4.5 out of 10

Mission Bay

Ranked 83rd best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.7716730412874 -122.39339352048
Great for
  • Eating Out
  • Internet Access
  • Public Transport
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Nightlife
Not great for
  • Parking
  • Childcare
  • Schools
  • Cost of Living
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Singles
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists

Reviews

2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Nov 16, 2016

"Unsafe: UDR building Channel Mission Bay"

Do not rent at Channel Mission Bay! Over a dozen burglaries and break ins yet management refuses to notify its residents. SFPD has released a video of the most recent break in. Note: you can clearly see a high chair in the video. UDR refuses to install cameras in the garage or hallways to protect its residents. Building management is hostile to its residents.
Pros
  • AT&T Park
  • UC SF Extension
Cons
  • Lots of Construction
  • No Nightlife
  • Unremarkable Restaurants
5/5
Jan 19, 2016

"MISSION BAY – THE NEW ‘IT’ SF NEIGHBORHOOD"

The Mission Bay neighborhood is on the rise. When the University of California, San Francisco moved its research campus to Mission Bay, people began to take notice - about $4M has been invested in its development so far. As a result the neighborhood is an oasis for young, single techies. Defined by Townsend Street on the north, Third Street and San Francisco Bay on the east and Mariposa Street on the south, residents find themselves close to both the Caltrain and the I-80 and I-280 highways. It is very convenient for professionals who work in Silicon Valley and for people who value being able to get to the bustling parts of downtown San Francisco in a flash. This means that Mission Bay represents a stimulating fusion of students and techies from all over California and the world.

Though this neighborhood is not as foodie-inclined or culturally rich as the Mission or Haight, it is definitely up-and-coming. We have no doubt that in a couple of years, the rest of the Bay Area will be clamoring to see the culinary adventures that new chefs are offering and the new, unique experiences that only Mission Bay can offer. In the meantime, rest easy, there are still many ways to spend your weekend. For instance, the AT&T Park is just a short block away for those who live here! Did someone say Go Giants? Additionally, its proximity to the water makes for a relaxing weekend picnic.

Due to its broad boulevards and vacant lots, Mission Bay has seen and will continue to see a boost in the housing development. Some high-rises that already exist boast bewitching sky-line views and all the amenities of the best luxury apartments.

One such apartment complex is Azure Apartments located at 690 Long Bridge Street, San Francisco. These apartments feature private balconies, walk-in closets, wood-style flooring, community grilling area and even electric car charging stations! The latter seems even more fitting as the area is filled with early-adopter techies.

According to an article in the San Francisco Business Times, rent for this building starts at about $3,650 a month for a 660-square-feet of space and starts at about $5,150 for 960-square-feet of space 2 bedroom apartment.

If you aren’t an apartment lover, Mission Bay also offers condos. Arden by Bosa is at the center of the Mission Bay neighborhood. Its closeness to the water presents residents with scenic running/walking trails and also opportunities for a variety of water sports. At the Arden, you will be able to make friends with your neighbors due to the condos’ plethora of community-orientated spaces such as the open-are grilling and dining area, the social lounge with entertaining kitchen and billiards and the luxurious library lounge.

Here, a two bedroom, two bathroom condo (1386 square-feet) has a going-rate of $1,425,000.

Another condo complex – Madrone – offers similar luxurious amenities to the interested buyer.

Now is an exciting time to explore the Mission Bay area. As a resident, you will be able see the community development each day. Being the first of the neighborhood’s bartender favorites is sure to offer great story at happy-hour! If that honorary title does not sweep you off your feet – you can take “First Techie to Move-In” or “First Neighbor to Throw Summer’s Last Bar-B-Que”!

If you are looking to live in a place with growing energy that has a lot of potential, Mission Bay may be perfect for you. Make sure to visit today and see where the future can take you.
Pros
  • AT&T Park
  • UC SF Extension
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Giants and Giant Plans"

Mission Bay (including the neighborhood area sometimes called China Basin) is the next step in the expansion migrating south from South Beach and SoMa. The long term plan is to continue to extend this growth as far as Bayview and Hunter’s Point—a prospect that has raised a great deal of controversy over the years.

In this area, unlike just to the north, much of promised growth is still in the future. You do have AT&T Park on its northern end (though the traffic for it doesn’t usually venture down here). You also have the UCSF extension in the neighborhood which ensures there will be growth on the campus’ periphery. Much of the landscape around the campus is still made up of empty lots and the detritus of the industrial docks that used to mark this area.

The China Basin area and the section of the neighborhood just to the south of the SoMa and the Bay Bridge freeway is
significantly more developed. Really it is just the southern extension of SoMa in terms of feel. (Government and commercial office buildings can be found here along with recreation areas like the dozen courts of the SF Tennis Club and number of restaurants—from McDonalds to some of slightly better quality, though not much to write home about at this point.)

There is also an Academy of Art College here.

Shopping is plentiful in the area. You can find everything from bicycle repair shops to florists. Many businesses take advantage of the moderate rents of the area and the proximity to major SF areas to set down stakes here. You will find everything from radio station headquarters to architectural firms and schools in the area.

Little about this northern section of the neighborhood is spectacular, but every city needs at least one or too such highly useful areas like this to support he commercial interests of the rest of the city.
Pros
  • UC SF Extension
  • AT&T Park
  • Lots of Stores
Cons
  • Lots of Construction
  • Unremarkable Restaurants
  • No Nightlife
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Give this area 5-10 more years"

Just wait: Mission Bay will be the next hot neighborhood in about 10 years. Right now, the scene is a bit strange. On the one hand, you have a number of open parking areas and deserted lots to contend with. If you pass by these areas, you might see Giants fans tailgating or soccer fans celebrating before a game. You might even see some homeless men gambling and drinking, as I saw this weekend. As you head farther south, then you can tell that this place is in a development boom. Most of the buildings look new, with large glass windows and walls.

Apparently, there are a lot of biotech companies starting to call this place home, and it'll show. The buildings will remind you of office parks, beautiful ones, but still not residential-looking. You'll see strange company names, like "Nektar," on each building. Also springing up, seem to be a ton of high-rise condo buildings. I saw one under construction this weekend, in fact. The buildings have small lawns on the sides with very manicured gardens. I think the boom in construction shows that the area is in a time of development and might be a great neighborhood in a few years.
Pros
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Not developed enough
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
2yrs+

"Better things to come"

Mission Bay is primed for improvement. Located in a small south eastern pocket of San Francisco, the neighborhood is full of open space and is yet to reach its full potential in business development. Currently, the neighborhood is overrun with industrial business, public parking lots and empty streets. In the small commercial district, the neighborhood boasts a university medical campus and a handful of bioengineering firms.

There’s a few residential buildings in this area, but the few that do are living moderately comfortable. Walking around Mission Bay, you’re sure to see some of the most beautiful and ritzy condominiums with breathtaking views of the neighborhood. For the few that live in the area, AT&T park is just a short walk to the north.

Although somewhat far from downtown, the Muni serves the communities medical students and industrial workers. Nightlife is very space, with a few dive bars sprinkled along Terry à François Boulevard. Mission Bay residents tend to spend their free time in more lively neighborhoods like the Mission or Soma. Criminal activity is somewhat frequent with car break-ins and theft becoming a big nuisance. But nonetheless, the neighborhood is mostly forgotten among the general public
Pros
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Not developed enough
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Parking lots and industrialized zones"

Mission Bay is a neighborhood that lies right next to the waters of the San Francisco Bay. There are good things and bad things to Mission Bay (as does each neighborhood have). But for Mission Bay, I’d say they’re more apparent. For one, AT&T Park lies right next to Mission Bay, and because of that, a good portion of Mission Bay is a parking lot for baseball game attendees. I’m pretty sure you can imagine it already, on game days, traffic gets heavy, and parking is scarce wherever you go. But game days aren’t the only days, AT&T Park often hosts concerts and such, and on those days, parking is just as scarce. But what’s great about living near AT&T Park or in Mission Bay is that occasionally you’ll see fireworks depending on the occasion. But it could also be a bad thing for those who hate the noise of fireworks. Public transportation is just as bad as parking on game days, but it’s always great to see San Francisco Giants fans decked out in orange. The land closer to the waters is mostly industrial and development land, but to me it seems like nothing ever really goes on there. And further from the water are homes.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Brave New World"

The future is here, and (in San Francisco at least) it is called Mission Bay. As one of the largest tracts of remaining open land in the city, it has been designated a kind of modern city-within-a-city, a vast space to be occupied by a university medical campus, a hospital complex, bio- and genetic-research organizations and firms, plus commercial offices and housing for all the employees and students and researchers the various concerns will attract. Little except the land and the bay remain from the area’s human history, and in keeping with the notion of a blank slate, the place will ultimately have an ultra-modern look, with sleek architecture and avant-garde urban parks and public places. As much of San Francisco looks back, to preserve and restore its past, Mission Bay looks forward, to create a new world that embraces science and technology and possibilities unexplored.

But this vision of the future is yet unrealized, most of it still on paper or in the mind of architects and builders. (What has been built has that haunted, where-did-the-people-go feel of modern architecture, with rectilinear utilitarian buildings looming over promenades and “village greens,” the palms and evergreen bushes planted at all-too-predictable intervals.) And as with most utopian dreams, the one on which Mission Bay is based has yet to be tested by the living, breathing, chaotic crush of human beings who will come here and alter the place as they occupy it. Whether it matches in reality what it promises in planners’ presentations remains very much to be seen.

What is obvious at first glance is that Mission Bay is a work in progress. These 300 acres were at various points in the last 150 years a true bay, bordered by marsh and tideland, then divided into parcels by San Francisco’s land-hungry 19th-century entrepreneurs, who sold “waterlots” (later filled with sand, garbage, trash—whatever they could get their hands on) on which they built ironworks and steel mills. The area was then crisscrossed with railroad tracks, maintenance sheds, and warehouses, handling as many as 2,000 freight-train cars a day. After the interstate highway system surpassed railroads as the preferred mode of moving the nation’s goods, the area slid into a peaceful if unproductive somnolence.

Today, the tracks and most of the historic rail buildings are gone. There’s hardly an old shack or building to remind you of what was one of the largest railyards between Los Angeles and Seattle. (The newly completed “T” line does carry train-like streetcars on tracks up Third Street and has three platform stations here, though that’s it for rails today.) But there’s plenty to tell you that this is something else: under the 1998 Mission Bay Redevelopment Plans, agreed to by the City of San Francisco and the primary developer Catellus, one of the largest biotech/biomedical centers (6 million square feet) in the United States is taking shape, with hundreds of people working in sleek new buildings to find new solutions to human diseases. About 6,000 housing units (1,700 of them affordable to moderate, low- and very low-income households) are slated, along with 800,000 square feet of retail space and a 500-room hotel. Forty-nine acres have been committed to public open space, including parks along Mission Creek and along the bay. A new public school, as well as a police station and firehouse, are also on the drawing board.

Between the vacant lots and empty streets, the pieces of the grand plan are starting to fit together. The University of California at San Francisco has established a second campus here (its original home still dominates the Inner Sunset); ultimately this biomedical research center will occupy 43 acres (most of it on land donated by the city and the primary developer, Catellus), including housing for students. Adjacent to the campus on 14 acres will be a new medical center, with a focus on children, family, and women’s health. A state-of-the-art research facility, the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, is up and running, to be joined by the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, scheduled to open in 2014 at Mariposa and Fourth.

The Gladstone Institutes, a nonprofit research facility for the life sciences associated with UCSF, comprising almost 200,000 square feet, opened in 2005, and QB3, a consortium of scientists and researchers from three UC campuses (Berkeley, San Francisco, and Santa Cruz), has moved into its new building here. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, a pro-stem-cell research advocacy organization that was in many ways responsible for San Francisco’s early lead in biotech research, sits on the edge of Mission Bay, at King and Third streets. Old Navy, (a spinoff of The Gap clothing brand), moved its headquarters into a curved, steel-and-glass edifice it is leasing along Terry à François Boulevard. And in 2004, Alexandria Real Estate Equities, a nationally known developer of private biotechnology research buildings, bought up much of the property in Mission Bay South set aside for commercial development and finished its first lab building on Owens Street.

So far, only about 2,000 people actually live in Mission Bay, according to U.S. Census Bureau data; 60 percent are white, 25 percent are Asian, with the rest a mix of African Americans and people of two or more races. They are young (median age is 35) and economically comfortable: median annual income is in the $80,000 range. Overwhelmingly (80 percent), they rent their homes. Interestingly, men (60 percent) outnumber women (40 percent) as a portion of the total population.

The waterfront here was long a home to dive bars and restaurants, the survivors of which along Terry à François Boulevard have gussied up a bit in anticipation of a new clientele: the Ramp with its funky patio; Mission Rock, a live-music club by night and restaurant by day serving lunch on weekdays and weekend brunch; and Jelly’s, a popular dance club (whose fate hangs in the balance after a recent fatal shooting in the parking lot). Otherwise, there’s little in the neighborhood besides chains (Subway on the UCSF campus) and franchise operations (Panera, on Fourth and King; Tsunami Mission Bay, on Fourth and Berry), though Peasant Pies on UCSF’s Campus Way gets high marks for its portable savory pies and reasonable prices and Philz Coffee on Berry Street draws crowds for its one-cup-at-a-time brew philosophy. It will take a while for the neighborhood to settle in with only-in-Mission-Bay spots. Meanwhile, residents venture west, to Potrero Hill (where there’s a Safeway and Office Depot in the Potrero Center, as well as a new Whole Foods on Rhode Island near 17th Street), or to the shops and stores of the Mission, or south, to the funky area known as Dogpatch (also commonly called the Central Waterfront).

For an interesting look at the area’s recent history, the curious can walk along Channel Street to check out the 20 houseboats moored in Mission Creek. These colorfully painted and outfitted floating homes were once considered an eyesore by the city’s port administration, but the 50 or so residents banded together and finally won a lease extension that permits them to live here until 2055. Nearby, just across the Fourth Street Bridge, sits the Mission Bay branch of the San Francisco Public Library. Opened in 2006, its collection highlights local interests like baseball and the city’s maritime history.

Because the area is so sparsely populated and children relatively few, there are no public schools in the Mission Bay neighborhood. But UCSF offers child care on its campus (just off Sixth and Owens streets) for kids ages 3 months to 5 years. The city’s redevelopment plan calls for an elementary school at some point in the future; meanwhile, Bessie Carmichael Elementary in South of Market is the closest public option.

Public transportation here is confined to the “T” streetcar that travels along Third Street headed for South of Market and the Financial District on its northerly trek and Bayview and other points as it heads south; three platform stops serve passengers as the streetcar line traverses Mission Bay. Students and faculty frequently use the shuttle buses provided by UCSF to get back and forth between the university’s main campus on Parnassus. For commuters, Caltrain offers daily service down the Peninsula from its terminal at Fourth and Townsend streets.

Crime is moderate, especially on the area’s peripheries, mostly because these are easy pickings for car break-ins and theft, which indicate the trend for property crime in San Francisco. Other quality-of-life violations, like disturbing the peace and vandalism, are also frequent. Assaults are not uncommon, especially around the ballpark and in the parking lots of bars and clubs. There have been four homicides in the last three years.

Real estate is not as inexpensive as might be expected, with many of the recently built condos here fetching up to $2.5 million (Berry and Fourth streets), and only a few in the $650,000 range (Radiance, on China Basin Street). Of course, with bay views and amenities like wide balconies, these homes could appreciate quickly. (The only development living up to the promise of “affordable housing” is Mission Walk on Berry Street, offering 131 condos—with some two-bedrooms starting as low as $200,000.) Rentals are likewise not cheap; a studio in one of the new buildings can fetch up to $1,900 (Avalon at Mission Bay North), with one-bedrooms on the neighborhood’s peripheries going for $2,300 a month, and two-bedroom condos fetching up to $3,200 and more.

Because this neighborhood promises to become desirable quickly (its proximity to the bay and downtown attractions like the ballpark and South of Market restaurants and clubs ensure a higher level of interest), it is hard to say how the expected influx of residents will alter what is essentially a planned community, not much different from similar developments (Park Merced in southwest San Francisco or The Gateway adjacent to the Financial District). That these places have become the latest to be frowned on, rife with the mistakes of their eras (1970s and ’80s uniformity and utilitarianism), should be lesson enough for this brave new world that calls itself Mission Bay.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"SF's Mission Bay Neighborhood he Ups and Downs of the Up and Coming"

Mission Bay: that crescent-shaped slice of land that has, up until the turn of the century, been largely ignored. Then, it seemed that when the economy was still booming, residential developers, businesses, and city planners woke up and noticed Mission Bay, this unpopulated, undeveloped swath of cheap land. This place put city planners to the test and so far, most new residents of the MB seem to be giving them high marks.
Mission Bay is green. There’s actually flat land on which to plant grass, and they have. But like most new trends, Mission Bay needed a trendsetter, a popular kid or a big fish to lead the way, to say that Mission Bay was okay. That big Fish was UCSF Medical Center. The medical monolith broke ground on a massive complex including three hospitals, a stem cell research center, and massive acres of green, community-themed centers for fitness, for kids, even a restaurant. With a few minor delays, everything is slated to be completed in 2014. But that’s not all.
The city set aside 30% of Mission Bay’s residential development for low income housing. This is the largest percentage anywhere in a city where people pay an extra 50-100k for a parking spot. Although lots of seniors and low income families have moved into brand-new apartment homes, and they have plenty of parks, green bike paths, there is a newness to the place that seems very unSan Francisco. Namely, the first floor commercial of some of the new residential buildings are filling up with chains like Starbucks, Panera Bread, and Subway.
At the south end of Mission Bay is a denser micro-neighborhood – Dogpatch – that counteracts this homogenization with a growing menagerie of shops and cafes. A couple months ago, Pfizer, the world’s largest drug company, backed out of their 10 year lease for a major commercial building, Mission Bay and its supporters held their breath. But then an up and coming online gaming company, Zynga, stepped in. An up-and-comer to rescue this up and coming neighborhood. If you can, get in on this neighborhood before its parking places are in the tens of thousands.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Revelopment central"

Mission Bay is another industrial area in San Francisco that is currently being improved. Much of this area actually used to be a railroad.

You are also near AT&T Park. I suppose this could be a major plus or a major negative depending on your view of sports. For me, the proximity to AT&T park is a major inconvenience and drawback. I mean on certain nights the parking is just going to be a nightmare!

As I mentioned, a great deal of construction is planned for Mission Bay. Much of this has already been completed. For example, the Beacon is a large condo complex in this district. There is also Arterra, which are LEED certified condos. There was also, of course, the addition of the Mission Bay Branch library in 2006. This is a big library that also has a multiuse center attached to it.

This area may currently be a good property investment. I mean it seems like things just keep getting added and added everyday. Also there is no denying this is a convenient location and you are right on the water. However, in my opinion, there is just a depressing and unnatural vibe in Mission Bay.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"SF’s new hot corner"

Since 1998 the Mission Bay area has been a major focal point for San Francisco redevelopment. What was once a drab industrial wasteland is now a booming new center for commerce and leisure and cutting-edge biotech research. The beautiful new AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants in neighboring South Beach, has helped anchor revitalization in the area. So has UCSF’s multibillion-dollar Mission Bay Campus expansion. Several biotech firms call Mission Bay home, including the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the UCSF Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Center, Bayer HealthCare, Pfizer and Necktar Therapeutics.

In addition to commercial redevelopment, an estimated 6,000 new condominiums are scheduled for construction over a 20-year period. Some of the initial projects are now finished including Avalon, The Beacon, Glassworks and Arterra, San Francisco’s first certified LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) market-rate condominium building.

Mission Bay seems some of San Francisco’s best weather. Due to its southeast location along the Bay, it is sheltered from chilly ocean breezes and the infamous fog that enshrouds most other SF neighborhoods. Parking in the neighborhood is generally good, except on baseball game days. Same goes for public transportation. The area is served by the new MUNI Third Street Line, the N Judah Line and several bus lines. Due to its close proximity to the Financial District, it is very easy to reach the East Bay via the Bay Bridge or BART.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"I Love Living in Mission Bay"

Mission Bay is great. The area is relatively easy for parking when there are not games, but really is awful when there are games.

Public transit is pretty ample, though somehow inconvenient to get many places directly. The N and T are your friend to get to BART heading to the east bay, but if you're looking to go to the heart of mission, don't be surprised to get on a few different busses.

King Street boasts lots of good stuff -- Mizu spa, though pricey, is really great and the service rocks. BJs has a great Burger, but then, so does 21st Amendment. The sushi place near 4th, Nama, is also great and has some excellent rolls (plus the plum wine is great too!).
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
2yrs+

"A neighborhood in the making"

Mission Bay boasts hotspot condos, lofts, and biotech research facilities. Home to California's Stem Cell Research headquarters and the new UCSF Mission Bay campus, Mission Bay is a neighborhood in the making.

Currently small and developing, Mission Bay offers few restaurants and entertaining hotspots. However, Mission Bay is adjacent to Protrero Hill and South of the Market, which offer all the amenities of urban living.

At first glance, there doesn't appear to be much if any liveliness in the streets, but don't overlook the green bike path along Mission Creek, the Blue Greenway path from China Basin to Candlestick Point, and easy access to the rest of the city via the Third Street light rail - making real estate prices soar.

When you do work up an appetite from all your walking, don't pass up Piccino Cafe or Serpentine. You will leave with your tummy full and energy to walk some more.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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4th St

3.5/5
"Perfect Place To Bring The Kids"
37.7769870696709 -122.394851987809
2

Brannan St

3.5/5
"Brannan is centrally located in SOMA"
37.7751358434826 -122.400567779774
"China Basin/Terry A. Francois Street by the bay"
37.7713716445651 -122.386540042886
4

Berry St

3/5
"Best New Neighborhood in San Fran"
37.7735040147673 -122.396241704503
5

Townsend St

3/5
"For Eating, Working and Playing"
37.7747987556887 -122.397882745582
6

3rd St

2.5/5
"Five-Star Stadium"
37.7742118540079 -122.389835232558
7

Michigan St

2/5
"Small boring industrial street."
37.7698177155526 -122.387561507788
8

Ritch St

2/5
"Ritch St: Overlooked"
37.7795077538022 -122.394643744079

Unranked Streets in Mission Bay

7th St

2.5/5
"An alright to plain street."
37.7738646022003 -122.404225286495

Bluxome St

3.5/5
"Great night life."
37.7759405163382 -122.397971242405

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