AKnight

  • Local Expert 920 points
  • Reviews 0
  • Questions 17
  • Answers 17
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Little Neighborhoods Inside of a Big Neighborhood"

Somerton is an upper Northeast neighborhood with easily discerning borders - County Line Road & Poquessing Creek at the north, Red Lion Road at the south, Roosevelt Boulevard to the east and the Philadelphia/Montgomery County Line to the west.

The area is divided into seven smaller neighborhoods including Timberwalk, Lorraine Gardens, Tudor Village, Camelot, and Old Somerton. The residents of largely foreign born, notably Indian and Russian immigrants.

Many of the homes in Somerton were erected pre-Word War II. They include colonial style single-family houses with quaint yards. There are townhomes in the area, as well as a slew of condos and apartment complexes. The median sale price for the homes in Somerton is around $241,000.

There are quite a few schools to choose from in the vicinity. One of them in particular, Watson Comly School, is on the National Register of Historical Places. Other schools include MASTery - a sciences charter school, George Washington High School, Saint Christopher's and William H. Loeshe.

Somerton has an amazing youth sports organization that provide sport programs. They offer football, baseball, softball, soccer for girls and boys, and basketball for boys and girls. The organization has intramural and travel teams. It is a focal point for the young people of Somerton and gives them something to do.

Poquessing Valley Park lies inside of Somerton. Unlike most of the parks in the Fairmount Park System, Poquessing is not devleoped with picnic tables, manicured grass, and mnaged trails. For a long time it was an illegal dumping ground, but it recent years the Fairmount Park System and Bansalem have been working toward making the park a more visitor friendly area.

There are an assortment of businesses throughc the neighborhood such as medical professionals, florists, manufacturing companies, and automotive dealers. Somerton also has an enticing array of restaurants with many featuring Indian, Asian or Russian cuisine. There isn't a lot of nightlife in Somerton, however, there are a few bars such as Benny the Bum and Chickie & Pete's Sports Bar.

It is better to have a car when living in Somerton. The area is close to many major roadways such as Roosevelt Boulevard (US Route 1), which can get you into Center City in 20 minutes or less. For those who do not drive there are plenty of SEPTA bus routes with most of them leading to the Frankford Trasportation Center, which will get you downtown in no time and one bus that brings you to City Line Avenue, which is lined with promising businesses and shopping plazas. Somerton station is the stop for the West Trenton Line that lead into New Jersey.

Somerton has a suburban feel inside of a bustling city. There is a strong sense of commty and the neighbors are tightly knit. The politicians of the area fight hard to keep Somerton community oriented with all the comforts of the suburbs.
Pros
  • Suburban feel
  • Low crime
  • Nice houses
Cons
  • No real park system
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Mind Your Manors..."

In the far Northeast section of Philadelphia sits an ideal neighborhood known as Parkwood Manor. With a name such as this, you expect to see huge homes with lush, vibrant gardens. Well, Parkwood isn't quite that kind of neighborhood, but it still has the beauty of a manor.

The area is generally bound between Poquessing Creek and Woodhaven Road. Academy Road lies to the southeast, Knights Road to the northwest, and Red Lion Road east of Roosevelt Boulevard.

In the 1950's, Parkwood Manor was developed as a predominantly residential area with brick row homes. However, these days you can find single-family houses, as well as apartment buildings and condominiums. Regardless of the rental options, over 80% of the neghbors are homeowners.

Even though Parkwood started as a mostly residential neighborhood, it is now home to thriving industrial and commercial areas. Byberry Industrial Park provides employment to more than 5,000 employees. Franklin Mills Mall is over 2 million square feet of more than 200 stores, a 14 screen movie theatre, 7 themed restaurants and 2 food courts.

For families with children, there are two schools in the vicinity. There is also a post-high school option in Community College of Philadelphia: Northeast Regional Center. The Youth Organization in Parkwood offers NFL Flag Football, Baseball, Soocer and Basketball to the neighborhood's young people. Junod Playground is a place for children to play and contains a building for indoor activities.

Major roadways consist of Southampton Road, Roosevelt Boulevard (US Route 1), Knights Road and Woodhaven Road; making getting to Center City a breeze. If you need public transportation there are three bus routes in the area that connect to the Market-Frankford Line for easy access to downtown. However, if you proceed to the mall you will find more bus routes that connect to other areas of the city.

Another interesting tidbit about the neighborhood is the Parkwood Farmer's Market, which is said to be one of the best inside of Philadelphia. Vendors are rumored to have some of the freshest produce around.

Parkwood Manor is an exciting and interesting place to live. Though slightly more expensive than other areas in Philadelphia, the property values are worth it. The neighbors are great and the streets are clean. This neighborhood is one of the best in the Northeast.
Pros
  • Beautiful houses
  • Franklin Mills Mall
  • Great for families
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Not many schools options
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"The Park Next to the Park"

In the Central Northeast section of Philadelphia lies Lexington Park. This quaint little neighborhood is one of few in the Northeast that is still predominantly white. Its borders consist of Roosevelt Boulevard to the west, Holme Avenue to the north and Pennypack Park to the east and south.

The homes in the area consist of twin and single-family houses, most of which were built after World War II. These homes generally have 3 bedrooms. There are a few apartment buildings and condominiums in the vicinity as well. The average home sale price is $260,000.

Nazareth Hospital is the medical facility in the area. There are also eye doctors, dentists and chiropractors in the vicinity along Rhawn Street. Rhawn Street is also the location for Lexington Park's commercial district, as well as Roosevelt Boulevard. The Roosevelt Mall is not far down the road either.

There is public transportation in Lexington Park in the form of several bus routes. One in which goes to Fern Rock Tansportation Center which is where you can catch the Broad Street Subway into the city. Another route goes to the Frankford Terminal which connects to the Market-Frankford Line, which will also lead into downtown Center City. Aside from these public transport options, Lexington Park is right against Roosevelt Boulevard, which will lead you into Center City in about 20 minutes, depending on the traffic.

Lexington Park is a very calming area and doesn't disappoint having the 'park' attached to its name. Pennypack Park surrounds half of the neighborhood. Just like the park that it sits beside, Lexington is quiet and serene and well worth moving into.
Pros
  • Close to Pennypack Park
  • Safe
Cons
  • expensive
  • lacks diversity
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Once The Location Of a Natural Spring"

In 1784, Captain George Esterly founded an area in which he called Harrowgate. Within this section he discovered a natural spring which was deemed as healthy. He started a spa, complete with gardens and room & board. This spa is now the location of the Harrowgate Park, which covers a whole city block.

Harrowgate is in the lower Northeast section of Philadelphia above Kensington. It's borders are Alleghany Avenue to the south, Aramingo Avenue to the east, Front Street to the west and Erie Avenue and Frankford Creek (aka Tacony Creek) to the north.

Once a historically working class Irish American neighborhood, Harrowgate has transformed into a melting pot of diversity. Aside from Irish Americans, the neighborhood is also home to a flourishing Dominican, Puerto Rican and African-American community.

Harrowgate consists of rowhomes and apartment complexes, all of which are reasonably priced Many of the residents are elderly but there are numerous young families as well.

The area has many schools run by the School District of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Archdiocese. Harrowgate also has some awesome programs and recreational alternatives to keep kids off the streets such as the PAL Center and the Harrowgate Boxing Club. Also, there is, of course, Harrowgate Park, McKinnley Playground and Scanlon Playground for families to go and enjoy the outdoors.

Public transportation is readily accessible in the form of buses, trolleys and train. These options help you get to the different sections of Philadelphia without the hassle of traffic. However, if you enjoy to drive there are plenty of major roadways in the vicinity which lead to the expressway.

Harrowgate is not a premiere neighborhood but it has a lot of potential if you allow your imagination to wander. The neighbors are nicer than most areas of the city and its generally safe to live. This neighborhood is affordable and well worth exploration.
Pros
  • Charming place to live
  • Low crime
  • Very friendly
Cons
  • Can be boring for young people
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Not Actually a Farm, Although It Used To Be"

Due to its small size and closeness to Bucks County, some mistaken Crestmont Farms to be a part of the Andalusia neighborhood, which is right next door. Crestmont Farms is cushioned against the Bucks County Line, nestled between Poquessing Creek and Knights Road. The area was originally a 40-acre farm divided into 70 single-family homes.

The neighborhood is an upper class residence wth mostly long-time homeowners. However, there are a few condos and apartment complexes in the vicinity. The majority of homes are attached but some, depending on the block, are detached houses. All display gorgeous well-manicured lawns and driveways.

This area is quite expensive with sale prices in the 400 thousands. Crestmont Farms' inhabitants are generally older families, those who have sent their kids off to college, and retirees. There are young professionals in the area but they occupy the renting options in the neighborhood.

For those who do have school-age children there are schools in the area, such as the Art Academy at Benjamin Rush. The Calvary Athletic Association is in the neighborhood as well and offers baseball, football, basketball, softball, lacrosse, and cheerleading.

For recreation, Poquessing Valley Park is on the east side of Crestmont Farms. It's a great place to take in the peaceful scenery as well as have a picnic or jog with friends. Chalfont Playground is also in the neighborhood.

There are not a lot, if any, shopping options inside of the Crestmont Farms neighborhood. However, if you don't mind crossing over into Buck County, the Woodhaven Mall is right in next door Andalusia.

Living in Crestmont Farms, having a vehicle is a must. It takes, on average, 30 to 45 minutes to get into Center City. If you do need to take public transportation, there are a couple of bus routes that run along Knights Road which lead to the Frankford Transportation Center. There you can catch the Market-Frankford El, which can take you right into Center City. It is a bit of a ride though.

If you are looking for a beautiful, quiet neighborhood and cost isn't an issue, than Crestmont Farms is where you want to call home. The neighbors are friendly and even though you technically live in the City of Philadelphia, it feels like the suburbs.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Safe
  • Well-maintained homes
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Far from Center City
  • Not much to do
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Suburban Life"

Academy Gardens resides in the far Northeast section of Philadelphia. The neighborhood is bordered by Pennypack Park, Grant Avenue, Holme Avenue and Jon F. Byrne Golf Course. The area was originally farmland owned by surveyor Thomas Holme until it was settled on by World War II veterans.

The home in Academy Garden were inexpensive when it was first settled on. This was mostly because the houses were unfinished to be cost effective. Over the years, all of these homes have been remodeled and each has its own individual style. Houses in Academy Gardens are detached, single-family style with driveways and beautifully manicured lawns.

Academy Gardens has recreation options for adults and youth. The area consists of not one, but two golf courses; John F. Byrne golf course and Torresdale-Frankford Country Club. Young people in the area have two recreational organizations to be a part of; Crispin Academy and Penn-Academy. All of these options keep residents liesurely occupied.

Education in the area consists of a few Catholic schools such as Archbishop Ryan High School. Also, Holy Family University, a prominant post-high school institution, resides in the neighborhood.

Retail stores in the area consist of businesses such as Liam Automotives and Billows Electric Supply. There are also some good restaurants in the vicinity such as Brick House Bar & Grill. Businesses generally run along Holme Avenue and Willits Road.

SEPTA (Philadelphia's public transportation) doesn't run frequently in Academy Gardens. However, major roadways, such as Frankford Avenue, and Interstate 95 are easily accessible. Due to not much public transportation there is a lot of vehicular traffic.

If you are looking for a suburban area to raise a family, Academy Gardens is the perfect neighborhood. It's peaceful, family friendly and far from the hustle and bustle of Center City. Also, with the park in the area, there is always a place away from home to experience and enjoy.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • near parks
  • nice area
  • Parks
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Long commute to city
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Holme to One of the Oldest Neighborhoods in Philly"

Named for the descendants of John Holme, Holmesburg resides in the Northeast section of Philadelphia. Holmesburg is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the Northeast. Its borders include Roosevelt Boulevard to the west, the Delaware River to the east, Sheffield Avenue to the south and Academy Road/Pennypack Park to the north.

Homes is this area are generally two-story, single family housing. Some have been turned into duplexes and triplexes, which is said to be the cause of erosion in some parts of Holmesburg.

The neighborhood is home to the Pennypack Theater, built in 1929 by acclaimed architect William Harold Lee. Also in the area backed up against the Delaware River, is the Philadelphia Prison System, which includes a number of facilities. The Holmesburg Prison (known now as Curran-Fromhold Prison) was used for three (3) motion pictures. The nieghborhood of Holmesburg was also the setting for the novel Green Grass Grace.

The area is accessible via car with Frankford Avenue being the main thoroughfare. It is also a historic byway. I-95 is in the neighborhood as well making it easy to get to the inner city. Public transportation is available in Holmesburg by way of SEPTA's Trenton Line, which runs straight to Center City, and bus routes such as the 66, 84, 28, and 88.

There are plenty of recreational facilities in the vicinity such as the Holmesburg Recreational Center, James Ramp Memorial Playground and Pennypack Park. The Holmesburg Civic Association, which meets every second Tuesday, helps to keep the neighborhood safe with its town watch program.

Holmesburg doesn't have a plethora of shopping options. However, there is the Holmesburg Shopping Center which includes stores like Family Dollar, Rite Aid, China Moon Restaurant and Advance Auto Parts.

With the surrounding parks, Holmesburg has an urban and suburban feel to it. With a little hussle for the city lovers and less bussle for those fond of the country, this neighborhood is just right for anyone looking for that in between action.
Pros
  • Urban and Suburban feel
  • Pennypack Park
  • Pretty area
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Better to have a car
  • Shops are far away
Recommended for
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Charm of the Northeast"

A charming neighborhood, Rhawnhurst is located in the Northeast section of Philadelphia; named after George and William Rhawn who owned property in the area. The neighborhood is surrounded by Pennypack Creek to the north, Roosevelt Boulevard to the east, Cottman Avenue to the south and Algon Avenue to the west. The zip code for this area is 19152 and parts of 19111.

Predominantly residential, Rhawnhurst offers mostly rowhomes and other attached dwellings. There are townhouses and small apartments in the vicinity too. The real estate median for Rhawnhurst is around 208,000. Many of the neighbors have a Romanian or Russian ancestry, coming from generations that have spent years in this cozy neighborhood.

Traffic can be heavy during rush hours in Rhawnhurst, but not by much. During regular hours there isn't much car congestion. Major roadways in Rhawnhurst include Roosevelt Boulevard (U.S. 1), Bustleton Avenue (PA 532), Cottman Avenue (PA 73), Rhawn Street, Large Street and Castor Avenue. If you use public transportation, SEPTA has several bus lines that serve the area and connect to the Market-Frankford Line, Broad Street Subway and regional rails.

The School District of Philadelphia operates four schools in the vicinity. This may or may not remain true in the coming months due to the district closing down many of the public schools. There are two elementary schools, a middle school and a high school in the area. Also, the Archdiocese runs a K-8 in the neighborhood as well.

There are many parks and playgrounds in the neighborhood as well. Rhawnhusrt includes portions of Pennypack Park. Bradford Park in Rhawnhurst is mostly used as a dog park for K-9's of all sizes and breeds.

Rhawnhurst is also home to three shopping centers; Roosevelt Mall, Cottman and Bustleton Center and Bell's Corner Shopping Center. You can find many of the larger chains such as Target, Macy's and Sears in these shopping centers. Barbera's Autoland, in Rhawnhurst, is a dealership as well as one of the top auto repair shops in Philadelphia. There is also a cool comic book and sports card shop called Garden of Earthly Delights on Bustleton Avenue.

There isn't much of a nightlife in this neighborhood with only a few bars. However, there are many restaurants if you like to eat out. They range from kosher spots to Chinese cuisine, Italian Delicatessens to Hibachi Buffets. You can find a taste that you'll like is this neighborhood.

Rhawnhurst is a unique neighborhood in many important ways. Mostly, Rhawnhurst is a place where anyone would want to raise a family or live out the rest of their days. It's definitely worth visiting and very much worth living in.
Pros
  • Shopping Centers
  • Major Roadways leading into Center City
  • close to parks
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Housing similarities
Recommended for
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Park or a Wood By Any Other Name Would Still Be Pennypack"

The Pennypack neighborhood is in the Northeast portion of Philadelphia between Northeast Airport and Pennypack Park. The area consists of two entries on the National Register of Historical Places - Greenbelt Knoll Historic District and the Holme Avenue Bridge.

One of the features of Pennypack is its park of the same name. Pennypack Park stretches past Pennypack and up into other neighborhoods. Its vast greenery keep visitors coming to bike, walk or jog along its many trails. This beautiful area is a wonderful place for a family outing.

The major roads in the neighborhood are Frankford Avenue, Roosevelt Boulevard, Grant Avenue, Rhawn Street, Academy Road and Pennypack Street. Pennypack is predominantly residential, with twin and row single-family homes lining the streets. Many of the homes in the area were built as far back as the 1950's.

Public transportation isn't abundant in and around the area, and it can be time consuming if you are trying to get to other parts of the city. Living out here, it is better to own a vehicle, especially if you want to get around quicker.

There isn't much of a nightlife aside from a pub or two. Shopping options are limited as well. There is, however, a small shopping center used by the neighborhood's residents. Pennypack also has some delis and sandwich shops worth trying.

Pennypack has an elementary school run by the School District of Philadelphia. There are also Catholic elementary and middle schools that serve the area. Little Learners Day Care is the leading program for children below kindergarten age.

One of the cool things about the neighborhood is the summer-long Pennypack Park Music Festival which features all types of bands. Its said to be a great time.

Pennypack is a family oriented neighborhood right along the edge of nature. A wonderful place to raise children, the area is a place to call home.
Pros
  • Family-friendly neighborhood
  • Great area for pets
  • Great park
Cons
  • Far away from the city
  • Not a lot of shops or restaurants
Recommended for
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Almost The Main Site of Philadelphia"

In the Northeast section of Philadelphia you can find Torresdale located along the Delaware River. Named by Charles Macalester for his Scotland home, the area had first been favored by Thomas Holme, William Penn's surveyor, as the site for Penn to place the city. Regardless that this area was not chosen, Holme had property in the area and would later be buried here.

Torresdale is the site for a few places listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Two interesting sites are the Frankford avenue Bridge over Poquessing Creek and the Glen Foerd at Torresdale, a historical mansion.

The area is home to the Torresdale Frankford Country Club with a Donald Ross designed golf course. The club holds weddings, as well as banquets. It also features a swimming pool and tennis courts.

Transportation is a cinch in Torresdale with the Delaware Expressway running along the neighborhood. Also, SEPTA provides service through its Regional Rail Station by the same name as the area and the Market-Frankford Line; both in which will take you into the city.

The homes in Torresdale are mostly single-family homes with townhouses and apartment/condo complexes sprinkled about the area. The home in Torresdale are absolutely gorgeous and each has its own individual feel.

There are five public schools run by the School District of Philadelphia. There are also four private and one charter schools. Torresdale also has an abundance of childcare facilities for children not of schooling age.

This beautiful neighborhood is also home to the Torresdale Boy's Club. Don't let the name fool you - girls ARE allowed. The club offers sports such as baseball, basketball and soccer amongst others. Children can begin attending this exclusive kid's club as early as 4 years of age.

Nightlife in Torresdale is okay. The neighborhood has a few pubs, sports bars and dive bars.

Torresdale is close to convenience stores, as well as chains such as K-mart. The neighborhood also has an array of music stores, auto shops, computer places, jewelers and florists. The majority of stores are around Frankford Avenue and Bristol Pike.

This premiere neighborhood may not have made the final cut for William Penn's city but it still is a quite beautiful place to live. Honestly, the hustle and bustle of Center City would have ruined this quaint area. It is wonderful just the way it is.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Nice houses
Cons
  • Not much of a nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not To Be Mistaken With Lawncrest"

Lawndale is a neighborhood in Northeast Philadelphia. Once a predominantly white part of the city, the area has become a lot more diverse in recent years.

The neighborhood has a fascinating diversity in home types. There are row homes, single and twin homes, and large estate type homes. Few homes have been built since the 1970's. The majority of homes are 3 bedroom and range from $60,000 to $200,000. Also, there are apartment complexes in the area.

The main business district includes 200 stores of varying degree. This section of Lawndale radiates from the intersection of Oxford and Rising Sun Avenues. There are a few restaurants too, including a sushi place and the famous Larry's Steaks.

Families with children have many options for childcare in the neighborhood. There are no public schools in the neighborhood. There are, however, options for Catholic and Private schools. Lawndale includes 2 elementary, 3 middle and 1 high school.

For public transportation SEPTA provides service on bus routes 18 and 27 and offers regional rail at the Fox Chase Station. For those who drive Rising Sun Avenue is a major roadway in the neighborhood.

In so many words, Lawndale is a nice place to live with everything close by. The neighborhood has gone through some changes in residence but is still on the city's top neighborhoods to live and be.
Pros
  • Friendly Neighbors
  • Lots of nice homes
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Not many public transportation options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"From Open Farm Land to a Serene Residential Neighborhood"

Bustleton used to be known as a rich farming area. In the twentieth century, however, the area became a largely residential community, with commercial areas on Roosevelt Boulevard, Grant Avenue, Red Lion Road, and Bustleton Avenue.

The neighborhood is racially and ethnically diverse with many groups represented, in particular Russian. You can tell this by storefronts, billboards and newspapers with Russian subtext.

As far as transportation in the area, you have a couple of options. If you would be using public transportation SEPTA offers bus routes 19, 58, 67 and regional rail West Trenton Line and Fox Case Line. If you drive a few major roadways in the area would be Red Lion Road (PA 63), Roosevelt Boulevard (U.S. 1) and Bustleton Avenue (PA 532).

A tidbit about traffic in the area. Bustleton is home to two of the most dangerous intersections in the United States; Roosevelt Blvd. at Grant Avenue and at Red Lion Road. Due to the large number of accidents, these intersections were the first in Philadelphia to have traffic cameras installed that photograph the license plate if you run a red light. So, safe driving out there.

The homes in Bustleton tend to be single-family houses with a few twin homes here and there. There are also apartment and condominium complexes in the vicinity. Some blocks feature side by side duplexes. Houses range up to 450,000 with 150,000 being the median.

For families with children, Bustleton has 4 public schools in the neighborhood operated by the School district of Philadelphia. There are 5 parochial schools in the area as well.

The neighborhood is home to the Bustleton Bengals Club at Hayes Playground. They offer athletic training to girls and boys which include baseball, softball, tee ball, football, cheerleading, soccer, hockey and basketball. Children can start as young as 4 years of age.

Nightlife isn't spectacular with only a few pubs, bars and pool halls. There is a nightclub in the area but it caters to a really young crowd and is only open Thursdays and Fridays.

Bustleton may no longer be a rich farming area but it still has the subtle serenity of the countryside. The location may make it hard to believe that there is a means for peace and quiet, but once you visit you will notice the calm that settles over the neighborhood, especially at night.
Pros
  • Clean and quiet
  • Great for kids
  • Largely residential
  • Great schools
Cons
  • Expensive to live
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"The Queen of Philly Nightlife"

Home of Fabric Row, the oldest and largest fabric district in the country, Queen Village was first settled on by the Swedish. The name actually comes from the Swedish Queen Christina, who was on the throne in the 1600's when the Swedish first settled here. The area has 800 buildings on the Philadelphia Historical Register, which include mid-18th century homes.

Which brings us to the architecture. The neighborhood features 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century homes; some with interior courtyards. Some of the modern homes have patios on the roofs. Three-story homes are the theme of the neighborhood.

Many households have lived in their residencies for generations. Queen Village is also home to young professionals, artisans and writers, doctors and lawyers, as well as families with young children.

Transportation is not an issue. SEPTA routes 40, 57 and 64 run through the neighborhood. The area is right off the I-95 for those who have a vehicle. Be aware, however, because of weekend traffic, parking can be an absolute nightmare. Plenty of people ride bikes in the area but there aren't any bike lanes, so you must be very careful if this is your means of travel.

Development of knowledge is important in Queen Village. The area has two schools in its bounds. The Free Library of Philadelphia has two branches. There are also tons of programs and resources in the vicinity such as Settlement Music School and the Queen Village Art Center.

There also several parks, gardens and playgrounds in Queen Village. One is Shot Tower Playground, which is for ages 12 year of age and under. The park was named after Sparks Shot Tower, which is one of a handful left in the United States.

Queen Village has a happening nightlife. The more exciting side of South Street is within the bounds of the area. There are several bars and lounges. The TLA Theater is also right on the edge of the neighborhood and there is always a concert going on.

Queen Village features a diverse blend of businesses, parks, residencies and people. It is totally accessible to the rest of the city and is worth the visit. Regardless that the neighborhood features on of Philly's hottest nightlife spots, Queen Village still is rather quiet.
Pros
  • Close to everything
  • houses are nice
  • Lots of nightlife options
  • Shopping
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Parking can be tough
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Port of industry"

Pennsport is considered to be one of the oldest sections of Philadelphia. The area is also said to be one of the first English settlements. These days it is predominantly populated by Irish Americans.

Many of the homes' architecture consists of Federal- and Colonial-styles. New homes built over recent years sport one car garages and porch fronts. New or old, one of the things that remains is the beautiful bay windows you see on most houses. All are single family homes with a few apartments scattered around the vicinity.

Pennsport has four schools in the area. Two of these schools, Furness High School and Abigail Vare School, are listed on the National Register of Historical Places. There are also three parks and a few recreational centers.

New Year's Day brings upon it a wonderful day for a family outing - The legendary Mummer's Parade. The Mummer's Museum is in Pennsport. Many of the Mummers clubs are located in the area as well.

Along the Delaware River, Pier 70 and Columbus Commons are Pennsport's retail district. There are large retailers such as BestBuy, Wal-mart, and Target. There are also retailers such as Forman Mills, Jomar's, and Bare Feet. There are fast food places, as well as eat-in restaurants. A portion of Pennsport's nightlife is along this strip of commerce too.

Pennsport is close to the expressway for those who drive. Due to the amount of lots, there is tons of parking. If using public transportation there are plenty of buses to get you where you need to go. The neighborhood is also biker friendly.

This part of Philadelphia is steadily improving while it bring in tons of business to the neighborhood. Don't let the hustle and bustle fool you though. This community in very close-knit and friendly. It is a perfect place to be - beautiful homes and close to shopping.
Pros
  • Shopping
  • Affordable
  • easy parking
  • Parks!
  • Steadily improving
Cons
  • bit of a hike to subway line
  • Traffic is heavy in certain areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"The village of University City"

Powelton Village is part of the acclaimed University City in Philadelphia. It was named after the Powel's, a Welsh colonialist family who owned much of the land in the area during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The neighborhood is actually a Historical District considering many of the buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.

Powelton Village consists of beautiful Victorian, twin houses. Many have been turned into apartments, but others still function as traditional family homes. The blocks are not only lined by these lovely homes. The streets hold a plethora of trees and gardens, some of which are historic.

The property values are rising gradually due to allure of being near retailers, medical facilities and educational institutions. Accessible by vehicle or public transportation to other parts of the city makes Powelton Village ideal for both families and students.

The commercial portion of Powelton Village lies mainly on Lancaster Avenue. Many of the shops and galleries in the area participate in "Second Fridays". Occurring on the second Friday of every month, stores remain open late, offer various specials and sometimes there is live music.

Powelton Village has an okay nightlife. There are a few bars and restaurants around the area. However, the neighborhood is best known for its many pizza shops - perfect for a quick bite to eat during a late study night.

The School District of Philadelphia zones to three schools for children in K-12. Higher learning options are right at the neighborhood's front door. Truly perfect for growing families or those in the transitional period between high school and college.

Powelton Village is true to its name. It is honestly a perfectly sized village while being a part of one of Philadelphia's busiest portions of town. It is always nice to take a walk through and breathe in the neighborly spirit.
Pros
  • friendly people
  • Great for college kids
  • Lots of shops
Cons
  • getting expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Revitalization makes a difference"

Northern Liberties is up and coming. A few years ago, half of the neighborhood consisted of empty lots and trash strewn streets. Now, the area is where everyone comes to party.

Home to students, artists, and young professionals, such as designers, Northern Liberties has a new and old vibe to it. Considering the neighborhood is a desirable place for both commercial and residential growth, Northern Liberties is building itself up each day. With the majority of housing being old style brick row homes, recent times have brought along condo and apartment complexes. All the new additions to the neighborhood have caused the property value to jump substantially.

For families with school-age children, there are 2 public K-8 schools, 2 public 9 - 12 schools and 3 charter schools. The neighborhood library is a diverse place for children to study and participate in sponsored activities. There are also two parks within the neighborhood. One of them includes an off-the-leash park for dog owners and the other is a park and playground where kids can hang out.

Transportation is simple with the Market-Frankford El running through the neighborhood. Bus and trolley routes run in and around the area as well. I-95 is right off of Northern Liberties and helps those who drive get to other parts of the city. Parking isn't too bad either. There is a huge parking lot across from the neighborhoods feature attraction - The Piazza - and the parking is free.

Speaking of the Piazza, this is where all the fun it located. With a number of restaurants and bars, outdoor concerts and movie nights on a huge flat screen, the Piazza serves for an awesome experience for the kids and part of Northern Liberties' eventful nightlife. You can go and relax in the Piazza's center on a lawn chair, or take to bar hopping. It's a cool place for families during the day and friends during the evening.

Northern Liberties was once abandoned and forgotten. However, with close attention being made to the neighborhood's growth, this section of Philadelphia has turned around totally 360 and is well worth the trip to check it out.
Pros
  • live events
  • Up and coming neighborhood
  • Easy parking
Cons
  • Increase in prices
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small town inside of a big city"

Manayunk sits on the banks of the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia. This small town inside of the city is where everyone is welcome and there is never much time for boredom. The neighborhood has a relaxed and uptempo feel all at the same time This can be accredited to the infamous Main Street with the Schuylkill River in the backdrop.

Along Main Street in Manayunk, you can find all kinds of boutiques, art galleries, cafes, housewares stores, fitness centers, and restaurants to choose from. Many of the shops are independently owned, which adds to the uniqueness of your shopping finds. The nightlife isn't too shabby either. There are bar & grills and pubs around the area to make for a nice night. While it's a nice place to be, Main Street does allow for a lot of foot traffic.

Another cool place to be is beyond Main Street. There lies a trail used by locals, as well as visitors, to walk, run or bike. Also, along the Schuylkill River, there is kayaking and boating. And just in case you're a dog owner, Manayunk is said to be a great place for dog lovers.

Aside from having an awesome strip and recreational aspect, Manayunk also acts as a median for going back and forth between the city and the suburbs. Whether you drive, take public transportation or you decide to bike, the neighborhood serves as a "director of traffic" in and out of the city.

The homes in Manayunk range in styles from lofts and townhouses to Victorian row homes. The architecture accents the small town feel of the neighborhood with a variety in its subtlety. However, Manayunk is filled with hills, so that is something to keep in mind.

Manayunk is a cozy neighborhood perfect for college kids and growing families. There is always something to do and everybody knows your name.
Pros
  • Great for college kids
  • Lots of nightlife options
  • small town vibe
Cons
  • Parking is awful
  • Hills everywhere
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students

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