8.0 out of 10

Queen Village

Ranked 9th best neighborhood in Philadelphia
39.938088075098 -75.1489356860883
Great for
  • Nightlife
  • Eating Out
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Shopping Options
  • Safe & Sound
Not great for
  • Lack of Traffic
  • Pest Free
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Parking
  • Cost of Living
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Retirees

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Fit for royalty"

Queens Village is one of the pricier yet prettier neighborhoods located in South Philadelphia. Adjacent to the neighborhood of Bella Vista, Queens Village is bound by Washington Avenue to the south, South Street to the north, the Delaware River to the east and 6th Street to the west.
The area is predominantly Caucasian but does have some African American and Hispanic residents. Queens Village consists mainly of row homes and a couple of houses have been created into multiple apartment units.
Due to its close proximity to South Street, parking can be a problem in Queens Village. On the weekends, the area can get fairly loud from the ruckus caused by all of the bars letting out on South Street.
Most of the area is very pleasant, however, and offers multiple bars, restaurants and shopping opportunities. Some of the nightlife destinations worth checking out in this area include Tattoo Mom’s, located on 6th and South and Manny Brown’s, which features an awesome draft beer selection. Since everything is so close, you can either walk or bike everywhere.
The only shady corner of the neighborhood is located at the intersection of 5th and Carpenter Streets, which was listed as number nine in a 2007 list of Philadelphia’s top ten recreational drug corners.
Pros
  • Close to everything
  • Lots of nightlife options
  • Shopping
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No parking
  • Drug corner on 5th and Carpenter
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Fit for a modern-day queen."

Just south of Center City, Queen Village is a quaint neighborhood bordering Society Hill. This area is a bit pricey, but full of diverse shops and strong community bonds.

Queen Village has a heavy Caucasian population, but some African American and Asian families have recently moved into the area. Residents include young professionals, independent artists, business owners, and young families. Many families opt to reside in Queen Village because community is held in high regard; there are two elementary schools, numerous playgrounds, two Free Library of Philadelphia branches and many art and music studios for children. The properties are typically three story row homes, and very well kept. The Queen Village Neighbors Association is a tight-knit group that focuses on the quality of life in the area and maintaining the streets, making for a very aesthetically pleasing atmosphere.

There is always something to do, primarily because South Street, which is known for a vibrant nightlife, borders the northern edge of the neighborhood. Shops, restaurants, cafés and bars line the street, the majority of which are privately owned. Many touring artists find their way through the area at the hole-in-the-wall music venue, the Theater of the Living Arts, located at 3rd and South. The famous Fabric Row runs through the neighborhood up 4th street, with numerous fabric and novelty shops for the frequent crafter or curious tourist. Thrift shops are aplenty, including Aids Thrift and Retrospect, known for selling vintage clothing, housewares and used arcade games.

Parking can be difficult, especially the closer you get to South Street. SEPTA buses service Queen Village, but the Broad Street Line is at least a ten-block walk. Overall, the area is full of fun for all ages, and very safe; although it is expensive, it is a cheaper alternative to the nearby Society Hill.
Pros
  • Clean and aesthetically pleasing
  • Lots of nightlife options
  • Shopping
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"The Queen of Philly Nightlife"

Home of Fabric Row, the oldest and largest fabric district in the country, Queen Village was first settled on by the Swedish. The name actually comes from the Swedish Queen Christina, who was on the throne in the 1600's when the Swedish first settled here. The area has 800 buildings on the Philadelphia Historical Register, which include mid-18th century homes.

Which brings us to the architecture. The neighborhood features 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century homes; some with interior courtyards. Some of the modern homes have patios on the roofs. Three-story homes are the theme of the neighborhood.

Many households have lived in their residencies for generations. Queen Village is also home to young professionals, artisans and writers, doctors and lawyers, as well as families with young children.

Transportation is not an issue. SEPTA routes 40, 57 and 64 run through the neighborhood. The area is right off the I-95 for those who have a vehicle. Be aware, however, because of weekend traffic, parking can be an absolute nightmare. Plenty of people ride bikes in the area but there aren't any bike lanes, so you must be very careful if this is your means of travel.

Development of knowledge is important in Queen Village. The area has two schools in its bounds. The Free Library of Philadelphia has two branches. There are also tons of programs and resources in the vicinity such as Settlement Music School and the Queen Village Art Center.

There also several parks, gardens and playgrounds in Queen Village. One is Shot Tower Playground, which is for ages 12 year of age and under. The park was named after Sparks Shot Tower, which is one of a handful left in the United States.

Queen Village has a happening nightlife. The more exciting side of South Street is within the bounds of the area. There are several bars and lounges. The TLA Theater is also right on the edge of the neighborhood and there is always a concert going on.

Queen Village features a diverse blend of businesses, parks, residencies and people. It is totally accessible to the rest of the city and is worth the visit. Regardless that the neighborhood features on of Philly's hottest nightlife spots, Queen Village still is rather quiet.
Pros
  • Close to everything
  • houses are nice
  • Lots of nightlife options
  • Shopping
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Parking can be tough
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
2yrs+

"Queen Village"

Not necessarily a village fit for a queen, this urban neighborhood has experienced a fit of renovation and increasing housing values. It is located along the Delaware River just below trendy South Street. Across the Washington Avenue boundary is located the Mummers Museum and Two Streets where after parades scores of Mummers gather to celebrate.

On the northern border at 336 Lombard Street once lived James Forten who developed a business manufacturing sail and sailing equipment. His wealth exceeded $100,000 and was built using both black and white workers. Forten was a founder of the Free African Society in 1787 and later became the first chairman of the Negro Convention held in 1830.

During every festival or concert along the river, hoards of people come through the neighbor to get their cars or to access public transportation. It can be a nuisance with trash strewn about. In the summer months, this is especially a problem.

Doting the corners are trendy cafes and restaurants. Near the corner of 4th and Bainbridge Street, there is the famous 4th Street Deli where politicians gather before and after every election.

William Meredith School is one of the top public schools in the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"The oldest neighborhood in town."

Queen Village is another one of those neighborhoods that is conveniently nestled between the hotbeds of activity without having to deal too much with the downsides of living near the excitement. It’s within walking distance of the Italian Market, South Street and Passyunk Ave. Not to mention it’s near Columbus Blvd where most of the strip malls are located, so shopping is easy to do.

Touted as the first neighborhood in Philadelphia, Queens Village has a lot of really pretty row homes. Every time I walk through the area I notice something different, usually a roof deck or smaller architectural detail. Rent is pretty expensive in this area because of its location and well kept houses.

Some residents are concerned about the future of the area and preserving its aesthetic appeal, thus the public-housing that spans from 3rd to 5th streets along Washington Ave is considered a bit of an eyesore and overall threat to the neighborhood. Safety and keeping the community clean is important to those who have lived in Queen Village for a lengthy period of time. There is definitely a noticeable difference in appearance from the condition of the privately owned homes to the public-housing.

Parking in this area can be difficult, most of the houses have their own private lots and side street parking is metered the closer you get to South Street. And the smaller streets are pretty narrow making parallel parking an even bigger nuisance.
Pros
  • convenient location
  • houses are nice
Cons
  • expensive
  • Parking can be tough
  • sketchy on the west side
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish

Best Neighborhoods to Live In

Best Cities to Live In

Tell everyone what you love about your neighborhood!

Leave a Review

Have a question?

How are schools? Is the area safe? What about public transit options?" Why not ask our community of locals!

Ask Now

Selling or Renting Your Home?

Maximize the selling price of your home by sharing what you love about your suburb to increase its appeal...

Leave a Review

Corporate Relocation Manager?

Enable your employees to share local knowledge in a private, trusted environment with those relocating... while building community.

Learn More