7.6 out of 10

South Beach

Ranked 31st best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.785974168663 -122.389712934556
Great for
  • Internet Access
  • Public Transport
  • Pest Free
  • Resale or Rental Value
  • Eating Out
Not great for
  • Parking
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish

Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
2yrs+

"I love South Beach! So easy to walk to everything. Easy access to/from freeway."

Parking is easy at night or on the weekends. Traffic is bad after 3pm on weekdays. Not really for families.
Pros
  • Great views
  • Baseball stadium
  • Great jogging trails
  • Good Restaurants
  • New High Rises
Cons
  • Parking
  • Traffic
  • Some industrial areas
  • Very Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
2yrs+

"Great place to live and work!"

South Beach is a walkable neighborhood of luxury condos, luxury high rises, and luxury lofts in reconverted warehouses attracts the affluent, those in search of an alternative lifestyle.
Pros
  • Great views
  • Baseball stadium
  • Great jogging trails
  • Good Restaurants
  • New High Rises
Cons
  • Parking
  • Traffic
Anna A. Lee
Anna A. Lee agreed!
2yrs+
Add a comment...
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
2yrs+

"Expensive High Rise Living"

You find South Beach on the far eastern edge of SoMa. I need to tell you because this neighborhood did not exist just a few years ago. This is part of the on-going effort to market SF by creating a series of neighborhoods like this. Usually they have names taken from other more prosperous neighborhoods (like “Lower Nob Hill”) or from other famous areas in other cities (South of Market is thus SoMa to recall New York’s SoHo).

So here we have South Beach—though the area has less the feel of Miami than some of the nicer areas of Boston. Just a couple of years ago there were still buildings going up and a ton of empty lots. Now however, you will find few signs of the massive construction project that created this area (at least south of the Bay Bridge—on the northern end there are still some projects still underway). Someone walking through might be mistaken in thinking this neighborhood has been here for a generation, at least—except for the amazingly high ratio of newer buildings and lack of Victorians—a rarity for SF.

So what is the cost like in this area? The typical apartment in the area averages around $2500/room with prices rising the closer you get to the ocean. (It is not unusual to see a one-room for $3800 in the close to the waters of the bay.) Put simply, this is one of the priciest places to live in a city that is known for its high cost of living.

What about nightlife and entertainment? Well, we need to start with AT&T Park of course. The home of the Giants is a magnet for foot traffic to the area and a whole set of restaurants and other shops have moved in to take advantage of both the high rent apartments and the fan traffic.

Restaurants of note in the area include One Market, Boulevard and Ozumo right along the waterfront—many of these are in the classy lounge style featuring American cuisine (like Serpentine in Dogpatch to the south).

There are also a number of bars in the area, starting with the Gordon Bierschi Brewery and the Hi Dive.

Overall, if you can afford to pay the equivalent of a teacher’s salary in rent, this makes for a very nice spot to live.
Pros
  • New High Rises
  • Good Restaurants
  • Great views
  • Baseball stadium
Cons
  • Very Expensive
  • Parking
  • Some industrial areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great views of the water"

I was just in South Beach this weekend while rollerblading, which I recommend highly. This area is a fitness junkie's paradise. There are long paved paths that go along the edge of the water and around the stadium (AT&T Park) in the area. You get great views of the East Bay and the Bay Bridge. It's also fun to see all the large boats that dock. Right next to the stadium, there is also a cool harbor with sailboats that you can gawk at.

Luckily, I wasn't there this weekend when there was a Giants game, because I hear it's madness, but we did see people forming a line for a soccer game at the stadium. The crowd seemed very tame and it didn't affect the atmosphere. I also didn’t drive, which can be a nightmare. Take public transportation to the Transbay Terminal and then walk over.

This are has the perfect mix of ingredients. It has the water and the public areas, but it avoids becoming a tourist trap like the northern part of the Embarcadero. The great thing is that you can hop up to the more crowded areas easily by public transportation.
Pros
  • Great jogging trails
  • Great views
Cons
  • Parking
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
2yrs+

"Home of the Tech Boom and the SF Giants"

Once home to the 2001 tech boom, South Beach remains one of San Francisco’s high density tech business areas. The neighborhood is relatively small, extending from the Bay Bridge to 3rd Street but offers great amenities including a waterfront location as well as South Beach Harbor.

During the week, the neighborhood is bustling with tech savvy entrepreneurial types and lively lunchtime eateries buzzing with business chatter. On sunny weekdays, joggers run along a long paved trail that skirts the edge of the Bay. Shopping is a bit hard to come by in this area though, only offering high end furniture and boutique book stores.

South Beach is also home to AT&T Park and the 2010 World Champion Giants. The area can get quite busy during baseball season as thousands of fans dressed in orange and black flock to the stadium during rush hour. If you didn’t get tickets to the game, there are a handful of enormous sports bars near the stadium with plasma televisions blanketing the walls. Two great locations adjacent to the stadium are Pete’s Tavern and Momo’s restaurant both on King Street.

Traffic in this neighborhood is a nightmare if you’re looking to commute over the Bay Bridge. You’re best bet is taking the Muni that travels along the edge of the Bay and up to Embarcadero. If you’re looking to live in the neighborhood and you’re wallets are deep, South Beach offers luxurious high rise condominiums with sweeping views of the Bay Bridge, Downtown and Dolores park.
Pros
  • Great jogging trails
  • Great views
  • Baseball stadium
Cons
  • Parking
  • Traffic
  • Some industrial areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
2yrs+

"I saw a guy doing pull ups on a "Walk" sign..."

It's true. Fitness freaks can have a great time enjoying the waterfront jogging trails, with beautiful views of the bay and lots of, err, convenient walk signs to do pull ups while they are waiting. And the rest of us can enjoy beautiful waterfront views as well. While the area is not quite as vibrant as the northern part of the Embarcadero, it is still offers plenty of dining options near the stadium.

On the flip side, the reason why I could see this phenomenon so well had everything to do with the fact that I was sitting in traffic for twenty minutes trying to get to the highway. Traffic here is chaos, and south of the interstate immediately gets worn-down and industrial, as is the case with so many neighborhoods near athletic stadiums.

Parking here is a nightmare near the stadium and north of the highway, but that is to be expected. South and east of the highway is slightly better, but good luck finding parking for more than two hours.
Pros
  • Great views
  • Great jogging trails
  • Baseball stadium
Cons
  • Parking
  • Traffic
  • Some industrial areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Home to AT&T Park and many things to do in and around"

South Beach is a bustling and busy neighborhood on home games at AT&T Park, home to the San Francisco Giants. And on these days you’ll see hundreds of people decked out in orange gear, it’s quite a sight to see as you drive by on the Embarcadero, you’ll even see them cheering for the Giants even before the game starts. Though, the mood really changes on game days, whenever body is in their orange gear, it’s like everyone is family, all the fans are friendly with one another whether or not they know each other. There is also a large number of boats on the waters right next to South Beach, mostly those who wanted to catch a home run ball from a Giants game.

There are a lot of great restaurants and bars in South Beach, great place to celebrate a Giants victory. And if you’re looking for more, you won’t have to go far as there are tons in Downtown San Francisco, which is only 15-20 drive to, depending on the traffic.

West of South Beach is a lot to do, and I’m speaking truthfully, there is so much to do that you won’t be able to do it all in a day. Just a bit west of South Beach, you will find several museums, such as, Cartoon Art Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Contemporary Jewish Museum of San Francisco. I’ve only been to the Museum of Modern Art, which I really enjoyed. In the same area, you will also find the Yerba Buena Gardens or center. There you have bowling and ice skating. Lastly you have the Westfield Shopping Center, which is the most trendy and hip place to go shopping nowadays for San Franciscans, it’s still relatively new compared to other shopping centers.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Everything Old Is New Again"

Talk about transition. Of all city neighborhoods over the last decade, the one that has undergone the most change—and is poised for even more transformation—is South Beach, the area south of Market Street nearest the bay. Where there were once old homes that fell to warehouses and light industry, today there stand skyscraper condos and commercial buildings. In spots, it is not so much a neighborhood as the promise of one, its vast empty lots and highway ramps slated for more high-rise condos and acres of urban parks and landscaped “commons.” Once this latest round of changes takes effect, few will recognize the area from its former incarnations. To many who remember South Beach for its forlorn alleys, rundown storefronts, and seedy bars, that is a good thing. To others, the gritty character of these thriving blocks will be sanitized, replaced by a sleek, overly designed vision of the city of the future.

Yet, in South Beach—and particularly its sub-district, Rincon Hill—change has always been a constant. It started out as a bona-fide neighborhood in the 1850s, one of San Francisco’s first, with large fashionable homes dotting the flanks of the gently sloping hill (Rincon) after which the area was named. But then, with the rapid growth convulsing the young city, the area went into rapid decline, its once gracious streets and neat yards derided by none other than Robert Louis Stevenson, who in 1880 described it as "a new slum, a place of precarious sandy cliffs . . . solitary ancient houses and butt ends of streets." The area’s fate was sealed by the 1906 quake and fire, which reduced it to a smoldering heap. It was rebuilt in the early 20th century as a warehouse district with light industry mixed in, and it remained so for the next 75 years, especially after being bisected by the elevated approaches to the Bay Bridge and later the I-80 freeway. Many of the blocks north of the freeway between the Embarcadero and Second Street were razed during the city’s unenlightened urban renewal in the late 1950s through the ’60s, with anonymous towers and developments (such as those around Folsom and Second) filling in the gaps over the years. It’s a somewhat different story south of the freeway, where many post-1906 quake buildings remain (including the ClockTower building on Second) along with the historic South Park, an oval greensward (copied after one in London) lined with sycamores and surrounded by low-slung buildings that form a cohesive enclave even in our disjointed 21st century.

The northern and southern halves of South Beach today can still be considered in terms of new and old, with the half north of I-80 (a.k.a. Rincon Hill) where most of the new skyscrapers are slated (including the massive Transbay Transit Center redevelopment, with its Cesar Pelli-designed tower and adjoining Renzo Piano-designed high-rises), and the half south of I-80 where much of the redevelopment of historic older structures has already taken place. Because most of the northern half is still on the drawing board as a “transit-friendly” development (Folsom Street, for instance, is scheduled to become the main drag of a new neighborhood of low- and high-rise housing), the part of South Beach that currently has the most street life, businesses, restaurants, and other attractions is the southern half, particularly around South Park, Bayside Village and South Beach Marina (the latter two modern apartment complexes off the Embarcadero), the Delancey Street Foundation’s award-winning retail/residential complex, and the recently built AT&T ballpark, home of the San Francisco Giants baseball team. With the new ballpark and the office campuses mushrooming in Mission Bay next door, a number of new apartment and condo buildings have sprung up along King and Townsend streets, many designed to fit in with the brick-warehouse look of the historic neighborhood.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, South Beach has about 8,000 residents, the great majority of them white (70 percent) or Asian (18 percent), with the remaining 12 percent either African American or of mixed race. Many are young adults (median age here is 35). Most earn about $70,000 annually. They tend to rent (69 percent) rather than own their homes.

Though a few attractions exist in the northern half of South Beach (such as Palomino restaurant and Gordon Biersch Brewery in the landmark Hills Bros. Coffee building—not to mention One Rincon Hill South Tower, at 60 stories San Francisco’s tallest residential building), most of the action, both day and night, is in the southern half. By day, the area is buzzing with Web 2.0 employees, the old dotcom boom of the late ’90s having been replaced by a multimedia-invigorated wave of Internet entrepreneurs and their established businesses and start-ups (MySpace, Buzzlogic, Slide.com, Macworld, Technorati, Wired, and Twitter, to name a few). By night, they join locals and sports fans at any of the numerous restaurants and clubs that serve both the ballpark crowd (MoMo’s, Pete’s Tavern, O’Neill’s Irish Pub), as well as trend-seekers (Tres Agaves, Paragon Restaurant and Bar, Nova). A number of eateries with a long history here continue doing business as well (South Park Café on the high end, Zeke’s Sports Bar and Grill on the low).

With the newly renovated small parks and promenades along the Embarcadero, the bay feels open and accessible to all, albeit in the form of boat slips and refurbished wharves. Though there are no beaches, there’s nothing to stop people from picnics and al fresco rendezvous along the paved walks and benches that line the newly opened waterfront.

Public transportation has the area covered. The “T” and “N” streetcars run along King Street and the Embarcadero before joining other lines underground at Market near the Ferry Building. Most bus routes drop off and pick up passengers at the Caltrain Depot en route to or returning from the Financial District, some specifically designed to do so. Express buses (Nos. 80, 81, and 82) go from the Caltrain terminal at Fourth and King to the Financial District and back, as do the No. 10 local, traveling along Townsend and then Second, and the Nos. 30 and 45, which make the circuit between Caltrain and Union Square. The No. 12 goes up and down Folsom Street and also Second Street. AC Transit brings commuters over the Bay Bridge and back from Oakland and other points in the East Bay.

Due to the number of businesses with many employees, the presence of the ballpark, and the dense population, parking here can be fairly described as difficult to nerve-wracking, with one- or two-hour limits on streets that don’t have coin-depleting meters (25 cents for five minutes). The city’s Department of Parking and Traffic issues “U” and “Y” residential parking permits for tenants of buildings on particularly congested streets.

Because there are so few children in the area, no public schools are located in South Beach. Marin Day Schools has a preschool/day-care center on Harrison Street, and there is a sand playground with swings and climbing equipment in South Park. But for the most part, the few kids here travel outside of the neighborhood to go to school and for outdoor recreation.
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This is an inner-city neighborhood, so crime here is moderately high, according to the San Francisco Police Department. In addition to vandalism (graffiti, broken windows, etc.) and disturbing the peace (noise outside of bars and clubs), assaults were frequent in a recent three-month period, as were robberies. Burglaries were also common. This is a hot spot for stolen vehicles and car break-ins as well, indicative of a trend in San Francisco. Additionally, there have been five homicides reported in the last three years.

Real estate is a fairly pricey proposition here, even after a 30 percent slide in the recent recession. Though a few lofts and condos (small one- and two-bedrooms, with one bathroom) can be found for under $500,000, the norm throughout the neighborhood is high range: $800,000 to more than $1.5 million, according to Trulia.com. If you’re looking for views, the just-completed One Rincon Hill South Tower has one-, two-, and three-bedroom condos from $600,000 to $2.9 million. Rentals are likewise expensive: Studios in Bayside Village are $1,600 a month, with other complexes asking up to $2,000 for a studio, $2,200 for a one-bedroom, and from $3,000 to $5,000 for two-bedroom, two-bath condo rentals.

This is not necessarily an area that will please everyone. The traffic, noise, street bustle, and urban edge may prove to be too much for certain prospective residents, but just right for those who don’t need to get away from the city to enjoy it.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"A fun and affordable neighborhood in the shadow of the San Francisco Giants stadium"

South Beach is an excellent neighboorhood in San Francisco. It is still an up and coming neighborhood so there are still a handful of apartments you can get at a reasonable price, well reasonable for San Francisco anyway. The San Francisco Giants stadium is just a stones throw away, making this location perfect for baseball fans. But be aware that traffic and parking on game days can be a nightmare. South Beach is located right on the water, so it's a great place to be if you enjoy running my bay. It is a short walk to the Embarcadero as well as the ferry building where there are tons of amazing places to eat. There isn't much shopping in South Beach but it is very well connected, so it's easy to get to Market Street where all the good shopping is.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"The magic of baseball and biotech"

San Francisco’s South Beach is a newly developed Downtown destination. South Beach is home to the San Francisco Giants and the team’s AT&T Park, a waterfront arena with awesome views of the East Bay. The ballpark, alongside the new UCSF medical campus and biotech firms in neighboring Mission Bay have catalyzed revitalization in South Beach. Many excellent restaurants now thrive along the waterfront south of the Bay Bridge. There are also new condominium developments and luxury towers springing up in South Beach. Most noticeable is the Millennium Tower, at $350 million 58-story residential high-rise that opened in 2009. The Tower houses Michael Mina’s latest restaurant, RN47, a wine bar and restaurant that serves exquisite food inspired by the Burgundy region of France.

Parking in South Beach is relatively good with one major exception—game days. When the Giants play, the streets become clogged with thousands of people eager to get to the ballpark. Public transportation is jammed and parking lots fill up fast. My friends that work in the area have told me that they prefer to stay late at the office on game days to avoid navigating the crowds. Other than Giants fever, South Beach is easily navigated by foot or public transportation. Although relatively safe, at night the area can feel deserted. Pedestrians should remain aware of their surroundings.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
2yrs+

"Fun For Everyone"

Sports enthusiasts will enjoy PacBell Park, though the prices are insane for everything from parking to beer. All the same, the stadium is lovely. If you go behind the stadium you can see inside which is always fun.

Bike riders, roller bladers, joggers and even walkers will enjoy the paved route along the water. It's a fabulous path, especially as you pass behind the Park.

The view is amazing and it's a great place for a photo shoot. Go down by the arrow sculpture (near Howard and Embarcadero). Look one way and you see the Bay Bridge. The other is the Ferry Building. Either make a great back drop.

If you want a good steak, check out Paragon.

If you're driving in South Beach, parking is a nightmare during baseball season when there's a game, so check the schedule and see if it makes more sense to take public transit.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
2yrs+

"Transportation Hub of San Francisco"

South Beach is one of San Francisco's newest and take-notice communities. It is surrounded by the Embarcadero and Bay Bridge to the north and east, 2nd street and King street to the west and south. For decades there were only warehouses, storage yards, and broken-down piers. Now it is one of the ritziest neighborhoods in San Francisco. Locals even deemed it the "new Nob Hill."

One of the best features of South Beach is AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants. Notable restaurants in the area include Jack Falstaff, MoMo's, and Crossroads Cafe. There are many great wine bars within walking distance like Local Kitchen & Wine Merchant.

There is also the Farmer's Market at the Ferry Building along the Embarcadero at the foot of Market Street. This is the center of a transit hub that connects all of San Francisco's neighborhoods and the surrounding Bay communities. The marketplace is accessible by BART, MUNI, and Ferry Boat. The historic trolley cars (Line F Market) also stop directly in front of the Ferry Building. The Market Place is only closed three days a year, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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Best Streets in South Beach

1

The Embarcadero

4.5/5
"one of the best experience"
37.7892704915027 -122.388468201618
2

South Park Ave

3.5/5
"Away from the hustle and bustle"
37.7808615001748 -122.394862000442
3

King St

3/5
"Long Street With A Lot Happening"
37.7800258185636 -122.389531716696
4

2nd St

3/5
"Great Place for a Lunch Break!"
37.7820073395003 -122.392277449611
5

Main St

3/5
"the business area by the bay"
37.7883355809648 -122.390569261858

Unranked Streets in South Beach

1st St

2.5/5
"A street that give back to the community"
37.7860793813681 -122.392949707138
"Quiet street in San Francisco"
37.7869591442518 -122.395971723588
"Federal St: Nondescript, average"
37.7835586904222 -122.391932066067

Fremont St

2.5/5
"tall buildings, busy urban street, not so great neighborhood"
37.7880172048504 -122.393623788947

Guy Pl

2.5/5
"Just off of 1st Street"
37.7862380868814 -122.394679760556

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