spsimons

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  • Reviews 5
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Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"South Philadelphia - Where the Hip People Meet"

South Philadelphia or “South Philly” as it is affectionally known is a huge area bounded by the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers. Quite a lot of Philadelphia history has taken place in South Philly and many historical figures have called South Philly home.

The Philadelphia Navy Yard has built a significant number of ships along the Delaware River and this same area has been the home of sports complexes where the Eagles, Flyers, and Sixers play.

Illustrious artists such as opera singers Marian Anderson and Mario Lanza were born and reared. Along the musical spectrum Chubby Checker who invented the Twist, Frankie Vallie, and The Roots hail from South Philly. Most notable is Kenny Gamble who along with Leon Huff created the Sound of Philadelphia which carried Philadelphia’s music around the world.

While Mayor, Frank Rizzo called the area home as this was key to his Italian political base.

Today, South Philly is a mixture of Irish and Asian with the “Italian” Market housing mainly Asian vendors. However, there are great Italian restaurants and pastry cafes which dot corners throughout the region.

Both the Walt Whitman and Ben Franklin Bridge reach to New Jersey from South Philly.
Buses crisscross the region and the Broad Street Subway is accessible by bus or a quick walk.
Pros
  • easily access public trans
  • Lots of bars and restaurants
  • most things are within walking distance
Cons
  • Parking can be an issue
  • trash everywhere
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
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"Southwark East"

Southwark East is one of the original neighborhoods of Philadelphia. It borders the Delaware River and served as a landing point for settlers making their way to the new land. Its stature in the history of this country as one of the first English Settlements in Philadelphia has been placed on the National Historical Registry which took effect on May 19, 1972.

The community is diverse and one where the generations stick-and-stay. Thus the row homes are populated by close-knit extended families. It is primarily Caucasian.

At every holiday and festival gathering the area is filled with merriment. Particularly in the spring, summer, and fall people make their way through Southwark East toward destinations such as Penns Landing and Festival Pier. Needless to say on these days of carnival both parking and litter, particularly beer cans, can be a severe problem. The Mummers prepare to stage their events in this area and after the parades return to Two Street for late night parties.

Recently, the area has been charged with hosting call girls after hours. Because of closeness to I-95, it is frequented by drug pick-ups and is listed as one of the top ten drug pick ups in the City of Philadelphia.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Cheap rent
  • easy parking
  • Parks!
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Elmwood - Country Living in the City"

Deep in Southwest Philadelphia is a neighborhood called Elmwood. For quite a while development authorities had slated the area to become an upscale residence. However, Elmwood has been to cleaned up to a reasonable area.

Elmwood borders Cobbs Creek and Delaware County where a very traditional and historic Quaker cemetery exist. With close proximity to the Philadelphia Airport there are a number of suites and bed and breakfasts nearby. Many are brand names familiar to most such as Korman Suites and Best Western. The Postal Service has placed its distribution center in the are because of the close area to I-95

Homes are of the tidy row variety with neat yards surrounding them. Residents have been neighbors for generations. Quite a few churches exist in Elmwood.

The Elmwood Roller Skating Rink is quite an attraction for area kids. The rink shares 41 likes on Facebook.

Events for the area include: Livable Communities and Philadelphia; 3rd Annual Philly Spring Cleanup; the Schylkill Trail Walk; and Bartram’s Garden to Dupont Crescent.

In the near future, the Nation’s “First National Water Trail” – in other words known as the “John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail” will design opportunities for recreation, historical interpretation, and environmental education. There will be efforts to restore a 200-mile long estuary.

In the near future, the Nation’s “First National Water Trail” – in other words known as the “John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail” will design opportunities for recreation, historical interpretation, and environmental education. There will be efforts to restore a 200-mile long estuary.





The Nation’s “First National Water Trail” – more properly, the “John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail.” And what a trail! – imagine the opportunities for recreation, historical interpretation, environmental education and efforts to restore a 200-mile long estuary – the largest in the world - that has been witness to some of the most profound history this nation enjoys.
Pros
  • Generations of families
  • Affordable place to live
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Passyunk - deep inside Philly"

Passyunk in Philadelphia is a typical urban neighborhood which reminds you of Greenwich Village in New York. Many of the houses are row homes with store fronts on the sidewalks and living spaces on top.

The streets are crisscross in grid-like fashion. It is an easy walk to Broad Street where public transportation can easily whisk you north to Center City and City Hall and south to the Sports Complexes where the Eagles, Flyers, and Phillies play.
Parking is a problem and if you are traveling to Passyunk you should plan for a search to find parking.

One nice thing about Passyunk is the interest in urban and cultural activities that has sprung up over the past few years. There are marching bands and high stepping dream teams for young people. As well, one of the singing divas gives lessons to up and coming singers. Devon Gardener who has sung with both Duke Ellington and his son Mercer Ellington, teaches young people in the high arts. Recently, she has sung at the Episcopal Cathedral.

There are cafes which feature opera on demand and incredible food at cozy tables. The area was traditionally Catholic and retains the spirit and fine crafts.
Pros
  • Public transportation
  • Nearby to Center City and South Sports Complexes
  • 24 hour CVS and Dunkin Donuts
  • Caters to young people
  • Decent bar selection
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No parking ever
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Haverford North"

Haverford North is a community just off of Haverford Avenue, an old Indian Trail. It is bounded by West Powelton to the east, Belmont, to the north, and the outer reaches of University City. For many years, it was overshadowed by public housing projects which have since been torn down. It is beginning to regain a footing with new housing developments of single family homes replacing the old stacked apartments.

Several bus routes travel through the neighborhood and the trolley is on Lancaster Avenue. Most of the public transportation is within walking distance.

There is a huge food market at the corner of 46th and Market Street and there is plenty of shopping along Lancaster Avenue.

University City is nearby and can be accessed through a quick trolley or bike ride. The Martha Washington School services the area and Lee Park provides playground facilities.

Not much happens in Haverford North. It is a quiet community of African Americans with a plethora of churches, mortuaries, and a few bars. It has gained from the close proximity to the University City District and perhaps will one day be incorporated into this special services area.
Pros
  • Proximity to University City
  • Inexpensive Living
Cons
  • Housing stock needs refurbishing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
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"Wissahickon - Natures Glory"

The Wissahickon is a tributary to the Schuylkill River. Located in the northern west portion of the city, a visit to Wissahickon might envision forestry and hikes. The fall season is especially beautiful with the leaves that are changing colors.

It is on America’s list of 600 National Natural Landmarks.

Deep within the park is the Wissahickon Valley Green restaurant with lovely porches and gracefully appointed dining areas. It welcomes runners and hikers as well as those in their Sunday best for brunch.

Homes along the Wissahickon are comprised of row homes and single family dwellings. The
Lincoln Drive is known for its stone mansions and large yards. It is a major roadway to the Schuylkill Expressway and can become quite crowded during rush hours. Buses are rarely available and trolleys and subways are non-existent.

Writers Edgar Allan Poe and John Greenleaf Whittier have been known to derive literary inspiration from the area. Poe wrote “Morning on the Wissahiccon.” Whittier describe the journeys of Johannes Kelpius in his poem, The Pennsylvania Pilgrim.

The Lenni Lanape Indians first discovered the area and the named the creek the Wissahickon which signifies catfish or “stream of yellowish color.”
Pros
  • Stone Mansions
  • Nature
Cons
  • transportation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Parking 2/5
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"Germany Hill"

Germany Hill is a sliver of a neighborhood above Manayunk and below the northwest border of Philadelphia. On each side rests the Schuylkill Expressway and Henry Avenue/Fairmount Park.
Ivy Ridge Green has undertaken an initiative to clean up the Ivy Ridge Trail which runs through Germany Hill. “Two Hours on Tuesdays” started in the summer of 2010 whereby gardening tools were provided and neighbors pitched in to spruce up.

Afterwards, the crew would join at Union Jacks a local watering hole for beers and other
refreshment. These events are held every two weeks.

Residents are adamant about keeping their green space green. The community galvanized against the zoning for development of 50 new residences in the area. They view it as the last green space near Manayunk. You will need a car to get around.

Schools that service the area include: Holy Child, Academy in Manayunk, William Levering School, and Belmont Hills Elementary School. The Saul W.B. Agricultural School is a vocation technical public school.
Pros
  • Peace and Quiet
  • Family Environment
Cons
  • Far from Center City
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"North Central - Location, Location, Location"

Philadelphia’s North Central neighborhood is experiencing the economic pressures of Temple University to the east and Center City to the south. In a word, it is poised to benefit from location, location, location. During the past 6 years, property values have increased by some 25 percent according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The homes are huge! Many are multi-story with wooden staircases and touches of Art Deco. Rehabbing these beauties will attract many new residences. Another attribute is the close proximity to transportation with buses along Broad Street and subways underground.

When former Mayor John Street represented the district in City Council, he saw to it that Temple did not continue acquiring land and building facilities such as the Liacouris Center until the university made provisions for longtime residents. Thus, in the middle of North Central are the studios for the international renowned WRTI, Temple University’s Jazz and Classical Radio Station. Also along Cecil B. Moore Avenue is Temple’s Business Development Center which is helping to revitalize the area which was once ravaged by the inner city riots of the 60s and 70s.

The population is comprised of 60 percent African American and 40 percent Puerto Rican.
Pros
  • Beautiful Homes in need of rehab
  • Proximity to Temple University
  • inexpensive
  • Transportation to Center City
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Wynnefield Heights - Peace in the City"

Wynnefield Heights is an up-scale neighborhood located between Monument Road and Ford Roads. The housing stock is comprised of low-rise apartment buildings, duplexes, and single family dwellings.

The Wynnefield Heights Civic Association is a strong community advocate which has worked to maintain facilities in the neighbor. Their mission is to provide interaction between the businesses and neighbors of the area as well as “create a clean, safe, and responsible community.”

Most recently, the civic association held a flea market raise money for an upgrade of the Consohohocken Windemere Playground.

Along its western border, City Line Avenue, are a number of shopping complexes such as the Pathmark Shopping Center and Target Department Store. A number of restaurants which are an easy drive from Center City are located there. Bus routes travel to points east and west as well as Center City from points along City Line Avenue.

Property values have declined by 11 percent in the last six years according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Philadelphia’s Osteopathic Medicine holds classes here as well as serving for the site of the 76ers basketball team practice facilities.

Wynnefield Heights is home to the mega-church, Sharon Baptist Church on Conshohocken Avenue.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
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"Fairmount Park - Spectacular Views of the Region"

Fairmount Park is nestled amongst the green trees and next to the Schuylkill Expressway in the northwest quadrant of the city. The neighborhood takes its name from the largest inner city park system in the United States. It incorporates 63 separate parks totaling 9,200 acres. As well, the first Zoological Park in America is located within the grounds.

In 1972, the area became a part of the U.S. National Registry of Historic Places.

Rising above the trees are apartment and condominium complexes that comprise The Presidential complex. Individual buildings take their names from various U.S. Presidents. From the high floors, the views of the region are spectacular. Pools, tennis courts, and restaurants are favored amenities.

Several of the mansions have found new usages such as Mount Pleasant which serves as an extension of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Belmont Mansion which hosts receptions. Other former residences include the Hatfield House, Randolph House, Historic Strawberry Mansion, and Woodford Mansion.

With the Schuylkill Expressway circling the area, it is a close drive eastward to Center City as well as points northward. Public transportation in the form of bus routes transverse City Line Avenue to points east, west and south.
Pros
  • awesome views
  • great exercise
  • Lots of parks
  • nature
Cons
  • Take care with night time visits
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Carroll Park - Where Families Nest"

Travelling westward midway in West Philadelphia is an area known as Carroll Park.

The neighborhood is not known for making news headlines and prefers to be a quiet enclave of row house and single family dwellings. It has borders with three main avenues: Lancaster, Lansdowne, and Girard. Lancaster and Girard Avenues have trolleys serving the area.

Primarily African American, it has a strong work ethic and strives for the betterment of its children. There are a number of barber and beauty shops where residents catch up on the latest “chit chat.”

Most appropriately, Carroll Park Neighbors, the community association, has hung banners proclaiming: “Where Neighbors Become Friends.”

The famous astronaut Guion Bluford grew up in the area and has a school named in his honor. He was the first African American to enter into space exploration. Mr. Bluford often returns to the area to give speeches that inspire young people to reach for their dreams.

Other schools in the area include: The Mastery Charter School – Shoemaker Campus and St. Rose of Lima School, a Roman Catholic parochial school.
Pros
  • Community Spirit
  • Clean
  • Lots of parks
  • Lovely people
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
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"Kingsessing - Not fit for a King"

Kingsessing is a neighborhood trying to hold its own despite crumbling economic conditions. Many families have lived there a longtime however they are interspersed with renters and abandon properties. It is a rough and tumble neighborhood. Property values have declined by 25 percent in the last six years according to a survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

It is located at the lower southwestern edge of Philadelphia and bounded by Cobbs Creek, 52nd Street, Baltimore and Woodland Avenues. The Philadelphia Airport is nearby and trolley routes go straight to Center City.

In the early nineties, drugs swept the area and community groups responded in kind. During this time, the huge park of the same name was replete with festivals all in an effort to keep the kids off of the streets.

Bartram Gardens is located there. It was established by John Bartram as a repository for plants, herbs, and flowers. The gardens are still in operation with a new farm for youth just opened.
Bartram High School is located in the area as well as a U.S. Post Office and a branch of the Free Library.

A recent complaint against the Kingsessing Recreation Center has been settled in favor of a Caucasian woman who charged discrimination against whites.
Pros
  • Airport nearby
  • Direct route to Center City
  • cheap
Cons
  • abandoned properties
  • drugs
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"Ludlow"

Ludlow is a North Philadelphia neighborhood bordering Temple University. With the explosive growth of Temple, soon this will become a thriving student community. Presently, there are tennis courts and parking facilities nearby.
Its close proximity to Temple University and Center City has caused property values to soar by 29 percent in the last 6 years according to a survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Ludlow Village is the name of the new community where 58 housing units are planned. There is an initiative to include Youth Build, the construction training program for inner city youth.

Controversy has struck as City Councilman Darrell Clark introduced legislation that would limit, if not, ban student housing in the area. However, real estate developers argue to the contrary stating that students are good for community redevelopment.

The borders include Girard Avenue to the south and Cecil B. Moore Avenue to the north. There is North 5th Street on the east and North 9th Street to the west. Primarily it is an African American and Hispanic neighborhood. There can be burst of crime but it is a relatively quiet and family oriented neighborhood.

Transportation is readily available with the restored trolleys of 1940s vintage running along Girard Avenue. Broad Street is not far with its bus routes and subway stations.
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Pros
  • Close to Center City
  • Close to Temple University
  • Family environment
Cons
  • Crime problems
  • Trash
  • Students
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"Eastwick - On the edge of town"

On the southern border of Philadelphia is the community of Eastwick, named after Andrew M. Eastwick. Originally, it was settled by the Lenni Lenape Indians who found the area ripe for hunting and fishing and the swampy environs were nicknamed "The Meadows.. Recently, The Heinz National Wildlife Refuge was built as a refuge for wildlife and connects "Eastwick to Tinicum Township.

For many years, it was a diverse working class community whose settlements of all races found work at the nearby industry such as the oil refineries and sewage treatment plants. Because of the close proximity to Interstate 95, the U.S. Postal Service located a regional processing facility here. The area is serviced by a branch of the Free Library.

Regrettably, it has seen a decline in property values by some 38 percent according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Nevertheless, renewed interest in development has caused many historic churches to have to move their facilities rebuilding with funds from the Redevelopment Authority.

Portions of the area were secured for building the Philadelphia Airport. A major trolley line and regional rails run into Center City through West Philadelphia. A number of short-term suites has located to service business travellers to-and-from the airport.
Pros
  • Beautiful area
  • Diverse housing opportunities
  • Great parks for kids
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
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"Garden Court - Distinctive Architecture"

Garden Court sits to the west of University City and therefore is populated with university related faculty and staff. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 5, 1984.

The neighborhood was the vision of Clarence Siegel who began amassing property in order to actualize this community.
Siegel started building after World War I and reached into Britain for many of the architectural touches that grace the neighborhood. As a type of center square, the Garden Court Plaza serves as a nucleus. An article from the Philadelphia Inquirer in the 1920s identified Garden Court as one of “the most exclusive locations in West Philadelphia.”
The placement of single family homes with driveways and back alleyways helped facility the use of the automobile in the 1920s. Trees and green plants are plentiful. Regrettably, the Great Depression served to halt progress.

As a testament to diversity, the area is home for two parks: The Garden Court and Malcolm X Park. Both host festivals and music events especially in the summer.

The boundaries include: Spruce Street, Locust Street, Cedar Avenue, 46th to 52nd Streets. Transportation is frequent with a bus route along Spruce Street and trolleys along Cedar Avenue.
Pros
  • Distinctive Architecture
  • Clean
  • low crime
  • Pretty neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Allegheny West - Not Forgotten"

Nestled along West River Drive, Allegheny West has been a housing community for workers at the Tasty Baking Company, a Philadelphia institution as well as Pep Boys. For more than 30 years the Allegheny West Foundation has served as a stabilizing entity to keep the area livable.

Most residents are African American in the working class. It is bounded by the Roosevelt Blvd and Schuylkill Expressway which made the area so convenient for manufacturing to move materials and finished goods.

Because of the loss of manufacturing, property values have dropped by 39 percent over the past 6 years according to a recent Philadelphia Inquirer survey. However, most residents are homeowners numbering over 70 percent. The housing stock is basically urban row homes.

Supporting institutions include: 22nd Street Commercial Corridor, the Allegheny West Industrial Corridor, and Temple University and Health Science Center. A number of civic groups operate in the area including: Chalmers Park Gardeners, Forgotten Blocks, Community Action Group, and RAH Civic Association.

The A. Philip Randolph Skills Center and Dobbins Technical High School service the youth.

Public transportation is plentiful with bus routes crisscrossing the neighborhood to points west and north. And, there are Regional Rail stops in close proximity.
Pros
  • Great public transporation access
  • Affordable to live
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"East Mount Airy - Lovely Just Lovely"

Heading northward, East Mount Airy is a neighborhood to the east (or right) of Germantown Avenue. Although it is less tony than its western counterpart, East Mount Airy takes great pride in its logistics. Comprised of tidy row homes, many with fancy back decks, the neighbors association is one of the most cohesive in the city.

East Mount Airy Neighbors publishes a monthly newsletter and sponsors a farmers’ market. There is a Learning Tree and a Community Development Corporation. The community is known for one of the highest voter turnouts in the city and its’ motto is “Working to Make a Good Community Better.” In 2011, a new endeavor is underway with a “Cooking with Who” festival bringing together local residents with prominent chefs from the area.

Transportation is good with a Regional Rail Station and buses that traverse Germantown Avenue. However, the winter months can be difficult because of the hills. Most homeowners have cars and parking is ample.

William Allen’s Mansion served as the focal point for settlements as Philadelphians left the city because of the Yellow Fever Epidemic in the late 1800s. Originally it was the site for the Lenni Lenape Indians.
Pros
  • Leafy green trees
  • affordable
  • diverse
Cons
  • some trouble spots near Germantown Avenue
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
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"Fern Rock - A Settled Enclave"

On your way to the Northern outskirts of town, you might pass by Fern Rock. It is a middle class neighborhood of African Americans who maintain neatly appointed row and single family homes. Property values reflect this care having increased by 9 percent in the past 6 years according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Most of the homes are 3 bedrooms.

Perhaps it is best known as the last stop on the Broad Street subway that runs to the stadiums in South Philadelphia. Accessibility to other parts of the city is no problem with the Fern Rock Station as well as the Olney Transportation Station, both on the Broad Street Line. On major game days, suburbanites flock to the station for high speed trains that do directly to the sports venues with limited stops.

The area is bounded by North Broad Street, W. Godfrey Avenue and West Olney Avenue. It is the site for the Northwest Regional Center of the Community College of Philadelphia. Broad and Olney is the location of Girls High School and Central High School two of the top public schools in the region. Einstein Hospital services the area.

Crime has been a problem with robbery and burglary plaguing the community.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Public Transportation Access
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
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"West Mount Airy - Leafy Green"

As the name implies, West Mount Airy is a dream neighborhood to the west of Germantown Avenue. The Regional Rail stop is along the western edge and is reliable most of the time with the exception of inclement weather.
West Mount Airy is the home of Weavers Way. It is one of the original food co-ops in America and will be an active participant in International Cooperatives Month sponsored by the United Nations.

Weaver’s Way sponsors farms and bike co-ops. As a part of the fall calendar, Monday’s are deemed as “Meatless Monday’s” and Apple Days are a part of this month’s calendar.

The neighborhood is diverse with many African American professionals settling in the comfortable tree-lined streets. Within the past 6 years, properties have increased in value by sixteen percent according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Known for its liberal political leanings, Comcast Executive David L. Cohen played host to President Barack Obama this past spring. On the other side of the political spectrum, mayoral candidate Sam Katz has called West Mount Airy home.

West Mount Airy is the location for some of the best schools in the region including St. Barnabas Episcopal Academy and the Springside School
Pros
  • diverse
  • Fairmount Park
  • Lovely houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
jimhart241
jimhart241 My son and daughter-in-law have moved there this year. Parking is bad, public transportation very good. Families leave their children's toys outside--seems to be a safe neighborhood. Its street are, in the main hilly so that it is going to be tough on people with back problems or who use wheel chairs, motorized chairs, etc. Friendly.
2yrs+
jimhart241
jimhart241 Having read, just now, after writing my own comment, I'd say all other comments accurately describe the neighborhood in areas I did not get into.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
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"Glenwood - Tough Turf"

Some neighborhoods are across the tracks however Glenwood is right smack in middle of them. Glenwood is the stop for Amtrak's Northeast Regional Rail's North Philadelphia Station. For many years, Glenwood served as the railroad lines that brought materials into the manufacturing plants of North Philadelphia and finished goods out to all points north, south, and west. It was a bustling terminal that kept the masses working with solid, income jobs. Regrettably, with the move of manufacturing work overseas, this is no longer the case.

As a result, the working class neighborhood destabilized with drugs and crime moving in. There are few if any services in the neighborhood. Schools, libraries, shopping and health care do not exist.

The area is bounded by West Glenwood Avenue, North Broad Street and 23rd Street to the west. Property values have declined by 39 percent with many homes abandoned. It is not an inviting environment.

Right in the heart of North Broad Street is Joe Frazier's Gym where young boxers looking for a way out are trained. Further up Broad Street is a settlement of Muslims with a regional Mosque.

If you are not comfortable in a lower class African American and/or Puerto Rican neighborhood, this is not the spot for you.
Pros
  • Public Transportation on Broad Street
  • Regional Rails
  • Amtrak Station
Cons
  • Drugs
  • High crime
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
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"Southwest Center City - Good Eats!"

When people refer to Philadelphia’s nightlife of the roarin' ‘40s and 50s, they are talking about the South Street boundary of this neighborhood. Eateries, movie theaters, speakeasies and nightclubs made this a must-visit spot to see Lady Day, Ella, and the big bands. A few boarded-up remnants of those days remain. However, some barber shops and BBQs still do a booming business.

Gentrification however has given the area new life. Several institutions call the area home including: Graduate Hospital, Marian Anderson Memorial Home and Park, and The Philadelphia Tribune. The Tribune is the oldest continuously-run African American newspaper in the country. And the Christian Street YMCA holds the same distinction.

It is home to one of the first African American Baptist churches in the nation, The First African Baptist Church. And the Frederick Douglas Memorial Hospital and Training was established on Lombard Street.

What makes the area so popular? It is a brisk walk or bike ride across the bridge to University City and equally convenient
to Center City. As well, public transportation is easily accessible.

Trendy cafes and bistros have sprung up where the nightclubs once held court. The Jamaican Jerk Hut with authentic Jamaican food is located at the corner of Broad and South. Good Eats!
Cons
  • No parking
  • No parks
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
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"Southwest Center City - Good Eats!"

When people refer to Philadelphia’s nightlife of the roarin' ‘40s and 50s, they are talking about the South Street boundary of this neighborhood. Eateries, movie theaters, speakeasies and nightclubs made this a must-visit spot to see Lady Day, Ella, and the big bands. A few boarded-up remnants of those days remain. However, some barber shops and BBQs still do a booming business.

Gentrification however has given the area new life. Several institutions call the area home including: Graduate Hospital, Marian Anderson Memorial Home and Park, and The Philadelphia Tribune. The Tribune is the oldest continuously-run African American newspaper in the country. And the Christian Street YMCA holds the same distinction.

It is home to one of the first African American Baptist churches in the nation, The First African Baptist Church. And the Frederick Douglas Memorial Hospital and Training was established on Lombard Street.

What makes the area so popular? It is a brisk walk or bike ride across the bridge to University City and equally convenient
to Center City. As well, public transportation is easily accessible.

Trendy cafes and bistros have sprung up where the nightclubs once held court. The Jamaican Jerk Hut with authentic Jamaican food is located at the corner of Broad and South. Good Eats!
Pros
  • Jamaican Jerk Hut
  • Good Transportatino
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
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"Hunting Park - A Philly Saves the Day"

Hunting Park has had a crime-riddled reputation in recent years. It is a neighborhood in upper North Philadelphia that has been the victim of an underground stream causing homes to sink into the ground.

Since the 1920s there has been a recreation park which has recently received a $3.3 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and advisory support from the Fairmount Park Conservancy. Phillies first baseman, Ryan Howard, made a major contribution toward rebuilding the baseball field.

For the first time, a farmer’s market operated in the park each week during the summer of 2011.

Hunting Park is largely populated by African Americans, Puerto Ricans and Dominicans with 50 percent Black and 50 percent Hispanic. Property values have dropped by 17 percent in recent years, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Access to public transportation along Broad Street is good.

Life has been breathed into the area by the arrival of the Squash Smarts Program. Established some 6 years ago, Squash
Smarts is an after school program that tutors and mentors inner city youth on a path to college. A new facility moved this program from the campus of Drexel University to North Philadelphia.

There is a US Post Office, Family Medical Center and Hunting Park Christian Academy.
Pros
  • New Farmers Market
  • Large park
Cons
  • Drugs
  • Bad housing conditions
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
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"Hawthorne - Up and Coming!"

Hawthorne, nestled between Bella Vista, Washington Square West and Broad Street, was once a neighborhood that you ran through: quick, fast and in a hurry. That is changing with the gentrification that is occurring on both sides of the major artery Broad Street as well as better housing for low income residents.

It was known for the huge, multi-story public housing residences named for the late Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. An implosion featured on all of the television stations demolished this public housing in 1999. The Philadelphia Housing Authority has spent $81 million constructing 245 new two and three story row homes.

More upscale houses are under construction. In recent years, the property values have increased by 9 percent, according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.


The shops still have a “seedy” tone including several pawn shops. Barber and beauty shops are interspersed. However, several classy restaurants such as Ms. Tootsie’s have opened venues on the northern South Street border.

Optimism abounds as longtime residents definitely feel an improvement in the neighborhood. In March 2011 ground was broken on a new park at 12th and Catherine Streets.
Pros
  • Center City is walking distance
  • Close to Italian Market
  • Lots of great restaurants and bars
Cons
  • Limited parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Queen Village"

Not necessarily a village fit for a queen, this urban neighborhood has experienced a fit of renovation and increasing housing values. It is located along the Delaware River just below trendy South Street. Across the Washington Avenue boundary is located the Mummers Museum and Two Streets where after parades scores of Mummers gather to celebrate.

On the northern border at 336 Lombard Street once lived James Forten who developed a business manufacturing sail and sailing equipment. His wealth exceeded $100,000 and was built using both black and white workers. Forten was a founder of the Free African Society in 1787 and later became the first chairman of the Negro Convention held in 1830.

During every festival or concert along the river, hoards of people come through the neighbor to get their cars or to access public transportation. It can be a nuisance with trash strewn about. In the summer months, this is especially a problem.

Doting the corners are trendy cafes and restaurants. Near the corner of 4th and Bainbridge Street, there is the famous 4th Street Deli where politicians gather before and after every election.

William Meredith School is one of the top public schools in the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
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"Haddington - A Quiet Powerhouse"

Haddington is a classic West Phildelphia African American community: conservative and cohesive. It started as an enclave for some of Philadelphia’s most prosperous and politica and in some respects, remains so today. William Smith, a member of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, owned quite a bit of the land. The Haddington Title and Trust was a prominent financial institution at 60th and Market Street.

Crystal Bird Fauset called Haddington home living with her husband Dr. Arthur Fauset at 5403 Vine Street. She was the first African-American women elected as a member of the Pennsylvania State Legislature. After her election in 1938, she became a member of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s cabinet on the issues of Black people.

In 1988, Haddington was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places because of the architectural work of E. Allen Wilson commissioned by Smith. The architectural style is Colonial Revival and Classical Revival.

Recently, a shopping center has been added. This Vine Street location has become the departure point for group trips to Atlantic City and shopping strips to Lancaster County.

Prominent African American churches are located in the area including Mt. Carmel Baptist, Better Way Bible Church, and St. Matthews AME church. The area has been a power base for many up-and-coming politicians.
Pros
  • Affordable place to live
  • Great for older residents
  • Nice neighbors
Cons
  • Need a car to get places
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
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"Fairmount - Enjoy The Park and The River"

Fairmount is a neighborhood just north of Center City. It begins at the Art Museum and is bounded on the east by 20th Street. To the south is the Benjamin Franklin Parkway which runs from City Hall to the Art Museum and is modeled after Paris’ Champs Elysees.

Three historic institutions are located here: The Fairmount Dam and Water Works, Girard College and the Eastern State Pennitenary. The Fairmount Dam and Water Works was built in 1822 and used to pump water from the Schuylkill River into the residences and businesses of Philadelphia. It now hosts quaint dining facilities.

Girard College is famous for the protests led by Attorney Cecil B. Moore which prompted a judge to break the will of Stephen Girard which banned African Americans from attending. Built in 1831, Girard College had been limited to poor, orphaned Caucasian boys.

The Eastern State Pennitenary was built in 1829 for the purpose of rehabilitating prisoners rather than merely incarceration. Tours are available the entire year however they are especially popular during the Halloween Season.

Boat House Row, along the Schuylkill River, maintains 10 rowing clubs, most of which are affiliated with the universities.
Bus routes run from Center City northward but there are no trolleys or Regional Rails that service the area. Walking and biking is prevalent.
Pros
  • clean streets
  • close to museums
  • trees
Cons
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Belmont - Inner City Living"

Belmont is a West Philadelphia neighborhood that is adjacent to Fairmount Park and the entranceway to the famous Belmont Mansion.

At one time, Stephen Smith lived at 1050 Belmont Avenue and amassed a tremendous fortune in the lumber and coal business. With $250,000 donated in 1867, he established the Stephen Smith Home for the Aged which is still operating today. It was also the site of temporary housing for the Pullman Porters.

On the corner of 40th and Lancaster Avenue there is a block long mural dedicated to the many historical aspects of the Belmont Community.

Today, Belmont is comprised of African Americans and has a median income of $20,527 according to statistics from 2009. Most residences are larger row homes with 2 to 3 bedrooms with a number being abandoned. The Belmont Improvement Association is working diligently on upgrading the neighborhood.

Since this is a lower income neighborhood, public transportation is important. Trolley lines run along Girard Avenue and Lancaster Avenue. The restored historic trolley from the 1940s runs along Girard Avenue from Kensington along the Delaware River to points south. Lancaster Avenue routes take you directly to Center City. Bus routes crisscross to points further west.

Known as a “food desert” because there are no supermarkets in walking distance, urban gardens have begun to sprout. Former members of the University of Pennsylvania Urban Nutrient Initiative have begun growing fresh fruits and vegetables on Preston Street. Their harvest includes: kale, collards, mustard greens, tomatoes, peppers, carrots, and herbs. These bags of fresh foods are available for local residents to purchase.
Pros
  • Close to the Universities
  • inexpensive
  • parking is easy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
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"Fox Chase - Chasing a Cure for Cancer"

Worldwide, this area on the outskirts of Philadelphia is best known for the cancer treatment center: The Fox Chase Cancer Center. Many discoveries have occurred at this facility founded in 1904 including: Hepatitis B virus and vaccine as well as the first mouse model of malignancy. In 2004, a Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to researcher Irwin Rose. Presently, there are talks of an affiliation with Temple University.

The origins of Fox Chase, however, are located in its name. During the Colonial Period, hunters actually chased foxes to bring back game to the settled portions of the city.

There is a suburban-like feel to the neighborhood that has boundaries which include: Fillmore Street, Hartel Avenue, and Hasbrook Avenue in the Northeast. Jeanes Hospital is also a major facility servicing the area. Burholme Park provides amble recreation space.

The area has experienced a major decline in property values by some 11 percent according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.
There are two Regional Rail Stations however having a car would be useful.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Parks!
  • Quiet area to live in
  • relaxing
Cons
  • Far from Center City
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
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"Nicetown - Think Twice!!"

Nicetown-Tioga is located in North Philadelphia just below the Medical Schools of Temple University at Broad and Allegheny. Its boundaries include Wingohocking Street, Roberts Avenue, Broad Street, and Allegheny Avenue.

In the pre-Revolutionary War period the area was settled by Mennonites. They were followed by Irish-Catholic and Polish-Jewish settlers. During the great migration from the South in the years following World War II, numerous African Americans found their way to Nicetown in search of a better life. The manufacturing plants in North Philadelphia have been a source of steady work.

Many of the multi-story homes have been carved into apartments bringing renters and a horde of children. Combatting crime is a constant struggle and the area is not recommended for new-comers or the faint of heart.

Property values have declined by 17 percent in the last five years according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Transportation is excellent as it is the crossroads to the wealthier northwest regions of the city. Germantown Avenue and Erie Avenue carry an abundance of trolleys and bus routes. The Broad Street subway runs underground.


Area residents strive to maintain a vibrant community. The area is host to a number of organizations including: The Salvation Army VFW Post, Habitat for Humanity, and The American Red Cross.
Pros
  • Affordable to live
  • Easy access to public trans
Cons
  • Dirty
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Andorra - Classy Environs"

Andorra is a traditional suburban neighborhoods sitting on the border of Philadelphia and Montgomery County. Andorra is a French name for a region between France and Spain.

In Philadelphia, as the elevation becomes higher, the neighborhood becomes greener and features the makings of suburban life. There is a shopping mall and a movie theatre. Incomes are high and property values strong. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer survey, during the past five years, the value of properties has risen some 57 percent from 400,000 in 2005 to 630,000 in 2011. Many of the owner-occupied homes have upwards to 3 bedrooms.

The population is nearly 90 percent Caucasian. There are single-digit representations for Asian, Hispanic and African American residents. The median income ranges to $55,000 plus.

Rumor has it that controversial Eagles quarterback has acquired a multi-million dollar home in the area. All eyes are pealed on the mega home.

Ridge Avenue and Henry Avenue are the two main thorofares. There is need to own a car because of the distance and snowy winters can make travelling treacherous.

The Philadelphia Cricket Club, Ace Golf Club, and the Sunnybrook Country Club are nearby. Several stone churches for Catholics and Episcopalians grace the area.
Pros
  • Good for families
  • Gorgeous neighborhood
  • Suburban feel
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
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"Port Richmond - A Close-Knit Polish Enclave"

Port Richmond is experiencing a surge of interest as housing prices are pushing residents outside of the near-Center City areas and closer to the Delaware River. Housing prices have risen by 11 percent in the last five years according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer. A typical row home will sell for $117,000.

It is one of Philadelphia’s classic river wards settled originally by Polish immigrants who formed a strong working class community. Glass and textiles were mainstays of employment. It has been the site for shipbuilding and coal transfer. Tioga Marine Terminal operates at the Delaware River.

The world-famous Polish American String Band hails from Port Richmond guaranteeing a wonderful News Years Day with their parade down Broad Street.

Many Polish churches and cathedrals dot the tree lined streets. Lithuanians comprise a large part of the population. Small shops featuring Polish delicacies such as babka, chrusciki and paczki dot the area. The Kracus Market thrives on Richmond Street.

The New Kensington Community Development Corporation provides service to the area.

Access is plentiful with I-95 between the Delaware River and the community. Public transportation is provided by The Market Frankford El and bus routes that run parallel to I-95.
Pros
  • Homey feel
  • inexpensive
  • Lots of little shops
  • Nice people
  • polish heritage
Cons
  • Crime increasing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
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"Lexington Park - Spacious, Gracious Living"

Lexington Park is one of Northeast Philadelphia’s bastions of civility. With a middle class population of second and third generation immigrants, it prides itself on twin and single family homes. The streets are tree lined with numerous lawns and flowers beds gracing the homes. Its boundaries include Roosevelt Blvd, Hartell Park, and Fairmount Park. On the northeast border lies Nazareth Hospital.

Close to the Northeast Philadelphia Airport, it is nestled into a remote section that is not well serviced by public transportation.

One claim to fame is the childhood home of Sylvester Stallone for the Rocky film series fame. On a trip to Philadelphia, Sylvester and his brother Frank returned to the old neighborhood for a visit. It is primarily a Caucasian neighborhood with other nationalities in the single-digit range.

Abraham Lincoln High School and Father Judge High School service the area. The James Ramp Memorial Park is nearby featuring a wide array of winter and summer sports. In the late 1970s, James Ramp was the police officer shot by the MOVE organization in a raid on their compound in the Powelton Village section of the city.

Home values in recent years have declined from a high of $195,000 in 2007 to the present value of $170,000, some 15 percent. Many homes have four or more bedrooms with some ranging up to 7 bedrooms.
Pros
  • Close to Pennypack Park
  • Safe
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
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"Belmont Mansion / Park - Breathtaking"

BELMONT MANSION

In 2009, Belmont Mansion was the recipient of a national honor – The Network to Freedom designation by the National Park Service. This honored the documented fact that escaping Africans were housed within this facility as a part of the Underground Railroad. The years of work required to achieve this goal was undertaken by Mrs. Audrey Johnson Thornton, a stalwart in Philadelphia for cultural and philanthropic endeavors. It has been restored to its former glory with rooms on the top floor featuring period furnishings.

The Belmont Mansion sits high on a hill in Fairmount Park and is adjacent to the Schuylkill River. Since the Colonial days prior to the Revolutionary War, the Mansion was owned by members of the Peters Family, who were prominent judges and politicians in Philadelphia. It has been restored to its former glory with rooms on the top floor featuring period furnishings.

Today, it is a site for many cultural activities as well as social gatherings such as weddings and receptions. The Mansion is surrounded by beautiful lawns and gardens and the tall buildings of Center City Philadelphia in the backdrop make for breathtaking photographs. Theatrical plays, musical concerts, and poetry readings round out the program offerings of Belmont Mansion. The twenty minute drive from Center City is worth the trip.
Pros
  • Breath Taking Views of Center City
  • great history lesson
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Mayfair - A Stick and Stay Neighborhood"

Once spacious farmland, Mayfair has become a fixture in Lower Northeast Philadelphia. It is a stick-and-stay neighborhood of Irish Americans who were joined by Polish, Italians, German, and English. Two organizations that have been critical in the area’s stabilization are the Mayfair Civic Association and the Mayfair Community Development Corporation (CDC).

The Von Steuben Day parade along Frankford Avenue gathers many of the descendants of German immigrants for a day of festivities. The CDC also promotes shopping corridor revitalization and greening activities.

A community center has been built for young people and is home to the Northeast Peanut League and the Northeast Rockers.

The Clean Sweep program maintains trash cans throughout the area and six street sweepers routinely gather the litter.
The area was once the bastion of long-time state representative John Prezel, however losing battle against criminal charges of misusing his office for political gain has brought about jail time.

Roosevelt Boulevard is the main route from Center City and points west. Public transportation flows by way of buses routed from the Market Frankford terminal.

Diversification is now prevalent with families of other cultures such as Arab, Asian, and African American now occupying the row homes of Mayfair.
Pros
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Crime on the rise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"EAST GERMANTOWN - History Lessons Abound"

Germantown has a long storied history. As the name implies, it was settled by Germans and the site of significant American and Philadelphia history. It was the site of the first Quaker revolt against slavery in 1688 and was the home of many abolitionists including the Johnson, Pastorius, Hendericks, Updegraeff and Kunders's Families.

To escape the Yellow Fever epidemic in the 1790s, President George Washington and his family took refuge at the Deshler – Morris House.

Germantown sits above North Philadelphia but below Chestnut Hill. Several schools continue to call the area home: Germantown Friends School and the Germantown Academy.

Although pockets of poverty have taken root in the area among the beautiful stone homes and spacious lawns; there is still a serene quality about life in Germantown. Property values have increased by 16 percent in the last few years, according to a survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Transportation is plentiful although at a distance where parts of Germantown border Fairmount Park. In the winter, you need a car.

National Historic Districts include: Awbury and Tulpehocken along with National Historic Landmarks such as the John Johnson House, an Underground Railroad landmark and Cliveden, the home of Benjamin Chew. This was an important location of the Battle of Germantown during the Revolutionary War.
Pros
  • Historical sites
  • Lovely houses
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Far from things
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"West Parkside - Revitalized!"

Stunning architecture is a highlight of West Parkside. Local developers have salvaged these masterpieces and block-by-block renovations and rehabilitations are bringing the area back to its glory.

The 1876 Centennial took place across the boulevard in Fairmount Park. The area is on the National Historic Register. Because of this designation, tax credits and other funding resources are available to revitalize the housing stock.

At the Mann Music Center is the summer home of the Philadelphia Orchestra. It is also home to the Zoo and the Please Touch Museum. Nearly two million visitors frequented these institutions in 2010.

The Microsoft High School brings bright student from the region to its facilities.

It is a relatively quiet community of middle-to-working class African Americans.

In 2008, the Park West Town Center, a major shopping center opened with a supermarket, home renovation store, and clothing stores. Built with $52 million in a private/public partnership, the mall is leased to capacity.

Transportation is good with bus routes connecting to major arteries.
Pros
  • Diverse
  • Interesting architecture
  • Park West Town Village Shopping Center
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"Walnut Hill - Got Street Cred?"

Walnut Hill is a diverse multicultural neighborhood in West Philadelphia. A highlight of Walnut Hill history is the site of Dick Clark’s American Bandstand which one held court at 46th and Market. Many of the touches of this American cultural icon can still be seen at the facility which now houses an entrepreneurial incubator, The Enterprise Center.

The Time Bank is based at the Enterprise Center and operates as a bartering system with time credits. There are 47 members. Next door is the Walnut Hill Farm one of the many agricultural initiatives which has developed in the area. To close the year, a pumpkin giveaway will take place on Halloween Weekend.

The housing stock needs sprucing and students are living in converted homes. One of the best thrift shops is based off of 45th and Walnut Sts.

At 46th and Walnut Street a Muslim community has taken root with supporting food shops, restaurants, and a mosque.

West Philadelphia High School has earned a national reputation for its development of energy efficient cars.

Transportation is excellent with the Market Frankford El and bus routes crisscross the community. Many of the university buses service the area to prevent students from having to walk the blocks from school to home.
Pros
  • Near colleges
  • Great for students
Cons
  • Some areas can be bad
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Spruce Hill - A Climb"

Nestled just west of the University of Pennsylvania, Spruce Hill is as its name sounds: plenty of hills and numerous spruce trees. It is a bedroom community for students, faculty, staff, and medical personnel. Pennsylvania Presbyterian, Children’s Hospital, The Wistar Institute, Penn’s Hospital, Dental and Medical School are nearby. Walking or biking gives you access as well as trolley lines and bus routes. In a word, transportation is great!

Clark Park sits in the center of the community and serves as a gathering area for concerts, flea markets, or other outdoor activities. Periodically, the Philadelphia Orchestra will host a special concert in the natural arena.

The Gold Standard, a premier restaurant is located at 48th and Baltimore Avenue. At 40th and Spruce, Cream and Sugar provides treats for the sweet tooth.

Community groups are very active and very vocal when necessary. They sponsor block cleanups, public safety initiatives, and activities for youth. The University City District patrols the area by car, on bikes and by foot supporting the Philadelphia Police.

The West Philly Tool Library located on Woodland Avenue provides tools for house renovations on a lending basis and UC Green focuses on maintaining the green trees and shrubbery throughout the area.
Pros
  • Clark Park
Cons
  • Students taking over
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Logan Circle - Charming"

Logan Circle takes its name from James Logan, a mayor of Philadelphia in the 19th Century. The area is also known as Logan Square from one of William Penn’s four green gardens which served as the four corners of Philadelphia.

Today homes sit alongside of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, a flag adorned Parisian-styled Boulevard that reminds many of the Champs d’ Elysees. City Hall anchors one end and the Art Museum anchors the other. The Central Library sits equidistance. The new Barnes Museum will be a part of the museums lining the parkway.

In the center of the parkway is an enormous circle with a large water fountain. Traditional has it that graduates of Hallahan High School, a Catholic School for girls, run through the fountain on the last day of school.

The row homes are charming with window boxes of flowers lining the block. Recently, the Schuylkill River walkway has provided recreation space for runners, bikers, dog walkers, and skaters.
Located in close proximity to University City and Center City, it is a pleasant walk or bike ride.

It is home to the Cherry Street Tavern, the first licensed tavern in Philadelphia in 1905. North of the parkway are the Kite & Key and Sabrina’s Cafe both lovely eating establishments.
Pros
  • Fountains!
  • Logan Square Park
  • Lots to see and do
Cons
  • Parking problems
  • Expensive
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"Temple University - Acre of Diamonds"

In the heart of North Philadelphia, Temple University has grown and grown. Spread over seven sites, Temple offers some 300 academic degrees and has over 37, 000 students. Rome, Tokyo, and London host Temple academic campuses.

Humble were the beginnings of Temple University in 1884. Founder Dr. Russell Conwell tutored working class students in the basement of Grace Baptist Church, which is how the name “Temple Owls” originated. “Acres of Diamonds” is a quotation from a speech by Dr. Russell Conwell which he delivered 5,000 times between 1900 and 1925. This quotation remains a cornerstone of the institution today. He believed that one should not search for value but cultivate the value within ones’ own backyard.

However, in the 1980s, the North Philadelphia took issue with the increasing encroachment into the community. John Street and his brother Milton Street were vendors at Temple University and galvanized the community concerning the increasing razing of homes and ensuing construction. John Street took law classes at Temple and during this time made a name demanding and negotiating concessions from Temple University for the right to increase their footprint. Eventually, John Street became the Mayor of Philadelphia and served for two terms. He lives in North Philadelphia today.

Transporation along Broad Street is excellent.
Pros
  • College neighborhood
  • Good school
  • Inexpensive
Cons
  • High crime
  • No parking
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"Wynnefield - In Philly Speech WEEN FEEL"

Stately stone homes grace the tree-lined streets of Wynnefield. Once settled by the Jewish immigrants from Russia and Germany, it is now an African American enclave of upper Middle Class residents. In fact, many of the current churches were once home to Jewish synagogues. A number of faiths have houses of worship in the community including Catholic, Holiness, Muslim, Presbyterian, Baptist, and Baha’i.

Michael Nutter, Mayor of Philadelphia was the long-time city councilman from the 4th District. Currently, Curtis Jones holds the district seat and at-large councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown and her family reside there.

Members of the entertainment world who hail from Wynnefield include: Will Smith, Lee Daniels, Will Mega, and Charles Stone III. Mr. Stone is the son of long-time Philadelphia Daily News Columnist Chuck Stone, who was known for as providing a safe haven for confessing criminals.

St. Joseph’s University is located on the border at City Line Avenue. Wynnefield Academy and the Settlement Music School are located in the heart of Wynnefield.

Transportation is accessible although it may involve a walk. Nearby City Line Avenue is known for its shopping areas and upscale stores including Lord & Taylor and Bonwit Teller. First Lady Jackie Kennedy was known to order millinery from a shop on City Line.
Pros
  • Transportation options
  • Comfortably middle class
  • Nice houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"Overbrook - Fresh Prince was here!"

High on the hill, this area is known for its basketball prowess through the numerous players Overbrook High School’s program has produced. In a word, they are awesome. Most notably is Wilt Chamberlain, who is one of 11 NBA players to emerge from the high school. Malik Rose, Lewis Lloyd, Hal Lear, Wali Jones, Wayne Hightower, and Mike Gale all count amongst this number.

Not only is the school known for its basketball but many politicians call Overbrook home including: Congressman Chaka Fattah and Councilman Curtis Jones. On the national stage, Will Smith came right out of Overbrook. The school is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Originally settled by Irish and Italians, the area is now largely African American and the home have held their value as a middle-class enclave. There are huge stone homes that dominate the streets with row home sections in-between.

Transportation is excellent with the Market Frankford El, trolley lines and bus routes all servicing the area.

The old Indian Trail, Lancaster Avenue winds its way from University City west through Overbrook and reaches into Montgomery County.

Community groups seek to maintain a good quality of life and include Neighbors of Overbrook Association, Town Watch, and the Royal Gardens Association.
Pros
  • close to the mainline
  • good schools
  • low crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Old City - An Original"

The area known as Old City sits alongside the Delaware River and was the first neighborhood in the city. Elfreth’s Alley was the first block of homes. Many of the tiny streets such as Quince and the alleys are built of cobblestone and Belgian block. Numerous bars and restaurants line Market Street and set the stage for a lively night scene.

First Friday’s originated here bringing attention to the art galleries that are housed on the side streets. The famous October Gallery moved to Old City and set up shop amongst the vacant iron cast buildings. Many other galleries followed and October’s international exhibit in the month of the same name is now its 26 year.

It is a thriving community with numerous historic sites in its midst. Philadelphia’s diplomatic corps has also found a home here.

Public transportation reaching the entire city is accessable and frequent.

McCall School services children from K – 8 while Furness High School picks up the students after middle school.

Nearby are Christ Church, The Philadelphia Mint, Independence Hall and the National Constitution Center.
Pros
  • Arts
  • Rich history
Cons
  • drunk people everywhere at night
  • sidewalks get really crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"West Oak Lane - On the Rebound"

West Oak Lane has been the prime beneficiary of state representative, Dwight Evans. For 30 years, One of his primary goals was the revitalization of Ogontz Avenue, a central artery through the community. As well, Mr. Evans controlled the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's Education Budget seeing that West Oak Lane received its due.

The area is comprised of an African American population considered largely middle-class. Spacious homes with large yards and greenery are the norm. Properties have maintained their value only declining 3 percent in a recent years.

The Free Library has the Ogontz Branch which a multitude of adult education classes. Recently seniors walk in support of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Cheltenham Mall is nearby just across the city line.

A highlight is the annual West Oak Lane Jazz and Arts Festival which is nearing its tenth year.
West Oak Lane is off the beaten path and so a car is necessary for convenient transportation. Nevertheless, there are some bus transit routes in walking distance.

There have been periodic spates of crime and neighborhood associations are keeping watch.

Martin Luther King High School has had its troubles and has been the recent site of controversy over the awarding of a charter school contract.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Houses with yards
  • Jazz Festival
Cons
  • Transportation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
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"Chinatown - Bursting with Energy"

Philadelphia’s Chinatown is in Center City along a seven block section of Arch Street. Among the many restaurants there are a plethora of services for the community. Fabric shops, herbal stores and acupuncture providers line the side streets. It is a tight knit community where you can find many dialects routinely spoken in the shops and restaurants. Cuisine from Canton, Fuji, Northern Sichuan, and Taiwan are located alongside of restaurants featuring Burmese, Japanese, and Vietnamese foods.

Midway on Arch Street there is the Chinatown Friendship Gate symbolizing the ties between Philadelphia and Tianjin, China. It was the first gate built by Chinese artists in America and portends good luck for the residents and visitors.

The area is in walking distance to the Historic District where the Liberty Bell and Christ Church are located. Recently CHINATOWN NIGHT MARKET was held whereby food vendors provided various dishes in a festive atmosphere of music, art and a lion dance.

Philadelphia’s Chinatown Development Corporation (PCDC) oversees the stability of the area. It was the prime opponent which galvanized the community against the proposed Phillies ballpark. The PCDC would not allow the same razing of the area that occurred during the urban renewal days of the 1960s.

Transportation is excellent with close proximity to the trolley lines which run westward and the Market Frankford line which runs from east to west. Buses take you north and south.
Pros
  • Easily Access Public Transportation
Cons
  • Loud
  • Parking can be tough
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 1/5
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"Chestnut Hill - A Beauty"

Huge stone mansions have made Chestnut Hill one of the most desirable places to live in Philadelphia. Spacious green lawns, which are at a premium in Philadelphia, surround the gracious homes.

Transportation is available along Germantown Avenue where for many years the longest trolley route in the world travelled from Chestnut Hill to South Philadelphia. Regrettably, the Route 23 has been discontinued in 1992 in favor of a transit bus which makes it a less of an adventure. However, the Belgian block that held the trolley tracks still remain on Germantown Avenue.

There is plenty of shopping along Germantown Avenue if you have “deep pockets.” Antique shops, dress boutiques, and galleries line the avenue.

Morris Arboretuem, owned by the University of Pennsylvania, provides a perfect backdrop for weddings and special occasions.

Property values have skyrocketed upwards to 57 percent increases according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Former Mayor Frank Rizzo and his family resided in Chestnut Hill.

LaSalle College and Chestnut Hill College are within the community. Chestnut Hill College recently converted from an all-girls institution. A number of private schools call Chestnut Hill home. They include: Crefeld School, The Chestnut Hill Academy, and Springside School. Several Friends School located nearby and include: The William Penn Charter School, Germantown Friends, and Abington Friends School. St. Joseph’s Preparatory is one of the finest high schools in the region.
Pros
  • beautiful archtecture
  • Clean
  • gardens and trees
  • quiet
Cons
  • Expensive
  • have to own a car
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Fishtown - Go Fish!"

One of Philadelphia’s notorious river wards, Fishtown has been a part of Kensington but now stands on its own. Frankford Avenue and York Street serve as street borders to this parcel along with the Delaware River by its side. Traditionally, it has been populated by Irish Catholics but German and Polish Catholics were also in the mix. It has a rough and tumble political history that is fabled Philadelphia politics and not to welcoming to African Americans.

Work in the manufacturing plants of North Philadelphia and along the river was a basis for survival until industry moved elsewhere. The Germans bought the fishing rights for shad along the Delaware River upwards to central Jersey. Urban legend has it that the largest shad in the world was caught here.

In 2011, artists have flocked to the area of quaint homes and friendly corner bars. Fishtown is a cheaper buy and therefore is benefiting from the skyrocketing prices in Northern Liberties and Old City. Arts festivals, book signings, open studio tours and gallery openings are a part of the new mix of culture and community.

A number of community groups have begun to stabilize the area and seek to promote its burgeoning arts community. These include: the Fishtown Neighbors Association, Old Richmond Civic Association, and the East Kensington Neighbors Association.
Pros
  • cheap
  • decent live entertainment regularly
  • easily access public trans
  • Great nightlife
  • Perfect for young people
Cons
  • dirty
  • Rising crime
Recommended for
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Point Breeze - Enjoy the Nightlife!"

If you think Point Breeze is near one of Philadelphia’s rivers, you would be sadly mistaken. Point Breeze is in the heart of South Philadelphia and an Avenue of the same starts at the banks for the Schuylkill River and runs diagonally through the district.

The row homes are tightly packed and neighborhood friendships have lasted a lifetime. Parking is an issue and public transportation may involve a short walk

Several neighborhood associations have formed to promote upgrading the neighborhood. These include: South Philadelphia H.O.M.E.S., Point Breeze Community Development Coalition, Neighbors in Action and Neighbors in Action. Among the activities are festivals for artistic youth and greening initiatives.

It is home to Pat’s Steaks and Geno Steaks who have maintained a fierce cheesesteak rivalry for decades! Another famous eating institution is the Melrose Diner because “Everybody who knows goes to Melrose.” Quaint restaurants dot Passyunk Avenue and there is even a café where the wait staff sings opera upon request.

Property values have jumped some 43 percent in the past five years according to a survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The night life is bright and the atmosphere is jumping. If you like a Greenwich Village like scene in Philadelphia, this is the place for you.
Pros
  • Affordable to live
  • Cheap Rent
  • Close to the hip areas
Cons
  • Dirty
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
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"Strawberry Mansion - Work is Needed"

Strawberry Mansion is a North Philadelphia neighborhood that has seen better days but can still pride itself on being a tight knit community. Sitting next to Fairmount Park, the area was once home to some of the wealthiest families in the 19th Century many of whom were Jewish.

Strawberry Mansion takes its name from a restaurant located in Fairmont Park that was famous for its Strawberry and Cream deserts. Also nearby is Lemon Hill Mansion. The famous Robin Hood Dell East sits inside the park and is a site of popular summer concerts. There is a large stable of horses which provide instruction for the kids and tennis courts for the adults.

Generally, the boundaries are considered to be 29th and 33rd Streets, Lehigh Avenue and Oxford Street.

The John Coltrane House is located on 33rd Street and in a landmark on the National Historical Register. It is owned and maintained by his “Cousin Mary.”

It is a primarily African American working class community. Property values have drop by 39 percent since 2005 in accordance with a survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Transportation is good and there is clear access to major roads such as 33rd Street which carries you west into University City.

It is only a matter of time before the gentrification occurring in neighboring Brewerytown will make its way to Strawberry Mansion.
Pros
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Bad housing conditions
  • High crime
  • neglected houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
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"Francisville - We will Rebound"

Francisville is a small enclave in North Philadelphia nestled between Ridge, Corinthian and Girard Avenues. Francisville is a unique location in Philadelphia as it does not follow the North/South or East/West grid. However, it takes on a sideways approach to street configuration that mirrors Ridge Avenue, an old Indian trail which transverses the area.

Location is one of its attractive features and it is a quick bus or bike ride to Center City. The Route 15 SEPTA Trolley which travels along Girard Avenue has refurbished cars reflecting their 1940’s glory. Temple University is nearby on North Broad Street and University City is across the Spring
Garden Street Bridge. Most residents spend a ½ hour in commuting to work.

Francisville is the home of fierce activists who refuse to see the area decline any further. Through the Francisville Neighborhood Development Corporation and Concerned Citizens of Francisville they have convinced City Hall to bring in Neighborhood Transformation efforts to reduce the number blighted properties and abandoned homes.

With a largely African American population, it has experienced no change in property values during the past 5 years.

Nearby is historic Berean Institute which recently celebrated its 100 birthday and enabled students to become skilled in a trade.
Pros
  • inexpensive
  • public transportation
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Cedarbrook - The Golf Pros are Coming"

Cedarbrook is toward the northwest of the city and is bordered by Cheltenham and Springfield Township in Montgomery County and Stenton Avenue along the Southwest. It is the perfect neighborhood for city workers who are required to live in the city. A majority of residents or 95 percent are African American and have maintained a quiet middle class environment. Most residents are high school graduates.

The Cedarbrook Mall across the city line provides numerous shopping options.

Properties have experience an increase in value by 12 percent according to a recent survey by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Access to transportation can be problematic.

Regrettably, a spate of violence has hit the area with gun shots wounding a SEPTA bus drivers and the murder of an elderly woman.

Recently, there efforts to revitalize the former Cedarbrook Country Club which is now a golf course and is also known as the Short Course of Cedarbrook Hill. It features 18 holes and provides lessons for the golf-challenged. Golf Digest rates the facility with 4.5 stars as a very favorable place to play. Dave Roberts of Cedarbrook is making golf news with his placement on the PGA roster.

A large part of the area is taken up by the Ivy Hill Cemetery which was opened in 1867.
Pros
  • Lots of parking available
  • Affordable to live
Cons
  • High crime
  • Dangerous area
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
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"Lower Kensington - Tough Turf"

Kensington is one of Philadelphia’s river wards that define rough and tumble living. The crime rate is high with drugs and prostitution prevalent menaces on the community. In fact, Kensington Avenue and Somerset Street was ranked one of the top ten drug corners in the city.

When moving in, one is advised to leave their valuables in storage because robberies happen frequently and strangers are viewed with suspicion. Residential values have declined by 9 percent in recent years according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Caucasian ethnics populate the area and are the descendants of immigrants that worked in the many factories that were housed along the Delaware River and throughout lower North Philadelphia. Irish, Italian, and Polish Americans comprise this group along with newer immigrants such as Hispanic, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans and African Americans..

K & A is a major crossroads for the area with Kensington Avenue (North/South) that parallels the river and Allegheny Avenue (West/East) that travels through North Philadelphia Westward. Several buses are routed through this area along with the Market Frankford El.

There is a branch of the Free Library along with several schools including Kensington High School and Jules E. Mastbaum Vocational and Technical High School. Most students who manage to gain admittance to college are usually the first of their families to attend.
Pros
  • Inexpensive
  • Transportation
Cons
  • Crime
  • Drugs
  • Prostitution
Recommended for
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Yorktown - Nice Living for Professionals"

Yorktown is a planned community in North Philadelphia designed to attract professionals to a comfortable middle class community. Built in 1960 on a 153 acre of land, the community was the first in Philadelphia where the home owners were African American. The Yorktown Community Organization was formed shortly thereafter by 650 residents. Its primary purpose was to maintain a high standard for the quality of life through zoning ordinances and developing athletic programs for young people.

Progress Plaza, the first shopping mall with a major food chain as anchor, has recently been revitalized. Also, nearby is the OIC training center, developed by the Rev. Leon Sullivan in the 1960s. It has been a bastion for African American politicians, teachers, and city workers. City Hall is just a look down Broad Street.

Temple University is within walking distance as well as Hahnemann Hospital and the Center City Campus of Drexel University. Students from Temple University have sought to populate the housing development and met with stiff resistance from the neighbors. Long-time residents have used the zoning ordinances concerning “non-related” renters in one home to remove the students. Concerns revolve around parties, trash and other disruptive behaviors that students bring.
Pros
  • affordable
  • close to public transit
  • suburban style
Cons
  • limited parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Lawndale - A low-key experience"

Lawndale began as a community of farmers. The 1890s saw the land divided into smaller parcels and homes began to rise along the wide avenues. In Philadelphia parlance, it was the near northeast and residential living was at its finest. However, time has begun to show wear and tear on the homes and the streets. Notably, it remains the site of several strategically located train stations convenient for people making their way to north Jersey and New York City.

There are two Parish Catholic school St. Williams and Presentation BVM Parish both of which operate schools. The Cedar Grove Christian Academy has established a large educational facility. There are no public schools in the area however Fels High School and Rhawnhurst High School are nearby.

It is a largely Caucasian population that has had some flight to the suburbs. Property values have dropped about 11 percent since 2005. There remains a mixture of housing stock including multi-family, row and single family dwellings.

The Naval Supply Depot is a major employer for the area with some 1,500 in staff. There is also a very large shopping district along Longshore, Pennway and Tyson Avenues.
The area has a library, recreation center, and firehouse.
Pros
  • Great for families
  • Lots of nice homes
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Far away from the center of the city
  • Need car
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"East Falls - A Jewel"

A beautiful neighborhood on the east banks of the Schuylkill River, East Falls attracts a blend of the elite living alongside professionals of many stripes. Many well-known politicians including former Governor Ed Rendell and Congressman Chaka Fattah call East Falls’ home. As well, there are a number of media personalities who live in the area. It is conveniently located equidistant to Center City and City Line Avenue address to a number of media outlets. The airport is a quick trip down the expressway.

The homes are well appointed with lots of flowers and greenery. It is a somewhat hilly and not many transportation lines are routed through the area. According to a recent study published in the Philadelphia Inquirer, home values for East Falls have increased by 19 percent.

It is a predominantly Caucasian community with a number of schools including Philadelphia University, William Penn Charter School, St. Bridget’s Catholic School and the Mifflin School. Currently, the School District of Philadelphia is renovating Mifflin School for $8 million.

The Arthur Ashe Tennis facility is nearby along with 16 tennis courts operated by the City of Philadelphia. At the Schuylkill there are running trails and riverside amenities.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Bartram Village"

John Bartram's botanical garden and arboretum are historical touches that make Philadelphia so special. On the western side of the Schuylkill River, John Bartram built a repository of plants that is now the oldest in America. He sent numerous samples to the King of England.

Bartram Gardens has partnered with Swarthmore College and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society in an effort to maintaining the area by driving more visitors to the site.

Various family activities have been sponsored at the garden which is located between 54th Street, Lindbergh Blvd. and the Schuylkill River. There are boat rides down the river from Market Street upstream. Tickets are a bit pricey at $20 (children) and $30 (adults) however it is a nearly 4 hour excursion. Families with children and pets can enjoy various festivals. And there are numerous gardening seminars and programs. To counterbalance the decline of bees, there are educational programs in urban beekeeping.

In this primarily African American neighborhood, there is some housing in the area and a public high school named after John Bartram. Public transportation is not all that great.

The home of the Bartram Family is open for tourists and is listed on the National Historical Registry. Recently, the American Association of Public Gardens brought its membership of 500 for a visit to the gardens.
Pros
  • Beautiful scenery
  • educational
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"Grays Ferry - Daylight Only!"

Grey’s Ferry is a neighborhood that exemplifies Philadelphia’s old reputation. Racial strife, gang bangers, and drug dealing still characterized the area. The only change is that high school girls are now on the corner as well as the boys. Suburbanites drive through the nearby freeways to quickly pick up their wares anonymously and travel home to safety.

Summertime when the heat is gritty can be the most dangerous time of year. Ethnic pride is high and the slightest insults can spark a flurry of gun fire. Strangers are viewed with suspicion. Numerous bars populate the corners.

Perhaps this is a fitting legacy as the area was born in war at the time of the Revolutionary War. To navigate the Schuylkill River a Floating Bridge was built by the British when they controlled the city. Eventually, George Gray took over the three ferry’s and in addition to his transportation business established both a tavern and an inn.

Recent city administrations have made a concerted effort to create peace in the area by tearing down the multi-story projects and paying significant attention to the local schools.
Pros
  • quick access to the expressway/I-76
  • Affordable
  • Always parking
Cons
  • Bad housing units
  • Dangerous
  • High Crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cobbs Creek - Fore!"

Cobbs Creek borders the western edge of the city. It is populated largely by middle-class and working class African Americans. Churches of all denominations are placed on numerous corners while Philadelphia’s notorious bars dot the other side. Atypical of Philadelphia residences, many of the homes are surrounded by well-manicured lawns, flower beds and trees. The Cobbs Creek Automobile Suburb Historic District, a cluster of blocks with very distinctive architecture comprises the area.

Cobbs Creek is famous for an Environmental Center located alongside the creek, which has undergone an initiative to clean up the creek and educate the community on environmental issues. Each April, the center gets its 15 minutes of fame for the year.

Powered by the waters of the creek, the area became home to numerous milling and manufacturing operations, most notably Millbourne and Angora Mills which were founded by the Sellers Family. When the mills closed at the turn of the 20th Century, large swaths of land were made available for real estate development.

Transportation is good with trolley lines and buses connecting all parts of the city. The area is a short commute to University City and easily accessible for students and faculty. If you frequent the airport, this is a good location. And, if you love golf there is a popular course nearby.
Pros
  • Cobbs Creek Park
  • easy public trans access
  • Good neighborhood for families
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Cedar Park - A Treasure"

Cedar Park

Cedar Park was built along the trolley tracks that brought passengers from Center City to the city line at Delaware County. Established in the late 1900s it is consider one of Philadelphia’s first suburbs with large homes replacing the rich farmland of previous generations. The Queen Anne architecture of the period makes for multiple story homes today. Many of these Victorian era palaces have been converted to apartments for students and young faculty.

Presently, Cedar Park is home to many of the faculty and staff at the University of Pennsylvania and affiliated medical institutions. Most notably, there are lavish parties held during the holidays for community and colleagues to celebrate.

Penn has established economic incentives for home buying and to retain these upwardly mobile residents, the university has created the Penn-Alexander School for K-8 children.

An increasingly diverse population of African immigrants is moving along the fringes of Cedar Park, particularly opening businesses and restaurants on Baltimore Avenue.

The No. 34 trolley line for which Cedar Park was created still exists and it is a quick ride to University City and Center City. Boundaries include: Larchwood Ave., Kingsessing Ave., 46th Street, and 52nd Street.[3]
Pros
  • Affordable to live
  • Lots of dogs
  • Parks!
  • People are interesting
Cons
  • Need a bike or car
  • Not within walking distance to major grocery stores
  • Rent is going up
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Mill Creek is Rising"

Mill Creek is experiencing a revitalization following an illustrious past during the drug wars of the 1990s. This West Philadelphia is much milder turf with a spate of new housing developments sponsored by the long time politician City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. So far, the neighbor is remaining clean and liveable.

Within walking distance, there is a discount full service supermarket and a station for the cross-town train, the Market-Frankford El. It is also home to a working farm which people find fascinating when they first hear of it. For the closing of this year’s harvest, pumpkins will be given away at the end of October.

The boundaries for Mill Creek are Girard Avenue, Market Street, 44th and 52nd Streets. Shopping is available along 52nd, a major crossroads. North of Lancaster Avenue and 52nd, there is a major shopping center with supermarkets, home improvements stores, and fashion outlets.

Mill Creek as its name implies was built on top of a creek and has had periodic water problems such as the collapse of the sewer in 1961.

The Philadelphia Inquirer has featured Mill Creek in an article by Larry Eichel entitled “"The New Urban Landscape, Mixed Blessings," published in 2005.

Mill Creek School, a private institution, remains one of the areas attributes.
Pros
  • African American Neighborhood
  • Cool folks
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Society Hill - High Society at its Best"

One of the most historic areas in the country is located in Society Hill. Overlooking the Delaware River, Society Hill was transformed by the mid-60s urban renewal initiatives to the sophisticated environs it is today. Attorneys, professors, real estate moguls, business owners and a number of Philadelphia’s “names” call the area home. Old world charm abounds with streets of cobblestone and row houses of brick. In recent years, several high-rise condos have sprung up along the borders.

Society Hill while bordering the river remains a close-knit residential area. It is filled with growing “Type A” families of two-career parents and kids have been cared by nannies since a very early age. There are several well-known private schools.

Towards South Street, there are plenty of restaurants and food stores. For a leisurely weekend, there is always a theatre production on South Street or in Old City.

At 6th and Spruce Street, there is the oldest land continuously owned by African-Americans in the name of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church. The landmark building for the Ladies Home Journal is nearby on Walnut at 7th Street. And, the National Constitution Center is located at 7th and Market. All are open to the public for tours.
Pros
  • Clean
  • great location
  • historical
Cons
  • Expensive
  • No parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Rittenhouse - For the Rich and Famous"

If you are seeking sophistication and upscale living then Rittenhouse Square might have just what you are looking for. Located in the heart of Philadelphia’s Center City it is home to many empty nesters who have left sprawling suburban abodes for the urbane life. Close to theaters, museums, and concert halls, the renewal of Rittenhouse Square has spawned a world-class night life.

Many of the side-streets contain multi-million dollar homes suitable for a single resident. On the Square are high-priced condos with spectacular views and are home to athletes who have brought excitement to the Philly sports scene.

Walnut Street is adjacent to Rittenhouse Square and features up-scale shopping for antiques, jewelry and clothing. Walnut Street is also a direct route to the colleges and universities in University City for either walking or biking.

Many private schools are located in the area but know that there are wait lists. The Greenfield School, a magnet public school, is several blocks away on Chestnut Street. You will also find the more common place venues such as drug stores and camera shops on Chestnut.
In addition the area is home to many churches which feature mid-week services as well as concerts and lectures.
Pros
  • Beautiful park
  • Easily Access Public Transportation
  • Nie houses
  • Walkability
Cons
  • Lots of traffic
  • Pricey
  • Sidewalks get crowded
Recommended for
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Bella Vista - A Beautiful View"

Do you have a passion for cooking with fresh ingredients? Are you an aficionado for open air markets? Then the Bella Vista also known as the Italian Market District would be the place for you to make a home. Fresh air markets operate from mid-week to the weekend offering the essential goods and exotic accents.

Traditionally, it has been home to the immigrants from Italy providing everything from hand-made wedding cakes to live turkeys. Stores supplying cooking utensils are plentiful. More recently, it has become home to newer immigrants from Asia and India bringing their spices and delicacies for sale.

The area is populated with row homes of 4 stories and trinities of 3 stories with one room per floor. Blocks contain homes of family and extended family. There are several public schools and playgrounds which field sports teams that play during the evening hours.

Transportation is excellent with buses running to and from Center City. On pleasant days, a brisk walk will carry you to the major hubs. Medical students from Thomas Jefferson and Pennsylvania Hospitals populate the area because of the close proximity.

South Street, a major entertainment corridor, is a few blocks away. En route, there are small café’s for coffee or light snacks.
Pros
  • Italian Market
  • affordable
  • Close to everything
  • Great location
  • Lots of restaurants
Cons
  • dirty from the market
  • Expensive
  • No parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Washington Square - A tony part of town"

Taking its name Washington Square from a large square area between 5th and 7th Streets, the neighborhood borders Society Hill. Washington Square has a rather storied history. It was once home to a flourishing publishing industry but has been replaced by a multitude of insurance companies. In the late 1800s, many banks which once called the area home are now a part of Jewelry’s Row, the largest concentration outside of New York City.

However, before businesses thrived in Washington Square it was the location of a jail, the Walnut Street Jail, which was on bordering Walnut Street. And, the victims of the Yellow Fever epidemic after the Revolutionary War are buried under what are now green grasses, trees, and memorials to the lost. . It is a nearby walk to Pennsylvania Hospital founded by Dr. Benjamin Rush, who performed the first surgery and combated the Yellow Fever epidemic.

Washington Square is home to the Philadelphia elite who have purchased condominiums that frequent the real estate offerings. Many doctors, lawyers and CEOs are counted amongst the residents. Schools are of the highest quality and nannies often walk young children along the square. This beautiful area contains many restaurants, theatre and events.
Pros
  • diverse
  • lots of great shops
  • walkability
  • Everything is close by
Cons
  • expensive
  • lots of traffic
  • minimal parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Frankford in Decline"

Sadly, many of the longtime residents have begun to flee this once tightly knit community for the suburbs and sections of New Jersey. Frankford was home to the lower class who worked in the manufacturing plants once located along the Delaware River and in North Philadelphia. Major employers such as Sears & Roebuck and Mrs. Paul’s Foods have gone but the local military supplier remains albeit with a reduced staff.

Settled by Germans, they created a tight community of neighbors who relied on each other. Most attended St. Williams, the local Catholic Parish. Youngsters play sports at the local recreation center on Rising Sun Avenue where there is a pool and a public library nearby. Recently, several of the large Catholic High Schools have closed in the area.

The 4th of July, a time for celebration, began a tradition in 1915. Everyone came to watch the fireworks and the parade. Vendors numbered in the 100s making it one of the largest flea markets in the area.

Today, it is a major center of transportation with two Septa Regional Rail Stations and the Market Frankford Line terminal which runs east to west throughout Philadelphia.

As a longtime resident lamented, many of the new members of the community don’t have the same pride or respect for the area that I grew up with.
Pros
  • cheap
  • close to public transit
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"Fairhill - Its Rugged!"

Fairhill, despite the name, is in a rough and tumble section of North Philadelphia. Living here is not for the faint of heart. Fairhill was the estate of the Norris Family who settled here in 1682, shortly after William Penn. German Immigrants built row homes when the land was divided into parcels in the 1880s. Those row homes iremain today in a densely populated neighbor of folks who “stick-and-stay.” Most of the manufacturing plants that employed the residents left in the 1970s.

Bounded by Kensington Avenue, 6th Street and York Street to Gurney Street/Clearfield Street, it is home to a large number of Hispanics who comprise 82 percent of the population and it has taken on the name of El Centro de Oro.

Thomas Alva Edison High School is renowned for a large concentration of military enlists has the highest number of casualties in the United States from the Vietnam War.

The Fairhill cemetery is on the National Historic Registry with Lucretia Coffin Mott and Robert Purvis, two noted abolitionist buried there.. Recently in 2000, Quakers from the region began to restore it. Markers now detail the historical significance of many who are buried there. However, because of the small headstones, the cemetery once took on the nickname of “the pet cemetery.”
Pros
  • Affordable to live
  • Available parking
  • Great public transporation access
Cons
  • High crime
  • Unsafe area
  • Not good for families
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"University City and You"

As the name implies, University City is a clusters of three universities: University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, and University of the Sciences. With expansion, it now encompasses the area from the Schuylkill River to 52nd Street.

The University of Pennsylvania is the oldest college founded by Benjamin Franklin and is an Ivy League institution which maintains its Quaker roots. Penn alone has twelve libraries, most of which are open to the public. Drexel University was founded in 1891 by Anthony J. Drexel and has a strong engineering tradition. The University of the Sciences was once the College of Pharmacy but has since expanded its course offerings.

As home and rental prices have risen accordingly, both Penn and Drexel have developed housing initiatives to undergird purchases by faculty and staff. Penn has initiated the Penn-Alexander, a primary school for young families with children. Drexel is now working with the Promise Academy, once the University City High School.

With many countries represented, the atmosphere is cosmopolitan yet academic. Lectures that are free and open to the public happen frequently. Coffee shops and outdoor cafés are plentiful. Every manner of food flavor is represented by the carts that have established their turf!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Washington Square"

Taking its name Washington Square from a large square area between 5th and 7th Streets, the neighborhood borders Society Hill. Washington Square has a rather storied history. It was once home to a flourishing publishing industry but has been replaced by a multitude of insurance companies. In the late 1800s, many banks which once called the area home are now a part of Jewelry’s Row, the largest concentration outside of New York City.

However, before businesses thrived in Washington Square it was the location of a jail, the Walnut Street Jail, which was on bordering Walnut Street. And, the victims of the Yellow Fever epidemic after the Revolutionary War are buried under what are now green grasses, trees, and memorials to the lost. . It is a nearby walk to Pennsylvania Hospital founded by Dr. Benjamin Rush, who performed the first surgery and combated the Yellow Fever epidemic.

Washington Square is home to the Philadelphia elite who have purchased condominiums that frequent the real estate offerings. Many doctors, lawyers and CEOs are counted amongst the residents. Schools are of the highest quality and nannies often walk young children along the square.
This beautiful area contains many restaurants, theatre and events
Pros
  • diverse
  • lots of great shops
  • walkability
Cons
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Mantua on the Block"

Mantua has been described as a stick-and-stay neighborhood in Philadelphia where generations of African Americans have lived and traveled to work across the region. Just north of the University of Pennsylvania and tony Powelton Village, consider Mantua as historically “across the tracks.” It is bound on the northwest by Amtrak and Philadelphia Regional Rails. America’s first zoological park is an easy walk across the bridge.

Mantua is the neighborhood where the Mural Arts Program was born taking large walls and presenting beautiful paintings such as “A Place Called Home” and a portrait of famed singer Patty LaBelle. In fact, Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles made a visit to see the gorgeous murals.

In three words Mantua is benefiting from location, location, location. It is a ten-minute trolley ride to Center City and buses transverse the neighborhood to various parts east and west. The housing stock is typically Philadelphian. Row homes abound but recently, new senior citizen and affordable high-rises have opened. Moreover, students from the nearby colleges and universities have moved into large homes that have been converted to apartments.

As a long-time resident and multiple property owner stated, “I’ll move when the University of Pennsylvania moves.”
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Great for students
  • Large homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Brewerytowns Around the Corner!"

Like a hip scene with an affinity for beer? Then Brewery Town may be the place for you. The area, just north of the Art Museum was settled by Germans who built fine homes around their establishments for brewing hops. A number of bars remain in Brewerytown.

Mugshots Coffeehouse, a popular “hang out” spot is planning a site on Girard Avenue. Girard Avenue features restored trolleys originally built in the 1940s and now traverse the entire route from Northern Liberties to West Philadelphia.

Young professionals are flocking to the area because of its close proximity to transportation and walking distance to Center City. Regrettably, the area has been subject to a spate of violence in recent years and now ranks amongst the cities’ most dangerous areas for shootings and muggings.

The Greater Brewerytown Development Corporation (GBCDC) has organized to fight the neighborhood blight. It features festivals, weekly musical events and brings local politicians to address community concerns.

Marathon Farms opened on a once vacant lot in early spring 2011 with a 100,000 investment. It will supply fresh fruits and vegetables for the six Marathon restaurants in the region and make available fresh foods to a neighborhood that lacks a supermarket within walking distance.
Pros
  • Lots of restaurants and bars
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Powelton Village A Quaint Village in the City Proper"

One of Philadelphia more “exclusive” neighborhoods, Powelton Village has had many iterations in its lengthy history. Named after Samuel Powel, Philadelphia’s Mayor under both the British and American Flags, it was the first westward suburb of the city. Crossing the river, it was home to the first Quaker Meeting along the banks of the Schuylhill River. Quaker traditions remain a part of the culture today.

In the 60s, it was home to the “hippies” and housed one of the first food coops in the area. The radical group MOVE made residence and the efforts to remove them, during the 1970s, caused quite an upheaval.

Today, Powelton Village is a quiet community of expensive Victorian homes whose residents are members of the Powelton Village Civic Association (PVCA). It publishes a monthly newsletter and maintains a website. The PVCA closely monitors zoning requests. Staving off encroachment by Drexel University is a constant struggle. Drexel Park, a block wide green space, is a recent addition.

The elementary school is named for Samuel Powel and the Community Education Center (CEC), the former West Philadelphia Meetinghouse was one of five centers in the country to win the Drops of Good, a $50,000 renovation from Maxwell House.
Pros
  • part of University City
  • close to schools
  • friendly people
  • Great for college kids
  • large Victorian homes
  • walking distance to major transportation
Cons
  • Crowded area
  • getting expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
stephy
stephy is there any low income apartments in that area?
2yrs+
Add a comment...
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Northern Liberties is Happenin"

Where the artists go……here comes the neighborhood! Northern Liberties, as the name suggests, is just north of Center City Philadelphia. As artistic working space became too expensive in other areas artists flocked to the abandoned warehouses and surrounding homes creating a vibrant community block by block. New York developers from Brooklyn’s fabled arts community are “hot” on the area making creative space for chefs who need certified kitchens and textile workers. Not long after the first artists, young families, affordable restaurants and cafes followed.

Originally formed in 1771, Northern Liberties was once home to German Immigrants and housed a community center for nearby residents. Spring Garden Street, its’ southern border, is also known for the residence for Edgar Allen Poe and the place where he wrote “The Raven.” To the north is Girard Avenue, west is Callowhill Street, and east is the Delaware River, a frequent site for outdoor activities in the summer.

Transportation to all parts of the city is easily accessible and it is an easy bike ride or walk to the heart of town, Center City.
There are two public high schools and several middle schools along with a public library.
Pros
  • Fun fun fun
  • live events
  • Lots of great restaurants and bars
  • Up and coming neighborhood
Cons
  • Hipsters
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Manayunk on a Bike"

If you up for an in-town weekend then Manayunk is your spot. The city has its own San Francisco with hilly residential streets rising above Main Street. Shopping, bar hopping, and exotic restaurant faire are all available along Main Street. Jewelry and antique purveyors appeal to the wealthy.
Manayunk is a Lenape Indian name and is where the first canal in the United States was started.

Manayunk was settled by German, Polish and Irish immigrants as well as a large number of African Americans. Located on the banks of the Schuylkill River, there is an island frequented by residents in the middle of the river. Two Naval ships have been christened the USS Manayunk.

Gentrification is the atmosphere prevalent today. Old world charm abounds with cobblestone streets and quaint flower gardens. The area is usually the first to shut down with cancelled public transportation at the slightest snow. Each June, an international bike race takes on the challenging hills and brings loads of tourist to the area.

Most of the working class residents who worked in nearby manufacturing plants have sold their homes and moved on. What remains are small row homes that young professionals have embraced and renovated. Alongside are many students who have chosen to commute.

Today, if you are visiting Manayunk make sure your wallet is filled.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters

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