8.0 out of 10

Cow Hollow

Ranked 20th best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.79809330827 -122.437348698999
Great for
  • Eating Out
  • Pest Free
  • Nightlife
  • Shopping Options
  • Gym & Fitness
Not great for
  • Parking
  • Cost of Living
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian

Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great place to live"

Pros
  • great bars
  • great restaurants
  • great apartments
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Crowded
  • Loud
  • Stroller brigade
  • Terrible Parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Good shopping/eating, not for living"

Cow Hollow is pretty similar to the Marina, except it's not on the water. The residents are mostly young, professional people. This is not really a neighborhood for families if that's what you're looking for. Additionally, you're going to have to pay more to live in this prized area. One bedroom apartments are probably going to cost $2300+ in rent. The high prices are what you pay to live close to all the bars and restaurants that are nearby.

The shopping and restaurants are great in this neighborhood. I especially love Union Street where most of the shops are located. My favorite restaurant, which I heavily recommend, is Betelnut. They serve upscale Chinese food and great drinks. It will be a little bit pricey though (the theme of the area).

If you are looking for a quiet neighborhood, then this isn't the place. On Thursday through Saturday nights, you'll find hoards of young people crowding the street. Hoards of young DRUNK people. I once saw a girl throwing up all over the street here.
Pros
  • great restaurants
  • great bars
Cons
  • Loud
  • Crowded
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
2yrs+

"Expensive and trendy"

Cow Hollow is a peaceful environment filled with yuppies and young families. It is a leafy, well-maintained neighborhood made up of preserved Edwardian and Victorian houses. The residents are mainly upper to middle class with houses running in a few million dollars. For those renting, studio apartments are on the upswing and can run you a pretty penny. Cow Hollow also carries over some of its charm from neighborhood communities including the Marina to the north.

Mostly, the neighborhood is rather quiet with the exception of the Union Street’s commercial drag. The area is a shopper’s dream, comprised of fashion boutiques, cafes, motels, beauty spas, antique stores and other designer shops. At night, Union Street is buzzing with nightlife. It offers plenty of fine dining restaurants, trendy dive bars and expensive wine taverns. Bar None is one of the more fashion forward sports bars in the area, where yuppies come to play beer pong and chat with other yuppies.

During June, the district shuts down a couple blocks to host Union Street Fair. Bunches of local merchants come to sell their paintings, crafts and ornamentation. The event also serves an array of ethnic cuisines and offers plenty of live music. However, over the last couple of years, the fair has decreased in size due to the economic downturn.

For public transit needs, the 41 and 45 traverses Union Street and then heads down south to downtown San Francisco. For those who own their cars (which many do), street parking is rather abundant.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Holy Cow!"

If you’re from outside of SF, you don’t hear much about Cow Hollow. It doesn’t have the Palace of Fine Arts like the Marina District to the north and it isn’t really a family neighborhood like Pacific Heights to the south. It hasn’t had movies named after it like the Presidio on the west (or Pacific Heights too). And it isn’t quite the destination for weekend partiers from the burbs that North Beach on the east is. As a matter of fact, if you live just across the Bay Bridge or down in San Jose, you could live here for years without ever even hearing about Cow Hollow. It is pretty much a SF enigma.

Those who know SF well, however, know this neighborhood as the place where young professionals who are either single or just married and maybe with a kid on the way live before moving up the hill to Pacific Heights. You might think of this area as the minor leagues for the Pacific Height Pros if that makes any sense. The differences have to do with age in part. The typical Cow Hollow resident is a bit younger than the typical Pacific Heights resident.
Pros
  • great apartments
  • great bars
  • great restaurants
Cons
  • Terrible Parking
  • Crowded
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
2yrs+

"Cool but pricey neighborhood"

I don't think many people outside of California have ever heard of Cow Hollow, but it is one of the more popular neighborhoods in San Francisco. It kind of reminds me of Park Slope in Brooklyn -- well, ok, except for the general building aesthetic and the fact that one is on a hill with an ocean view and tons of green and the other is in . . . Brooklyn. But, they really are quite similar in energy and demographic. Cow Hollow is like the young person's version of Pacific Heights. It's where the younger sect of people with high income live when they are somewhere around newlywed age. I would say the median age is 33. There are a lot of cool restaurants, bars, cafes and shops (the shops are pretty much all on Union Street). And, because of the cool factor, there is a younger, hip crowd with a lot of energy that seems to be mixed in with an awful lot of strollers. I feel like this area is part hip and part yuppy.
The buildings are beautiful and there are tons of parks nearby and there really is a lot to do. So, if you can get over the yuppies or the stroller brigade (or, if you are one of the aforementioned) then this is a pretty ideal neighborhood. It's really quaint, has great views and a definite energy. The only thing I can't get over is the price discrepancy between renting and owning a home in this neighborhood. I recently read that the price of renting a one bedroom apartment in Cow Hollow can be as much as $2500 / month (as a California - New York resident, I don't find that to be outrageous). But, buying a place in Cow Hollow costs around $2 million to start. Huh? That seems kind of insane. So, I guess what I'm saying is that this is a great neighborhood to live in as long as you don't ever plan on actually owning your home.
Pros
  • great bars
  • great restaurants
  • great apartments
Cons
  • Stroller brigade
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great neighborhood with a lively spirit"

Cow Hollow is one of the ideal neighborhoods to live at in San Francisco. However, mostly for those who have a big enough paycheck to spend for the living costs here. I’d say that Cow Hollow is mostly for those who are of the younger generation with a good job who also want to raise a family in a quiet area. I’ve done some private work here in Cow Hollow before for someone, and through that experience I’ve seen that there are a good number of singles living here as well. Although raising a family in Cow Hollow is the ideal place and definitely a great place to, there are few places to take the kids out. There are few parks, during my working time in Cow Hollow I rarely saw of any recreational areas. Shopping and eating here in Cow Hollow is aplenty. I’ve been to a several restaurants such as Kara’s Cupcakes, Mel’s Drive-In, and a Thai restaurant (that I forget the name of, forgive me). Great food and definitely a great neighborhood to enjoy the food in. Lombard Street also runs through Cow Hollow, although the steep curvy hills of Lombard Street are not in this neighborhood, though you’ll eventually reach them as you travel down Lombard Street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"From Cloven Hooves to Well-Heeled"

In many respects, Cow Hollow mirrors its counterpart to the north, the Marina District. It’s a gathering spot for the young and well-heeled, with a chic shopping street (Union) paralleling rowdy, dowdy Lombard a few blocks away, in the way Chestnut in the Marina does. But Cow Hollow differs in that it has hills, older homes, and a whiff of old money that the Marina’s air of nouveau riche lacks.

The name is historic, one of those monikers that seems more a misnomer in modern times. But at one point in its history, Cow Hollow did indeed have cows. In the mid-1800s, the area’s springs (earlier on, the place was called Spring Valley) pooled into a small lake, and the surrounding grassy meadows served as pasture for dairy herds that supplied the city’s population. By the 1890s, however, the push outward from central San Francisco, especially by well-to-do merchants, politicians, and influential citizens, had transformed the locale into a prime residential area. The cows were banished in 1891, and some of the neighborhood’s more spectacular Victorian homes filled in the fields. Union Street, once a dirt trail leading to the Presidio, became a paved main road through the area and has, since the resurgence of the district in the 1950s and ’60s, served as a prime shopping and restaurant corridor.

The great quake of 1906 spared many of Cow Hollow’s homes and landmarks: the Vedanta Temple (at Webster and Filbert streets), an extravagance of domed turrets and arched galleries, was built in 1905 and is said to be the first Hindu temple in the Western Hemisphere; St. Mary the Virgin Episcopal Church (at Union and Steiner streets) where one of the original Cow Hollow springs still flows in the Eternal Fountain; Octagon House (at Gough and Union streets), built in 1861 and one of two such houses remaining in San Francisco (the other in Russian Hill), was acquired and restored in the 1950s by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in California and is today a museum whose unusual collections include decorative arts and furnishings from America’s colonial and federal periods as well as documents from early colonial history, notably the signatures of 54 of the original 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence; and the Sherman House (on Green near Fillmore), among the best examples of San Francisco’s vanishing Italianate Victorians.

Today, Cow Hollow is an area of well-maintained, often opulently restored homes and small apartment houses. U.S. Census Bureau figures show the neighborhood to be overwhelmingly white (86 percent), with a small minority of Asians (9 percent) and other racial groups. Young singles have been attracted to the neighborhood for many years, and many have stayed as they have found mates and begun raising families (the sidewalks outside Union Street cafes are often choked with tandem strollers and toddler-toting parents). Almost everyone here is educated (with more than 75 percent having a bachelor’s degree or better), young-ish (56 percent are between 25 and 44 years old), and financially comfortable (median household income is $150,000), though three-fourths of all residents rent, rather than own, their homes.

Though the boundaries of Cow Hollow are not particularly well defined (and depend on who is doing the defining), Union Street is universally considered both the main commercial drag as well as the dividing line between Cow Hollow’s more upper-crust (and steeper) southern half and its less affluent (flatter, though still trendy) northern half. It is among San Francisco’s more boutique-heavy blocks, with a dizzying assortment of clothing shops (including Armani Exchange, Bebe, Lululemon Athletica, et al.), numerous restaurants and cafes, a number of well-known watering holes (including Perry’s, which longtime owner Perry Butler has nurtured since 1969 as an upscale neighborhood bar, and Bus Stop Saloon, a quintessential sports bar), and several fitness centers. Although the Metro Theatre, built in 1924 and a visual landmark on Union (between Webster and Buchanan streets), has been shuttered as a cinema, it is slated for renovation as a fitness center and its owners plan to keep the marquee and many interior details, including the historic murals. Meters regulate parking on and around busy Union Street; elsewhere, residents get a “K” parking permit and occupy their on-street spaces (when they can be found) religiously.

Filbert Street also has a number of eateries and watering holes, along with a Real Food market, known for its organic produce and gourmet food items. Along with Greenwich Street, it has most of the area’s late 20th-century buildings, blocky apartment units or small single-family houses that look as if they might have been airlifted here from Daly City. This rather treeless, boxy section of Cow Hollow is redeemed somewhat by the presence of two side streets that run three blocks each (between Steiner and Buchanan)—Pixley and Moulton. Along with the charming Charlton Court (off Union between Buchanan and Laguna), these little streets resemble alleys, really: leafy, low-scale, quaint and quiet refuges from the bustle of the surrounding area.

Lombard Street, considered the northern limit of Cow Hollow, is a main off-ramp from the Golden Gate Bridge. With its collection of hotels, motels, fast-food eateries or more established restaurants, along with gas stations, cleaners, and a post office, it provides the neighborhood with services but little visual or esthetic appeal.

As for green spaces in the area, the tiny, picket-fenced Allyne Park on Green Street (behind the Octagon House) is the only park contained entirely within Cow Hollow. But the neighborhood adjoins the hundreds of acres of green space offered by the Presidio directly to the west. The Lyon Street steps, descending from Pacific Heights, also afford residents some topiary and great views of the bay and surrounding city going up or coming down its two-block stairway.

The Cow Hollow Association strives to “protect and preserve the residential character of one of San Francisco's distinctive neighborhoods,” according to its mission statement. In the last decade, that has meant serving as a watchdog over such projects as the Letterman Digital Arts Center and other projects in the adjacent Presidio as well as the realignment of Doyle Drive as it concerns traffic flow in and out of the area. The association has also raised concerns that the inns and motels along Lombard not be redeveloped in such a way as to negatively affect the neighborhood’s character.

Cow Hollow has two sizable grade schools: St. Vincent de Paul (private, K-8, Catholic) and Sherman Elementary School (public, K-5; it got a 9 out of 10 rating by GreatSchools). Tule Elk Park Child Development Center, on Greenwich at Webster, is run by the San Francisco Unified School District and offers preschool kids an art- and recreation-centered program, with an award-winning garden playground. Older children from the area often attend one of the reputation-driven elementary/middle and high schools just up the hill in Pacific Heights.

Public transportation options are good for Cow Hollow residents, especially those who don’t mind commuting via bus to jobs downtown or in the Financial District. The 41 and 45 buses traverse Union Street and then connect to Columbus Avenue for quick trips to Union Square (45) or Embarcadero Center (41). The 22 bus makes its way north and south mostly along Fillmore Street from the Mission District to Marina Green on the bay. And the 76 joins Golden Gate Transit buses going up and down Lombard and then Van Ness for treks to Civic Center.

Most crimes are clustered along main commercial streets like Union and Lombard, where San Francisco Police Department figures show that disturbing the peace and vandalism are fairly common, with occasional burglaries and robberies in a recent three-month period. Assaults, especially along bar-heavy Union Street, occur about once a week, though no homicides have been committed in the last three years.

To live here obviously requires money: single-family homes south of Union Street range from $2.5 million for a modest two-bedroom, two-bath to $4 million-plus for a Spanish colonial four-bedroom, 4-bathroom mini-mansion on an inclined street with views of the bay. Condos (one bed/one bath, and generally in buildings north of Union and near Van Ness or Lombard) go for considerably less, in the $500,000 to $800,000 range. Rentals are comparably pricey: studios go for $1,300 a month, with one-bedroom apartments fetching up to $2,500 and two-bedrooms going for $3,200 and up. True, it’s a lot to pay to rent a roof over one’s head, but given the neighborhood’s amenities, it’s unlikely many people spend much time at home.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Cow Hollow - Great peaceful place to live with nice neighbors"

I grew up in Cow Hollow it's a very nice and peaceful neighborhood.The neighbors are great and they usually mind their own business.It's a great environment for families with kids.Cow Hollow School preschool is excellent and offers parent participation.I personally like to get involved with my child's education.There are a lot of fun activity's you can do here in your spare time.We have nice restaurants,stores,boutiques and wellness centers and spa's.Allyne Park is a nice place to just sit and relax in the middle of all the rush.I couldn't imagine living anywhere else!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"You will be really happy in this neighborhood if you have expendable income!"

Cow Hollow is near Pacific Heights and the Marina. The area is home to many yuppies. If you feel you are “young,” “urban and “professional,” you will feel at home. In other words, this is a pricey neighborhood, and it is going to cost money to buy or rent. However, if you have the dough, Cow Hollow has a lot to offer.

Of course, Cow Hollow includes Union Street, which has a wide variety of great stores and spots for libations. There are also some amazing restaurants slightly North near Lombard Street. For example, I went to the Plant Café Organic, which is right between Marina and Cow Hollow. There are some great creative vegan dishes. The veggie burger, in particular, is highly recommended. The Plant Café has some great vegan dessert offerings too.

So what puts the “cow’ in Cow Hollow? In the 1800’s, this part of town was full of cows for dairy. There were over 30 cow farms! Also the vegetable gardens in Cow Hollow used to provide a lot of the fresh produce for the city. Seeing Cow Hollow now, it is hard to imagine those days of the past. As a vegan, I have to admit I feel a little guilty wandering around this part of town!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Nice work if you can get it!"

Cow Hollow is a clean, quiet, well-manicured neighborhood. If you can afford the rent, Cow Hollow is an ideal place to live. Parking is plentiful, especially near the Presidio on Lyon. Public transportation is very good in this area and hardly anybody uses it so the busses are clean, quiet and run on time. Union Street is posh and elegant, yet lacks some of the pretension found in Pacific Heights or Russian Hill. The neighborhood is full of wonderful restaurants like the Rose Café and Liverpool Lil’s. There are several cozy neighborhood bars like Moana Loa, and I’ve never seen such a concentration of so many high-quality dry cleaners/laundry businesses! In Cow Hollow fresh breezes blow directly off the ocean through eucalyptus groves so the air is very refreshing. And at night, most of Cow Hollow is as peaceful as a small rural town—with the exception of stretches on Union Street when the bars let out.

From Cow Hollow you can embark on several wonderful walks or bike rides with ease. For a rigorous workout, many people march or run up and down the daunting Lyon Street steps, taking in a splendid view of the North side of the Bay. You are also a hop away from the Presidio, a National Monument and Historic Landmark that is brimming with foot trails and bike paths. On the edge of the Presidio filmmaker George Lucas has built the Lucasfilm Letterman Digital Arts Center that contains a beautiful native plants garden for the public to enjoy. This is the perfect place to lie in the grass and read a book. There is also a great walk though the Palace of Fine Arts and over to Crissy Field, a bayside bike path/footpath that can be followed all the way to Fort Point and the Golden Gate Bridge.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Cute neighborhood, good for young professionals"

Cow Hollow is a lesser-known area of San Francisco, but it is a great neighborhood to explore. There are lots of boutiques and restaurants, where you can have everything from espresso to sushi, but it is not as saturated as some of the more touristy areas of the city. The Presidio is nearby and although there is some traffic, it is not too bad. It is a good neighborhood to live in and take advantage of all the cute businesses and restaurants. Overall, it is a good neighborhood for pampering yourself at a spa or just strolling and taking in the ambience of this corner of the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"A nice place to live"

Cow Hollow is a rather nice and affluent neighborhood in San Francisco. Its located near the extremely affluent neighborhood of Russian Hill and is also relatively close to the bay. The area is rather residential but there are lots of hotels, inns, and motels in the area. It features many large old homes and lots of older flats and apartments. The major area of interest is around Union Street which has great shopping and lots of spas. There are also several good restaurants such as Brazen Head and Liverpool Lil's.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
2yrs+

"The Late Night IHop"

If you're looking for pancakes late at night and just can't be without, check out the iHop on Lombard Street down in Cow Hollow. There are lots of little hotels and motels over there, some of which you can even get a good rate at (nothing like Union Square hotels).

An absolutely site to behold is the Palace of Fine Arts Dome which is up where Richardson meets Lyon. It's amazing -- the architecture and beauty of it. If you're lucky, you'll catch some fire dancing there. Right next door is the Exploratorium -- a great place to take kids for some exposure to cool science experiments.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
2yrs+

"No more dairy farms"

Cow Hollow was originally named after the old dairy farms of the 1800s, but all you will find now in this suburban like neighborhood are grand homes, Edwardian flats, and Victorian style apartments. There is a pleasant mix of the young and old but commonly wealthy, and they all frequent the shops on Union Street.

Shops like Blue Jeans Bar, Uko, and Stuart Moore will require your padded wallet, and if you are in the market for great cosmetics, take a gander at Sephora and MAC. Every year in June there is an amazing Eco-Urban Festival along Union Street. 2009 will mark the city's 33rd year that the festival has been running.

The local secret for eating great is Brazen Head. Dark, quaint, and serving up classic pepper steak and french onion soup.

Cow Hollow is also known for its nightlife and bars. Classic destinations include: Bar None, the HiFi Lounge (great place to dance), and Blue Light.

Cow Hollow offers so much that it is no surprise that it is one of the most sought after neighborhoods in the Bay Area.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Travelling to Cow Hollow?

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Best Streets in Cow Hollow

1

Union St

4/5
"Washington Park and Nice Pads"
37.797217583846 -122.434478741918
2

Pixley St

3/5
"Great proximity to restaurants, bars and shops"
37.7985915136442 -122.434952257842
3

Laguna St

3/5
"Charming just to drive along."
37.7990274288517 -122.430823852618

Unranked Streets in Cow Hollow

Fillmore St

4.5/5
"The Matrix, Million Dollar Condo and Much More!"
37.7988338834663 -122.435843272445

Harris Pl

2.5/5
"Harris St: Split "
37.7990805011865 -122.430292500481

Miley St

3.5/5
"nice area but not a picturesque street"
37.7972670004604 -122.44536150019

Moulton St

3.5/5
"another street that should be an alley"
37.7995232643008 -122.435141007288

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