail area offering a wide range of stores, including Safeway and Target, along with hotels and other services. This allows many island residents to shop, eat, and work without ever leaving the island. Jantzen Beach is a popular destination among residents of neighboring Vancouver, Washington planning to make big-ticket retail purchases because Oregon has no sales tax.

Hayden Island is connected to neighboring Tomahawk Island, off the far east tip of the island, by a narrow stretch of land; most of the marinas and yacht clubs on the island are actually located on the Tomahawk side. West Hayden Island is much less developed. Much of the land is owned by the port system, but has been left in its natural state. There are no schools on the island, making it unpopular for families with kids.

Hayden Island is home to condo complexes, apartment buildings, and several mobile home communities, along with houseboats and modest houses. In recent years some nicer housing developments have been built, though residents tend to choose this unique Portland neighborhood for its proximity to the River, rather than the residential environment, which can be a bit rundown in places. Residents tend to be blue collar workers spanning a wide age range who are interested in marine activities.
Pros
  • Marine activities
  • Jantzen Beach shopping area
Cons
  • Difficult to get on/off island
  • No schools
  • Many rundown areas
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Popular Family-Friendly Neighborhood With a Great Park"

This Northeast Portland neighborhood is named after Grant Park, a large city park. The park is best known for the Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden, a great water feature incorporating life-sized sculptures of characters from her children's stories. Nearby Klickitat Street was the setting for several of her books. The park is nearly 20 acres, and has a very nice heated outdoor pool that is quite popular during the summer months.

The Grant Park neighborhood. is very walkable; it's easy to visit the library, restaurants, and locally-owned stores on foot. Though there's no grocery store in Grant Park itself, the neighboring Hollywood district offers a Trader Joe's. While there are a limited number of restaurants and stores in Grants Park itself, everything else you could need can be found in Hollywood, a short walk away.

The homes in this district are beautiful older Craftsman houses. This family-friendly neighborhood feels quiet and well maintained. Streets are tree-lined, and on the sidewalks you're likely to see joggers, moms with strollers, and plenty of kids.

Located next to several other desirable neighborhoods, Grant Park is a very popular area, which makes it more expensive than other parts of the city. As a result, most residents are white collar professionals. Residents seem to love living here in the center of everything.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • Park and pool
  • Beautiful homes
Cons
  • Expensive housing
  • Not very diverse
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Beautiful Neighborhood of Historic Homes"

Goose Hollow, one of the beautiful historic districts of Portland, offers great access to downtown. Because of its central location, you're near most of the popular shopping and dining districts, along with tourist activities like the Zoo and Arboretum. With public transportation and easy access to freeways, you can get to any other area of the city quickly. However, the hill can be a bit steep for those who would rather walk. On the up side, the hill does offer a great view.

The neighborhood itself is home to the Portland Timbers' professional soccer stadium, officially called Jeld-Wen Field (though many residents still call it by its former name, PGE Park). This is great for soccer fans, but maybe not so great for those who would be bothered by the traffic and noise of game days. Lincoln High School, which is highly regarded, is also located here. As far as shopping and dining, there are a number of popular historic restaurants. Goose Hollow Inn is the best-known of these.

Because of its great location, homes in Goose Hollow tend to be expensive, though if you can afford it I highly recommend this area. Houses tend to be large and beautiful. Many of the homes are historic, and feature imaginative architecture that makes it a true delight to drive or walk the streets of Goose Hollow.
Pros
  • Center of everything
  • Great schools
  • Beautiful historic homes
  • PGE park
  • Washington Park
Cons
  • Steep hill
  • Expensive houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Affordable Housing In This Suburban Neighborhood"

Glenfair, in far East Portland, next to the suburb of Gresham, is a suburban area known for affordable housing. Because this area is far away from the city center, home prices tend to be lower, though there is a tradeoff in lack of access to amenities. Residents tend to be young single people, couples, and families renting apartments or modest homes.

As a sprawling suburban neighborhood, most residents are dependent on their cars. With that being said, other areas of the city are relatively easy to reach because several major streets, including Burnside and Glisan, run through the neighborhood. Though there aren't many shops or restaurants in Glenfair, there is a nice city park right in the center of the neighborhood that tends to be popular, especially during the summer.

Next to the park is the neighborhood elementary school, Glenfair Elementary, which is a below-average school with many English language learners. Some parents move to a more expensive area of Portland as their children reach school age so that they can attend a better school.

Overall, it's affordable but doesn't have much going for it other than that. Many areas of Portland offer better amenities and better schools and aren't much more expensive.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Nice park
  • Major streets make for easy commute
Cons
  • School is poorly rated
  • Not many shops or restaurants
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Suburban Residential Neighborhood Anchored by PCC Campus"

Far Southwest is a Portland neighborhood located just north of the wealthy suburb of Lake Oswego. It's best-known as the home of Portland Community College's Sylvania Campus, which takes up most of the neighborhood. It feels comfortable and safe here.

Lesser Park, also located within Far Southwest Portland, has acres and acres of wildlife habitat, along with beautiful hiking trails traversing streams, woods, and open green spaces. There's plenty to explore here!

Other than the PCC campus and park, there aren't many amenities within the Far Southwest neighborhood itself, though they are available in neighboring areas. Residents tend to drive elsewhere in the city for shopping, dining, and professional services.

The rest of the neighborhood consists mainly of homes built from the 1940s to the 1970s. They tend to be sprawling homes on large lots. These established neighborhoods are very family-friendly and offer homes in a range of style. Residents range from young families to established professionals to retirees.

Far Southwest has a nice suburban feeling that seems worlds away from the hustle and bustle of downtown. If you're looking for a very quiet neighborhood, look for a house situated away from Interstate 5, which runs along the western and northern edges of the neighborhood.
Pros
  • Comfortable suburban community
  • Lesser Park
  • Away from hustle and bustle
Cons
  • Lack of shopping and dining
  • Interstate 5 can be noisy
  • Car dependent
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Urban Neighborhood with Character"

Eliot is a North Portland neighborhood with a great mix of residential and retail spaces. This urban neighborhood has character that you won't find in newer areas of the city.

This close-in Portland neighborhood offers easy access to everything. It's a great location for commuters; with onramps for I5 and I84, plenty of buses, and the MAX light rail, it's easy to get most places in Portland from Eliot.

The neighborhood itself also offers plenty to do, including popular restaurants, shops, and music venues. It's best known for its restaurants, with a wide variety of culinary options from all over the world. There are also plenty of bars. Two popular neighborhood landmarks include the McMenamin's White Eagle Saloon, which supposedly used to be a brothel, and the Wonder Ballroom, a historic lodge that's now a cafe, bar, and event space. There's also the community center, which offers an indoor swimming pool.

Eliot has a reputation for being a little rough around the edges in some spots, though other areas of the neighborhood are filled with charming, well-kept older homes. This diverse, older neighborhood is home to residents who are fighting hard to hold onto the neighborhood's past in the face of the commercial redevelopment that has come to the area over the past few decades. Eliot was recently in the news as residents fought successfully to keep a McDonald's from moving in.

There are several new condo and apartment buildings here, in addition to new commercial spaces, bringing in a flood of new residents. These developments are likely to change the flavor of the neighborhood with time. It will be interesting to see how these new developments change Eliot.
Pros
  • Charming historical character
  • Easy commute to other areas of city
  • Plenty to see and do
Cons
  • Rough around the edges
  • Fighting off gentrification
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful Homes Surrounding Golf Course and Parks"

Eastmoreland is known for the Eastmoreland Golf Course. In fact, many Portland residents don't realize there is also a neighborhood by this name. The neighborhood surrounding the golf course consists of upscale, early 20th century houses occupied by professionals and families. There aren't many businesses in the neighborhood, save for the Eastmoreland Market & Kitchen, which has been there for decades and is a popular local spot.

Eastmoreland has long been associated with green spaces. The golf course has been there for nearly a century, and the rest of the neighborhood is filled with mature trees. Other parks in the neighborhood include a beautiful rhododendron garden. This is a seriously 'green' neighborhood, making it a good choice for those who work in a more urban area of Portland and want a home where they can get away from it all.

Homes in the area tend to be large and older. The area has an inviting and relaxing aura. Considered a desirable neighborhood, homes tend to be relatively expensive. The traditional, colonial styling of most of the houses has made it a popular neighborhood for East Coast transplants. Many of the houses feature large lawns and well-cared-for gardens. This makes an interesting contrast with Reed College, the campus located just off the northern edge of Eastmoreland. Reed College is known for being a progressive and somewhat 'hippie' school.
Pros
  • Lots of green spaces
  • Upscale, inviting neighborhood
  • Beautiful houses
Cons
  • No business district
  • Expensive houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Parks and Golf Courses on the Columbia River"

East Columbia, along the Columbia River in Northeast Portland, is known for its many green spaces. It is home to the Columbia Edgewater Country Club, Portland Meadows Golf Course, and Delta Park. There's also another golf club just outside the eastern boundary of the neighborhood, and another just to the west. East Columbia is also home to the Columbia Children's Arboretum, a popular attraction for families.

It is a good neighborhood for those who enjoy being active in the outdoors. In addition to the parks and golf courses already mentioned, there are also a number of marine activities enjoyed by residents of this neighborhood bordering the Columbia River. It tends to be seen as a bit more upscale area than neighboring Bridgeton, which lies between parts of East Columbia and the Columbia River and is more well-known for its access to marine facilities and activities.

Housing here tends to include newer houses, apartments, and condos, occupied by a mix of blue-collar and professional residents. New housing developments have attracted many newcomers to the area. Residents of this fairly spread-out neighborhood tend to be dependent on their cars. Within East Columbia, there is not a lot of shopping, though surrounding neighborhoods offer a full range of restaurants and retail areas.
Pros
  • Green spaces
  • Car dependent
  • Newer homes
Cons
  • No shopping or dining options
  • Noise due to airport
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"A Diverse Urban Neighborhood"

Cully is a Northeast Portland neighborhood named for Cully Boulevard, which runs through it on a diagonal. It is found directly between the airport to the north and Rose City Park to the south.

Though there are a couple of small parks and community gardens within Cully, this is not the neighborhood for anyone who wants to visit green spaces on a daily basis. This is definitely an urban neighborhood, with densely packed housing and businesses and not a lot of open land.

This culturally diverse neighborhood has a strong sense of unity, and you'll definitely notice when you've stepped foot in Cully. Residents tend to feel strongly about improving the livability of Cully, particularly addressing traffic and crime problems, which have historically plagued the area. It can be noisy here due to the traffic, proximity to the airport, and urban nature of the neighborhood. Residents also feel strongly about maintaining the diverse character of the neighborhood and resisting the gentrification that has happened in similar Portland neighborhoods.

Living in Cully tends to be affordable, with plenty of modest starter homes in the area. Some are more well-kept than others. Residents seem friendly, and range from students to young families to retirees. If you're looking for urban living on a budget, Cully may be right for you.
Pros
  • Diversity
  • Affordable houses
  • Welcoming
Cons
  • Noise
  • Few green spaces
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Artsy Neighborhood Anchored by Small College"

The neighborhood of Concordia is named after Concordia University, a private Christian University located here. This Northeast Portland neighborhood is currently experiencing a resurgence, with revitalized streets, improved housing, and dropping crime rates. Today, it's known as a creative and fun urban neighborhood.

The school itself is more than 100 years old, but there are several newer parts of the campus. They just opened a brand new athletics complex last year. Concordia is also home to Alberta Street, an artsy retail district where you'll find plenty of small shops and restaurants. Local landmarks include the Concordia Ale House and McMenamin's Kennedy School, a former school that's been turned into a hotel and restaurant. There is also a community garden and several nice parks.

This densely occupied neighborhood includes houses in many styles, occupied by students, professors, and other professionals. The college is fairly small, so there aren't too many students living in the surrounding area, giving it a good mix of college kids and older residents. This older neighborhood is known for cute bungalows, and housing tends to be more affordable here than in some other Northeast Portland neighborhoods. It seems like a very livable place with a lot going for it.
Pros
  • Revitalized in recent past
  • Fun urban neighborhood
  • Affordable, interesting housing
Cons
  • Known for being a little run-down
  • Can feel a bit like a college town
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet, Conservative Residential Neighborhood Near College"

In Southwest Portland, the neighborhood of Collins View is found between Tryon Creek State Park directly to the South and River View Cemetery to the Northeast. It is not a very well-known area; those who don't know Portland well sometimes confuse the name with that of Collins Beach, a clothing-optional spot on Sauvie Island in the Columbia River.

Collins View, on the other hand, is a relatively conservative residential neighborhood. There really aren't any businesses in Collins View itself. The main routes through the neighborhood are SW Terwilliger Blvd and SW Boones Ferry Rd, both of which are curvy routes that run roughly North-South. Interstate 5 is fairly close to the north edge of the neighborhood, making commuting a bit easier, though it is still a bit of a commute to most places in Portland.

Lewis and Clark College, a highly regarded private liberal arts college, is along the east side of the neighborhood. Although some college students do find housing within Collins View, on the whole it's out of the range of many students' budgets, making it more popular among professors and other professionals. Homes here tend to be large and well-kept, with beautiful landscaping and unique architectural features.
Pros
  • Quiet residential neighborhood
  • Near Lewis and Clark College
  • Beautiful homes
Cons
  • Commutes can be difficult
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Beautiful Urban Park Under St. Johns Bridge"

Let me start by saying that Cathedral Park is beautiful! This large urban park is located just under the east side of St. Johns Bridge, a suspension bridge across the Willamette River. The shape of the bridge's steel arches give the park its name.

It is believed that Lewis and Clark camped at the spot that is now Cathedral Park as they passed through the area in 1806. For many years, it served as a popular fishing and camping site, though over time it became run down. In the 1970s, it officially became a park.

The park itself is a great place to picnic or enjoy the rare Portland sunshine. Yet many lifelong Portland residents have never been here. It always seems to be empty – it seems people just don't realize how great it is! With large open grassy areas and views of the river, it is truly a beautiful place.

Homes in the neighborhoods surrounding the park include large Victorian style homes to smaller bungalows, and even a few condos and apartment buildings. Some are definitely fixer-uppers, while others appear well kept. Overall, it appears as though residents take pride in their neighborhood, and are focused on improving both their homes and their namesake park.

Many new residents have moved into the area within the past decade. Many are University of Portland students, although Cathedral Park is not just home to students. There are plenty of young families and old-timers here too. While there aren't any shops in the Cathedral Park neighborhood, the neighboring St. Johns and Arbor Lodge communities offer a wide range of shopping and dining options.
Pros
  • Beautiful park
  • Quiet neighborhood
  • Good mix of housing options
Cons
  • No shopping or dining
  • Some areas have a reputation for being rundown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
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"Fun and Funky Urban Living"

A fun Southeast Portland neighborhood between the Willamette River, East Burnside, and SE Hawthorne, Buckman has a young and laid-back vibe. Buckman is home to two unique shopping areas – the Belmont District and Hawthorne District. There, you'll find plenty of coffee shops, boutiques, and other local businesses, evidence of Buckman's quirky, eclectic mix of residents. There are also some bars and late-night restaurants, along with several breweries, making the area popular among a younger crowd.

You can look west and see downtown Portland, across the river, from many roads in Buckman. Three bridges over the River make for an easy commute to Chinatown and Downtown Portland. Close to many of Portland's hippest neighborhoods, many of the residents choose to walk or bike rather than driving.

In addition to the many small businesses, there is also a good mix of housing options here. These include larger, historic homes, quaint houses with interesting architectural details, and a few apartment and condo buildings.

Parents tend to love Buckman for its family-friendly vibe. Though there seem to be fewer children living here than in comparable Portland neighborhoods, Buckman is home to Buckman Arts Magnet Elementary School, a highly regarded public school for students interested in the arts. For other students, Buckman Elementary School is located right in the neighborhood. Other popular attractions for families include the Colonel Summers Park, Buckman Community Garden, and the Vera Katz Eastbank Espanade, which offers beautiful views of the river, Hawthorne Bridge, and downtown.
Pros
  • Funky Shops
  • Beautiful Homes
  • Very friendly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Diverse Up-And-Coming Residential Neighborhood"

Not a borough in NYC, Brooklyn is a central Portland neighborhood with a much quieter ambiance. This mostly residential area along the Willamette River offers a diverse mix of house styles, along with a smattering of apartments and newer condos.

As one of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, there are several historical landmarks, which include the Poulsen House, built in the 1890s, and Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Many of the businesses in the area are housed in historic buildings, giving the community an eclectic and historical feeling. In addition to residential areas and small, locally owned businesses, Brooklyn is also home to a few industrial sites, which are located along the river, along with a large railyard.

The neighborhood used to be known as a low-income area before it was revitalized a few decades ago. Now, it is considered a middle-class neighborhood, and some even consider it to be among the most desirable housing areas of SE Portland. It's close to other popular Portland neighborhoods, and seems to offer something for everyone. There are many families with young children here, and you're likely to see many people out and about, including cyclists, joggers, and moms pushing strollers. It seems very safe and family-focused.
Pros
  • Historical landmarks
  • Up-and-Coming
  • Friendly neighbors
Cons
  • Industrial sites and railyard
  • Used to be rundown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet, Outdoorsy Residential Neighborhood"

Bridlemile, along the Southwestern edge of the city, is part of the West Hills. It is mainly a residential neighborhood, though there are a few businesses along Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway. The main landmarks within the neighborhood are the Bridlemile Elementary School and Hamilton Park, which is right next to the school.

Its location in the West Hills means that many of the hills in Bridlemile are built along winding, hilly roads. It is fairly secluded; expect lots of cul-de-sacs and woods here. Though it seems like a neighborhood where the neighbors mostly keep to themselves, in fact there is an active neighborhood association, and residents are known for being strongly involved in the school and in environmental projects. Because of these efforts, much of Bridlemile appears to be well-kept.

Living in Bridlemile may be a good choice if you want to live close to downtown, but desire a suburban environment. This area has many parks and trails; Bridlemile offers a great mix of urban amenities and outdoorsy activities. The homes are rather spread out, and tend to be on larger lots. Most of the houses were built in the 1950s through the 1980s, and are single family homes including ranch and split level styles.
Pros
  • Quiet and spread out
  • Community spirit
  • Clean and well kept
Cons
  • No restaurants or stores
  • Good balance of urban and suburban
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Water-Focused Neighborhood On the Columbia River"

Bridgeton occupies a skinny strip of land along the Columbia River. It's home to a number of houseboats, along with apartments, condos, and houses. The neighborhood is named because of its location near the bridge crossing the Columbia. Anchored by Marine Drive, the location near the river seems to define this area.

This part of the Columbia River offers boating, sailing, and fishing opportunities. As you might expect, there are several marinas and marine-related businesses located here. The neighborhood also has a growing residential area, along with several new condo developments. Residents tend to move here because of its proximity to the river and are very active in the outdoors. There are many ducks in the area, which some residents enjoy feeding and others consider a nuisance.

Residents deal with a moderate level of both traffic and noise, including that from the nearby airport. If you want to avoid the traffic, ride your bike. There is a 40-mile bike trail loop passing through Bridgeton. The MAX light rail system, as well as the freeway, are accessible at the west edge of the neighborhood. While Bridgeton residents are very close to Vancouver, at the other side of the River, commuting there can be tricky during rush hour.
Pros
  • Bike trail
  • Marine activities on Columbia River
  • Interesting Mix of Housing Options
Cons
  • Noise
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Argay Offers Both Suburban and Urban Feel"

The Northeast Portland neighborhood of Argay is located right next to the Columbia River. While it's bounded by several busy roads, including Interstate 84, it is known within NE Portland as a quiet neighborhood, past the busy streets, though there are still several major thoroughfares cutting through the neighborhood.

The area is home to a mix of apartment buildings and houses, giving it both a suburban and urban feel. Home to many families, the community's several parks, such as Argay Park, are quite popular. There are lots of kids and teens living in Argay, along with a sizable number of retirees.

In addition to plenty of housing, there are a few major businesses within the neighborhood, such as Costco, which draw shoppers from surrounding neighborhoods. There are also many smaller businesses owned by locals, in particular several Asian restaurants that are favorites among Argay residents.

Argay is less walkable than many other areas of Portland. Most people appear to own cars rather than relying on public transit. However, thanks to the major streets bounding the neighborhood, those living in the area also tend to enjoy the relatively easy commute to downtown and other areas known for their shopping and dining possibilities.
Pros
  • Costco
  • Parks
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Busy streets
  • Less walkable
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Hip, Up-And-Coming Neighborhood"

Not to be confused with the capital of Idaho, Boise is a Portland neighborhood just off Interstate 5 in North Portland. Also known as Boise-Eliot, it offers a mix of residential and commercial areas. One of the best parts of Boise is its convenient location for those who frequently travel to downtown Portland or other major neighborhoods within the city. With easy access to both I5 and I84, and a nearby MAX light rail stop, it's convenient no matter how you commute.

Although Boise has historically been one of the poorer neighborhoods in the city, it seems to be improving in recent years, with many new developments springing up. Increasingly hip and popular, it is home to a number of local shops, restaurants, and bars. The neighborhood welcomes diversity, and it always seems like the residents are busy doing something unique.

The retail core of Boise is located along Mississippi Avenue. The other main area of Boise is Williams Avenue. Some of the residents of this area actually consider the two to be separate neighborhoods, with their own unique personalities. In particular, Mississippi Ave has changed a lot in the past decade. It used to be home to boarded-up houses and rundown businesses. Now, the area is young and bustling. It feels much livelier and safer with a new core of commercial developments. Some of the old-timers complain that the local flavor has been lost to gentrification, and rents are rising due to new condo developments.
Pros
  • Easy commute via bike, bus, MAX, or car
  • Diverse
  • Many local restaurants, bars, shops
Cons
  • Rising rents
  • Can be noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Upscale Neighborhood With Small-Town Feel"

Located along Alameda Ridge, Beaumont-Wilshire offers beautiful views of downtown Portland, along with the Cascades and Willamette River. This Northeast Portland neighborhood is one of the nicer residential sections of the city. This older, well-established neighborhood offers an ideal mix of commercial and residential areas, making it ideal for those who want to bike or walk to stores and restaurants. As you might expect, this expensive neighborhood is considered very safe.

The main retail area of the neighborhood is known as 'Beaumont Village,' and is on NE Fremont Street from 33rd to 50th. Serving as the center of the community, it offers a wide range of professional offices, stores, and restaurants. This community center gives the neighborhood a small-town feel. Other shopping is just a short walk away, in the Hollywood District. Fremont Street separates the neighborhood into Wilshire (on the North side) and Beaumont (on the South side). Wilshire is home to Wilshire Park, a huge and beautiful park.

Beaumont is home to some of the most expensive houses in the city, with Beaumont tending to be a little more posh than Wilshire. The homes here were built in the early 1900s, and are mainly occupied by professionals with the funds to afford living here. Those living in Beaumont-Wilshire seem to really love it.
Pros
  • Beautiful Homes
  • Small-town feel
  • Pedestrian friendly
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Quiet Bedroom Community With Beautiful Homes And Green Spaces"

Ashcreek is a small residential neighborhood in Southwest Portland, directly east of the city of Tigard. This quiet bedroom community is known for beautiful homes and expensive green spaces. The neighborhood is home to Ash Creek Natural Area and several other parks, making it popular among those who want to live in Portland but enjoy fresh air and wooded areas.

As far as shopping and dining, expect to drive out of the neighborhood, as Ashcreek has no retail district. It's mainly a bedroom community for people who work and shop elsewhere, and you won't find much else besides houses here.

The neighborhood features a mix of beautiful craftsman and modern homes set on large suburban lots. With plenty of space between homes, it doesn't seem like the type of community where people really get to know their neighbors. The community's sole elementary school, George Smith Elementary, closed a couple of years ago, and it's still a sore subject among some longtime Ashcreek residents. This safe and quiet neighborhood is still home to plenty of kids, though there's no longer a school located in Ashcreek itself. Still, if you don't mind commuting out of the neighborhood daily, it is a beautiful place to live.
Pros
  • Beautiful Homes
  • Green Spaces
  • Safe and quiet
Cons
  • No shopping or dining
  • No schools
  • Residents tend to keep to themselves
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Suburban Residential Neighborhood With Lots of Trees"

Arnold Creek is along the Southern edge of Portland, just North of Lake Oswego, a wealthy suburb of Portland. As the name suggests, a creek cuts through the center of the neighborhood. This wooded residential enclave borders several parks, including the large Tryon Creek State Park to the east.

You'll find lots of trees and green spaces here, but not a lot of shopping. Residents usually drive elsewhere for shopping, dining, and nightlife, and there isn't much reason to travel here unless you live in Arnold Creek.

The neighborhood is mainly single family homes set on large suburban lots and surrounded by lots of older trees. There are no apartment or condo buildings to be found here. An upper-middle-class neighborhood, residents seem to be well established. There isn't a lot of turnover, and most homes are occupied by retirees or empty nesters. During the day, the neighborhood seems empty, because there aren't many kids and the residents of Arnold Creek tend to commute by car rather than walking, biking, or taking public transit. It doesn't seem like the sort of place where the neighbors talk to each other.

Arnold Creek seems less welcoming to newcomers than other areas of Portland. It has a reputation for being a fairly insular community. Those who live here seem to enjoy it, though, and the neighborhood is very safe.
Pros
  • Green spaces
  • Safe
  • Well established neighborhood
Cons
  • Not very neighborly
  • Lack of shopping and dining options
  • Seems empty during the day
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Beautiful Residential Neighborhood Filled With Parks And Green Spaces"

Arlington Heights, in the West Hills area of North Portland, is one of the most upscale residential areas of the city. Filled with beautiful homes, the neighborhood offers beautiful views of downtown Portland.

This area is walking or biking distance to major attractions, including the Oregon Zoo, the Japanese Gardens, and the Rose Garden. It is also very family-friendly, with plenty of parks and the Children's Museum. There are many young families here, so expect to see lots of toddlers in playgrounds and moms pushing strollers down Arlington Heights sidewalks. While it's mostly a residential area, the many parks and other outdoor attractions bring plenty of tourists into Arlington Heights.

Homes in the area are mostly older and well kept. Expect quiet, winding roads lined with large, older trees and expansive homes. It's an ideal neighborhood for Portland's well-off residents who are looking for easy access to downtown Portland but want to live away from the hustle and bustle of urban life. There are no major highways through the neighborhood, giving it a quiet and relaxed feeling, though major thoroughfares on the borders of the neighborhood make for easy commuting. Most people tend to commute elsewhere in the city for shopping, dining, and nightlife. If you enjoy lots of green spaces and want to live in a beautiful neighborhood, Arlington Heights might be right for you.
Pros
  • Parks & Other Green Spaces
  • Beautiful views
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Not many shopping or dining options
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"A small neighborhood in Southeast Portland"

The oddly-named Ardenwald, also known as Ardenwald-Johnson Creek, is a small neighborhood between Portland and Milwaukie. This Southern Portland community has plenty of green spaces, including the large Tideman Johnson Natural Area, a unique wildlife refuge home to many birds, coyotes, and other species of wildlife, to the north, along with the smaller Ardenwald Park along the southern edge of the neighborhood. There are also several trails running through the area.

A small, not very well known area of Southeast Portland, it is bisected by SE 32nd Ave (running North-South) and SE Tacoma Street/SE Johnson Creek Blvd running East-West. The streets form a major intersection in the center of the neighborhood. SE McLoughlin Blvd/99E, a major highway, is located along the western boundary.

The neighborhood is residential, and is not very transit-friendly unless you live along one of the major roads. Houses tend to be modest and inexpensive when compared with other areas of Portland, though prospective residents should be aware that the area is bisected by a railroad.

This family-oriented neighborhood is anchored by Ardenwald Elementary, the local elementary school. While Ardenwald is less well known than other SE Portland communities, it is also less urban, providing a quiet refuge for those who want easy access to the city center without living in an urban environment. Those who live in the area seem to like it, and the Ardenwald-Johnson Creek Neighborhood Association is very active.
Pros
  • Green Spaces
  • Family oriented
  • Community Pride
Cons
  • Railroad and busy highways
  • Not many businesses or restaurants
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Up-And-Coming With Good Public Transit"

Arbor Lodge, in North Portland, is a neighborhood with a good mix of residential and commercial areas. The neighborhood is popular among public transit riders because it is on the MAX yellow line. There is easy access to many other areas of Portland, including downtown. There is also convenient access to Interstate 5, as the neighborhood lies directly west of the freeway. Transit developments have changed the character of the neighborhood over the past decade. There is also a newly remodeled Fred Meyer and many new businesses springing up in the area.

With the growing popularity of biking and public transit, Arbor Lodge is now considered an up-and-coming area for professionals and young families, mixed in with old-timers. Housing in the area includes a vast range of architectural styles, which tend to be modest homes set on quiet streets. Though many of the homes are well kept, there are also plenty of fixer-uppers, making it a popular place for young families to purchase their first homes.

Those living in the area tend to be very civic minded and eco-conscious. Driving down Arbor Lodge's streets you will see plenty of dog walkers, moms pushing strollers, and cyclists. A major feature of the neighborhood is Arbor Lodge Park, home to plenty of recreational opportunities.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Good transit
  • Neighborhood spirit
Cons
  • Not much nightlife
  • Can be noisy next to major roads or transit
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Alameda -- A Beautiful Historic Neighborhood"

Northeast Portland's Alameda is a charming neighborhood with beautiful views of the Cascades, the Willamette River, and Downtown Portland. A popular residential area, it is home to tree-lined streets filled with historic homes, from modest cottages to large Craftsman and Tudor mansions, mixed in with expensive modern homes, all which appear well-kept..

One of the oldest areas of the city, Alameda tends to be populated by well established professionals who are active in their community. The neighborhood is next to Wilshire Park, a large and well-maintained community park. Another popular outdoor activity is to walk Alameda Ridge, a walking route stretched along four miles of Alameda's panoramic views and beautiful mansions.

Popular among families, Alameda tends to be a quiet area with a strong sense of local spirit. It feels like a place where people know their neighbors and enjoy frequenting local coffee shops and small retail stores, many of which have been there for decades. Though there are few large businesses in Alameda itself, there are plenty of commercial areas in nearby areas. The neighborhood's main roads are NE Fremont Street, which runs east-west, and NE 33rd, running north-south along the eastern side of the neighborhood. NE Portland is also a short drive – around 15 minutes – to downtown Portland, making it popular among commuters and those looking for urban living with a quieter ambiance.
Pros
  • Tree-lined streets
  • Beautiful mansions
  • Great views from Alameda Ridge
Cons
  • Hilly
  • Not a lot of shopping
  • Homes are expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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