6.4 out of 10

Ingleside Terrace

Ranked 72nd best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.7247302021101 -122.467358942718
Great for
  • Internet Access
  • Peace & Quiet
  • Safe & Sound
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Lack of Traffic
Not great for
  • Nightlife
  • Eating Out
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Families with kids
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Singles
  •  

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"A Bit Ho-Hum"

Ingleside Terrace is the neighborhood just to the east of the Stonestown Galleria, the mall that SFSU students are all familiar with. Although this neighborhood is very close to the campus, not that many students live here because not only are there few rental homes but the ones that there are, are fairly expensive. Right now, for example, the only home for rent that I can find is $3200 for a 2 bedroom.

The exception is down on Holloway where there are a number of more affordable places (around $800/room).
The homes here are a strange mix of architectural styles. The central part of the neighborhood is shaped like a coliseum racetrack with a street that circles around the main neighborhood. These homes are not quite as well kept as in some of the neighborhoods to the north, but you do have some very cool homes here in the Mission style. You will find some Tudors and some gambrel roofed deals as well.

There are three turnabout cul-de-sacs in the neighborhood centered around small green spaces—not really big enough to function as parks or attractive enough to really add to the attractiveness of the neighborhood. They mostly just seem a little out of place to me.

There is also one home which has a second story front door, but no stairs leading up to it. (I assume it fell and was demolished?) All in all, a bit of an odd-ball of neighborhood in spots.

This is not really much of a neighborhood for singles nor does it have much nightlife. There is the mall and some restaurants and both City College and SFSU are nearby, but this neighborhood seems relatively unfazed by this, remaining a fairly ho-hum middle class residential neighborhood.
Pros
  • Close to the City College and SFSU
  • Away from the City Madness
  • Some Nice Homes
Cons
  • A Bit of a Mixed Bag in terms of Homes
  • Overpriced Rents
  • Unattractive Cul-de-Sacs
Recommended for
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"What Leonard Hath Wrought"

Sandwiched between the campuses of a state university on the left and a city college on the right, Ingleside Terrace would seem to be teeming with students. Both places of higher education (San Francisco State University and City College of San Francisco) bring a combined student body of tens of thousands to the area a day. Yet this place, though claiming a student resident here and there, is more a traditional neighborhood, with neatly maintained (and often grand-scale) single-family homes instead of dormitories and cramped apartments.

Ingleside Terrace has a history that belies its quiet, almost suburban aspect. These tranquil, upper-crusty blocks with wide, landscaped yards, palm trees, and grassy public spaces were once home to makeshift gambling operations, a shooting range, and a certain seedy element in the late 19th century. Then, the Pacific Coast Jockey Club opened the Ingleside Racetrack across the way from a well-frequented roadhouse and toned things up a bit with a fancy clubhouse and even a rail line to transport horserace enthusiasts to the site.

The new track was not all that successful (the dense fog that often visits the area in the summer obscured the action at inopportune moments), and after the owners attempted to bring other types of races to the track (including autos), they gave up and sold the place to a competitor in 1905. But the city’s other racetracks were declining at the time, and when the 1906 earthquake struck, the track was converted to a camp for quake and fire refugees and the clubhouse served as a temporary home to the residents of the Laguna Honda Hospital, which needed extensive repairs.

By 1910, sensing an opportunity, developer Joseph A. Leonard bought the racetrack and its surrounding land (for $2,500 an acre) and began building the neighborhood seen today—a community of broad streets, curved drives, grand entries off Ocean Avenue, and tastefully landscaped small parks with unique ornamental touches and landmarks. Urbano Drive itself follows the oval contours of the original racetrack, and the irregular-sized lots are in keeping with his vision of creating a semi-rural retreat in the midst of a growing metropolis.

Perhaps the most enduring reference to Leonard’s vision is Entrada Court, which is actually two streets leading at 45-degree angles to a circular drive, in the middle of which sits a massive sundial (which Leonard marketed with great fanfare), surrounded by curlicue walkways, benches, and low-profile trees, shrubs, and pedestals topped with plants. It imparts a stately, tasteful aspect to the western end of the old racetrack, a reminder to those who gaze upon it that time is indeed fleeting.

Leonard’s plan for the neighborhood is also evident in the styles of homes arrayed on the curved street plan. These pastel-hued domiciles—a Craftsman here, a Mission revival there, punctuated occasionally by a two-story Tuscan villa—comprise a vision of an early 20th century “residence park.” Many of the area’s homes follow this eclectic architectural pattern, giving it the feel of Southern California—or at least Monterey.

One pernicious effect of Leonard’s grand plan was the shutting out of minorities, especially African Americans. Then, in 1957, Cecil F. Poole, a black lawyer (and Harvard grad) arrived, the first non-Caucasian to buy a home in Ingleside Terrace—one of Leonard’s former residences to boot. Poole, president of the San Francisco Urban League and an assistant district attorney, would one day become a federal judge. Still, that did not spare him the indignity of having a cross burned on his front lawn. Despite such overt expressions of hate, Poole and his family remained in the neighborhood until the 1980s, by which time most barriers to home ownership based on race had been challenged, if not removed altogether.

Today the enclave’s population of 4,500 is more diverse than ever, if still somewhat dominated by whites (about 60 percent, according to U.S. Census figures). Asians have a strong presence (30 percent), and African Americans and those of two or more races make up the remaining 10 percent. The mostly upper-middle class residents (median annual household income is above $100,000) overwhelmingly own their homes (90 percent).

Shopping is along Ocean Avenue, with its array of service stores (dry cleaners, hair salons, nail parlors) along with an assortment of shops, from Ocean Cyclery and Golden Gate Wine Cellars to Aquatic Central (for rare aquarium fish) and the Comic Outpost (“We have issues” is the store’s slogan). A number of mom-and-pop cafes (King’s Coffee et al.), restaurants (like Emmy’s), and baked-goods stores (e.g., Zanze’s Cheesecake) also line Ocean Avenue as it curves gently around the neighborhood’s northeastern perimeter. Residents can also take advantage of the big department stores and specialty shops at the nearby Stonestown Mall on 19th Avenue.

The small neighborhood has no schools, private or public, within its bounds, although a number of options (Aptos Middle School, Mercy High School, Lick Wilmerding High) are nearby.

Public transportation is limited for the most part to the “K” streetcar line, which travels regularly along Ocean Avenue en route to the West Portal stations and downtown destinations beyond or to the Balboa Park station, where it connects with BART. Many residents here choose to drive, however, and with so many homes having garages, onstreet parking is never difficult, except near the neighborhood’s western edge, where competition for spaces increases with the daily influx of SFSU students. For this reason, the city’s Department of Parking and Traffic has issued the “H” residential parking permit, enabling those who live in those western blocks affected to park their cars longer than for two hours. The only other restrictions to parking on the street elsewhere are the weekly street-sweeping times and the usual (if rarely enforced) 72-hour limit on occupying any one spot.

There is not much crime here: an instance of vandalism or disturbing the peace, an occasional burglar, the rare assault or even sex crime. Vehicle theft and car break-ins are also infrequent, contradicting a trend that San Francisco police are increasingly at a loss to prevent in other neighborhoods. No murders have been reported in the last three years.

Real estate is predictably pricey, even as the neighborhood suffered one of the biggest drops (26 percent) in median sales price in the economic downturn, according to Trulia.com. A four-bedroom, two-bathroom single-family home recently listed for $1.2 million, while a two-bedroom, one-bathroom home was advertised at $860,000. Rentals, driven by the student market to a great degree, are reasonable: a small three-bedroom, one-bath in-law unit off Estero Avenue recently listed for $1,900 a month, while a three-bedroom, two-bath single-family home was asking $2,800 a month. In spite of the slide in the market, homes and apartments in Ingleside Terrace remain in demand, as more residents seek to “move up” to this earliest of San Francisco’s planned residential communities.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
tz3
tz3 Ingleside Terraces is the hottest real estate investment in San Francisco. It has numerous great restaurants, close to every freeway to Silicon Valley and San Francisco, huge front and backyards, but not yet built up like other neighborhoods in SF - hence you will not only make money simply buying SF real estate, but you will be getting into a neighborhood ready to skyrocket! It is adjacent to the sunset and forest hill neighborhoods - ranked the hottest 2016 neighborhoods. 2017/2018 will see Ingleside Terraces jump up even higher - get in!
Nov 25, 2016
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4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Great suburban-styled neighborhood"

Ingleside Terrace is a really nice neighborhood compared to its counterpart neighborhood, Ingleside Heights. You definitely get the suburban feel when you go through this neighborhood as the homes are quite grand, they are separated, nice green front lawns, and quite a spacious driveway. My aunt lives in this neighborhood and every time I would go to visit her, there would always be peace and quiet in this neighborhood, definitely very suburban-like. The people in this neighborhood are also very friendly, and every now and then you’ll see residents working on their front lawns, planting plants and such. However, the homes here aren’t as new or modern as you would think, I’m not sure how old these homes are, but they sure do look quite old, or at least that is the feeling I get from this neighborhood. If you look at a map you’ll notice that in the center of Ingleside Terrace is a neighborhood in the shape or a medicine pill. Quite the design isn’t it. There is also a big sundial in this neighborhood, although I have no idea how to read it, it’s always fun to come up to it and look at it. Living in Ingleside Terrace is great since you’re near the Stonestown Shopping Center as well as the various restaurants and shops on Ocean Avenue.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great Place to Raise Kids"

Ingleside Terraces is a quiet, homey, comfortable neighborhood, just south of Saint Francis Wood. Every house has a backyard (rare for san francisco), and the kids can go out and ride their bikes in the quiet street. It's also a huge plus being near Stonestown Shopping Center. It has a Trader Joes, McDonalds, Chevy's, Olive Garden, Macy's, Nordstrom, Footlocker, EB Games, and much, much more. The kids love it. It's also easy access to the K Ingleside Muni line, which can get you downtown very quickly. I can't imagine living anywhere else. Fabulous neighborhood.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
2yrs+

"Pleasant Suburban Area"

Near the somewhat crazy and confusing intersection of Ocean Ave, Junipero Serra Blvd, Portola and West Portal Avenue, Ingleside Terrace is another one of those south western San Francisco districts that boasts easy highway access and a less than urban feel. While it is not as grid like as the neighboring Merced Heights or the areas of the Sunset to the west of 19th, this area still has a suburban flavor to it.

On the northern edge (Ocean Ave), you'll be able to find some great shops and food and for people looking for easy access via the public transit system, you'll have the K line with all the transfers to/from it that are offered (half a dozen lines at least). That said, Ocean can be a slow road to drive on, so leave plenty of time when you're going anywhere by car.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
2yrs+

"Too much dead grass"

My first and last impressions of Ingleside Terrace is too much dead grass! Not sure if it is a water shortage thing or a yard is too big to water thing. Either way, the dead grass is a common thread in this community and can become an eye sore.

The homes are large but the area overall is a little run down. With a little restoration, a standard home could prove quite the investment as well taken care of homes sell quickly when priced right.

Ingleside Terrace does have a lot to offer in terms of eateries. You will want to hit Ocean Avenue for all the restaurants. Stonestown Galleria is nearby should you decide to shop in some great retail stores. You are also close enough to the ocean that you may hear the waves at night. An easy escape route out of Ingleside Terrace is along Junipero Serra, which will take you onto I-280 and to all points south in just a matter of minutes.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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Best Streets in Ingleside Terrace

1

Estero Ave

3/5
"A nice suburban vibe"
37.7234937574971 -122.470652350688
2

Holloway Ave

3/5
"Nice little residential street in Merced Heights"
37.7216640562456 -122.467012604047
3

Victoria St

3/5
"Typical street with houses"
37.7233208382443 -122.464538499771
4

Mercedes Way

2.5/5
"A Curvy Street"
37.727631273008 -122.470123300108
5

Pico Ave

2.5/5
"Pico Ave: Nice small street"
37.7242675008519 -122.46272600002

Unranked Streets in Ingleside Terrace

Alviso St

3.5/5
"Beautiful neighborhood near Stonestown"
37.7225752359602 -122.469388742915

Borica St

3.5/5
"Peaceful and beautiful street"
37.7238007036514 -122.467561866143

Cedro Ave

2.5/5
"Cedro Avenue - A beautiful neighborhood"
37.7269336371707 -122.468490924304

Cerritos Ave

3.5/5
"A peaceful neighborhood near Stonestown"
37.7263074839295 -122.468837845307

Corona St

2.5/5
"Beautiful suburban homes!"
37.7248745928607 -122.466260492526

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