NeverSleeps

  • Local Expert 13,949 points
  • Reviews 55
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 1,294
  • Discussions 19

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
Just now

"The beach & boardwalk live on!"

I honestly don't know anyone who lives on Coney Island, though apparently there are quite a few residents in the neighborhood (not an actual island, by the way). Coney Island has seen some massive changes in the past few years, and fun here has morphed into a more family-friendly state-of-the-art kind of carnival thing - but it's still the best place in the city to get a hot dog by most accounts.

Even if many of the old school Coney Island tourist attractions have closed shop, it's still a grand nostalgic sort of place - and a must-see for anyone who has never been to the city. It's quite possibly one of the coolest spots in Brooklyn (though, admittedly not my personal fave).
Pros
  • carnival stuff
  • awesome hot dogs
  • great timeout from the rest of the city
Cons
  • carnival stuff isn't as cool as it used to be
Recommended for
  • Tourists
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Not for me. But maybe you?"

As a twenty-something resident of New York City (more specifically, of Brooklyn), I would never want to live this far from civilization. There is surprisingly little for a young person to do in this neighborhood, and it's a far journey to get to a neighborhood where there are things to do. That said, rent is pretty affordable out here - so if you don't mind being so far from anything remotely trendy and you don't want to pay crazy NYC rents, this is your spot.

There seem to be lots of people with cars in this area - as well as a number of driveways to park these cars, but street parking seems to be hard to come by all the same.

Besides a few Caribbean restaurants, your typical corner store fare, and the usual American fast food outposts, there isn't much going on down here that isn't residential. But properties here are somewhat affordable, and many have backyards - the holy grail of New York City (but not so uncommon in Brooklyn).
Pros
  • quiet
  • affordable
Cons
  • boring
  • far from civilization/trendy NYC
  • close to (unsafe) Brownsville
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"An all-around average kind of street"

I was wandering around this area recently, desperately searching for the Gowanus Nursery (which I consequently never found), and I have to say there wasn't much going on.

Summit is lined with mostly decent-looking residences, but it's a little close to the waterfront for my taste. (In NYC, waterfront property is vastly overrated. We have too many months of cold weather to live near an icy, windy waterway, thank you very much.) To be completely honest, this street seems sort of dismal to me, even if it is part of the mostly affluent Carroll Gardens neighborhood.

Don't get me wrong, I love Carroll Gardens - there are plenty of cool places to shop and eat - but this street is a bit far from the area's action. That said, it seemed like a family-safe sort of place (in fact, the only people I seemed to see around anywhere were parents with kids or high school-aged kids).
Pros
  • it's in Carroll Gardens
  • lots of trees, brownstones
Cons
  • subject to winter waterway winds
  • kinda far from cool stuff
  • public transport slightly lacking
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"For rather young parents and their rather young children"

It's not easy to rate Carroll Street because it is so long and transverses some vastly different neighborhoods. The best way to divide it up is by using Prospect Park - basically, the Carroll St on the west side of the park is magnificent, and the Carroll St on the east side of the park is less-than-savory.

On the west side, you have the Carroll Street of Park Slope - or, the Carroll Street that gets four stars. East of the park, you have the less lovable Carroll Street - the one where there isn't much to do and where I personally wouldn't love to live.

East of Prospect Park is the Crown Heights area - a neighborhood that has gotten increasingly less shady over the years, but it's not out of the dark just yet. That said, you can probably land some cheap rent over here. Just don't expect to have a lot of selection when it comes to good takeout or nightlife spots.

In Park Slope Carroll Street is a sloping lane of beautiful brownstones. Where the street intersects with 5th and 7th, there are tons of restaurants and shops. Two blocks north and parallel to the street in question is Union Street, another street literally lined with places to spend your money (suggested places to get acquainted with: Rosewater on the corner of 6th Ave and the Park Slope Food Coop between 6th and 7th Aves).

It seems like brownstones in this area are going on sale often enough, and are usually in the $500,000-to-just-under-a-million range. Lots of rather young parents live here with their rather young children, as you've probably already heard.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • lots of boutiques, restaurants nearby
Cons
  • if you're walking east on Carroll west of Prospect Park, you're walking up a rather steep slope
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"It's not that great now but...just wait?"

Wellllll - there are businesses springing up in this area believe it or not. They're of the sort that can't afford to open up in a less industrial, more expensive area. Gowanus right now is like Williamsburg before any musicians decided to move in to the warehouse spaces on the waterfront. Of course, the Gowanus Canal is way more poisonous than the East River - so move in at your own risk, poor artist types!

I was wandering down this Ave on my way home from Lowes and I think I passed that new music venue that is opening up here - in spite of warnings to all not to walk around such a deserted industrial area at night. Anyway, it's supposed to open in two months on 2nd Ave and 14th Street, and it'll probably be awesome and remind everyone of Williamsburg before there were condos and shops that sold $300 t-shirts.

At the moment it's difficult to rate many of the above Additional Ratings because there just isn't much here besides warehouses and service stations. It's quiet, but ugly. If anyone can find a place to live on 2nd Ave, I can't imagine they'd pay much for it. At least, I hope they'd be wise enough not to.
Pros
  • good place to open loud music venues - no neighbors to complain
Cons
  • eerily inactive
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Now exiting Park Slope"

This is around the area where boundaries start to blur: 16th Street isn't Park Slope - at least not by any account I know of - but it isn't Sunset Park either - that's a ways further south. But even though you're not too close to the glamorous Park Slope brownstones and the row houses on 16th just aren't as pretty as those on, say, 3rd St, you're still in good hands with this area.

You're close to the action on 5th and 7th Aves (though admittedly the action is better if you travel north on these streets), but far from the bar noise and the shopping traffic. Sure, it's a long walk to the Park Slope Food Coop from here, but they'll still let you join!
Pros
  • It's quiet, not much traffic outside of a few intersections
Cons
  • Kind of a far walk from true Park Slope grandeur
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Perfect Carroll Gardens Sample"

Degraw Street is a sample of why I would love to live in Carroll Gardens (at least if I were on the verge of getting married and settling down): it's calm, quiet and stunning (at least as far as Brooklyn neighborhoods go). The street is lined with beautiful brownstones, and it cuts through an interesting neighborhood and the shop-lined Court and Smith Streets.

The Street gets somewhat too close for comfort to the poisonous Gowanus Canal, and the western end takes you to the not-so-pretty Waterfront District. As long as you stay in Carroll Gardens, you will likely be envious of Degraw Street residents.

There are some downsides to living down here. For instance, the F/G trains aren't the most reliable (and in fact are often referred to as some of the city's worst examples of public transport).
Pros
  • beautiful/clean/lots of trees
  • close to a number of boutiques, mini-grocers, restaurants
Cons
  • public transport in the area can be lacking at times
  • proximity to Gowanus Canal
  • proximity to ugly Brooklyn waterfront
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Take your pick of classy joints for eating, shopping and working out"

Near the southern border of the Park Slope neighborhood, 14th Street is not as nice as some of the lower-numbered streets closer to the main brownstoner action. That said, it also must be noted that 14th Street is in around where the area stops being full of dollar stores and starts getting real.

Harbor Fitness - a classy joint of a gym - is in the area, and trendy coffee joints keep on popping up on nearby Avenue intersections (the latest being a outpost of Crop to Cup on 4th and 14th). Residents of this street will stay fit and caffeinated, and a number of bars and restaurants are just a short walk from most doorsteps.

Aside from places where one can spend money, the main properties of 14th Street are of the residential variety. Row houses - lots of 'em. As with the rest of the neighborhood, properties closest to Prospect Park tend to be lovelier (at least from the outside) than those near the Gowanus Canal (which is famously brimming with poison).
Pros
  • Close to everything your heart wants to spend money upon
  • quiet, residential
Cons
  • area near Hamilton/4th Ave is not the prettiest
  • 4th Ave intersection traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Residential spot in a friendly neighborhood"

The scene down around 23rd Street isn't trendy-cool - it's not Meatpacking, it's not even Williamsburg, not even close - but there are some awesomely friendly bars in the area. You know, of the everybody-knows-your-name variety. (718 comes to mind, but there is no shortage of beer houses on 5th Ave.)

I lived in the area for a while, and bartenders weren't the only ones who remembered my name - the guys at my corner store and local coffee shop really knew how to run a friendly business as well. The neighborhood was really welcoming, and there are few neighborhoods left in Brooklyn like it.

If you live on 23rd Street, you're only really close to the action if you live near 5th or 7th Aves - otherwise the street is pretty quiet and very residential. It's not all that cute, to be honest. Lower numbered streets in the neighboring Park Slope area are lined with beautiful brownstones, but down here what you get is a lot of aluminum-sided row houses with the occasional brick one thrown in the mix. But the streets tend to be clean, and it's an affordable area and just a short walk from some decent restaurants and shops in Park Slope.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Affordable
  • Close to Park Slope
Cons
  • Not the greatest grocery store options (not counting Rossman's produce stand)
  • Bland as far as Brooklyn goes
  • Busy intersection at 4th Ave
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"A 'hood that hasn't reached the finish line, but doesn't know"

I considered moving to Prospect Heights, but the problem I found was that the apartments available in the area were not only overpriced, but seriously cramped. I know you're probably thinking that this is merely an NYC phenomenon which can't be avoided, but it's worse here than in other areas! Prospect Heights is on the up-and-coming side of things, but it's not quite there yet - unbeknowst to realtors. I'm sorry, but I don't want to pay $2200 for a crappy two bedroom on a cruddy street just because someone opened a cool bar a few blocks away. To make matters worse, people are actually paying these ridiculous rents to live in Prospect Heights, which I predict will put a damper on the neighborhood's development. (Obviously, if the rents are too high, then the cool but poor start-up businesses will start in other areas - like Gowanus. Or Bushwick. Or even Crown Heights.)

The bright side: Prospect Heights is home to cool things, like the greenmarket in Grand Army Plaza, the main branch of the Brooklyn Library, Brooklyn Botanical Gardens and the Brooklyn Museum. The area in and around Prospect Park is where most of the trendy new cafes and bars are located, as well as some of the better real estate.
Pros
  • lots to do and see - Botanical Gardens, etc
  • year-round greenmarket at Grand Army
  • up-and-coming bar scene
Cons
  • kinda cruddy, rundown area
  • far from Manhattan, but rent prices don't reflect it
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Awesome neighborhood vantage point"

I've become familiar with 12th Street mostly around where it ends after Hamilton Place - and that's because I've been frequenting the plant nursery at Lowes (and of course the Pathmark next door, a horrible store for produce but great for buying TP and paper towels in bulk).

The blocks west of 3rd Avenue are no place anyone would want to live - there is a city vehicle maintenance garage in the vicinity and the street is lined with snow plow trucks - but you couldn't move in if you wanted to, as all of these buildings are of the industrial warehouse sort.

Go east of 3rd Ave and you get to the good stuff - the row houses go up in value and beauty as you approach Prospect Park. These six blocks are almost completely lined with brownstones (especially west of 5th Ave), with the occasional corner store of Blockbuster video taking up space where the street intersects with an avenue.

Those that live close to 5th and 7th Aves will be able to enjoy the great deal of amenities that populate these particular streets, but being set away from them will also protect 12 St residents from the bar traffic noise that never seems to die down on any given day.
Pros
  • Lowes, Pathmark
  • nearby nightlife
  • lots of great restaurants will deliver to your apt
Cons
  • built on a sloping hill
  • industrial area west of 3rd Ave
  • near the crappy F, G, N, R trains
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"Just a hop away from neighborhoods that are hopping"

Notable in Kips Bay are the Bellevue Hospital facilities - which are really incredible, it's sort of like the airport of hospitals. Hopefully no one reading this will ever find themselves there but if you do, you'll find yourself in good hands. Other than Bellevue - a building that is rather historic in itself - there isn't much to be seen in this neighborhood. (Obviously, if the first thing one mentions in a review is a hospital, there isn't much hope for the area.)

Kips Bay is well stocked with drug stores (not surprisingly, see above), and little places to grab a bite. But this little section of Manhattan is a far cry from anything trend-worthy. On the up-side, it's not a far walk to the cooler neighborhoods of Chelsea or the East Village. Heck, you could even cab it to the LES in no time at all.

So the conclusion is this: even if there isn't a lot to do in the immediate blocks that make up Kips Bay, it's not very difficult to get from boring Kips Bay to a more happening area. And then, when you've had your fun for the evening, it wouldn't be so bad to head back to this quiet area and hit the hay.
Pros
  • Convenient
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Boring
  • Generic
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"Absolutely stunning street"

Sure, you'll never find a parking space on this street (and note that this is an area that sees a lot of film crews taking up valuable street parking as well), but if you're lucky enough to find/afford one of the beautiful brownstones that line 7th St you'll be hit with this street's serene beauty every time you walk out your door. (Another word of caution: if you are planning on doing your real estate on 7th St, beware moving close to any of the Avenues - save 6th and 8th - as they tend to either feature heavy car traffic or heavy bar traffic.)

I find myself on 7th Street quite a lot - on my way to either the Barnes and Noble or the Five Guys at 7th Ave, admittedly - and although it doesn't differ from many of the neighborhood streets (as in those east-west streets that are quite a different scene from the neighborhood's north-west lying Avenues). There are a few downsides to 7th (depending, of course, on how you look at things) - New York Methodist hospital takes up the block between 7th and 8th Aves, and causes quite a traffic jam just about all of the time. Then again, if you ever need the hospital's services, it's right there.
Pros
  • Prospect Park
  • beautiful brownstones
  • very green street
Cons
  • no parking
  • Methodist Hospital
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"Brooklyn's Little Hideaway"

Boerum Hill is one of those Brooklyn neighborhoods that manages to attract quite a variety of outsiders with its endless shops, cafes, and restaurants (admittedly, I mostly head to Boerum for the shopping experience) despite being small in stature.

The past forty years or so have seen this near-Downtown Brooklyn area transformed from a not-so-safe place to one whose tree lined streets practically wink and glitter at you. Brownstones here look much like the ones in Park Slope - that is to say, lovely - but I think the shopping experience may be better than what you find in surrounding neighborhoods. For example, those ladies with designers in mind will find boutiques that cater to exactly their purpose, and those with a more mainstream aesthetic in mind can head to Urban or American Apparel.

It may be important to note that the neighborhood doesn't conform to brownstones like Park Slope seems to - the occasional brick home makes itself known in Boerum Hill. Park life is a little lacking, but it's not far too Fort Greene Park and there are quite a few trees on the neighborhood's residential streets.

It's obvious that the locals love their Boerum Hill neighborhood as the streets are among the city's cleanest, even if people are always on the area's sidewalks in droves. Yards, stoops and private buildings are well-maintained - it's almost like being in one of those gated communities in which people are required to meet certain standards that appeal to the eye. This neighborhood attracts families (though nowadays a family dwelling in this area is likely to cost millions), as it is safe and tends to quiet down pretty early in the evening. Nightlife is limited to restaurant-going - there are a few corner bars, but no clubs that I've really seen.

Atlantic Ave is the neighborhood's most happening street - it's lined with places to eat and shop and the traffic is jammed up regularly until after nightfall - but side streets like Court and Smith can be just as interesting to the casual shopper/restaurant goer and are often more populated with sidewalk traffic.
Pros
  • So much to buy! So many places to eat out!
  • Close to the Brooklyn Trader Joe's
Cons
  • Close to the insanity of Downtown Brooklyn
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Dyker Heights strung out for the holidays"

"Dyker Heights" is synonymous with "holiday decor" - so much so that people from all over the city flock to the neighborhood to check out the historic mansions draped in strings of light bulbs. It's rather unexpected that a neighborhood so far from the bustling center of Midtown Manhattan could manage such a draw, but mid December begins to see the commuters stream into this old school Brooklyn area nonetheless. (The attraction of the neighborhood was once spoofed on Late Night with Conan O'Brien, in a segment in which the comedian informed viewers: "Apparently this house can be seen from the space shuttle in orbit. Several astronauts have called it tacky from 15 miles up.") The over-the-top light displays are often professionally assembled, and it is apparent that each house tries to outdo its neighbors with its holiday cheer. (See: http://gonyc.about.com/od/christmassights/ig/Dyker-Heights-Christmas-Lights/)

The population in Dyker Heights is predominantly composed of Italian-Americans, and while residents aren't opposed to having a few new neighbors, they work hard to keep condos from going up in the area. Indeed, if high rises were to be built there the neighborhood would lose much of its charm - this area is packed with sprawling stand-alone homes that offer something most New Yorkers will never know: space. In addition to such amenities, home owners work at keeping their grand-standing homes in excellent condition (which adds to the overall effect of the Dyker Lights displays). Eleventh Avenue is perhaps the highlight of the neighborhood as it features a row of mansions (as opposed to the one- and two-family homes found elsewhere in the area) that are the main attraction each Christmas season.

Being an Italian-American neighborhood, the local amenities involve exactly what one would expect: pizzerias, delis, meat markets, Catholic churches. Dyker Heights is very much an enclosed area - the locals don't see a lot of outsiders except when they have their Christmas lights displays up, and this can not only be attributed to a lack of tourist attractions, but to a lack of subway stops as well. In order to get to Manhattan from Dyker Heights, one has no option but to take a bus.
Pros
  • Christmas Lights
  • Very quiet, friendly
Cons
  • Far from Manhattan
  • Boringly residential
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"The epic Brooklyn neighborhood"

I live in this neighborhood, and even if I sometimes think it's a bit overrated, it attracts all sorts. I have always been more fond of the areas around Cobble Hill and Boreum Hill for some reason, even if Park Slope is a similar sort of place. Park Slope is certainly known for its beautiful brownstones, and I do recommend taking a stroll down President or Prospect Park West during Brooklyn's green months (or even during the fall), as the combination of architecture and greenery is rather stunning.

Another thing Park Slope is known for is the strollers. I can't blame families for wanting to settle in such a beautiful neighborhood, but I can blame them for getting upset about the noise from the established bar scene (hey, you knew about all those bars on 5th and 7th Aves before you moved in!).

It seems like Park Slope is often home to disputes between its older and younger generations. The latest is about a bike lane that was installed on Prospect Park West to keep cars from speeding down what used to be a three lane highway (it's now two lanes of car traffic, one parking lane, and a bike lane on the park side of the street). The bike lane's protesters are upset that bikers don't ever stop for pedestrians - but facts show that the bike lane has done much to slow down car traffic on the street.

Anyway. Park Slope is full of restaurants (check out Union Street, 5th Ave, 7th Ave) and random shops (Beacon's Closet!), and the neighborhood does draw an early evening crowd. My experience with the bar scene is that it is a little sparse (compared to such happening neighborhoods as Williamsburg), but that bartenders/bar owners get to know their neighbors - which is rarely a bad thing. Personally I think that South Slope is friendlier than Park Slope proper, but that's just me.
Pros
  • Lots of strollers
  • Cool bar and off-the-beaten-track music scene
  • Odd Twin, boutique clothing stores
Cons
  • Lots of strollers
  • Next to no parking
  • Too many mediocre restaurants
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"A street that improves as you near Prospect Park"

There are only two blocks on 15th Street that rate less-than-average - those between Hamilton Place and 3rd Ave. Those blocks are super industrial and crammed with city vehicles (ie, ambulances and street sweeping trucks), as this is where their maintenance garages are located. The rest of 15th Street perks up the closer you get to Prospect Park. Little markets and delis pop up where the street intersects with the neighborhood avenues, but for the most part 15th Street is lined with row houses and shiny new condos (which are either still under construction or standing mostly empty, having just been completed).

Harbor Fitness is here, and at 6th Ave the street hits a beautiful community garden, complete with tomatoes residents can freely pick, a weeping willow and tiny fish pond.
Pros
  • Close to Prospect Park
  • Community Garden at 6th Ave
  • Home to an awesome gym, Harbor Fitness
Cons
  • Rent can be on the expensive side
  • Little parking to be found
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Meh. No thanks."

During a recent apartment search, I was allowing myself to check out places in Prospect Heights - which is one of those "up-and-coming" neighborhoods that is seeing a lot of trendy bars, restaurants and organic groceries spring into action. However, conniving real estate agents would often list apartments in Bed-Stuy as being located in Prospect Heights. Sure, they are neighboring 'hoods, but they are a world apart (you can usually tell when a listing was really in Bed-Stuy by its low rent).

There are streets in Bed-Stuy that are still known for their gang activity - even if the area has become greatly gentrified in the last decade or so. I read an article recently in which residents were thrilled that they could actually throw a block party and not be scared of insane fights breaking out, which is something that apparently used to happen often here.

Bed-Stuy remains a place for those with modest incomes - it's not that safe, and it has no appeal whatsoever to those who can afford to live outside of it. Clinton Hill (okay, I suppose it might be it's own neighborhood nowadays) is what they're calling the area of Bed-Stuy that has drawn the most gentrification and Pratt students. There is a marked difference, however, as you are traveling west on any street in Bed-Stuy and come upon Clinton Hill - suddenly the streets are cleaner and the buildings better kept.

Rent is cheap in Bed-Stuy, so I can understand the appeal to those students who study close by - or to any student, really. The areas closer to Clinton Hill and Prospect Heights are surely much nicer than those near Bushwick and Williamsburg, where there seems to be much more public housing high rises.
Pros
  • well... rent is cheap
Cons
  • not especially safe
  • dingy looking
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
Just now

"Not for the Faint of Heart"

Because Bushwick is slowly being gentrified by hipster kids who can't afford to live in Greenpoint and Williamsburg - likely because they work in the service industry and spend all their extra cash on Ray-Bans and angular haircuts, this means that there are cool bars and restaurants that cater to this crowd springing up all over the hood. One spot known around BK for being awesome is Gotham City off Myrtle Ave. However, beware the rat population in this area late at night. As one can see, going out in Bushwick is not for the faint of heart.

Besides providing shelter for much of the city's rat population, Bushwick is home to its share of crime (especially in the summer months, like most neighborhoods prone to such activity). There are a few low-income housing projects peppering the neighborhood, and there are plenty in the neighboring Bed-Stuy, giving the area a low chance of ever truly being gentrified. Keep this in mind when your hipster cousin invites you to come live in the extra room in his Bushwick apartment and he tells you: "In five years this place is going to be the new Williamsburg!"

Of course there is always speculation as to which neighborhood will be the next big trend monster - and if you're looking to get into the bar business, it won't hurt to set up in the area of Bushwick that borders Williamsburg. Already bars like Wreck Room and Kings County are doing pretty good business in the area. But I disagree that Bushwick has any real potential to drive out the low income natives and see condos rise from the ashes. Sorry, hipsters.
Pros
  • Cool bars/restaurants popping up
  • Close to Hipsterville Williamsburg
Cons
  • Still gentrifying
  • elevated J/Z train is loud/annoying
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"The good is very good and the rest is in-between"

This neighborhood has become very gentrified in the past few years, thanks in part to neighboring Pratt. The Brooklyn flea is in this neighborhood on Saturdays, and on weekends the area around Atlantic Ave is busy with shoppers and brunch goers. This neighborhood is much nicer in the areas that border Prospect Heights and Fort Greene - over by Bed-Stuy is not where I would want to be living or hanging out.

I checked out this neighborhood in my recent search for a new apartment and found that there were a lot of newly renovated apartments on slightly questionable blocks. These apartments tended to be overpriced - after all, this neighborhood is still being gentrified. While there are a lot of trendy restaurants opening up in Clinton Hill, the neighborhood still shows signs of its old wear-and-tear.

Of course, there are exceptions - real estate closer to Atlantic Ave, especially in the western portion of the neighborhood is much nicer and perhaps worth paying higher mortgages and rents. In addition to having prettier apartment buildings, the nicer part of Clinton Hill is lined with tall trees and close to some really cool places on Atlantic Ave.

Highlights of Clinton Hill proper include Urban Vintage, a coffee shop with a really unique atmosphere, and Pilar Cuban Eatery, an inexpensive cafe offering some real deal Cuban cuisine.
Pros
  • Spacious, affordable appartments
  • Hot Bird
Cons
  • Near a still-gentrifying neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
SanjiD
SanjiD Not sure that the gentrification of Clinton Hill has anything to do with Pratt (they've been there since 1887), but has more to do with the affordability, larger living spaces and proximity to Manhattan post 9/11. Now in 2016, the nabe is unaffordable for most of the long time older residents who are being displaced at an alarming rate. It's great for property values and finding great places to eat and drink, but the losses (small mom and pop stores, parking spaces, general friendliness, ethnic diversity, etc. ) are heartbreaking. And with all the high rise construction going up on every brownstone block, we are super crowded together on narrow streets that were never designed for thousands of people. We have also lost the views of the Manhattan skyline and, more importantly, THE SUN! One silver lining in all this is that many of the original owners have not sold and are renting their property at those exhorbitant rates to those who can afford it (thanks to help from Mom and Dad!) and have purchased nicer homes in warmer states. I used to say I would never leave Brooklyn, but that was before it turned into Manhattan.
Jul 07, 2016
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"It's pretty, but lacking in lifestyle options"

I'm truly surprised at how highly rated this Brooklyn neighborhood has become on Streetadvisor. Although there are some very beautiful family homes in Lefferts Gardens, they are part of a historical district and this real estate is difficult to get one's hands on. And although the neighborhood is next to the lovely Prospect Park, the surrounding neighborhoods are not that great. It's been my experience that there is not much to do in this neighborhood, and I really don't recommend the sushi restaurants. In fact, none of the restaurants I've tried in this area have been very good.

If you ask me, this neighborhood is really, really boring.When I go out in Brooklyn I don't go out to look at all the old world family homes. But that's just me. What I want from a neighborhood includes good food, crowded bars and maybe a few places to pick up a decent pair of shoes. The main drag through Lefferts, Flatbush Ave, features a lot of hole-in-the-wall hair salons that also sell knock-off Gucci bags. I definitely prefer the Brooklyn neighborhoods on the other side of the park.
Pros
  • Gorgeous mansions
  • Close to Prospect Park, Botanical Gardens
Cons
  • Far from anything resembling cool or trendy
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Industrial goes Condo"

I realize it's just me - as everyone else seems to be a big fan of this neighborhood - but I have never spent a day in DUMBO without wishing I was somewhere else. Perhaps I just haven't been introduced to the right spots to hang Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass. After going on a few dates at merely average restaurants in this neighborhood, I haven't been back much. From what I have seen, however, there seems to be plenty of expensive real estate and gyms in the area, and it is very quiet here at night. Almost too quiet.

In my opinion DUMBO is seriously lacking in Brooklyn personality. What used to be a neighborhood full of warehouses has been converted into rows upon rows of shining new condominiums. This, of course, is not the most uncommon transformation to occur in a New York neighborhood - but it's still a little bit depressing.

Overall, a visit to DUMBO is a pretty average experience. The restaurants are average, the shopping is minimal, and I'd honestly rather spend a night on the down in Boreum or Cobble Hill. Or even in Williamsburg.
Pros
  • Converted warehouse apartments
Cons
  • Overpriced
  • Hills and strangely steep sidewalks
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Inexpensive and close to some trendier neighborhoods"

Crown Heights is not somewhere I'd personally like to spend a lot of time, but I do have friends who live here in order to enjoy the low low rents offered in the neighborhood. It's not so bad a place, and parts of it (where there are old one-family homes and plenty of trees) are actually kind of beautiful. That said, the area borders on Brownsville - a less-than-awesome neighborhood - and doesn't exactly offer an upscale dining or shopping experience. Instead, what you find in Crown Heights are a lot of fast food restaurants and mall-type clothings stores of the cheaper variety (Rainbow comes to mind).

There is absolutely nothing trendy about Crown Heights, but it's not far from Prospect Heights, which has become much cooler in the past few years, and it's a short ride to Cobble Hill and Boreum Hill, which are pretty established cool places. (Of course, potential residents should keep in mind that while there are awesome Brooklyn neighborhoods east of Crown Heights, there are some pretty bad ones directly west.)
Pros
  • Inexpensive real estate
Cons
  • close to some unsafe neighborhoods
  • has its own worrisome (though decreasing) crime rate
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
Just now

"Unsafe and Ugly"

I agree with the previous Streetadvisor reviews on Brownsville - this is a pretty nasty place. The area is poor and rundown and consistently tops the list of Brooklyn neighborhoods with the highest crime rates (along with East New York). I've actually only been here once - and it, incidentally, was because I didn't have much of a choice in the matter.

The are quite a few public housing projects out here, and the rest of the area is lined with the sort of row houses commonly seen in poor Brooklyn neighborhoods. Brownsville is actually the neighborhood with the highest concentration of public housing in the entire city. There are also a lot of empty lots where housing projects have been torn down - it's not an ideal landscape, and surely not one that I would want to live anywhere near.

Problems with crime and drugs keep many away from this neighborhood - it's one of those places where kids have to go through metal detectors just to get to class in the morning. Hospitals are filled with a high concentration of stab and gunshot victims. There are few Brooklyn neighborhoods that I would be reluctant to visit, but this is definitely one of them.
Cons
  • impoverished area
  • high crime rate
karyns
karyns Very honest review. I agree completly.
Oct 14, 2017
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2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Tends to be a grim place"

Bed-Stuy has a reputation for being a bad place. There are a lot of people living in poverty and in housing projects in this neighborhood, but there are also a lot of working class citizens and Pratt kids in the area. It's a rough place, and there has been plenty of gang activity here in the past.

However, gentrification is happening here - if a little slowly. This area will never be the next Williamsburg, though, and potential residents should be very careful about moving onto certain blocks (some are known gang spots). The worst areas are closer to Bushwick, or in the north side of the neighborhood.

Cute little groceries and cafes keep popping up here, especially in the area closer to Atlantic Avenue and Clinton Hill. Of course, this is the area that has been gentrified the most. Havana Outpost is in this area and attracts a huge crowd when it is open in the summertime, and the newly opened Hot Bird is just as popular with its huge outdoor (and indoor) space.
Pros
  • inexpensive real estate
Cons
  • not yet very gentrified
  • crime rate remains something to worry about
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"A lovely place to retire"

I've looked at some really awesome apartments in Ditmas - but there are a few reasons I didn't move into this neighborhood. For one, it seems to be mostly populated by the older generation and a few Jehovah's witnesses (who are ever sitting outside their apartments, passing out flyers). And another - it's far away from anything cool and trendy, and let's face it: part of the reason twenty-somethings move to the city is to be near things that are cool and trendy.

That said, I would recommend this neighborhood to anyone looking to settle down a bit (or a lot). I think it's traditionally a working class sort of 'hood, and that's why you can get a huge apartment for a reasonable price.

There are a lot of one family homes here with gorgeous lawns, and there are some pretty cool pre-war brick buildings that have yet to be gut renovated and made into the tiny boxes enjoyed by the rest of the city. Cortelyou Road offers a few cool places to eat, as well as some cafes.
Pros
  • some really cool apartment spaces (that are actually affordable!)
  • Cortelyou Road
Cons
  • really far from Manhattan
  • a lack of general trendiness
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Not exactly the high life"

There are a lot of cool-looking old houses in Flatbush, but this neighborhood really feels like a working class Long Island suburb. The area is mostly filled with families - and it's a good place for them, as there isn't really a whole lot of nightlife. Some of the streets are very congested (like, say, Flatbush Avenue), but a lot of the residential streets don't have much traffic at all.

Anyone who moves to New York to experience the city as they see it on TV is not going to want to move here. Parts of this neighborhood are really rundown and the opposite of uplifting. On the other hand, the residential spots with the sprawling old houses have actual lawns - not something you see around this city all too often.

Nightlife is practically non-existent in Flatbush, and decent places to eat and grocery shop are few and far between. Not the place I'd pick to live my life.
Pros
  • quiet
  • people have actual lawns
Cons
  • it's far from Manhattan
  • feels like the suburbs
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
Just now

"A rare Brooklyn neighborhood"

Whenever I venture to Windsor Terrace (I live nextdoor in Park Slope) to get a little dry cleaning done, I have a nice time wandering around these established streets. I venture into used book shops and little groceries - it's not exactly a happening neighborhood, but it offers a certain coziness. It seems to me that most of the residents are retired, or at least old enough to retire, but there are some older twenty-somethings moving into the area as South Slope becomes louder and louder with all of its bar action.

I have heard that real estate can be sort of expensive in Windsor Terrace, but a friend of mine is moving there at the end of the month and will be paying a mere $700 for one bedroom in a three bedroom apartment. Not bad! But then again one also has to take in the fact that there isn't much to do here, and it's a hike into the nearest trendy neighborhood.

However, if you're not young and fabulous - that's another story. Since there seems to be so many retirees here, I'm going to assume that it's a great place for them. Whenever I visit I am struck by how little traffic is on the avenues, and by how quiet it always seems to be. Quiet and peaceful - rare adjectives to describe a Brooklyn neighborhood.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • cool neighborhood staples, such as book shops and groceries
Cons
  • out-of-the-way location
  • rents can be weirdly expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"A balance of good and evil"

I don't get out to Red Hook as much as I would like - because it's not the most accessible neighborhood via public transportation. You really have to make a day out of any trip to this boondocks of a neighborhood - not that it isn't worth a visit. It is, it's just a pain to get around (unless of course for some reason you have a car in the city).

Red Hook was supposed to be the next Williamsburg - a haven for twenty-something hipsters to shop, eat and make art/music, as that's all the trendy set ever seems to do. And it sort of is - except that it never caught on as much down here as in Williamsburg and surrounding neighborhoods. Perhaps this is because Red Hook was never as affordable as Williamsburg once was (and Bushwick and Bed-Stuy still are, being crap neighborhoods to live in). Or perhaps it is because residents of Red Hook must take the hated G train to get anywhere (TERRIBLE transit!), or perhaps it's the housing projects that keep people away.

Red Hook is half industrial and half residential - I've looked at some very roomy and fairly priced spaces for rent here, and many have amazing views of the city skyline. And the neighborhood has its bright spots: the ballfields, IKEA, Fairway, and a ton of trendy boutique restaurants and cafes, like Baked, Sunny's Bar and Steve's Authentic Key Lime Pie. I'm not sure how many would agree that the city views, quaint residential streets (many of which are paved in shoddy brick) and parks would make up for the housing projects, industrial action (there are always huge trucks driving around these parts) and crap transportation. I suppose it's one of those neighborhoods where residents take the good with the bad.
Pros
  • view of the Statue of Liberty from Fairway
  • IKEA
  • bar/restaurant life
Cons
  • cobbled streets could use a repaving
  • you need a car - unless you have eternal patience required to live with only the G train
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"The Hipster Version of Swank"

Today Williamsburg is bustling with a variety of activities: the home-office-at-the-coffee shop kind, the fashionista sort that brings mass crowds of people on weekends and the type that builds condos. There is something about the air around here, though - it's not uncommon to come across snotty shop keepers and baristas. It's gotten pretty swank around here in the last decade. From a neighborhood of mostly industrial warehouses (which have been converted into some pretty cool apartments where they weren't knocked down to create high rise condos on the water), Williamsburg has fast become swanky albeit in a youthful way.

On the weekends there are book vendors on the sidewalks and a farmer's market in McCarren Park (which I suppose is borderline Greenpoint area), and all the bars and places to get brunch really serve as neighborhood draws. While there are some cute clothing stores and at least one awesome shoe carrier, I don't think it attracts many people outside of the hipster circle, unless anyone outside of a hipster likes second hand "vintage" shops.

I have a few friends that live in the south part of Williamsburg, which isn't nearly as nice as the area of the neighborhood starting around Grand. Down there there are a lot of brand new buildings or newly remodeled ones, but somehow they aren't very charming. I hear the apartments around the Bedford L - besides being hard to obtain - have gotten pretty expensive for what they are, which is nothing new and nothing too special.
Pros
  • sidewalk book sales
  • no shortage of shopping/eating opportunities
  • Home to artists and art galleries
  • Many good restaurants and bars abound
  • The neighborhood is populated by a diverse population
Cons
  • the weekend shopping crowd can be a little much
  • features just as many not-so-great places to eat
  • Area near the water is littered seemingly deserted new condo developments
  • Noisy at night due to late night revelers who take their party out on the street
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Almost unwittingly awesome neighborhood"

Greenpoint is a haven of authentic Polish food, and though it may not look like the trendiest shopping district, there are some pretty cool shops scattered around thanks to the influx of trendy residents who can't afford to live in Williamsburg anymore.

As far as Polish food is concerned, Lomzynianka comes to mind - as well as Krolewskie Jadlo. If you have a thing for stuffed cabbage, pierogies or kielbasa you can hardly skip a visit to Greenpoint, Brooklyn. There's also cool kid neighborhood staples like Enids, and though I've only been there to drink (they have a healthy bar atmosphere there), I hear the food is pretty good - and they serve a brunch that seems to be pretty popular. Generally the bars on Manhattan Ave stay flush with skinny hipster kid types, much like the neighboring Williamsburg bars.

Greenpoint can sort of be divided between the super-residential east side and the somewhat commercial west side (there are still plenty of residencies on this side, they just happen to be accompanied by restaurants and shopping options). Those that live on the east side have a pretty good walk to the L or the G trains, as well as to any of the action taking place on the other side of the neighborhood. If I had my pick of Greenpoint apartments, I think one one the more commercialized side of the neighborhood would make for a better living experience.
Pros
  • polish eateries
  • cheap jewery shops
  • close to McCarren Park, Williamsburg
Cons
  • it's ugly
  • residents are often forced to take the G train
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Brooklyn's Trendiest 'Hood"

Sure, the hipsters have cased out Williamsburg and it's now brimming with shops and restaurants that cater to their set - but Cobble Hill just can't be reckoned with when it comes to having the better eating experience and the trendier shopping outlets. In fact, you don't even have to want to shop or eat to enjoy your time here, because unlike Williamsburg, Cobble Hill is stunningly beautiful. Walking around here, I always feel like I'm living in a fashion ad (in fact, Ralph Lauren shot the commercial for this year's fall collection there).

Undoubtedly it's a fair penny to own one of the brownstones that line these streets, as well as to simply rent one. But, it's one of Brooklyn's best neighborhoods, so what else do you expect? If you do move in to Cobble Hill, be prepared to enjoy a number of neighborhood bars and book shops. Up on Atlantic Ave there are quite a few shops owned by immigrants from the Middle East, with Arabic writing on the awning and quite a variety of things for sale. This is also where the Brooklyn Urban Outfitters and Trader Joe's locations live, so you can expect to see a lot of foot traffic (as well as car traffic - the neighborhood is right off the BQE) at all hours.

If I were going to compare Cobble Hill with any Manhattan neighborhood (certainly a dangerous undertaking), I would pick the West Village. It's quaint and attracts quite a few people who like to eat out, but it's not exactly the biggest night spot. Of course there are bars in the area, but it's not the neighborhood you head to when you're going all out for a night on the town.
Pros
  • plenty of places to shop and eat
  • beautiful brownstones
Cons
  • crowded sidewalks - at least on the main retail drags
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Classic Brooklyn"

Bay Ridge is one of those neighborhoods where many of the residents are from Brooklyn and have lived here there whole lives. Sure, many of their parents were newly integrated immigrants, but that only adds to the classic Brooklyn vibe emitted from Bay Ridge. There are so many true blue New Yorkers wandering around Bay Ridge it's hard not to feel like you've woken up in one of those gangster movies that throwback to the sixties and seventies.

If there's anything off-putting about this 'hood, it's that it's so far away from the action in Manhattan. You'll be on the M/R for a good 45 minutes before you get back into the city, but maybe that's why so many people DO move out here. (Or, maybe their families have just lived here for a few generations.) Anyway - I wouldn't want to wait that long to get home after a long day of shopping in the city, but that's just me.

Because there is a Century 21 store in Bay Ridge, a lot of people head down to this otherwise sort-of-obscure Brooklyn neighborhood. I have to admit that this store is the reason I'm familiar with the neighborhood in the first place. But, that aside, Bay Ridge doesn't seem like too shabby of a place to live: there shops in the form of pet supplies, hair care and just about anything you can think of in the area around 4th and 5th Aves. The residential buildings nearby are behind tree-lined streets, and they look nice enough. Bay Ridge is definitely an even-level middle class neighborhood, perhaps with some working class flavor.
Pros
  • quiet, inexpensive
  • friendly neighbors
Cons
  • far from civilization
  • not much to do
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Brooklyn's Dim Sum Secret Hideout"

Foodies know about it, but your everyday tourist might not have a sojourn to Sunset Park on the itinerary. But they should! Brooklyn natives and residents head to the virtual Chinatown here to eat at amazing dim sum places like Pacificana and Seafood Palace. Yes, Sunset Park is a bit out-of-the-way for a date night if you don't live in the surrounding area, but I think it's worth the trip on a number of levels.

Since the neighborhood is largely residential, it offers a sort of old school Brooklyn vibe, and it's really fun to just wander around. It's a completely different scene from the crowded streets and high rises of Manhattan, and therefore can offer some relief to a chronically rushed city dweller. Granted, Sunset Park isn't as fancy and exciting a place as neighboring Park Slope - but I wouldn't mind living here. It's a bit of a trip into the city - maybe a 20 minute train ride to Union Square - as well as a bit lacking in nightlife, though. Perhaps it's a neighborhood best left to families and retirees. And foodies.
Pros
  • dim sum!
  • no shortage of dollarstores
  • cheap haircuts available
Cons
  • long train ride into the city
  • lacking in nightlife and restaurant variety
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
maximd
maximd Twenty minutes is a "bit of a trip"? Say what? Only for hipsters and lazy slacker Americans.
Jan 09, 2017
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4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cute, Cozy and Quaint"

I'm a little surprised that Carroll Gardens has come out atop the list of all Brooklyn 'hoods, but that's not to say that it isn't a quaint little place deserving of some praise and perhaps some tourist action. The residential streets in Carroll Gardens tend to be both quiet and safe, and if you want to walk around here late at night with your headphones cranked you are unlikely to have any problems.

Walking around Carroll Gardens, it's likely to strike you just how many homes have driveways - and it is a good place to have a car, as the only trains that stop down here are the F and the G. The latter is notorious for not arriving on time, and those poor residents in the north side of Brooklyn (who are forced to take the G) do nothing but complain about it.

A friend of mine who lives in this neighborhood - and reportedly landed a sweet deal on a studio apartment; they're not easy to come by here - says that the area is safe because there are still some Italian mob dudes hanging around. I'm not sure how true this holds, but for whatever reason, there isn't much to fear in Carroll Gardens as far as public safety goes.

The neighborhood is surely being infiltrated by the surrounding trendy spots in Boreum and Cobble Hills. These areas are loaded with good places to eat and expensive places to buy women's wear, and as the real estate fills up in the Hills, these kinds of retail outlets are popping up in Carroll Gardens more and more.

The Grocery and Buttermilk Channel are two neighborhood restaurants that continue to please, and that continue to turn up in trend-setting mags and online foodie forums alike. There is also a good deal of nightlife that can be taken advantage of - bars like Prime Meats and Zombie Hut attract young South Slope residents who aren't scared to take the G train late at night (or call a car, which will get you there much faster).
Pros
  • Fantastic restaurants and boutique along Smith Street
  • Great architecture which is dominated by historic brownstones
Cons
  • Subway connections are not often reliable especially on the weekends
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"What's better than Brooklyn?!"

Just like any outer borough - or even like Manhattan itself - Brooklyn has its bright spots (Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Williamsburg), and it also is home to neighborhoods that no one should have to reside in (Brownsville, East New York). But it was once its own city, and walking around Brooklyn today that much is still apparent; Brooklyn remains very much a unique flavor, and each neighborhood is a variation on that flavor.

Sure, there are more middle class, non-trendy neighborhoods than anything else - but those have a vibe that can't be matched by Manhattan neighborhoods, and you can usually bet that there is a family-owned pizzeria nearby that serves up a mean slice. There are some unexpected niches in some of these middle class neighborhoods as well, like the virtual Chinatown in Sunset Park, where you can get fabulous dim sum at places like Pacificana.

Nicer, more expensive places to live - like Boreum Hill/Cobble Hill and Park Slope - are truly beautiful with their brownstones, numerous cafes and shops, and their leafy green streets. There is a certain moneyed air about neighborhoods like these - it's almost like being in a shorter version of the Upper East Side in Manhattan, but with much younger neighborhoods.

Then of course there are the neighborhoods into which the trendster set has spilled - the hipster neighborhood of Williamsburg. The rents have shot up in Williamsburg in the past few years, so poorer twenty-somethings who want to be close to the action have had to move into Greenpoint and Bushwick, the latter of which is certainly the more affordable - if not the safest - choice. Williamsburg does have some cool bars and some really awesome shopping holes, but overall it's not a beautiful as Park Slope - and McCarren Park is no match for Prospect Park, by far Brooklyn's most awesome park.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Lots of shopping, lots of eating, little peace and quiet during daylight hours"

People from all over the city head over to Atlantic Ave because it's the home of Target and the Atlantic Center, which houses our local DSW, a giant Marshall's and all of the usual retail spots found in standard commercial malls. The place is always, always massively crowded - and I really recommend getting to Target early in the morning on a weekday, if at all possible. It's a mad house in there just about all of the time.

Besides the Atlantic Center, Atlantic Ave is home to the Brooklyn Urban Outfitters and there is an American Apparel close by. In short, Atlantic Ave is home to just about every mall or chain retail outlet your heart could ever desire. Close to the Brooklyn Bridge Atlantic Ave becomes especially downtown-like, but where it cuts through Cobble Hill there are a lot of interesting little restaurants and boutique shops.

The avenue is crazy packed with traffic just about all of the time - especially in the areas from the BQE to the Atlantic Center, and it kind of tapers off after that. I don't think I would want to live on this street, just because it is a little too busy and a little too commercial for my tastes.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
Just now

"Fabulousness on the Cheap"

Eastern Parkway may be four lanes of traffic in each direction, but it has a few awesome points that make it worth it to live on this street. First of all, I've looked at some GREAT apartments on this street, with views of the Brooklyn Museum and of Prospect Park - and since this is in Prospect Heights, the rents weren't too bad. If these same apartments were on Prospect Park West, there is no way they would be half as affordable.

If you have a car and live on Eastern Parkway, you'll be relieved to know that there is a wide access road on the north side of the street where everyone parks their cars - there is just no way you can park on the actual Eastern Parkway over by the park.

Of course, the further east you go down this road, the more questionable the neighborhood becomes (the closer you stay to Park Slope, the nicer the neighborhood stays). That said, I have to say that I love Prospect Heights. It's undergone so many improvements in the past few years, and these days you can get a really good meal right off Eastern Parkway. Someone recently built one of those popular all-glass apartment buildings on this street, right across from the library (which is another big highlight of this street), which to me is a sign of spreading opulence.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"I love life on Union!"

Union Street is one of the most lively streets in the neighborhood - especially when it comes to eating out or high-end grocery shopping. That might be a downside if you want to actually live here, but if you don't mind a little bit of a nightlife crowd and can afford to land one of the beautiful brownstones that line Union, then I think this would be a wonderful place to live.

This is where the original Union Street Market is located, as well as the neighborhood food co-op, Park Slope Food Cooperative. There are a bunch of organic restaurants on Union as well, like Rose Water and Scottadito's. I've heard great things about the latter, which is a place that serves organic Tuscan cuisine.

There is one downside: the actual street is a little traffic-heavy, but the fact that it is absolutely gorgeous makes up for the fact that you have to be on the look out for cars all the time. Union is the street that a lot of people take to get to Grand Army Plaza - a huge, highly trafficked roundabout at the end of the street - and so there is usually a long line of cars sitting at the light there.
Pros
  • unlimited supply of organic restaurants/groceries
  • Uncle Louis G's italian ice
Cons
  • backed up traffic heading to Grand Army
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Partially Industrial, Partially "Up-and-Coming""

Like many industrial spots in Brooklyn, there have been a lot of cool joints popping up in this neighborhood - like, say Four and Twenty Blackbirds, a pie shop that is constantly being featured on TV and in glossy magazines. This area has gotten way cooler as Park Slope spreads its wealth in a westerly fashion, and more shops and eateries and quaintly remodeled apartments continue to pop up - especially in the area around 9th Street.

The northern section of the neighborhood tends to be pretty cool as well - this is where the commercialism of Boreum Hill is spreading out, and the streets are lined with trees and gorgeous brownstones.

The area around the Gowanus Canal is probably the lamest part of the neighborhood. This is where you can find places like Pathmark and Lowes and Home Depot - and a lot of dirt and dingy looking buildings.

Overall, Gowanus is a hit-or-miss type neighborhood. If you happen to live in the area, then you probably know of some awesome places to eat and shop, but it's not like the area attracts many people who don't already live there.
Pros
  • Near cool neighborhoods: Redhook, Park Slope, Carroll Gardens
  • Pie from Four and Twenty Blackbirds
  • New bar/restaurant scene popping up
Cons
  • Very Industrial
  • Rather ugly
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Just now

"Dirty, Industrial and Unworthy - Albeit a Neccessary Evil - Overall"

A cabbie once told me that many drivers consider Hamilton Ave to be an offshoot of 3rd Ave (which it kind of is), or even as being the same street. Hamilton Ave is kind of horrible - it's right beneath the BQE (which for some reason is constantly dripping with disgustingly dirty water) and the street seems very dirty and very industrial. I do believe there are a few storefronts with apartments over them, but I can only feel very sorry for whoever lives in them.

Hamilton Ave is more of a necessary evil than anything - if you want to get to the BQE from South Slope, this is where you do it, and if you want to head to IKEA this is the route you take. It's a three lane highway built mostly for reasons of easing traffic flow, and that's the kind of thing that drivers have to appreciate. But Hamilton Ave isn't good for much else! And if you do drive your car on this road when the interstate happens to be raining that gross water, be prepared to have to wash your car - I'm not exaggerating in the least.

A friend of mine had to rinse a layer of black filth from her windshield after driving under the BQE "rain"!
Pros
  • access to the BQE, Red Hook from Park Slope/Gowanus
Cons
  • having to wait in traffic for the drawbridge to close
  • not conducive to walking
  • It's underneath the BQE
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
Just now

"Surprisingly easy to transverse Prospect Park"

Rush hour will set you back about half an hour on the Prospect Expressway - at least in the morning, headed west toward the BQE. The after-work crowd doesn't clog up the expressway as bad heading east in the evenings, but it can get a little traffic-y around then. Other than during rush hour, the Prospect Expressway stays pretty empty (as far as NYC highways are concerned), and I actually enjoy a cab ride over the park much more than I enjoy the crazy ride up the BQE to Williamsburg, which is never a quiet ride.

Just keep in mind that when I say there's not much traffic, I'm using the rest of the city as a scaled comparison!
Pros
  • Easy acess to neighborhoods on opposite sides of Prospect Park
Cons
  • expect rush hour traffic (duh)
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Great on one side, a little less than average on the other"

Prospect Park is bordered by four relatively diverse neighborhoods, and the south side of the park - where Caton Ave is - probably isn't the best of of them, but it's not TOO bad. Prospect Park is gorgeous on the north side of the street, but the apartment buildings that line the other side of the street aren't all as beautiful as you would expect. The neighborhood isn't a rich one, and the brick buildings here remind one of middle class government housing buildings. They aren't, of course, but the point is that these apartment buildings are terribly ugly from the outside, and sort of take away from the glorious greenery of the park.

This area of the park is full of playing fields and basketball courts that have been thriving all summer, and Caton Ave is relatively close to the huge lake in Prospect Park. This street is pretty residential, but there is tons of pedestrian traffic in the area. The surrounding neighborhood offers some good Caribbean joints, but there isn't a lot of awesome nightlife and there certainly aren't any good shopping outlets on this street.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Borders Prospect Park
Cons
  • Prospect Park isn't very safe at night
  • Not an affluent neighborhood
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"An unexpected gem!"

Grand Army Plaza is undoubtedly in my Top Five places in Brooklyn. The Civil War memorial arch that sits in the center of the Plaza is probably the most beautiful monument in the borough, and the Brooklyn library across the way isn't too shabby either, even if the building is not really geared toward my tastes. Beyond the arch there is a fountain that has been bursting and burbling since summer began, and in spite of the horrid amounts of traffic the area stays leafy green and beautiful.

There is an entrance to the north side of Prospect Park here as well - which is by far my favorite park in Brooklyn. The buildings that surround the roundabout are an interesting mix of old and new. I prefer the old ones - they're really beautiful - but the glass apartment building across from the library can make for some interesting people watching.

Besides a number of picnic tables outside of the city library, there are also a number of places to lounge around and people watch around the plaza - especially right in front of the park. You see a lot of musicians playing in the area, and on warm weather weekends there is a fabulous farmer's market in Grand Army Plaza.
Pros
  • location - acess to Prospect Park, Brooklyn Central Library
  • weekend farmer's market
  • surrounded by amazing architechture, arch, fountain
Cons
  • slow-moving traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"The Main Street of Park Slope"

9th Street is pretty much the main east-west drag in Park Slope. While all of the parallel streets are single lane, one way streets that are mostly residential, 9th Street is the one with four lanes of traffic and is lined with a number of places to spend your money.

I think because there is so much traffic on this street, it's not as pretty as other streets in the area, and because of all the storefronts, fast food joints, banks and the YMCA, there is a definite lack of the charming brownstones that the neighborhood has become known for (with the exception of the area closest to Prospect Park). Withstanding that, 9th Street is somewhat unavoidable - if you live in the area, this is a very practical street to visit. All of the trains that visit the neighborhood stop here - the F, G, M and R - and the street has everything that a Brooklynite would want: pizza, grocery, banks, gyms, and bars.

Highlights include the 9th Street entrance of Prospect Park (located close to the baseball diamonds as well as the concert shell where they have free shows all summer) and Barbès, a bar that features new music just about every night.

I do live in the area, but I can't say that I would want to live right on 9th Street, since it stays so busy with traffic and nightlife - it's not the quietest place to be in Park Slope, but it can be fun.
Pros
  • nightlife
  • access to shops, bars, Prospect Park
Cons
  • traffic
  • late night noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Clinton Street is all the colors on the Brooklyn spectrum"

Cruising from Gowanus Bay in Red Hook all the way up to where Tillary Street becomes the Brooklyn Bridge, Clinton Street undergoes quite a few changes in scenery along the way. Things on Clinton Street range from very clean to not-so-nice, from very quiet to very busy and very noisy.

The area south of the where the street goes under the BQE is relatively industrial (but the street stays pretty busy, as this is a main drag on the way to neighborhood hot spots like IKEA) and none too pretty. It becomes pretty residential after that - at least until you hit the downtown area.

In Carroll Gardens, Clinton Street is nice, quiet, clean, and safe. I've heard that this is a longtime mob neighborhood, but I've also heard that that's why Carroll Gardens is so safe. There are a lot of cool nightlife spots around here as well.

It's obvious when Clinton Street reaches Cobble Hill, because the street is suddenly lined with shops and restaurants and the more expensive real estate looks the part. Cobble Hill is a fantastic place for people who like to sample random shops and places to eat on their own.

In the Downtown Brooklyn/DUMBO area, Clinton Street is much, much busier with both street traffic and pedestrian traffic. It's more difficult to find any parking in this area, and it's another expensive place to live - but less quiet and less leafy.
Pros
  • cuts through scenic/safe areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"Where Latin food goes to die"

Bay Street is one of the best streets in Red Hook - mostly because of the vendors that hang around the Red Hook Ball Fields. You can get some of the best Latin food in Brooklyn from these trucks, including - but not limited to - empanadas, grilled corn (with chili, lime and cheese), tamales and the infamous pupusas.

Besides the Red Hook Ball Fields - where you can get your soccer game on - the Red Hook swimming pool also sits right on Bay Street.

Bay Street never really gets very residential, and the eastern most block is pretty industrial and deserted-seeming. The recreational area of this street is a great place to be during the day, but I don't know that I would want to hang around here at night, seeing as how not many other people stick around and it stops being as safe.

Like the rest of the neighborhood, Bay Street offers up an awesome vibe, but if you don't have a car down here your transportation options remain pretty limited. For some reason, the G train is still the only train that comes down to Red Hook - no matter how up-and-coming the neighborhood has proven to be in recent years.
Pros
  • pupusas! empanadas! and other street vendor comidas
  • Red Hook Ball Fields
  • public pool
Cons
  • some blocks are overly industrial
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"The Street in Gowanus Bay"

There is actually a pretty good reason as to why someone would drive out of their way to visit Columbia Street in particular: and that is that the actual street extends pretty far out on one of the docks and into the Gowanus Bay. This is a highly commercial area, so don't expect pretty beachs - quite the opposite, really. This docking area is a place where big commercial shipping boats like to dock, and it at least makes for an interesting view of the Statue of Liberty.

Traveling north on this street, mostly what you'll find are the rowhouse residencies of the locals. This street is populated by a pretty young crowd - it seems like a lot of young couples move in here, but there is a definite hipster vibe to the place. As the neighborhood continues to get cooler, little shops and restaurants are continuing to move in, and rents continue to rise - even if there is still no decent method of public transport in all of Red Hook.
Pros
  • Beautiful views of Manhattan
Cons
  • Industrial setting
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"Swedish Meatballs, Anyone?"

Beard Street may be close to the waterfront, but don't expect any to find any New York City treasures around here. IKEA sits right off this street, and in front of the somewhat new furniture store the street is nicely paved - which is good for IKEA shoppers, as it is advisable to at least rent a car before you head there to shop. But as soon as you pass the Swedish furniture giant, the road turns to brick. Well, mostly brick - some of the bricks seem to be missing.

The street isn't the least bit pedestrian or bike friendly, at least not until you pass Van Brunt Street - but then there is just one block left, which is the street's only residential area. Residents that live here enjoy close quarters with a rather large garden supply shop and Fairway Market - both of which are conveniently located about a block away. No doubt the rent prices include the awesome view of the NYC skyline that many of the residents of Red Hook enjoy.

This street is by all means safe during the day, but I wouldn't want to be wandering around here at night - it's just too deserted after IKEA business hours.
Pros
  • IKEA
  • waterfront views (though industrial ones)
Cons
  • needs to be paved
  • construction has closed off one of the sidewalks
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Old World Feel, but Featuring New World Shops"

Friends of mine that have lived in Red Hook swear it's necessary to have a car if you live on this street or elsewhere in this neighborhood, but car drivers beware: while Van Brunt Street is paved, many of the surrounding streets are made of shoddy bricks. Van Brunt is one of the neighborhoods busier streets - but there still isn't much traffic around here.

Much of the draw has to do with Fairway Market at the end of the street (if you haven't been, I recommend you check it out - it's right on the water and there's a little cafe in the bakery area where you can take a break from shopping and take in the view). There's also a little wine shop a few blocks from Fairway - Dry Dock - and while it's not exactly a huge draw for people who live outside the neighborhood, I find myself stopping there just about every time I do any shopping at Fairway, which doesn't sell any wine. The people there are knowledgeable and friendly, and all of their recommendations have worked wonders for my pasta dishes.

Van Brunt is a kind of quaint street that offers both a residential feel and a commercial one, as it is lined with the occasional antique shop or barbecue pub. Perhaps the one down side of living on this street is that if you have no choice but to take public transportation, the only train available to you is the G train, which is not exactly MTA's most reputable transit option.
Pros
  • good eats
  • awesome neighborhood vibe
  • interesting shopping options
Cons
  • public transportation somewhat lacking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Plenty to do almost all the way down Court Street"

If you find yourself on Court Street in the Brooklyn Heights/Downtown area, you may feel like you haven't actually left Manhattan. But even though Court Street has all the standard big chains - Starbucks, Barnes and Noble, Trader Joe's - it also is home to quaint shops and privately owned restaurants, and is one of my favorite places to shop. I think there is even a Checkers on Court Street - not exactly a common sight in New York City. But even if you aren't a fan of southern fast food chains, I think the average shopper/ tourist would really enjoy this area of Court Street. The smaller stores are more prominent where Court Street runs through the neighborhood of Boreum Hill, and once you cross Atlantic Ave you begin to find the big name chains (American Apparel and such). Court Street runs all the way down to Red Hook, and is the street you take to get you most of the way to IKEA - another popular Brooklyn go-to spot.
Pros
  • lovely shopping scene without Manhattan crowds
Cons
  • downtown traffic
  • lame retail chains are taking over
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Window Shoppers Delight!"

Perhaps because of its proximity to Atlantic Ave, there are a lot of stops for your highly specific shopper to be found on Bergen Street. One is Bergen Street Comics - a little comic shop where the staff is very friendly and helpful (if you, like me, aren't exactly a huge comic buff and need a little help navigating), and another is the infamous female-friendly sex shop, Babeland (they also have a location in the Lower East Side), where you can pick up all of the things you are imagining right now.

I am a big fan of the Bergen Street of Prospect Heights and, more especially, of Boreum Hill. In the latter neighborhood this street is a residential one close to the shopping districts of Atlantic Ave, Court Street and Smith Street - which are lined with shoe and clothing shops, boutique restaurants and a general browser's delight.
Pros
  • cool shops
  • range of restaurants and cafes
Cons
  • can be a bit crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"It doesn't get much better than this in BK"

This street is remarkably beautiful, but it gets low marks for noise pollution. The three lane, one-way highway that is Prospect Park West may offer pedestrians the beautiful backdrop of Prospect Park to the east, but the constant noise of cars zooming (and I mean zooming!) by takes a little away from the experience. Then again traffic is part of the city's charm (even if it generally shouldn't be as bad in Brooklyn as it is in Manhattan), and it's something we've found we can grow accustomed to if forced.

There is a little movie theater down by 14th St, making this street a nice option for date night (a nice walk in and around the park followed by a sweet little film is likely to score points with anyone), and Prospect Park West is close to quite a few restaurants that would also make for a cozy night out (Applewood on 11th at 7th Ave comes to mind).

More than a few running clubs meet on this street before heading into the park for a workout, and joggers can be seen on Prospect Park West at all hours of the day. Currently (in the month of June), strollers can bear witness to impressive foliage and rows and rows of blooms - in the park and in the front yards of residents' brownstones.
Pros
  • gorgeous veiw of Prospect Park
  • gorgeous architecture
Cons
  • near-constant traffic flow
  • neighborhood backlash over bike lane created last summer
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A street beloved by both singles and young families"

For the most part, 22nd is a residential string of blocks stretching from the commercial area around 3rd Ave to the old school cemetery that stop the street at 7th Ave. The street makes for a fun bike ride westward from 7th Ave - you'll find yourself speeding down a decent sized hill. Greenwood Cemetery reaches even greater heights; if there weren't so many obstacles in the form of headstones the grassy knoll would make for perfect sledding grounds come wintertime.

The row houses here aren't as lovely as the ones a few blocks north in Park Slope (residents of this street live in the neighborhood of Greenwood Heights, or what the younger locals have taken to calling "South Slope"), with one exception on the southeast corner of 4th Ave. The house located there resembles a miniature castle and looks a bit out of place among the redbrick houses and those with aluminum siding.

This area is completely safe - I have lived here recently and never encountered anyone that wasn't friendly, and I've never worried for my safety. Not only that, but there are tons of little bars and restaurants nearby, and there are some really hot spots within walking distance, just blocks away in Park Slope. This makes it a prime location for young single people, but there are also a lot of young families moving into the area, as this is one of the nicer neighborhoods where budding careerist can afford to buy property.
Pros
  • quiet, clean
  • close to Prospect Park
  • close to a few cool bars, restaurants
Cons
  • features a few ugly row houses
  • hotel on the corner of 3rd Ave draws strange crowd
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Nolita has it all"

Nolita is one of my favorite New York neighborhoods, and I find myself here often - whether it be to shop, eat, grab a few cocktails or just to stroll. On weekends the area does get crowded, and even during the week this neighborhood never exactly dies down. If you want to catch Nolita with quiet streets and empty sidewalks, try stopping by during a blizzard. There is an endless string of trendy bars, restaurants and shops in these blocks - making it a perfect place for the singles set. Beware, though - if you aren't making big bucks you are unlikely to be able to afford such incredible digs.

You'll find a lot of tourist-friendly/famous restaurants (think Balthazar) here, as well as staples like the Dean and Deluca store and the Housing Works book shop. If my parents were coming into town, I think this is the one neighborhood where I would most delight in taking them. For an area so crowded, the streets stay clean (a New York clean) and these blocks are absolutely beautiful.
Pros
  • endless bar/restaurant scene
  • Very pretty
  • Fantastic central location
Cons
  • Crazy expensive
  • Tiny apartments
  • Tourist mobs on weekends
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
3/5
Just now

"Can't believe they fit a neighborhood onto this island!"

There is nothing - nothing! - to do here, but in my humble opinion the neighborhood is a sight to see. After all, it's a 0.279 square mile section of New York City - a strange thing if there ever was one. Okay, the area is stocked with dowdy-looking rental buildings which are mostly rentals rather than a place a budding family can purchase for their own, but it is an interesting enclave of the city in that it is a tiny island that almost doesn't seem fit for habitation, and yet it is incredibly stocked with New York City lives.

On the plus side for residents, there is a lack of hustle and bustle in the area - at least compared to neighboring Midtown East.
Pros
  • good or families
  • quiet
  • Cool haunted stuff
  • safe
  • Gorgeous views of Manhattan
Cons
  • boring
  • isolated
  • no nightlife
  • Poor retail options
  • Small town atmosphere
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Noho is really a neighborhood! ...I think."

Unlike many people, I'll admit that Noho exists - well, barely. It's not exactly a huge slice of Manhattan, but it seems legitimate enough. This used to be one of my favorite areas of the city when I was in my early twenties. Astor Place is charming enough, and this piece of Broadway is home to the Strand - possibly the world's greatest used book store.

The surrounding area is much prettier than Noho - the East Village has some lovely buildings, but the area around Cooper Square isn't nearly as attractive. The new Cooper Union building is, um, interesting, and I would recommend taking a peak at it - no matter how out of it actually seems when taken in with the surrounding architecture. (I must admit to being a fan of the old building - it's much more classic and visually appealing than the new residence, which is full of curves, sharp angles, steel and glass.)

The one thing that keeps me coming back to Noho is Astor Wines & Spirits - truly a great New York City staple, and they offer some of the best tastings I've ever taken in for free.
Pros
  • decent bar scene
  • central location
  • close to major transport
Cons
  • Crowded
  • Expensive to buy and rent because it is so desirable
  • lacking in personality
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
Just now

"The (slightly) quieter version of Midtown"

No self respecting New Yorker could ever admit to enjoying Midtown, of course, but Murray Hill isn't the Midtown that tourists flock to - rather, it's a more low key version of the neighborhood. That's not to say that it isn't noisy and crowded, it's just less crowded and noisy than the area directly west of it. Residents complain of noise and traffic often, apparently, even if it does get worse elsewhere in Midtown.

If you're browsing the real estate market for a surprisingly affordable (for a New York City brownstone, anyway) brownstone, there are plenty to be had in this area - this is an area that would make a great permanent residence for established families, but as a young person who enjoys New York City nightlife I wouldn't even consider moving to this area. The area noticeably lacks trendy bars and whatnot, and therefore isn't a hot spot of the singles circuit.

The neighborhood is an appealing one for families, however, as there are plenty of high quality medical facilities as well as good schools in the area. Its proximity to the Long Island Expressway and the FDR Drive make it an easy neighborhood for drivers to access - which is good for residents in that they can easily return to their own neighborhood, but also bad for them in that traffic flows endlessly through the area.
Pros
  • middle class NYC rents
  • Good medical facilities
  • Home to one of Manhattan's 'Little Indias'
Cons
  • doesn't know the meaning of the word trendy
  • boring
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Charming college town aura"

If I were asked to choose between the college town neighborhood that is Washington Square, near the NYU spread, and the one that is Morningside Heights, where Columbia and a lot of other establishments of higher education reside, I would have to say that I prefer the latter.

The neighborhood boasts some incredible history which can be found in landmarks like Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, Grant's Tomb and Riverside Church or the West End Bar, where beat poets liked to meet up and compared notes during the forties and fifties.

Surrounding streets boast a little bit of that old school charm without being too overrun by corporate restaurant chains and/or stores, like you see down in NYU territory.
Pros
  • great bookstores
  • feels like a college town
  • Buildings are beautiful
  • Great coffee shops to write a novel in
  • Proximity to Columbia
  • Home to the stunning Cathedral of St John the Divine
Cons
  • bars are full of students
  • Noisy and crowded, especially if you're not a student
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Overwhelming commercial outpost"

While I understand the power this place has over tourists and people who have otherwise never seen New York City - and, hey, I even encourage them to go! check it out! make up your own mind! - I absolutely hate this horrible neighborhood. But, then, I rarely have an occasion to go. It's not as if I'm one of those people who needs to check out the latest Broadway musical - especially when the powers that be are letting people like Green Day contribute to the art form - and I don't especially want to spend ridiculous amounts of money at Saks or any of the chain restaurants that roost here in great numbers.

This is the neighborhood of flashing lights and sparkling sidewalks - as seen in Times Square - and it tends to be overwrought with crowds, which may be something that most people expect from this city, but in this case the crowds are a bit out-of-control and entirely slow-moving. Besides tourists, plenty of people make the trek to this neighborhood to go to their corporate professions so it stays incredibly packed during business hours.

I've seen Midtown - even Times Square - looking pretty desolate during the weeknight hours, and I suppose that while there are plenty of bars to be found they tend to cater to the after work crews and the tourist types rather than the trendy New York club goer.
Pros
  • The New York Public Library
  • beaux-arts architecture
  • Transportation
  • Byrant Park
  • The Grand building of the New York Public Library
Cons
  • bars are lame
  • Crowded
  • Tourists
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
  • Petty crime remains a problem
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Another up-and-coming NYC 'hood"

There currently isn't much up in Manhattan Valley that your everyday tourist would be interested in seeing - architecture buffs may be curious to take a peek at the former New York Cancer Hospital, established in 1887 and really a sort of spectacular edifice. Tourists beware, however, that this isn't exactly New York's most pleasant and welcoming neighborhood. Granted, it has undergone quite a bit of gentrification in recent years, but really what Manhattan neighborhood hasn't as rents continue to rise and your average Joe finds it more and more difficult to be able to afford NYC real estate?

Formerly known as the Bloomingdale district, this neighborhood on the upper west side has gone from being a rather unfortunate place to live to one that hosts its own Whole Foods Market - usually a grand sign that things are looking up. Things are still somewhat in-between overall, however, and you will still hear things about the neighborhood's drug culture even as it becomes increasingly safer in general.
Pros
  • close to Columbia
  • Live music bars provide much entertainment
Cons
  • Pretty far from everything
  • Dead at night
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Nice space, no complaints"

I don't really have anything bad to say about Madison Square - it's a nice little park in the middle of the tall New York City landscape, and as someone who lives in NYC you can't really do too much complaining about any amount of green space that may appear on the horizon. One of my favorite New York sights - the Flatiron building - is located here, and the surrounding area plays host to some decent shopping, especially at affordable chains like H&M and whatnot. I've never really heard the surrounding neighborhood referred to as "Madison Square," but perhaps there is still someone out there who calls it that.

I recently stopped by Shake Shack for the first time ever - I got a Shack burger, fries, and a strawberry (malted) milkshake. Everything was great - and it the burger was the best greasy fast food number I've had in a while. Definitely recommend (just beware the 90 line that tends to trail around the park during lunchtime).
Pros
  • Flat Iron building
  • Excellent shopping located nearby along Fifth avenue
  • good transport connections
  • Shake Shack
  • Trees
Cons
  • Crowded
  • The lines at Shake Shake can be unbearable at times
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"The Lower East Side continues to transform..."

The Lower East Side has become more of an extension of Soho than anything else - every inch has been overtaken by something that hopes to offer trendiness, be it in the form of food, clothing, or bar-slash-music-venue. These days I hear it's still okay for hipsters to maintain their image by sneaking into the LES only on weekdays, as weekends draw in something other than a hipster crowd. (Though I am not convinced that hipsters leave Williamsburg all that often.)

Anyway, this neighborhood has seen a lot of turnover in the last five years in terms of shops and especially in terms of restaurants. The young hipsters who could barely afford to live here in 2005 have since been driven across the Williamsburg bridge, however, and it seems like the yuppies are increasingly moving in. Either that or the hipsters that staked out the place when it was still predominately a Hispanic neighborhood are just aging?
Pros
  • great bar scene
  • great music venues
  • Great restaurants
  • nice mix of old and new
  • Home to the Tenement Museum which catalogues the history of NYC's immigrants
Cons
  • Loud all the time
  • Rising rents
  • weekend B&T crowd
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"NYC Classic"

It doesn't get more Woody Allen than this - posh is exactly the right word, but in an Upper East Side sort of way. The area is flourishing with condos and co-ops and other forms of luxury buildings; it is a permanent home to the city's upper crust...and that's about it. Tourists will find a lovely temporary stay here, and there are many things that draw them to the neighborhood besides its loveliness - like the Frick, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Asia Society. Anyone looking for the New York City that they've seen in movies about rich people will find it in this neighborhood - definitely a classic NYC hood.
Pros
  • The Park
  • Populated with wonderful cultural institutions -the Asia Society, the Whitney, the Frick Collection
  • People watching
  • The Lenox Hill Hospital
  • The neighborhood has some great restaurants il Riccio, Candle, Bella Blu, Terra Mare, Fred's at Barneys,Alice's Tea cup
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Dead at night
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Boring, and not especially beautiful"

I can't remember the last time I strolled through this neighborhood - and with good reason. There isn't much to do here unless you're hospital hopping, and I can't say that hospital visits are something I enjoy or that, thankfully, I've been forced to do in recent months.

This is a Manhattan neighborhood that is actually rather unappealing, it's not especially pretty and isn't home to any city landmarks that would attract the occasional NYC tourist. I mean, if your neighborhood is in Manhattan and can only boast a shopping center which is home to a Rite Aid (where isn't there a Rite Aid!) and a Crunch fitness center (also relatively common in the city), then it's likely your neighborhood is pretty sad.
Pros
  • Kips Bay is home to some good restaurants like Alibaba and Ethos
Cons
  • No personality
  • Boring
  • Dead at night
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"It's far, far away - but peaceful"

I like this neighborhood - I mean, s'alright - even if I have no real reason to ever go here. There are pretty views of the Hudson, and some little parks - Fort Tyron Park and Inwood Hill Park - which are relatively cool. Fort Tyron Park is the location of the infamous Cloisters, where a bunch of Medieval art pieces are exhibited.

Like some other people mentioned, being in this neighborhood is sort of like leaving the city - and so if you've come to experience the gritty, fast paced version of the city you may not find it so much in Inwood. However, I can understand why such a neighborhood would be appealing to so many people, especially those who need a bit of a break from the chaos of the city. Inwood is very far (in Manhattan distance) from the rest of the city, and I could never live here as such a long train ride would discourage me from every going anywhere else in NYC.
Pros
  • affordable rents
  • The Cloisters and the park
  • Inwood Hill park is a boon to the neighborhood
Cons
  • far from trendy NYC neighborhoods
  • boring
  • dead at night
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"One of the quieter sides of Park Slope"

8th Ave is nowhere near the commercially trendy hub that is 5th Ave - or even 7th Ave - in the Slope, but there are a few brunch spots and tattoo shops and what have you on this street. More importantly, this street offers quiet apartments/brownstones away from the noise of the barhopping areas of this neighborhood. And more than that, it is another beautiful Park Slope avenue. So, if you are looking for a street that is close and yet removed from all of the action, you are likely to love Brooklyn's 8th Ave - at least the Park Slope version of the street.
Pros
  • close to shopping, restaurants on 7th Ave
  • quiet/clean/residential
  • beautiful brownstones
Cons
  • difficult to find a parking space
  • lots of stroller action
  • lack of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Lots to eat, lots to buy, lots to behold"

7th Ave is probably the second best Avenue in Park Slope - it may be way up on the hill beside (though not RIGHT beside) Prospect Park, but there is plenty to do up here if you have a lot of money burning a hole in your pocket. Shoe Mine on 7th Ave between 16th and Windsor Pl is a really great tiny shoe shop, and there is a "Shoe Hospital" on 7th at 7th for when your shoes break down. There is absolutely no shortage of eateries on this street - the avenue is so full of them that you may find it hard to decide just where you want to go. Cafe Steinhof at 14th St. is one of the standouts, and the Smiling Pizzeria at 9th St is another good place to stop in.

Just like much of Park Slope, 7th Ave is tree-lined and fenced in with lovely brownstones and is quite a nice walk in any season.
Pros
  • decent eating, shopping
  • proximity to Prospect Park
Cons
  • bar crowd makes for loud nights
  • lack of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Good bet for a quiet apartment in Park Slope"

6th Ave is a surprisingly residential street between two rather commercial outposts (ie, 5th & 6th Aves) in Park Slope. It's also a surprisingly gorgeous street - the Park Slope area is lined with brownstones and trees and the residents have been known to keep little gardens in their little front lawns. Naturally the street has amenities typical of any New York neighborhood - the laundromat, the deli, the preschool. 6th Ave in Park Slope is one of the more quiet avenues in the area. 3rd Ave is too industrial and congested, 4th Ave doesn't have a whole lot going on except traffic, 5th Ave is packed with bars/shops/restaurants and general nightlife, making it incredibly noisy at night, and 7th Ave is somewhere in between the quiet residential attitude of 6th Ave and the busy nightlife on 5th. Anyway, my point is that if you want to live in this area to enjoy all that it has to offer but still live on a quiet street, this is one of your best bets!
Pros
  • quiet residential life
  • close to cool shops/bars on 5th and 7th Aves
  • beautiful brownstones
Cons
  • bar goers can be heard at night
  • can be difficult to locate street parking spaces
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Pretty standard Brooklyn fare"

If there's any reason why I wouldn't want to live on this street, it would have to be simply because it is a 6 lane highway - which is actually pretty rare in the city at all, much less in Brooklyn. Three lanes of traffic are traveling in either direction up and down the avenue, and I know from experience that they aren't all exactly driving at 30 mph.

Besides that, however, the street is pretty okay. It's not Fifth Ave - where you can find a lot of shops and restaurants - but there are a few mom and pops businesses: pizza parlors and Chinese joints and what have you. If you don't actually think about how much traffic is zooming by you at all times, the street is pretty standard as far as Brooklyn is concerned.
Pros
  • close to bar/shopping action on 5th Ave
  • afforable rents
Cons
  • six lanes of traffic stay busy
  • dingy/awkward shaped apartments
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Yuck - wouldn't want to live here."

This street only receives two stars for its proximity to civilization - Park Slope, that is. If you live out here, you live under the Gowanus Expressway, which for some reason is always leaking a lot of water and ricocheting with the sounds of constant traffic. The traffic on the street below - 3rd Ave, that is - isn't much better as 3rd Ave is one of the main arteries of the area. This street is mostly commercial, and there are a lot of businesses sitting empty on it at the moment. Overall it's a dreary place, and I don't recommend it if you are simply going for a stroll.

There is perhaps one stop you need to make on 3rd Ave if you happen to live in the area (and only if you happen to live in the area), and that is Rossman Fruit and Vegetable District. They have excellent prices on fresh produce, and they have enough other products available to make a decent shopping trip out of the experience.
Pros
  • pie shop Four and Twenty Blackbirds
  • Rossman Fruit and Veggie stand
Cons
  • lies under the overpass
  • lacks any decent nightlife
  • hardly any space for parking
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Great vibe, lovely street"

The thing that's great about 5th Avenue in Park Slope is that there is something to do - or buy - no matter what your mood or interests have you craving. There is a lot of excellent second hand and vintage shopping to be had, and you can get everything from a surprisingly decent burger at Aperitivo's brunch for $9.95 to some first class sea bass at Al Di La.

The street itself is rather like a long shopping strip, and stays that way until you find yourself leaving the neighborhood of Park Slope. Then it becomes rather residential, and not nearly as lovely. Down in the Windsor Terrace/ Sunset Park area of the street you may not have the same amenities as you find in Park Slope, but this area is quiet and close enough to the good life to make it a great street to live on.
Pros
  • Awesome restuarant in Al Di La
  • lots of bars
  • some really awesome shops
Cons
  • noisy at night due to nightlife
  • can be difficult to find parking anywhere in the area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
Just now

"One of New York's great tourist traps"

This neighborhood is the most annoying in all of New York. It bothers me more than the smell of Chinatown. I've never had great food here - the restaurants left in Little Italy all have a tourist-trap feel, complete with some shady dude standing in the door of each one beckoning/heckling you to come inside and eat. Not my idea of a lovely night on the town, and in New York City anyone can do much better than a visit to Little Italy. I'm not even sure what else is in this neighborhood besides a bunch of mundane mom-and-pops Italian restaurants, so if that's what you're looking for you've come to the right place. However, if you are looking for a great Italian meal, head elsewhere.
Pros
  • Cute streets
Cons
  • noisy at all times of the day and night
  • pushy, in your face restaurant folk who try to lure unsuspecting tourists into their establishments
  • Crowded
  • expensive
  • Fakey tourist trap with bad food
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
Recommended for
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
Just now

"Plenty of history and real estate to be had"

Undoubtedly rich in history, this neighborhood has attracted all shapes and ethnicities in recent years, as the real estate here is both attractive and affordable - at least by New York standards. The area is traditionally and historically a place of African American roots, but it has become something of a melting pot because of the attraction the real estate offerings hold over everyone - and the further north you go (naturally) the cheaper the offerings are.

Crime rates have dropped quite a bit in recent years, making the neighborhood even more appealing to bargain hunters.
Pros
  • good place to find an awesome jazz band
  • affordable rents
  • rich cultural traditions
Cons
  • can be creepy at night
  • Crowded
  • far from downtown
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Eh. It's an alright place."

This neighborhood has recently seen a transformation from righteously gritty to a sort-of gritty interspersed with some posh-ness. Meaning: you can live in an apartment with a doorman and wall-to-wall windows if you so desire, and you can dine and head out to a lot of bars, but it somehow seems sort of...off. I had a few friends who lived in this neighborhood for a while before relocating to the East Village, and their apartment was amazing but the bars in the area tended to be on the dead side, especially/perhaps unsurprisingly on weeknights. This neighborhood is okay - there are definitely cool things to do here, and I highly recommend the year-round Hell's Kitchen flea market.
Pros
  • The Flea Market on 39th street between 9th and 10th avenues
Cons
  • Dirty
  • Crowded
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
Just now

"Can understand the appeal completely"

All of my Craig's List apartment hunting stints seem to end up here - and with good reason. This neighborhood - especially the Sugar Hill area - seems to offer some of the city's most spacious yet affordable (!) apartments. Which is why, of course, many young families and budding professionals tend to relocate here. The neighborhood itself isn't exactly the Upper West Side, of course, but gentrification has certainly set in. It's a little far uptown for my tastes, which tend to keep me either in BK or in the general downtown area, but I can surely see the appeal this neighborhood has over those who move here.
Pros
  • affordable rents
  • quiet
  • No great restaurants though cheap food abounds
Cons
  • crime rates
  • dead at night
  • far from downtown
  • Crime rates have skyrocketed especially crimes against young women
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"A nice, neat little package of a neighborhood"

I find myself in this area more often than any other Manhattan neighborhood - perhaps because it has been so long established as the art-y neighborhood where so many poets and musicians hung out. Younger artists and musicians have of course moved on to cheaper neighborhoods, but the charm still remains in the East Village.

As you get closer to the East River the neighborhood gets a bit sketchier - but bars and shops are constantly popping up even here in an commercial landscape that is constantly changing to suit the needs of those art-y kids who grew up and got real jobs but still never left the neighborhood.

Anyone in need of some shopping therapy, a bit of bar hopping or just a stroll around an inviting neighborhood would fare well in the East Village.
Pros
  • legendary downtown music and theater venues
  • Great bohemian legacy
  • Cheap, great restaurants
Cons
  • loud bar scene
  • Not nearly as edgy as it wants to be
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"The forever enchanting West Village"

There's something truly enchanting about the West Village that keeps me coming back, especially when I have no good reason to be there. It's got a contemporary vibe, and there are people of all ages milling about at any given time. There is something in this neighborhood for every type of shopper - whether you are looking for shoes, spices or sex toys, you can find everything you need right here. If you want to take a leisurely stroll, this is a great place to do it. If you are looking for a cafe to hang out in with your laptop, you will find no shortages here. You can get oysters if you want them, or fast food if you prefer - and the backdrop of the neighborhood couldn't be better suited for a particularly romantic meal.
Pros
  • awesome range of shops/restaurants; something for every wish
  • excellent restaurants
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • expensive
  • can be overpriced
  • Heavily tourist trafficked especially on weekends
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"We just never learned to get along"

I always get lost in this neighborhood. No matter how many times I troll the area for outdoor book sellers, I can never find my way around properly - mostly because the streets tend to take on names instead of numbers in this area. In any case, there isn't much wrong with this neighborhood if you don't mind the population overload of NYU students - but it's never been my cup of tea, really.

The dining in the area tends to cater to that poor college kid crowd, which is something I can no longer relate to, even if I'm sure there are many people who would enjoy this neighborhood for just that reason. The bars also tend to be crowded with that specimen that is the NYU student, which is also not my scene in any way.

But, if you're into the offerings of the 'hood, then you will be happy with what it has to offer. It's in no way a bad neighborhood, it's just not a good fit for me personally.
Pros
  • central location
  • excellent restaurants
  • great bar scene
Cons
  • Crowded
  • Noisy
  • too many students
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Its title of Best Neighborhood is well-deserved!"

Gramercy Park is the perfect place to be in these first days of spring. This neighborhood is absolutely stunningly gorgeous - and right now the trees are blooming with white flowers and delis have set out buckets and buckets of fresh cut flowers in every imaginable color. If I were going to take someone who'd never been to the city on a random stroll through its streets, I would head to Gramercy Park before all else.

I was strolling down 3rd Avenue in the area just yesterday, and I noticed that a lot of shops are having drastic sales. I'm not sure if this is because it's the season for such things, or if it's because the recession is forcing many boutique businesses right out of business. In any case, there is much to do here for anyone that enjoys a little bit of exploring.
Pros
  • unexpectedly cool shops, such as the Shoe Box
  • excellent restaurants
  • exclusive neighborhood
  • Garmercy Park
  • gorgeous apartments
  • central location
  • Tons of history
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
Just now

"I generally avoid it"

Sounds like it would be an awesome place for fashionistas, doesn't it? But it's not. Unless you are a fashionista capable of creating your own designs with some fabric and stitching, which in no way applies to me. Not only that, but this neighborhood isn't exactly known for being a place that anyone would be dying to grab a bite or hang out after dark. Not. Recommended.
Pros
  • close to major transport
  • Historic distric which was once home to New York's buzzing garment industry
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
Cons
  • crime rates
  • dingy apartments
  • terrible grocery stores
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Lovely spot for bit of low-key shopping"

This is where I typically go when I'm going on an outing to shop at the best/most affordable new clothes chain shops in the city: H&M and Zara. Sometimes, if I am feeling like spending a bit more money at such a chain, I'll stop into the neighborhood's Anthropologie. So, long story short, I am in the neighborhood quite a bit. (Though last time I stopped into H&M, I felt like I was in K-Mart. Let's hope the selection gets better with the arrival of spring.)

The Flatiron District is really quite lovely, in a New York City sort of way - and though the area around these shopping hot spots can be a little hectic, it's nothing like the chaos that is the Soho shopping district on Broadway - not even close.

I enjoy an evening stroll around the place, and the neighborhood is home to a lot of random eateries - but I have yet to explore many of them, as I'm usually too busy shopping.
Pros
  • Shopping
  • Great cheap restaurants
  • Proximity to Union Square and other exciting neighborhoods
Cons
  • Crowded
  • tourist mobs
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Perhaps the cleanest neighborhood in the city?"

Normally I'm not a big crowd person, and normally I avoid places that are as full of tourists as the Financial District tends to be. But there is something really appealing about this neighborhood - every time I'm there I think to myself, "man, this must be the cleanest place in all of New York City." Because, comparatively, the streets are amazingly clean - which is impressive for a place that is bustling during business hours.

The neighborhood is full of tourists who've come to check out Wall Street and whatnot, but the neighborhood really caters to the suits who run the city - with endless delis and eateries and a few upscale club-type of restaurants.

This is not a neighborhood I would ever consider living in - the action dies out pretty early around these parts, after the tourists have moved on and the business men have gone home or out in a more happening part of the city. But I'm sure people do live down there - they must. And it's clean and probably pretty quiet at night, as no one else is likely to venture down there unless they happen to live there...
Pros
  • A lot of historical sights
  • affordable rents
  • The Century 21 designer discount store is a huge draw in the financial district
  • The harbor nearby
Cons
  • deli-heavy for the business lunch crowd
  • dead at night
  • The WTC continues to be heavily tourist trafficked
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
Just now

"Slow gentrification but still mostly a working class neighborhood"

These days a lot of twenty-somethings are moving up to Spanish Harlem for the attractively low rent price tags (which means, say, a room in a three bedroom/1 bathroom apartment for about $600). The neighborhood is of course historically Hispanic, and it still greatly shows, however slowly the area is being gentrified. The past decade has seen much improvement in this, one of Manhattan’s notoriously gritty neighborhoods. Unsurprisingly, upgrades in the area began around the southern border, around East 96th and 97th Streets, where condos reminiscent of the neighboring Upper East Side started popping up. As you move further north, the area is decidedly a working class Latino neighborhood, worthy of its nickname, El Barrio.

I wouldn’t say that this is a tourist’s dream, but there are a number of Latin-style eateries that make the train ride all the way up Manhattan well worth it. Amor Cubano is one such place – the restaurant not only offers remarkable food but often has live music as well, and the fact that it attracts so many Cuban immigrants certainly bodes well for its dishes.
Pros
  • the new shopping mall at 125th which has the city's only Costco outlet and Manhattan's first Target
  • Cheaper than elsewhere in Manhattan
  • Great South/Central American restaurants
Cons
  • crime rates
  • far from downtown
  • Dirty
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
Just now

"A little bit of Every Mall America in New York City"

I feel a bit apathetic about this area, to be honest. Last summer I actually found myself at South Street Seaport – which is nothing more than a glorified mall that doesn’t even really have that great a selection of stores – a few times. There is an outdoor mall of sorts across the street from the aforementioned glorified mall, which caters to wearers of such overpriced brands as Abercrombie & Fitch. This is not a New Yorker’s sort of neighborhood – really I’m not sure if people actually live around here or not, it seems more downtown business-oriented, besides the shopping. In any case, I certainly wouldn’t want to. Besides a spectacular view of the Brooklyn Bridge from the Seaport, I can’t really see how this area attracts so many tourists, when the stores they offer in the area are really the ones you see in every mall in America.
Pros
  • affordable rents
Cons
  • dead at night
  • Few restaurants outside of the South Street Seaport area
  • crime rates
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Battle the stink and the crowds for some excellent Dim Sum"

I must admit that I don’t up to Chinatown too often – I like to avoid crowds and nasty smells whenever possible, which puts Chinatown low on my list of New York things to do. But it does have some unique offerings that you are unlikely to find elsewhere in the city – especially when it comes to edible items.

The place is a true tourist’s delight (if you can stand the slow moving crowds), with seemingly endless offerings of (truly) cheap merchandise along Canal Street and a similarly uncapped amount of restaurants offering Chinese cuisine. And even though I am not partial to the crummy-ness of the area, I really do love a good Dim Sum – and there is no lack of it here.

Dim Sum Go Go on East Broadway (which is a completely different street apart from Broadway) is a great option (even if doesn’t offer the cart-style kind), as is Ping’s Seafood on Mott Street. The latter is possibly the best Dim Sum to be had in the city – and certainly in the neighborhood – and it is not in any way a secret, so prepare yourself to battle your way into the small restaurant.
Pros
  • affordable rents
  • Great cheap restaurants
  • Dumplings and massage places galore
  • dim sum
Cons
  • Hard to fit into the community if you're not Chinese
  • Dirty
  • Smelly
  • dead at night
  • crime rates
  • knockoff Fendi bags
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Bowery, yuppified"

The Bowery can be all kinds of fun in the evenings to early mornings. The poverty that was once present in this neighborhood is no more, and you have to be a bit of a yuppie to afford such digs these days. But even those who can’t afford to live here can afford to go out and about in the area – there are a number of bars and restaurants lining Bowery, and anyone would be doing themselves a favor by checking out the student artwork at the local Cooper Union. The area doesn't differ much from the sorts of places found in the neighboring East Village.
Pros
  • close to major transport
  • industrial lighting and kitchenware shops abound
  • The New Museum and Whole Foods means it's going upscale fast
Cons
  • expensive
  • packed with people
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
Just now

"Nice view, boring area"

I honestly haven’t been to the park for quite some time – mostly because the area tends to be full of tourists, and I do mean full. The area may be crowded during warmer seasons, but anyone who has never been should definitely venture out and take a look. I have to say that I don’t really enjoy the area when it comes to dining or shopping experiences, so the area’s only draw is really the spectacular view of the Hudson and the Statue of Liberty. After taking in the view, it’s best to head on out to greener pastures, or in this case more culturally enriched NYC neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Great Park
  • Gorgeous views of the water
  • Upscale doorman residences
Cons
  • dead at night
  • expensive
  • Not too many shopping options
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
Just now

"The well-to-do have maintained their positions in Carnegie"

A tightly-knit sort of community of high-end stores, restaurants and real estate can be found in this breathtakingly gorgeous neighborhood. It’s the sort of place that one imagines the well-to-do characters of Woody Allen films to reside, and the area hasn’t seen any reconstruction for quite some time, making the area an aesthetic delight for tourists and residents alike.
Pros
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • major museums
Cons
  • astronomical rents
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
5/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
Just now

"Perfect for a quick getaway"

During my last trip to the park, I found myself sitting under the fall trees, listening to a three piece jazz band that often plays to the crowds in the Park. Central Park can be almost magical if the weather is just right – thanks in part to countless movies that have immortalized the place. No one is too young or too old or from too far away to enjoy Central Park, a much needed respite from the rest of the stress-inducing isle of Manhattan.
Pros
  • buskers
  • Beautiful
  • Trees
  • classy neighborhood
Cons
  • dead at night
  • crime rates
  • The area around Central Park is not very well illuminated at night and can seem a bit spooky
  • neighborhood isn't what you'd call hip or young
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"You can find it all in Chelsea"

Chelsea is one of the great New York neighborhoods: great food, great hangout spots, great real estate – but as is the trend in NYC, the price of such things in Chelsea are quite high. That said, Chelsea has just about everything that a well-rounded resident or tourist would expect from the city: art galleries and tons of trendy restaurants and clubs. It’s not the hipster-fied Williamsburg or what was once the Lower East Side, but rather a more upscale brand of cool.
Pros
  • The Chelsea Market and the Chelsea Piers
  • Art galleries abound
  • Famous landmarks
  • Great discount shopping at the Housing Works and Angel Thrift Stores
Cons
  • New luxury developments are changing the character of Chelsea
  • Too many people around at times
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish

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