7.3 out of 10

Duboce Triangle

Ranked 43rd best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.7675040423157 -122.431407050796
Great for
  • Public Transport
  • Internet Access
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Eating Out
Not great for
  • Parking
  • Cost of Living
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
2yrs+

"A Great Triangle"

Duboce Triangle is a little neighborhood just to the north of the Castro—it’s name, as is obvious from anyone who has seen it on a map, derives from it shape. Duboce Triangle is known as a pretty quiet neighborhood that is home to a medical center and that has certain amenities like a supermarket, and a very nice dog park at its heart.
The homes here are tightly packed Victorians for the most part. There is a Muni bus line that runs right by the park disappearing underground right by the Buena Vista Park (the other park in the area).

Here’s the round-up of Duboce:

Rents—Rents in Duboce Triangle vary a fair amount with some places dropping to $850 while others rise to as much $2600/room. On average most places average around $1700/room, low compared to the Castro just to the south or the Twin Peaks areas to the west.

Eateries—Not that you really need them with the Mission, Castro and the Haight so close, but there are also about half dozen inexpensive sandwich shops in the area.

Bars and Nightspots—Duboce is not really known for its nightspots but there are even a few of these here—a clutch of dive bars: Noc Noc, Toranado, and The Residence right by Market. Again, it doesn’t really need to have these given its location.

Supermarkets—And even though it has the luxury of a Safeway right in its borders, the neighborhood still doesn’t lack corner grocery stores—thus you could say it has the best of both worlds.

Crime—Despite its reputation for being a fairly quiet neighborhood, the crime rate is comparable to the Mission and the surrounding areas when population is taken into consideration. Given the fairly amount of homeless people in the area this should not come as much of a surprise to those who frequent the area.
Pros
  • relatively affordable
  • supermarket
  • Close to everything
  • dog heaven
Cons
  • crime
  • childcare
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5
2yrs+

"Beautiful suburban area"

When I discovered Duboce Triangle on a run one day, I was absolutely smitten. It's picturesque! This area seems like a very sweet and friendly neighborhood. There's a park named, what else, Duboce Park and it's very popular with dog owners. You can stop by and watch the dogs run around for awhile. It's a great place to enjoy the scenery.

The neighborhood isn't very big and I think that's what gives it a good vibe. It's sort of a quiet and quaint area located in one of hte greatest cities in the country.

Duboce Triangle is mostly residential. You aren't going to find a lot of crazy nightlife or great restaurants here. There is a cute cafe across from the park that draws the dog owners and coffee lovers in. If you do need to venture out to get your restaurant fix, then the Castro or Market Street are extremely close by.

One downside of the area is its price. Because this neighborhood is so prized and gorgeous, rents and housing prices are going to be above average (and San Francisco rents are already pretty high).
Pros
  • Duboce park
  • dog heaven
Cons
  • no restaurants
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Lower Haight: A ’Hood Unto Itself"

Just about the time everyone was rediscovering what an interesting neighborhood Haight-Ashbury is, somebody noticed that there was another ’hood to its east that had grown distinct from the original and, in fact, could justifiably be considered the “other” Haight. Although that moniker never stuck, “Lower Haight” did, and today it is an area with its own character, in many ways different (some might even go so far as to say better) than the original (sometimes known as Upper Haight). It’s a bit tidier and quieter, less touristy and more indicative of what a San Francisco neighborhood is like than its progenitor on the other side of Buena Vista hill, but with its own urban grit and maverick culture that make it stand out from the increasingly gentrified neighborhoods around it.

And just as it was peeling off from Upper Haight, it was also coming to terms with its connections to Hayes Valley. For many years, Lower Haight had to contend with the crime and drug activity associated with the numerous housing projects on its borders. Though much of that problem has cleared with rebuilt public housing and increased police and resident vigilance, the area remains a sort of crime filter, with small-time drug dealing and theft along its borders as well as residual activity from what’s left of the once-dominant gangs. Physical boundaries are also an issue: Whereas the dividing line between Upper and Lower Haight is generally considered to be Divisadero, the point where Lower Haight ends and Hayes Valley begins has been difficult to define. Some say Webster Street, others Laguna (Waller and Fell streets are the generally accepted south and north boundaries, respectively). Still others say Lower Haight extends all the way to Octavia Boulevard, the highly successful reconfiguration of the surface street that ran under the late and little-lamented Central Freeway. The latter would put not only the U.S. Mint but also the recently built LGBT Community Center within the neighborhood limits (something much of its diverse population would likely approve).

Lower Haight has the advantage among a very few of San Francisco’s neighborhoods of harboring a number of historic buildings from the 19th century spared not just the great quake and subsequent fire of 1906, but also the mutilation that many architectural survivors faced as they were updated or “renovated.” Indeed, a number of notable Victorian buildings, many in the ornate Italianate or later Stick styles popular at the time, line the streets, some of them intact as single-family residences. For a fine example, see the Nightingale House at the corner of Waller and Buchanan; this landmark home was built using Stick, Eastlake, and Chalet ornamentation in 1882 for the president of the California Pioneers, who arrived in San Francisco during the Gold Rush. Numerous others sit shoulder to shoulder on Page between Fillmore and Webster, including the Daniel Einstein home (584 Page), another landmark with an impressive turret. Germania, a narrow, leafy side-street between Webster and Steiner, has an array of modest cottages and two-story houses that, if lacking a cascade of architectural marvels, make a charming splash of their own.

The neighborhood also offers a number of streets of little or no incline between the hills that rise from downtown and South of Market to Golden Gate Park and the neighborhoods near the ocean, and for this reason is a favorite among bicyclists, who have christened a mile-long stretch through the area “The Wiggle” for its zigzag (though flat) route bypassing steep hills.

Who lives here? According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, it’s a fairly diversified population of 15,000 or so made up of 65 percent white, 15 percent black, and the remaining 20 percent divided among Asians, American Indians, and people of two or more races. (About 8 percent of all races identify as Latino or Hispanic.) They are young (median age: 32), educated (65% have a bachelor’s degree or higher), and more or less economically well off (with a median household income of about $60,000 a year). About three-quarters rent their living spaces, with the remaining quarter owning their homes.

Though each street corner seems to have a laundromat or coffeehouse, most businesses and restaurants cluster along Haight Street, particularly in the four blocks between Webster and Pierce. Here is where you’ll find a Walgreeens, a natural foods store, a meat-and-fish market, a few used-and-new record stores (check out Rooky Ricardo’s for its collection of old soul, jazz, gospel, and reggae LPs and a thousands of vintage 45s), a couple of smoke shops, a number of bars (including Toronado, famous for its dozens of beers on tap, and Mad Dog in the Fog, a hub for soccer and rugby fans with its satellite TV), and eateries both ethnic (Indian, Thai, Japanese, French, Mexican, German [Rosamunde Sausage Grill], Ethiopian, and Mideastern) and all-American (Kate’s Kitchen, Memphis Minnie’s Bar-B-Que, Mystic Pizza, and Burger Joint). The street’s also known for its eclectic salons and barbershops, from the Wak Shack Salon and Edo’s to Aquarius Barbershop.

One sore spot amid all of the humming commercial life of late has been the cropping up of medical-marijuana dispensaries; though the city’s planning department sees no link between these storefronts and crime, some merchants object to the fact that “clients” often resell the cannabis on the street, attracting a criminal element.

Perhaps the densely populated area and its popular restaurants and shops explain why parking can be difficult, particularly midday. Most who live south of Haight Street get the “S” residential parking permit, allowing them to disregard the two-hour parking limits.

The neighborhood has a strong tradition of creative graffiti; the sides of many buildings, especially along Haight, feature fancifully executed, multicolored works (some of which, like the one inhabited by odd creatures on the corner of Haight and Steiner, appear to be commissioned murals). But, despite the fact that there are also a few galleries here showcasing street art, the scourge of impromptu graffiti (the sort of “spray-painting” that defaces facades and irks property owners) is also making ugly inroads on the neighborhood’s homes and storefronts.

Though the area is not known as a particularly kid-friendly place, one public school serves youth in the area, John Muir Elementary (on Webster and Oak), which got a 1 out of 10 rating from GreatSchools. A brighter spot is the Harvey Milk Recreational Arts Center, at the west end of Duboce Park (an expanse of lawn bordering the Lower Haight’s southern end), which hosts the San Francisco Park Department’s drama, dance, and music divisions and photography center, offering classes in ethnic-jazz, tap, hula, and ballroom dance; voice and piano; and aerobics. It is home to the Young People’s Teen Musical Theater, the San Francisco Adult Free Civic Theater and the Midnight Music Program.

The area has four major bus lines: the Nos. 6 and 71, which travel back and forth on Haight, and the Nos. 22 and 24, which go mostly north/south on Fillmore and Divisadero, respectively. The “N” streetcar, which emerges from underground near the neighborhood’s southern boundary (behind the Safeway on Market), is popular for commuters with jobs downtown or for those seeking a fairly fast way to get to Ocean Beach. The neighborhood is also a few blocks away from all of MUNI’s subway lines at Church and Market.

The legacy of numerous, nearby rundown housing projects (which have been either razed, rebuilt, or replaced by low-income housing) gives the area a perhaps undeserved reputation as a hotbed for crime. This may still be true in terms of assaults, robberies, and burglaries, which are higher here than elsewhere. And vehicle theft and car break-ins have become common in the area (following a citywide trend). Noise nuisances and vandalism are, as ever, a problem. Otherwise, things have calmed down a lot in the last few years, with only two homicides in the last three years (both committed in 2007).

As for real estate, the neighborhood has rebounded from the recent economic downturn, showing only a slight decline (1.5 percent) in median sales price in the last year, and a significant increase in the last months. Many recent sales have been for condos or flats in multi-unit buildings; these are going from $420,000 to $900,000, depending on number of bedrooms as well as location. Detached, single-family homes (where available) are going from $900,000 to $1.4 million. Rentals, likewise, have been fairly solid for the last year, with studios (if you can find one) starting at $800 and up, one bedrooms going for $1,500 and up, and two- and three-bedrooms going for $2,000 and up—all depending on location and amenities.

Back in 1997, the San Francisco Chronicle referred to Lower Haight as “grungey, post-punk bohemian.” A lot has changed in the last decade, notably the grunge and the post-punk. It’s still not clean, per se, but considerably less trashy and a lot more grown-up, with serious young professionals occupying the apartments and residences and frequenting the trendy restaurants and bars. The bohemian side still exists, though perhaps on an older, wiser level. Just look at the prices for some of the artwork in the area’s galleries, and you’ll see that these are bohemians who have caught on to capitalism, big time.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"A convergence of public transportation"

Duboce Triangle is a neighborhood I’m very familiar with, mostly around the N-MUNI stops, Safeway area, and around Market Street. Duboce Triangle houses one of the MUNI train centers as several lines converge in the northeastern area of Duboce Triangle. On Duboce Avenue you have the N-train coming towards Safeway and eventually going underground into the tunnels. On Church Street you have the J-train. And on Market Street you have the F-train. There is always an abundant amount of public transportation commuters in this area of the Duboce Triangle, so I would definitely try and not find a place to live here at. Not only that, but also the large number of homeless people in the vicinity, mostly because of the recycling center right next to Safeway that attracts many homeless people who gather recyclable material. Although recycling is not a bad thing, the homeless people is what tends to make people take a step back. There is a little back alley that runs along the whole Safeway complex and the entrance for the N-train where many bikers go through every day. There are even cops at times, mostly to control the homeless. When I first went through this area, it was pretty sketchy for me, but it straightens out as you go through the neighborhood more.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Offering plenty of sun and entertainment"

Duboce Triangle is another San Francisco neighborhood with great Victorian homes. The actual neighborhood itself is shaped like a triangle if you see it on a map, hence, the name. You are directly south of Alamo Square and North of the Castro. Duboce Triangle is bordered by Castro Street to the West, and Duboce Ave to the North. Market Street forms the diagonal line on the triangle.

The neighborhood has a lot of great entertainment options, yet it also remains pretty quiet. Duboce Triangle is a great neighborhood for dog lovers and dog owners. The Victorian homes are really pretty, and there seems to be a good amount of park space. In fact, you will see plenty of happy dogs running around these parks.

If you live in this part of town, you will find yourself going to the Castro a great deal for your entertainment and dining. You are also a pretty close walk to Buena Vista Park. For some reason, this neck of the woods is considered to be one of the sunniest areas of San Francisco. So in Duboce Triangle, you will be certain to get all your Vitamin D!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Life inside a triangle isn't all that bad!"

Duboce is a quirky neighborhood with many convenient features. In the tip of the triangle are tucked away heavenly tree-lined streets like Henry, Belcher and 15th with well-kept Victorian flats and single-family homes. Noe Street begins in the Duboce Triangle. This lesser-known stretch of Noe is beloved by its residents and many have created little street gardens with public benches along the street’s ample sidewalks. There is also a lovely coffee house, a sushi restaurant and a very romantic and tiny French restaurant named L’ardoise.

Near Market Street the Duboce neighborhood becomes more funky and run-down but you can’t beat the location! It’s close to the Market Street transportation hub and MUNI K, L , M and J lines run directly through the neighborhood. The “wiggle” a well-known and well-used bike route runs directly through Duboce, right alongside charming Duboce Park or “Dog Park”. Over the last few years there has been a tug-of-war going on between the two camps of those who want parks for humans and those who want parks for dogs. The neighborhood seems to have struck a great compromise, and a well-designed low-hanging chain fence now delineates a dog section where dogs of all sizes and breeds frolic in the green grass and drink water out of their very own doggie drinking fountain. The upper section of the park is reserved for humans only, complete with a playground and the newly renovated Harvey Milk Community Center. Duboce Triangle is also home to Golden Produce—the BEST independent grocer in San Francisco.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
2yrs+

"Centrally Located to Everything!"

Duboce Triangle is a public transit riders heaven. With all the major train lines stopping in this area either at Duboce and Church or 14th and Market, getting from here to other places in the city is a breeze. If you're driving, however, this area is somewhat challenging for parking so it makes good sense to take the MUNI when you can.

You can enjoy the small but lovely Duboce Park on the north edge of this area, the cute coffee shops on Noe, the bars on 14th, the comforts of "Home" at the restaurant on Market and Church and my favorite place to go in this area: The fruit and veggie market between 14th and Duboce on Church where you'll find the best prices on produce.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
2yrs+

"Ecclectic and unique in every way"

The F streetcar will get you to Duboce Triangle or the Art Deco Ghetto and once you arrive...enjoy! Deco Ghetto has lots of local flavor and is continuing to grow right before our eyes.

Sights around the neighborhood include Black Hearts Tattoos, a landmark San Francisco drinking hole/tattoo parlor. Also around the area you will find many art deco shops and antique stores.

Nightlife includes the CAV Wine Bar and Kitchen - a casual wine bar that offers plates of game hen, Martuni's - 80s tongue in cheek classy and spacious bar, and many more.

Be sure to stop by Ceasar's Cafe on Valencia Street for coffee and sweet homemade crepes. They also have live music every Saturday night.

Reasonably easy to find parking includes a garage on Mission Street as well as metered parking on Market and most side streets.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees

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Best Streets in Duboce Triangle

1

Duboce Ave

4/5
"Beautiful Classics and a View from the Park"
37.7694170901501 -122.429744024722

Unranked Streets in Duboce Triangle

Belcher St

2.5/5
"Belcher is a street of residences and 1 church as well"
37.7685270000266 -122.430163999012

Henry St

2.5/5
"Narrow street near parks"
37.7666620138062 -122.43333133638

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