BonnyHeather

  • Local Expert 2,316 points
  • Reviews 17
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
Just now

"As trendy as it gets - deservedly"

West Highland, along with Highland to the east, is now one of the most in-demand neighborhoods in the city. The wonderful thing about it is the way that the old neighborhoods have been restored instead of razed and filled with new construction. The homes here often date back 100 years or more, and no one wants to knock them down. Instead, they are being carefully brought back to life. Of course, that comes with a price, and home values here are extremely high.

Businesses here are run with the same loving care as the home restoration. In fact, many new businesses have opened out of the same kind of old homes that people are living in. Others are in buildings that have always been commercial, and tend to be old brick shops or garages converted to stores. These independent stores and restaurants are full of character. The restaurants here are the best in the city, but they are run with a casual vibe and without five-star prices.

I would move here in a second, except I can't afford it. Instead, I visit regularly, along with many other locals, to window-shop and try new restaurants. If you can afford to live here, you won't be disappointed.
Pros
  • some of the city's best small restaurants and stores
  • historic character
Cons
  • peak housing market
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Hit or miss--could pay off big"

When locals think about West Colfax, their first instinct is sometimes to steer clear. Driving down West Colfax itself (the street, that is) won't help. This is one of the rough spots here. But it is also adjacent to Sloan Lake on the north, with the wildly popular Highland area beyond. So at least in part, the West Colfax neighborhood is up and coming, and some of it might be considered "arrived".

Areas further south are still a tough proposition. Long an area for crime and violence, it is still struggling to recover. This spot had not quite seen the influence of the northerly revitalized areas before the housing market crashed, and the already-poor area was hit hard. Housing values here fell again last year. However, this is still a promising neighborhood, so those who are house-hunting with an eye toward investment should consider this area.

This spot's closest retail and eatery district is Federal Blvd, which has long been a good strip for delicious but inexpensive food, especially if you like Mexican or Asian options. Colfax is also a business strip, but many stretches are run-down and unsafe.

There are nice homes here that just need a bit of work. This area isn't quite as handy to downtown as the spots to the east, but it's a short commute by car. If you are interested in moving here, look carefully and start with the north side. Many families live in West Denver and enjoy it once their own experience has been set against West Denver's bad reputation.
Pros
  • Low housing cost
  • Adjacent to revitalized areas
  • Great restaurants
Cons
  • High crime areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Mix of retail and housing that runs the gamut"

If you mention "Washington Virginia Vale" to a local, don't count on most people knowing what you're talking about. Glendale and "east of Glendale" will be a better description. I moved into the southwest corner of this neighborhood when I got my first apartment. Although I moved away from the neighborhood long ago, this is still an area I visit for shopping. Actually, most city dwellers head here when they need to go to Super Target. This spot has some major chain stores along Colorado. Busy Leetsdale Drive has a mix of grocery stores, convenience stores, offices, and smaller shops and restaurants.

The Glendale section of the neighborhood has, in addition to all of the retail, some of the cheapest rental units in the city. While it's not exactly low-income housing, it is such a warren of large complexes that this spot has a particular feel all its own. I couldn't handle living here again, because it lacks the character of my favorite parts of town. The apartment complex area reminds me of what might happen if you took a bunch of trailer parks and stacked the trailers on top of each other instead of giving each its own plot. I dislike this sort of complex--it reminds me of rat cages stacked in a lab.

East of Glendale, there are nicer single-family homes. Cherry Creek Drive offers green spaces, paths, and a quick route to Cherry Creek, and downtown beyond. There isn't really anything remarkable to recommend this neighborhood, except possibly Four Mile house and its park. But it is safe and affordable, and many people make their homes here.
Pros
  • Lots of stores and restaurants
  • Low housing costs
Cons
  • Heavy car traffic on main roads/commercial areas
  • Some pockets of sad-looking buildings
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
Just now

"Perennially popular upscale neighborhood"

Washington Park, while close to Cherry Creek and downtown, feels much farther away than it actually is. This is a quiet residential neighborhood with very high-end homes. The only crowds here are not the noisy, partying crowds of neighborhoods to the north, but the swarms of people who spend time in Washington Park green spaces. This park is beautiful and wildly popular. The people who spend time here come not only from the immediately surrounding neighborhoods, but from other parts of Denver as well.

The park is laid out to mimic the gardens of George Washington's stately home. The large planted areas are in bloom every summer, amid lakes, large swaths of green, and the paths that wind through it. It's a popular spot for picnics, jogging, you name it. Annual events like Furry Scurry (a sort of doggie marathon held each May) further boost the foot traffic here.

Leaving the park does not take you away from the green spaces entirely. The residential streets surrounding it have grassy lawns and huge old trees. These homes exemplify the elegant brick architecture of southeast Denver, and they cost plenty. Those who can afford this area have a beautiful space to call home.
Pros
  • Gorgeous park
  • Historic and upscale housing
  • Safe neighborhood
Cons
  • High housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Very nice residential area handy to business districts"

Residents of Virginia Village seem to love their neighborhood. Many don't ever leave. It's not in a trendy area, and has therefore been immune to the up and down swings in value and neighborhood amenities that has changed much of Denver. This is a boom-and-bust town, but Virginia Village is a steady spot.

South Colorado Boulevard is a major north-south artery, and a rather bland retail strip. But if you venture off the main drag, you can find surprisingly attractive neighborhoods like this one. Cherry Creek Drive is a very busy street, but it follows a waterway (as you might guess from the name). This means that there are many green spaces along its meandering path that won't be developed. This is also one of the longest of Denver's hundreds of miles of bike and walking paths.

This helps ensure the stability of Virginia Village. The neighborhood has nice but inexpensive apartments. It also has many single-family homes of the brick bungalow variety. I used to live here with a roommate, and the neighborhood is quiet, safe, and pretty. There are also some neighborhood restaurants off of the main strip that are true gems. The Bull and Bush is a Denver local favorite. Virginia Village is a solid neighborhood.

For more shopping and dining options, this is a very short drive to Cherry Creek. To branch out even more, this is about 15 minutes from downtown. Cherry Creek Drive offers a quick beeline to these areas.
Pros
  • Nice homes and aprtments
  • Quick drive to Cherry Creek and downtown
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Car required
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
Just now

"Still rough, but a possible up and coming area"

Villa Park, like many West Denver neighborhoods, has a rough reputation. Unfortunately, this reputation is not undeserved, because this has been an area of gang activity and other types of crime. It borders the rough, industrial Sun Valley, and has many housing projects. The popularity of areas just to the north has not really spread south of Colfax, so these areas remain depressed. If you were just to drive by on 6th Avenue on your way out of town, you'd probably not give this area another look.

But that might be a mistake. There are nice single-family homes here. Some are well-kept and some are very run-down. The new light rail line set to open in 2013 will run along the north end of the neighborhood, linking it more closely to downtown. As it is, this area is already close by car or bike.

The shopping in this area is a bit lacking. The exception is Federal Blvd. There are no cute or quaint stores like you find in trendy neighborhoods, but Federal has wonderful ethnic food (a strange but appealing mix of Mexican and Asian).

If you are house-hunting here, take it block by block. If you are used to urban areas, you might find a spot that will seem like a major bargain in an area that you will enjoy. If you are from the country, suburbs, a small town, or more affluent areas, then you probably would not feel safe here. A home purchase here will be something of a gamble, but it could pay off in a big way. The trendy areas to the north have, on the whole, been not only recession-proof but have continued to rise in value. That means that areas on the fringes of these neighborhoods should be poised to see values rise.
Pros
  • Low housing cost
  • possibly one of the next trendy areas
  • light rail coming soon
Cons
  • rough, dangerous spots
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"Pretty neighborhood with old settlement feel"

This neighborhood consists of quiet, elegant residential blocks crisscrossed by streets that carry a lot of traffic. All of the streets that form the borders of this neighborhood are major arteries. In addition, due to the fact that many streets don't cross University, those that do are also heavily trafficked. These streets are in the northern half of the area, namely Evans and Iliff. Because these streets are older and surrounded by homes, they cannot be widened and traffic there is extremely congested during rush hour.

Nonetheless, this is a popular residential area. There are many of the old brick homes with large porches that are typical of the neighborhoods around Washington Park and DU. Colorado Blvd provides the main retail-chain shopping area. University Blvd has some smaller stores and neighborhood restaurants. There are a few small businesses in the neighborhood itself.

This spot has close access to schools for all ages (not just university students) and nice park spaces, too. The parks right in the neighborhood are small by city standards, but are very nice spots. For wider spaces, Washington Park is a short drive away. This neighborhood has plenty of history, none of the packaged feel of suburban residential neighborhood, and fairly quick access to Downtown and other hot spots.
Pros
  • Pleny of green spaces
  • Beautiful older homes
  • good schools nearby
Cons
  • Pricy area
  • some heavy traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"Runs the gamut from large retial to upscale residential"

University Hills has a bit of a surprising mix of areas. The northwest point has rather oversised businesses. Colorado Blvd is essentially a business strip, and this end has big stores, a large movie theater complex, large restaurants, and a Dave & Busters. It's essentially big-box land. The I-25 border is a hugely-trafficked commuter strip, so it is a hard border to this neighborhood, without much development immediately adjacent.

The residential neighborhoods that spread out along the southeast here are rather surprising given its borders. This is a spacious, wealthy residential areas with some exclusive private schools. It has a rather out-of-the way feel to it to me, being a bit cut off from the inner city action that I prefer. However, this is a quiet, often overlooked area perfect for the well-to-do families that inhabit this neighborhood.

The homes are well-maintained and subtle, without the garishness of the more famous Cherry Hills area to the west. There is plenty of peace and quiet here--too much for some tastes. This is one of the last areas that has not been overdeveloped, and the open feel of it is a pleasant surprise. Those who don't live here have no reason to venture back into the quiet streets, but anyone who discovers this area (and can afford to live here) might feel that they have discovered one of the best-kept secrets in the city.
Pros
  • Safe, spacious neighborhoods
  • top-notch schools
Cons
  • Expensive area
  • Location is a bit out of things-little innovation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"The academic heart of Southeast Denver"

The aptly-named University neighborhood is due to the University of Denver (DU) campus located here. Its old brick buildings and beautiful green campus make this place look like just what it is: a prestigious private university. It's quite self-contained in an older, upscale neighborhood. There are plenty of local restaurant options here, and the neighborhood is also easily accessible to beautiful Washington Park.

Schools of all kinds are peppered through the adjacent neighborhoods, which is one more reason that this area is very popular with families as well as students. The cost of housing can be high here. While there are some affordable apartments, as you might expect in an area with a large student population, there are also many high-priced older brick homes. When I lived near this neighborhood, there also seemed to be a higher crime rate than you might expect for an upscale community of this kind. That might simply be due to the fact that the population density in this area is high. Overall, though, this is a beautiful neighborhood with a lot going for it.

This area is one of the greenest-feeling parts of Denver. There are huge trees everywhere, growing out of lawns and park spaces. If you can't get enough of manicured green spaces, this spot is also close to Harvard Gulch, with its walks, rec center, and par-3 golf course. This is a good spot for families, students, and faculty.
Pros
  • Feels like a vibrant university town
  • Great quality of life
Cons
  • Can feel like a cultural bubble
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Where it all started"

This spot and the blocks surrounding it is the seed of Denver's revitalization frenzy. This development caused the area, which used to be nothing but the wrong side of the tracks, to grow into a lively spot for residents and partiers. The revitalization started in the 80s due to investments by developer Dana Crawford, who began the transformation of LoDo (lower downtown) into a hot space for loft living. She, almost single-handedly, turned the first of the abandonded Victorian brick warehouses into lofts worthy of high-end price tags.

The construction of Coors Field cemented the district's upswing, and LoDo is now a long-established place to live, shop, and work. This is the core of urban cool. I wouldn't waste much time bargain-hunting, because costs here are high. But this is a great place to be. Union Station, the rail transport hub, is also the hub that connects 16th street mall's Downtown area to the more popular area for nightlife. Here you will find block after block of historic facades fronting hip bars, restaurants, and boutique stores.

Parking is predictably rough here. Not only is this a trendy place to be, it's also part of the scene before and after any sporting event. It's a natural fit for anyone going to or coming from Coors Field, the Pepsi Center, or Mile High. If you don't pay attention to game schedules, you might find yourself packed shoulder-to shoulder in crowds filling every street and sidewalk. Even on weekend nights without games, you certainly won't be alone in the Union Station neighborhood.
Pros
  • The hub of urban activity
  • Beautiful commercial facades
Cons
  • Parking is a constant frustration
  • Can be swamped by loud, drunken crowds
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Riding the wave of popularity"

Sunnyside is reaping the benefits of the hugely popular Berkely and Highland neighborhoods. It deserves to, because this is a beautiful neighborhood, despite the fact that it has seen some tough times. This used to be pretty much the wrong side of town. Now, it's the right side if you want to be where the action is. Sunnyside has beautiful historic homes that are getting some much-needed attention, large trees and yards, schools, and park spaces.

This area does not have as many dining options as Berkely, but that's not a problem since it's so close to that neighborhood. Driving along Federal, there is a surprisingly green feel for an area this close to Downtown and to major highways. It's a residential neighborhood in the heart of the city, close to everything yet lacking none of the amenities of residential areas that are further away.

If you are house-hunting, there is no lack of options here. There are many old homes and new condos here, but the prices aren't cheap. This is not so surprising, because of the beautiful homes and excellent location. This neighborhood offers a variety of housing options. Be selective, because there are still some rough patches here. But it's not hard to see that this neighborhood is coming into its own, and in many ways has already arrived. It's adjacent to the trendiest parts of town, and it's hard to overlook.
Pros
  • Prime location
  • beautiful historic homes and buildings
Cons
  • high housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"Good spot for sports, but I wouldnt want to live there"

Sun Valley on the north end is taken up by our football stadium and the surrounding parking. This is the stadium that replaced our old Mile High Stadium, one of the most fun sports venues ever. The spot lost some character with the construction of brand-new Invesco Field. Locals were so p.o.'d about losing thier "Mile High" designation in favor of a company that most of us hadn't heard of that they compromised with "Invesco Field at Mile High". It's just not the same, of course. Now, it's become Sports Authority Field at Mile High.

Hard to know what to call it these days. In any case, it's still a fun place to watch football. Those of us who like to avoid the high parking fees park at Auraria and walk to the stadium. This walk led through the concrete pillars of overpasses, down train tracks, and over an old bridge spanning the Platte. It has become something of a tradition, although it's a long hike. There are burrito vendors and people trying to score tickets en route.

As far as the rest of the neighborhood goes, concrete and old streets pretty much sums it up. This is a bad neighborhood. West Colfax and Federal are both rough areas, and driving by on 6th Ave freeway will reveal the uninviting nature of this neighborhood. While areas north and west of here have been revitalized, Sun Valley has remained an ugly area of crime, with little to recommend it.
Pros
  • Major sports arena
Cons
  • 94% housing projects
  • poverty, crime affects many residents
Recommended for
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
Just now

"The largest new suburb in the city"

Stapleton neighborhood used to be Stapleton International Airport. We got pretty used to hearing planes over our Park Hill Neigborhood, but it seems wierd to think about it now that DIA has been established far from the city. I used to work at one of the shops there. The shopping there now is, to say the least, a lot more popular. Since the airport moved, Stapleton has turned into a huge, prepackaged community development.

It's pretty well done for that kind of planned community, but that's as far as my enthusiasm goes. It's got a very suburban feel, despite being part of the city. The Northfield section is an enormous shopping center, with many of the stores that you can find in oversized suburban malls. There are, of course, also chain restaurants, movie theaters, and the like.

It's built to be a safe family neighborhood, and that's what it is. Those who like the space and modern fixtures afforded by new construction, along with the shopping, will presumably be happy there. The housing has been built to accomodate most price ranges. There are rentals in addition to the single-family homes for sale. It takes about half an hour to get to Downtown from Stapleton, longer in rush hour.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
Just now

"From upscale to urban"

Speer lies along the transition between the very upscale Cherry Creek east end, and the older, commercial strip of Broadway on the west. It also runs from Capitol Hill on the north to the Washington Park West area on the south. Given these different influences, you might expect a mix up upscale, casual, eclectic, and even slightly gritty edges. That's just what you'll get in this neighborhood.

South of Speer is a very wealthy neighborhood, with upscale homes surrounded by a high wall. This extension of the Country Club neighborhood is beyond the financial reach of anyone who might get sticker shock in Cherry Creek. The Governor's Park neighborhood to the north is a funky, lively neighborhood with longstanding local bars and restaurants among the old mansions and Parks. It's expensive too, but not as upscale as the south section. Finally, along Broadway, there is an older, more affordable strip of retail with some more excellent restaurants, and more affordable homes.

The restaurants and shopping here are terrific, as is the living if you can afford it. While this area is very close to Downtown, it has a very different vibe. This is a wonderful Denver neighborhood to live and play. Even those who can't afford to live here head to the neighborhood for dinner sometimes.
Pros
  • Close to downtown
  • Lots of dining and nightlife options on the periphery
Cons
  • High cost of ownership
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Tech Center neighborhood-perfectly average"

This is one of the neighborhoods that I have loathed will all my heart since it was built. That is actually a good recommendation if you like suburbs, postmodern office spaces, and new, CCR-controlled, committe-approved, inoffensively-colored panelled housing. This is a suburban family area, with business parks, residential communities, schools, and designated open spaces. I would not live here if you paid me, but many families call this place home.

The areas around the Tech Center have had strong growth for the last three decades. It has wide streets with big signs, company offices, and suburban families. If you like the Tech Center, then you might find this the ideal place for you. Just one warning, you should not live here unless you never tire of brown and beige.

In case you haven't figured it out by now, I'm highly predjudiced agains things suburban. No, I'm far from anti-corporate and I have nothing against the American dream. I just can't take the acres of mediocrity that seems enshrined in the typical suburb. I want inspiration and originality. But if you just want an office with a neighborhood prepackaged to provide parks, schools, and chain stores, then Southmoor might hold your dream home. It's a clean, safe, neighborhood.
Pros
  • Handy for Tech Center workers
Cons
  • Can feel prepackaged
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"An ideal neighborhood"

This is such a good neighborhood--it will be tough to do it justice. By the way, residents don't distinguish between South Park Hill and North Park Hill. We just call it all Park Hill. But I can see why they want to divide it up this way on the map, because it's a large and diverse area. Just don't expect locals to know what you're talking about if you try to make the distinction.

I grew up in the center of this neighborhood. Between us, my family has owned three houses here. I went to Park Hill Elementary, which was fantastic because all I had to do was to walk across the street. I went to dance classes and took piano lessons here. My sister bought her first house in this neighborhood. This area has been a formative part of my life experience.

Park Hill is full of wonderful brick homes that range from middle-class to high-end. I was not one of the children of the well-to-do on Montview, Monaco, and 17th Ave Parkway, but if you are looking to spend some money on a beautiful old mansion, this is a good neighborhood to choose. There are some delicious local businesses on Colfax Ave. as well as 23rd. These quiet, tree-lined streets have consistently been a haven for city families, and they maintain their appeal. The neighborhood itself is wonderful, and the surrounding neighborhoods offer City Park, restaurants, hospitals, shops, schools, and access to anything you could want out of this city.
Pros
  • Beautiful, classic brick homes of all sizes
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Generally high housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
Just now

"Major revitalization here"

Sloan Lake has become one of the city hotspots for families. The transformation of many of these neighborhoods has been nothing short of astonishing. Sloan Lake, for as far back as I can remember, has been just that area west of Mile High Stadium. That was back when it WAS Mile High Stadium. Everything changes. Sometimes, these changes are for the better. Soan Lake has certainly crept up, both in reputation and in price.

Sloans Lake Park (yes, Sloans, not Sloan) is a very large green space, most of which is water. It's a very nice place for biking, walking, running, picnicking, you name it. It's surrounded by respectable if unattractive new construction for the most part, but the longer views are magnificent.

The older residential blocks have small, single-family homes. They are the little wood-panelled tract house kind. This has been a family neighborhood through thick and thin, and still is. There is easy access to Auraria Campus and downtown, and the retail strips of Federal and Sheridan. Housing values have risen along with the neighborhood's popularity, but if you find something in your price range, go for it. This is a great spot.
Pros
  • Beautiful views of the mountains
  • amazing lake and park
  • not a long drive to downtown
  • safe neighborhood
Cons
  • Recently popularized
  • New cookie-cutter construction around park
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
Just now

"Coming into its own"

Skyland is among the north central neighborhoods that was hit hard by the gang crime wave of the 80s and 90s (see my review of North Park Hill, for example, for a description of this). But Skyland seems to be fighting back, and home values are rirising to reflect this. There was a time when I would not have ventured into this neighborhood. Now, I couldn't afford it.

Skyland is decidedly residential, full of block after block of post-WWII brick bungalows. The south end of Skyland neighborhood is comprised of City Park Golf Course, which is a city-run public course. From this green space, you can see iconic views of downtown with the mountains for a backdrop.

The only retail parts are along Colorado Blvd to the east and York Street to the west. Frankly, they don't offer much. But this neighborhood is also extremely close to the shops of Colfax and the restaurants of neighborhoods just to the west. In addition, it's only a few minutes from downtown and those surrounding neighborhoods, so it's not at all cut off by car. Access to City Park itself is an excellent plus, with the green spaces, lake, pavillion, zoo, museum, and IMAX theater.

While there are rough spots here still, Skyland is a very nice central neighborhood, increasingly attractive to younger families and professionals. You could do a lot worse.
Pros
  • Nice brick homes
  • close to central neighborhoods
  • close to the major park
Cons
  • pockets of crime remaining
  • home prices are rising
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"A spot to find a slope in winter--in the middle of the city"

I mostly am personally familiar with Ruby Hill simply as a spot on the other side of Aqua Golf, which I visited a few times. I also know it by reputation because of the sloped hill in Ruby Hill park, which is very popular in winter. It's tailor-made for sleds, and sometimes there are even beginning skiers trying out planks or boards as they take lessons in the park.

So far, so good. The downside is that this is--well--Southwest Denver. I don't think I'll ever be tempted to spend much time here. It's just got a rather flat feel to it, without much spirit or interest. And that's not even addressing the problem of persistent areas of crime.

However, this area seems to hold a lasting appeal for people who clearly have very different tastes and priorities than I do. Actually, that probably covers the majority of people, so there's every reason for these neighborhoods to be popular. Families find some neighborhoods in this part of town appealing for the lower costs, good views and many park spaces. On the other hand, those looking for a safe, suburban-style family neighborhood should probably look elsewhere.

Overall, Ruby Hill is a sort of patchwork of good and bad. Street-smarts will help you locate the safer areas here, but I would advise house-hunters to use caution. On the right block, you could find a low-cost and safe family area. In other spots, this can be a worrying part of town.
Pros
  • affordable
  • Great park
  • many areas feel safe
Cons
  • some problems typical of West Denver
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Family neighborhood with a great green space"

Rosedale is a nice south Denver neighborhood with an excellent park space occupying most of it. It is representative of the areas in this part of the city. There are shops and restaurants, family homes, peace and quiet, and a popular green space. Housing here is not cheap. It is comparable to many residential neighborhoods in the city, with some housing in the 200 K range, but most homes in the 300s.

Harvard Gulch is a large and popular park space. There are walking trails and a rec center. There is also a fun 9-hole, par 3 golf course here. It's not surprising that this is a desirable family neighborhood. I played this course a couple of times when I was trying my hand at golf, and remember a pretty, quiet neighborhood and a feeling of space and green to it. The golf game didn't last, but the impression did.

One of the attractions of South Denver is the good schools, and this neighborhood has access to them. It is a long-ish but not unrealistic commute to downtown for professionals who work there. Within the neighborhood, there are pleasant walks and restaurants that are local favorites. Also typical of this part of the city is the mellow feel that lacks the excitement of the east, north, and northwest neighborhoods. This area appeals to families looking for peace and quiet.
Pros
  • major park
  • excellent family neighborhood
  • quiet
Cons
  • higher housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
Just now

"Could use a bit of influence from nearby blocks"

Regis feels a lot more like Arvada than it does like Highland. That's not such a good thing. At least I don't think so. This area, despite some interesting and historic attractions like Regis college and Lakeside, is just a bit lacking. It's got a flat, run-down feel to it. This is an area that I've always found a bit depressing. In fact, it's amazing how close this is to the wonderful arts districts of 44th and Tennyson, one of my favorite spots in the city. The two feel worlds apart, even though they are so close.

I-70 is a major divider between attractive and unattractive neighborhoods in the northwestern section of the city. This might well change, given the new momentum of these neighborhoods. Regis does have good things going for it, including its well-respected private college. I wouldn't be surprised if adventurous investors began making home and commercial purchases here.

For now, it's worth looking into for the lower cost of living, good schools, and access to some good park spaces and quick trips to the mountains. The neighborhood vibe is lacking, but the wonderful restaurants, shops, and activities of artsy neighborhoods to the west are nearby, without the high cost.
Pros
  • Housing for far less than areas west
  • could gain value in the future
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Beautiful south Denver neighborhood"

Platt Park Is one of the neighborhoods with the distinctive feel of the Washington Park and DU neighborhoods. These areas have historic homes and institutions, and beautiful green spaces. Being on the other side of a major roadway from the true Washington Park neighborhood, you might expect to see much lower home prices, but this is not really the case. This is an upscale neighborhood, and home prices reflect this.

Many of these old homes date back a century. Even the proximity of a college does not keep rents down. Presumably those who can afford the private school tuition can afford housing, or else they stay closer to the apartments of University Blvd. Platt Park, while lacking the exclusive feel of neighborhoods like Belcaro, is distinctly upper-middle class. If you can afford the cost of a home here, though, it is hard to top this area. Residents of Platt Park love their neighborhood, and with good reason.

This neighborhood has small boutique businesses and restaurants scattered amid the well-maintained homes. There are park spaces and golf courses nearby. A commute to downtown from here is not too onerous, and would yield a good mix of downtown activity and the more sedate, genteel feel of the Platt Park neighborhood. Some of the city's best schools are within easy distance, as well.
Pros
  • beautiful homes and trees
  • excellent dining
  • quiet, casual, upscale
  • overall high quality of life
Cons
  • high cost of housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Often overlooked with hidden potential"

Overland is a neighborhood that is easy to drive right through. It consists mostly of the industrial development and road work that is evident from S Santa Fe Drive. But you will also notice a green golf course and many park areas if you take a closer look. This golf course has the claim to fame of being the oldest one west of the Mississippi. This also might be the oldest settlement in Denver.

Southwest Denver appears run-down, industrial, and easy to overlook. But this spot is rather a gem. Home prices are low, views are great, and this is close to downtown, so commutes are short. The golf course has some of the best 4th of July fireworks veiwing that you can find. There are many open park spaces just outside of Overland, including the increasingly popular Ruby Hill.

It might feel a bit claustrophobic at first, when you realize that you're in a heavily-developed neighborhood bisected and bounded by large thoroughfares. But going through the side streets with their tiny bungalows, you might discover the ideal place for a starter home. This area is overlooked by many, but is actually charming, interesting, and inviting when you get to know it.
Pros
  • good location
  • great views and green spaces
  • low housing costs
Cons
  • has been depressed for a long time-hard to predict recovery
  • heavily trafficked streets
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"Still struggling to rise"

If you read my North Park Hill review, you will get a good idea of the gang problems that began to plague this area a few decades ago. This area is still struggling. There are many nice detached homes here, especially toward the south. With two golf courses and excellent park spaces nearby, you might expect this to be a posh area. It's a kind of block-by-block thing.

There are still areas here where you feel immediately unsafe if you stumble upon them, and with good reason. In addition, the northern end of this neighborhood is industrial rather than residential. On the other hand, there are areas with nice homes, and there is every reason to think that improvement will continue.

The poplularity of the neighborhoods close to City Park is one positive sign. There is also the influx of new commerce which overflows from the busy new Northfield development. Many of these perimeter areas east and west have a decidedly civilized and settled feel, and are both safe and attractive. It stands to reason that residents who withstood the worst of the gangland crime wave will not give up now, and new residents and businesses will support their confidence in this neighborhood.
Pros
  • good housing values
  • may improve in the future
Cons
  • new businesses along Quebec
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Reclaiming its dignity and pleasures"

North Park Hill is overwhelmingly residential, with the brick homes that make Denver neighborhoods so nice. Unfortunately, this area was swamped under a heavy crime wave that has made it incredibly rough for old residents and small business owners. The good news is that it is making a comeback. It deserves better days.

I grew up just south of here, and for many years this spot had a bad reputation. It wasn't just North Park Hill, but in many ways this spot was the epicenter. In the 80s, LA street gangs discovered a big untapped drug market in Denver. The city was nicknamed "Little LA" and "The Big Easy" as Bloods, Crips, and other gangs swarmed in. Suddenly, the blocks to the north of us were gangland. Every few days, someone else was shot in my beloved neighborhood. Through the late 80s and early 90s, this area was part of a swath of violence that changed the face of north central Denver.

Fortunately, neighborhood residents are reclaiming their beautiful and historic neighborhoods. It has become a much safer and better place to live once again. The strip of north central blocks from Five Points running east to Quebec have quieted down, and people once again take pride and joy in these neighborhoods. It's good to see that these homes and businesses are thriving once more. North Park Hill is a good place to live, work, walk, shop, and raise families.
Pros
  • diverse (race, income, etc.)
  • good for strolling
  • wide range of housing
Cons
  • Close to parks and shopping
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Big fun on the edge of downtown"

This neighborhood isn't called North Capitol Hill. I would say another reviewer was right that most people call this area "uptown". Capitol Hill will suggest areas south of Colfax. But whatever you call it, this is an exciting area to live. It's crowded and busy, so don't consider moving here if you don't like that kind of urban environment. But if you do, you'll be in heaven here.

The western edge of this neighborhood is really downtown proper, and toward the east, this is a bustle of streets, restaurants, and apartments. There are new boutique-style apartments, trendy and expensive updated apartments, and some houses. There are still some affordable rentals here, but the place has become more popular and prices are rising.

17th Avenue is a hot spot for restaurants. This stretch of Colfax is a ton of fun, with lots of bars. The two old theaters, the Fillmore and the Ogden, are wonderful live show venues that have some entertaining history. In between is a great mix of people, mostly young professionals. It's also a popular spot for students at Auraria Campus, although prices are tough on starving student populations.

This area is worth checking out either for a visit or for prospective residents. It's one of the areas on the edge of downtown that is just a fun place to be.
Pros
  • part of the downtown vibe
  • Amazing restaurants!
Cons
  • heavy traffic
  • High housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Hard to beat this spot"

I bought a home here in the late 80's. Selling that place a couple of years later was one of the biggest mistakes I've ever made. It's value has since QUADRUPLED. And it was a fantastic house, one of the wonderful brick bungalows of this neighborhood, with enormous trees in the yard. But I'm still near this neighborhood (in adjoining Hale) and have a friend who rents a house here. This is a wonderful place to live.

Actually, I can't help but think of Montclair in two parts, because Monaco makes a distinct dividing line. It is a busy thoroughfare, but is also a gorgeous green parkway lined with stunning (and expensive) brick homes. 6th Avenue fits the same description. The areas west and east of Monaco are somewhat distinct from each other.

East of Monaco, there are some amazing huge homes among much cheaper places. This stretch of Colfax is still rough, with cheap hotels, tough bars, etc. Some of the surrounding blocks reflect this depressed feel, but there are many nice places as well. It's a block-by-block kind of place.

West of Monaco, the stretch of Colfax that used to be a very scary place after dark has been refurbished. The little shopping area for this neighborhood lies along Krameria between 13th and Colfax. On Krameria, there are two grocery stores right across the street from each other. Safeway shoppers head east, and King Soopers shoppers go to the little strip mall to the west. There is also an amazing floral greenhouse that has been here forever, a long-standing Jewish deli that is one of the area's secret foodie spots, and some little neighborhood bars. These bars have a comfortably "divey" feel, but are actually very safe and friendly.

All of these neighborhood places on both Krameria and Colfax lend some variety to the more standard drugstores and fast food places that also operate here. The housing is beautiful, and there is a variety of price ranges. There are the high-priced brick mansions along the parkways that I mentioned, and the single-family bungalows that are in the 200-300k range. But renters can also find deals on houses and duplex or 4-plex units, so it's not out of an average person's price range.

Not only is Montclair a great neighborhood in and of itself, but it's also an easy hop to City Park, and downtown, so it doesn't feel cut off in any way. This is far enough east that the parking, cost, and crowding issues that affect areas closer to downtown are mitigated, but there is easy access to everything. The fantastic medical facilities of Rose and National Jewish hospitals are close by, but don't interfere with the traffic of the neighborhood.

This is an all-around wonderful place to live. I can't recommend it highly enough.
Pros
  • Great mix of local and chain businesses
  • Accessible to parks, urban spaces, schools, and medical facilities
  • good architectural mix/beautiful homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Transformed from tough outlying neighborhood to a family haven"

Growing up, I remember that my mental association with Montbello was a neighborhood way out in the northeast with a bad reputation. It blurred together with Commerce City as a sort of no-man's land of industry and crime. Although my memories or childhood understanding of this neighborhood might be skewed, this neighborhood has undoubtedly improved tremendously. The low housing costs and more open spaces has made this a wildly popular area for people who are looking for a place outsite the central metro area. This is now known as a great place for families.

Many young couples ready to raise children have flocked to Montbello. It's a suburban neighborhood, although many of the houses here are not new. This is now a mix of older detached homes and new construction. There are established schools and parks. It is pretty out of the way, being closer to the airport than either the city or the mountains, but if you don't mind a commute this could be an option for you.

Probably the most standout feature of Montbello is its access to Rocky Mountain Arsenal. This used to be a weapons manufacturing area, but has been reclaimed as a nature preserve, and is a pretty cool open space. It's a popular spot for wildlife photographers and students of wildlife biology.

Montbello walks a line between an old neighborhood in an industrial area, and an increasingly popular area for suburban families. I think this gives it a bit more character than many suburbs, despite the rather flat feel of the northeastern edges of the city. For those who prefer to be in a suburban area, this neighborhood has proven to be a good choice.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • open spaces nearby
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Long commute to downtown
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Suburban heart, city address"

Although a Denver neighborhood, Marston is not really "city". This neighborhood is suburban through and through. This is a land of beige-paneled houses and golf courses. Like all southwestern neighborhoods, the views are fantastic from the open spaces. From the homes, views are obscured by the housing-committee-approved beige paneling of the house next door. I only know this neighborhood from visiting a family who lives near here, because I'd never live here myself. But that's because I'd rather live in the most dangerous block in the inner city than live in the 'burbs. Obviously, people trying to raise a family will have very different priorities and preferences.

For those who want a safe, suburban neighborhood, Marston is a good choice. It's very safe and clean, and dotted with the aforementioned golf courses in many surrounding areas. Don't let the Denver address fool you, you will have a suburbanite's commute if you work downtown. Housing here is relatively cheap, being in line with suburban prices rather than city prices. If you like newer construction, there is no end to cookie-cutter family homes available. Although I have no enthusiasm for these neighborhoods, plenty of families seem happy with this environment. If the southwestern suburbs are your idea of home sweet home, Marston fits the bill.
Pros
  • Safe and clean
Cons
  • cookie-cutter suburban area
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Affordable area within the city"

Mar Lee is a better neighborhood than many other southwest Denver spots. Housing costs here are much lower than the average Denver neighborhood. This is an area with older homes, and there are some bad blocks here. But overall this could be a good spot to find a deal on a home. This area has great views and nice park spaces, like most of southwest Denver.

While Mar Lee isn't exactly adjacent to downtown, it's not too far out of the way. Federal and Sheridan see heavy traffic, but compared to many commutes this one is a breeze. This neighborhood also has shopping within and surrounding the neighborhood. Federal Blvd has great ethnic food stores and little family restaurants, but it is also rough in stretches, including this one.

This is an old urban neighborhood, and might strike some people as looking run-down, especially if you are used to spanking-new suburban areas. But these older neighborhoods have a lot more charm and character, as well as nicer green spaces, than suburbs. So if you like living in the city, but prefer to avoid the crowded neighborhoods of the more central metro areas, then this could be just the place for you. The low housing prices, great views, and access to downtown will appeal to many professionals and families.
Pros
  • affordable
Cons
  • Federal looks dilapidated in this area
  • surrounding neighborhoods struggle with crime/poverty/gangs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"A well-done new development on a reclaimed military base"

I need to start by saying that I have a huge bias agains the new-construction, build-a-beige-community-overnight kind of development. Anything, evenly the outstandingly ugly, is better than the acreages of mediocrity encapsulated in this kind of architecture. And Lowry has a lot of it. It's almost as ugly as any other "community" suburb development built in the last 30 years.

That said, I can understand the attraction of Lowry. (By the way, no one calls this Lowry "Field". It's just known as Lowry to locals.) For a new community, it's pretty well done. They did keep some of the old structure, including two huge hangars and some older brick office buildings, that help this place retain a bit of character. Lowry used to be Lowry Air Force Base, so the airfield/aviation pieces that have been preserved are military, not commercial, unlike the Stapleton development.

Lowry has lots of apartments and condos as well as single-family homes. It has been populated as soon as the housing has been built. It's a popular neighborhood with families. Lowry Town Center is the little business and retail district that serves the neighborhood. It's very friendly, with restaurant patios, boutique stores, and fountains where children play in summer. Various associations hold many neighborhood events, from movies-in-the-park to fairs and concerts. There is a community feel that makes this new neighborhood feel a little older than it is--a little more established than other places. Lowry is a close-knit community with new amenities, and housing at all price ranges.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • nice retail center
Cons
  • standard new development housing among more interesting stuff
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Great location, tough neighborhood"

Lincoln Park, the location, has everything going for it. It's adjacent to Auraria Campus, which lies to its north. It's adjacent to Civic Center and Capitol Hill on its east. Downtown is just a short distance to the northeast. And aside from the art museum east of Lincoln Park, the Santa Fe Arts District in the neighborhood itself has a thriving gallery row. First Fridays here are the largest in the city. Famed Colorado photographer John Fielder's gallery is here, among others.

So, why is it such a tough neighborhood? It's hard to say. Many areas around downtown have been depressed urban areas, and remained so throughout the 90s. But most of them are seeing better days. There is a large arc from the northwest through the southeast that has gained ground and become prosperous. Lincoln Park seems to lag behind. It's hard to understand why. All of the ingredients for success are here. It's just struggling, despite its popularity with visitors.

High crime rates make this a risky area. And it's not the cheapest part of town to live in either, making it risky. On the other hand, the potential is obvious, and there are bargains to be found, so it is an attractive option if you find a block where you feel safe.
Pros
  • close to downtown
  • Arts district
  • enormous potential
Cons
  • run-down looking
  • poverty, crime affects many residents
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Out there with lots of green space and not much town"

Kennedy is not really as much of a neighborhood as it is a golf course. It's a public course, so maybe this would be good for people who like golf but can't really afford the country club lifestyle. This neighborhood also borders on Cherry Creek State Park, which is a large area for recreation. The reservoir and paths offer outdoor activities for those who are not swinging a club. This area is fairly close to the Tech Center, but really it is more of a spot for anyone who does not want to live right in the city.

Kennedy is out in a southeast area that hasn't seen many changes over the years. That is to say, at least not compared to the rest of the city. The Hampden/Havana stretch and nearby S Parker Rd have retail stores, bars, restaurants, etc. There is a lot of strip-mall, chain-store stuff mixed in with a few neighborhood bars that give these areas a bit of character.

There are some residential and retail areas in Kennedy itself, and this is not an expensive part of town. If you're house (or apartment) hunting, though, you might have better luck finding available living spaces in the surrounding neighborhoods.
Pros
  • Golf course
  • Green space for recreation
Cons
  • out of the way for downtown workers
  • Heavy commercial development
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
Just now

"A hot spot between Highland and LoDo"

Jefferson Park, at first glance, doesn't seem like anywhere you'd want to visit, much less live. It lies along an extremely busy stretch of highway, and seems like it's just the fallout from downtown. However, this is a great spot. With LoDo to the east, Highland to the north, and Sloan Lake to the east, this is a can't miss spot for city lovers.

Jefferson Park lies in the center of trendy, artistic, vibrant, new neighborhoods. Actually, a lot of it is old rather than new, but has had new life injected into it in recent years. It includes Downtown Aquarium and many refurbished houses and new businesses. There is no longer the sharp divide from one side of I-25 to the other. Good neighborhoods lie on both sides of the highway, and they are now connected. This has resulted in neighborhoods like Jefferson Park, where there is always something interesting to see and do.

Housing in these neighborhoods is expensive and rising, but there are still some good deals to be found if you can scour the neighborhood. This is not the kind of place for anyone who wants lots of open space and quiet neighborhoods with big yards. But for those who love the pulse of the city, this is a really good place to be.
Pros
  • something for everyone
  • easy access to other vibrant neighborhoods
  • historic character
Cons
  • crowded and increasingly pricy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Nondescript area with cheap rentals"

I used to live just north of Indian Creek neighborhood, and would drive past every morning on Quebec on my way to work. It's a rather unremarkable patch with some unused open areas, apartment buildings, storage units, and some small convenience stores. The main attraction to this area is that rents are extremely low here, but that's about it. Southeast Denver isn't the most interesting area to live in anyway, and Indian Creek doesn't add to the charms.

This area feels like about what it is--a sort of limbo between Denver and Aurora. It's about half an hour to either downtown or the Greenwood Village/Tech Center area, longer during periods of bad traffic. The handiest nice neighborhood for shopping or dining is Lowry, which is a few minutes' drive from Indian Creek.

Most of the housing out here is bland 70s and 80s architecture. There are mostly apartment buildings. The northern corner has some heavy traffic, but there is also a surprising amount of unused space out here, just fields of stubble mainly. The nicest nearby park space is actually Fairmount Cemetery. That might sound surprising, but it's an interesting place, and the Highline Canal path runs right through it.

This area really isn't too exciting. It's fairly safe, and cheap, as I mentioned. If you're looking to save on rental or even condo purchase costs, and don't mind being a bit away from the action, then it's not a bad area.
Pros
  • Very cheap living
  • adjacent to two great bike/pedestrian paths
Cons
  • Not much to do
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"Beautiful and stately neighborhood: comes with a high price tag"

Hilltop is a gorgeous neighborhood, in a location that's hard to beat. It is a fairly central location, close to downtown, and adjacent to the neighborhood retail choices of Lowry and the upscale shopping district of Cherry Creek. Yet once you move inside the busy streets on Hilltop's borders, there is a mellow neighborhood feel. The homes here are absolutely beautiful. They are large brick homes.

The houses particularly along 6th Ave Parkway and Monaco Parkway are enviable abodes. The whole of this neighborhood has fairly large and pricey homes. They are full of quiet dignity rather than showiness, but you will pay a premium to live here. The neighborhood is an old one, as can be seen by the towering oak and elm trees in every green yard.

The little shopping areas along Holly St. make this a delightful place to walk, and add some variety to the larger stores in the more frequented areas around the perimeter. This is an excellent neighborhood for families in a higher income bracket. Lower-priced homes can be found along the busier edges, so if you want the amenities of the neighborhood with a bit more budget-conscious price tag, look there. Overall, though, expect to pay higher-than average prices to live here. This is not the most expensive neighborhood in the city, but it's far from the cheapest. Those who live here find that it is worth the cost.
Pros
  • Tree-lined streets
  • Plenty of shopping options
  • Beautiful homes
Cons
  • Out of most people's price range
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
Just now

"Decidedly trendy, with plenty to do"

Highland was the first neighborhood since LoDo to undergo such an astonishing transformation with such spectacular success. This used to be a run-down area and a pretty scary neighborhood. It is unrecognizable as such now. In fact, it doesn't get much more trendy than Highland, and it has been so successful that all of the surrounding neighborhoods are in demand as places to live, work and play.

The Victorian homes have seen some much-needed TLC, and are wonderful houses. This and surrounding neighborhoods have become such interesting spots becuase the businesses that thrive here are entrepreneur-owned independent spots, so there is an exciting variety that is not to be found in many revamped neighborhoods with nothing but chains. There are tremendous restaurants, art galleries, and other small businesses.

You've missed the boat by several years when it comes to real estate investments in this area. These gorgeous little homes have risen in price to a high-end range for the low square footage involved. It may have peaked, but costs are not falling. Bargain-hunters will find few options here.

There is a wonderful energy in this neighborhood. The vibe is cheerful, energetic, and varied. The downtown feel of variety and activity has spilled over into this neighborhood. But despite the density of people, this has a much more intimate feel than LoDo and downtown. If you can afford it, this is a fantastic place to be.
Pros
  • Wonderful vibe
  • Historic and eclectic
Cons
  • Housing costs have doubled-tripled over a decade
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Suburban feel in southeast Denver"

You can read my review of Harvey Park to get some more input on this neighborhood. I'm admittedly strongly biased toward the east central neighborhoods, so I don't spend much time in southwest Denver. There are many nice family homes on green blocks in this spot. There is a bit more of a mixed flavor here than in the more unidimensional suburbs, which I would consider a big plus.

There are also good nearby park spaces with golf courses and green spaces. One of the best things about the southwest areas is the views of downtown and the mountains from any open space. On the 4th of July, almost every fireworks display on the Front Range is visible. Overall, this area has an air of contentment about it. I get the feeling that those who live here really enjoy their part of town.

There are shopping options right in the neighborhood, and access to the major thoroughfares. Commuting either to downtown or to the Tech Center can take a good chunk of time out of your day because of the heavy highway traffic. Housing is reasonably inexpensive for a safe area within the city, and there are some nice detached homes with yards. If you are considering moving your family to Denver, this is an area worth checking out.
Pros
  • Relatively inexpensive
  • Nice middle range homes
  • golf courses with views
Cons
  • longer commutes
  • flat feel to the retail areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"Southwest older suburb"

It's hard for me to think of anything in particular to say about Harvey Park. To me it's just "southwest Denver". That doesn't mean it's not a good place to live, it's just that it doesn't suit me. But my priorities are very different than most, because I'm not now and never will be looking for a good place to raise a family. If I were, I might be more drawn to this area.

Harvey Park has older homes, and home prices here are very attractive. Commutes to the city are packed with heavy traffic, so they are not quick, but it's really not that far. For some reason this feels much farther away than equidistant neighborhoods to the east. Many west neighborhoods have a bit of a bad reputation, but this is a nice safe neighborhood with an old suburban feel. There are parks and golf courses nearby. Southwest Denver has excellent mountain views from the parks and other open vantage points.

The retail options in the western parts of Denver have an older strip-mall feel, but there are also some excellent ethnic food markets on South Federal. Home prices here are much more attractive than in areas to the north and east. Families who want to be away from the crowded central districts but still fairly close to the city might enjoy Harvey Park.
Pros
  • closer to central districts than the true suburbs
  • affordable housing
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • possibly long commutes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Average suburb with access to above-average park spaces"

It's a little weird to me that I lived here during my first several years. I feel no connection to this neighborhood at all. When my parents owned their house here, these were truly the 'burbs of Denver. We lived on the very edge of residential development, with a park right across the street--and no building visible south or east of the neighborhood. I remember tumbleweeds blowing down the cul-de-sac in fall. Now, there is development around here to the south stretching practically to Castle Rock.
The development of the Tech Center has made this a sort of middle ground between the city and outlying areas, but it still has a very suburban feel, despite the crowding and traffic. There are a lot of neighborhoods here that were built in the 70s, and the architectural styles reflect this.

There are plenty of retial and shopping options, assuming you're ok with chain stores and strip malls. This area is also a short commute to the offices of the Tech Center. This is a safe neighborhood with the usual suburban amenities, and many people consider this a good place to raise a family and to live throughout retirement.

The most remarkable feature of this area is the access to Cherry Creek State Park. There is a reservoir here large enough for small boats and windsurfing (although it's crowded), and there are miles of green space and trails for biking and running. Other than that, it's a pretty average suburban area.
Pros
  • Good park spaces nearby
  • Convenient for Tech Center workers
Cons
  • Bland architecture
  • Busy streets with chain stores
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Another older southeast suburb with commercial strip"

Hampden neighborhood is a settled older suburb. The people who live here seem to be happy with this neighborhood, although it's pretty far removed from downtown. This area has a mix of rentals and single-family homes. Costs are steady and fairly low here. The residential areas are clean, quiet and tidy. The strip of Havana and Hampden is a major commercial strip, so shops and restaurants are nearby.

Although the commercial area is handy, it's anything but pleasant. This strip is a major traffic corridor, and it's all chain stores and restaurants. As far as commuting from this neighborhood, the Tech Center is nearest. Hampden is a fair distance from downtown--30 to 60 minutes depending on traffic. The biggest plus to this area is the accessibility of park spaces. There are several smaller parks, and Cherry Creek state park is nearby. There are two golf courses, and lots of biking and running trails.

Families who prefer an older to a newer suburb might find this area attractive. I am not fond of being this far from central neighborhoods. I also cannot get excited about the 70s architecture and the bland retail options. However, this is a good safe neighborhood, and many people who don't want to be in the middle of the city can find rentals or home ownership options very affordable, clean, and safe.
Pros
  • Handy to parks and reservoir
  • Family-friendly
  • safe neighborhood
Cons
  • Commercial development is primarily strip malls
  • Heavy rush hour traffic on Hampden Avenue
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"All-around great neighborhood"

I have lived in Hale for the past five years, and grew up in an adjacent neighborhood. I love it here. It's a beautiful neighborhood with a range of housing options. There are streets with the classic brick bungalows found all over older Denver, high-end condos, and inexpensive rentals. The revitalization and trendy neighborhoods around downtown have not quite reached this area yet, so the cost of living is very low for a central neighborhood. In fact, rents in many buildings here are less than they are in Capitol Hill, traditionally the neighborhood where people go for city living on the cheap.
Hale is far less well known, and is for some reason a bit of an open secret. The neighborhood is centered around a cluster of hospitals, so if you live on Hale Parkway like I do be prepared to hear ambulance sirens at all hours. I worked in this neighborhood when I did research at the Health Sciences Center, which moved out to Aurora. Developers were set to take over and rebuild the old site, but the deal fell through because the timing of it coincided with the housing crash in 2008.
I was secretly relieved by hearing that the development was stalled, because I was afraid that rents would skyrocket. Instead, the rents have stayed low because the student and faculty population in the neighborhood moved east, along with the ridiculous traffic congestion. There is still plenty of activity here to continue to support the restaurants and stores along Colorado Blvd. and 8th Ave, though.
There has been a lot of new high-priced condo and luxury apartment development along this stretch of Colorado Blvd already. Developers will eventually get the job done on the old campus, so both rents and housing costs will probably rise precipitously over the next several years. But in the meantime, I will enjoy my low rent for a great apartment, my proximity to City Park and downtown, and the great restaurants, park, and bars right in the neighborhood.
Pros
  • Tree-lined streets
  • Affordable rents in beautiful, safe neighborhood
  • World-class medical facilities
  • Quiet yet accessible
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"Older suburb that has had time to develop some character"

Goldsmith used to be one of Denver's suburbs, but is now solidly surrounded by town. It is roughly halfway between downtown and the Denver Tech Center, with roughly an hour's commute to each (that's in rush hour). It's actually probably quicker to the Tech Center. Goldsmith homes are nice homes, dating mostly from the 60s and 70s. They are well-kept and there are green yards and trees here, instead of the flat sod and saplings of depressing newer suburban areas.

I used to spend a lot of time in this area because I was dating a man who lived close to Monaco and Evans. This is a nice, safe neighborhood. It's surrounded by the heavy retail area of Havana/Hampden, but is a quiet, safe neighborhood. In fact, it's too quiet and out of the way for my taste, but all of the people I know that either grew up here or live here now really like this area.

Housing costs here are very reasonable compared to more central neighborhoods. There are some inexpensive apartment rentals, and many single-family detached homes. The retail options out here are pretty much confined to chain-type stores and restaurants, but there are also some clubs for people needing a bit of nightlife. For daytime activities, there are no parks inside the neighborhood itself, but there are many large parks within a short distance. Overall, this is a very family-oriented neighborhood.
Pros
  • Shorter commute to downtown than many suburbs
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • No interesting independent stores/restaurants
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Unexpectedly intriguing area, even with the heavy concrete"

This is an odd, rather awkward part of the city. But investors have been paying attention, and the area might be coming into its own. At first glance, it seems crazy to think about living anywhere near the tangle of concrete where the two major interstates (I-25 and I-70) come together. As another reviewer correctly noted, this interchange is also known as "The Mousetrap", and it's an area of heavy traffic, overpasses, and large industrial development.

The attraction of the area is that it is close to downtown, Auraria Campus, and other neighborhoods that have seen major revitalization and new business. There have been some attempts at new building in this and adjacent neighborhoods. I think it began with an attempt to provide some low-cost student housing, because the Auraria Campus has three colleges but no dorms.

There are some rough patches along this corridor. But the thriving mix of students, artists, and professionals in nearby LoDo and Highlands are making it increasingly attractive to people who like to be in the thick of it all. Some developers are building new or refurbished apartments in this neighborhood that are truly meant to have a loftlike, artistic character, and some bargains are to be found. There's really no getting away from the industrial feel, but many people are ok with that. I wouldn't recommend this as a great spot to raise kids, but for anyone looking for a lively but still fairly affordable downtown neighborhood, this is definitely worth looking into.
Pros
  • mix of industrial, artistic
  • close to downtown
  • some affordable housing options
Cons
  • streets are a tangle
  • pockets of crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"New suburban area"

Green Valley Ranch and Gateway are really suburban rather than city. This area is located between Aurora and the airport, rather than being part of the metro area. The development out here is new. If you want to live in the 'burbs, then this might be a good place to raise a family. I honestly can't understand why anyone is drawn to areas like this, but then again, I'm not a family person who wants to get out of the city. I will never appreciate the suburban development. It has no attractions for me.
Obviously, there are plenty of people who are drawn to the suburbs, however, so here's one of them for you. I can't really say that there is anything about this one that differentiates it from any other. The houses are new, and it's a safe area. The housing has that stamped-out, committee-approved, uninspired blandness of architecture that can be found almost anywhere. Commuting between here and downtown would involve some heavy traffic and long drive times. Either DIA or the Anschutz campus with the Health Sciences Center would offer a better commute if that's where you work.
Aside from the typical housing options, there are chain restaurants and hotels. These businesses are probably supported by commercial travelers as well as the local residents. There are good views of the plains and the mountains from here. There are also some good green spaces, especially since the area is adjacent to the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, which is now a park and wildlife refuge.
I suppose this area would suit those who want a suburban environment with new building, new schools, etc. But there is nothing inspired in the architecture, design, or businesses. If you are looking for a city neighborhood with character and individuality, look elsewhere.
Pros
  • Family-friendly
  • Safe neighborhood
  • Wide open spaces nearby
Cons
  • Cookie-cutter development
  • Downtown workers will face a long commute
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
Just now

"An old suburban area far from central Denver"

When I think of Fort Logan, I usually think of the cemetery here. This is an old military cemetery for service personnel and their families. My grandfather, who was a marine and served in the Pacific in WWII, is buried here. The funny thing is that I do not think of this area as Denver, because it is quite a drive from the main part of the city. I'm actually surprised to see it on the map, because I have to admit that I thought this was Englewood.

This is one of the old suburban neighborhoods. There are lots of new suburban areas, which have a completely inorganic feel, as though they have been plopped onto wide swaths of land overnight with no particular reason for being there. But Fort Logan isn't like this. The buildings here are older and well-established, as are the homes. But for anyone who needs to commute to the center of the city, this is quite a long way from downtown. It's a bit more accessible to the tech center, but if you need to find a spot close to a commercial district, Fort Logan is pretty far out of the way. I allow about 45 minutes when I head from central Denver to Roxborough State Park, and Fort Logan is even further south. During rush hour, it could easily take twice as long.

On the plus side, this is a beautiful spot. This feels much closer to the mountains than the city, and the views are spectacular. There is no shortage of open park spaces just outside this neighborhood. Roxborough and Chatfield to the south are hugely popular open spaces. There is fishing, boating, hiking, and camping here. There are lakes and golf courses. This would be a good spot for anyone who wanted to raise a family around lots of outdoor activities without actually moving to the mountains.
Pros
  • Close to outdoor recreation
  • Excellent views
Cons
  • Not close to downtown
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"A hot spot in the thick of it all"

Five Points, maybe even more than "East Colfax", is a phrase synonymous with "really, really bad neighborhood". However, That reputation has changed along with Five Points itself. It's a neighborhood just north of downtown with a very checkered history. It's the core of a strip that runs through northeast central Denver that has had a rough and varied past. It's also the first to get turned around.
Five Points is locally famous for being a spot for bootleggers during prohibition, for being a residence of Jack Kerouac in beat years, and for being a neighborhood full of drugs, gangs, and crime that reached a peak of violence in the 1990s. It has reached a new incarnation as a wildly popular spot to live and hang out. There are artists, pub crawlers, and just about everyone else here nowadays. In fact, it has become a bit tragically hip. Despite the fact that there are still blocks here that are so rough that you'll get scared if you happen to take a wrong turn, Five Points is also so cool that you'll have to pay extremely high rents to live here.
There are fantastic restaurants, galleries, bars, and apartments here. There's Coors Field and Great Divide. Sports, galleries, and microbrews. That's Denver in a nutshell. Unfortunately, like I said, it has become so trendy that you might have a tough time finding reasonable rents if you'd like to stay. The Curtis Park area in particular is in high demand, but it's so close to downtown and so lively that you'll really have to pay a premium. This is a wonderful spot where there is always something happening, past and present, but everyone seems to have heard about it, so it might just be too trendy for its own good.
Cons
  • Uber-trendy, with rents reflecting this popularity
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"Gritty and industrial"

This nighborhood is frankly pretty depressing. It's gray. It's concrete, chain link, and corrugated metal. It contains old stretches of major highways, old factories, old houses, and old warehouses. Actually, I'm not one to have that knee-jerk reaction that factories and industrial development are ugly. Some of the factories out here are fascinating and beautiful. They are mini-cityscapes with a variety of shapes, plumes of pure white steam, covered with lights at night. Production in its purest form.
But the surrounding area has been depressed for decades, and appears buried under years of grime and stagnation. And, frankly, it literally stinks most of the time. This is due to the presence of the Purina factory here. (Or whatever dog food brand it is now--I've noticed the Purina checkerboard logo has not been visible for quite some time now.) Stick your nose into a dog food bag and take a deep whiff. That's what this neighborhood smells like. In fact, that's what the city smells like when the weather's right. National reporters who come here for the Stock Show each January have come away with the impression of Denver as a dank, smelly city because this is the site of the colisseum where the show is held. And that (the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo) is the only reason most Denver residents ever actually come to this neighborhood.
If you like truly industrial grit, and low property values, then go for it. But this is the last place that most people would want to live.
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"One of the rough edges"

There are rougher neighborhoods in Denver, but driving through East Colfax each day to work used to remind me of the old Colfax reputation for the quintessential bad neighborhood. In fact, Denver residents can look at each other and say "East Colfax", with a shrug, and know that they're talking about poverty, crime, drugs, and prostitution. Actually, that is changing thanks to revitalization efforts, but improvements haven't made much of a dent this far east. I would label this a mixed neighborhood, because it is not an unmitigated disaster, but is still rather stagnant.
There are many nice bungalow homes on the blocks off of Colfax itself. Some of these home prices are still comparatively low. But of course, there's a reason for that. There are some pretty rough spots east of Quebec. On the other hand, it is a settled family neighborhood, and there are spots worth considering. Because many city neighborhoods are on an upswing even in this economy, homes in neighborhoods like this that haven't quite "arrived" yet could end up being a brilliant investment. It's almost like the stage is set for this to be a perfect family neighborhood--older detached homes, big trees, nearby parks, schools, and quick access west to downtown and east to the excellent medical facilities of Anschutz campus.
All in all, this area is brimming with potential. Sadly, there is still a decided feel of danger lurking here. If I decide to go house-hunting anytime soon, I will check out properties here, but will also be very cautious.
Pros
  • Nice small detached homes
Cons
  • Colfax needs some redevelopment in this area
  • Higher than average crime rates
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"Wonderful mix of commercial, retail, residential, tourist urban environment"

Denver's downtown district is a really great urban area with the casual vibe that makes it a true Western city. Steel and glass skyscrapers stand shoulder-to-shoulder with historic brick buildings. The mix of laid-back and civilized is ever-present in each block of downtown, with the mountain backdrop serving as a constant reminder that a wilderness adventure is nearby whenever you get tired of the city crowds. It has been a joy to watch this area come into its own over the past few decades.
There was a time when downtown was a place to do business, with some shopping and dining options, but it wasn't a friendly place to live or to hang out after dark. All of that has changed completely.
It began in the early 80's with the redevelopment of 16th Street. This corridor was transformend into a pedestrian mall. Many predicted that it would not be able to sustain itself, because, at 13 blocks long, this was far longer than other major cities' efforts of this kind. The mall, with the diamond pattern designed by famed architect I.M. Pei to be reminiscent of the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, has beaten the odds, seeing increasing foot traffic from morning to night. Rents here are on the high side compared to many other neighborhoods, but those moving here from other major cities migh be pleasantly surprised. Compared to other mid-large cities, rents are competitive considering that this is obviously prime real estate. As of this writing, it's still possible to rent downtown for as low as roughly $1200, and they go up from there to many thousands per month.
Traffic and parking are predictably rough, as might be expected for a downtown area. Fortunately, Denver's light rail and bus service to downtown offer pretty good service. Getting around downtown itself is very easy thanks to the free 16th St. mall shuttle, which runs every minute up and down the central street, affording easy access from one end of downtown to the other.
You can find shopping at all price ranges here. Along 16th, there are low-mid priced stores, from drugstores to discount stores like Ross and TJ Maxx to more typical mall stores and a large movie theater. Larimer Square offers boutiqe shopping, a wonderful mix of restaurants, and a corridor of small white lights after dark. There are plenty of bars, whether you want to play a game of pool (Tarantula Bar), have a beer after seeing a baseball game, watch a cabaret show (basement of the D&F tower) or have a sophisticated cocktail while watching the sun set behind the mountains (try the Peaks lounge for a view that is worth the high-priced drinks--27th floor of the Hyatt Regency). There always seems to be a festival or parade going on. The Performing Arts Complex hosts conventions, and has theater and cultural events. There are touristy things to do here besides shopping. You can tour the nearby state capitol building, or the Denver Mint, which is one of only five in the nation. If you are looking for a lively area to live, work, and play, downtown will be a great fit.
Pros
  • Always something to do
  • Casual urban vibe
Cons
  • Lack of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
Dia
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"Airport, highways, and plains"

This is not a residential area. DIA, (Denver International Airport) is pretty much the only thing out in this area. There has been some recent residential development in some of the surrounding areas, but the region inside the borders contain mostly roadways and the airport itself. I think there are a few residences along Tower Road, in the southwest corner of this neighborhood, but that's about it.
DIA is actually far from Denver proper. I live in east central Denver, about 10 minutes east of downtown. I usually allow 45 minutes to get to the airport during times of light traffic, and more if it's anywhere close to rush hour. Actually, I-70 carries a lot of traffic most of the time. So this area isn't actually thought of as a Denver neighborhood--it's really just DIA.
If you want somewhere to live out on the plains, then you might consider this an interesting area to look into. But considering the pace of development, I wouldn't count on the isolation lasting very long.
The few homes out there tend to typify the new suburban-style community. They are inexpensive, beige, cookie-cutter houses with CCR regulations intended to keep them that way. It's hard for me to imagine what about this is appealing to anyone, but if you like that kind of new construction at a distance from the city, then by all means check it out.
Pros
  • Wide open spaces nearby
Cons
  • Far from downtown/central Denver
  • Still in its residential infancy; feels new and raw
Recommended for
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"A posh neighborhood with a twist"

Denver Country Club is an exclusive, members-only club that caters to the wealthy surrounding neighborhoods. This will give you an ifdea of what the Country Club neighborhood itself is like. It is adjacent to the Cherry Creek business district, Cheesman and Congress Parks, and is a beautiful residential neighborhood. Obviously, it's not cheap.

The neighborhood is adjacent to the upscale shopping district of Cherry Creek, which lies to its immediate east. Smaller businesses lie near the north section along the 6th Ave corridor. The beautiful brick mansions of the 7th avenue parkway contribute to the atmosphere of wealth and beauty in this neighborhood.

Along the western part of the neighborhood, there is more affordable living and shopping. Downing St. has more of the feel of nearby Capitol Hill, which adds some eclectic twists to the country club feel of the streets to the north. Country Club is an excellent neighborhood for anyone who is looking for high-end living and access to shopping and park activities.

There is some fairly heavy traffic here. University, 6th, 7th, and 8th Avenues, and Downing Streets all carry a lot of traffic. Nonetheless, this is not a noisy or unsafe neighborhood. The many adjacent park spaces provide an open and green feel that you might not expect from a central neighborhood, while the nearby shopping and quick access to downtown prevent this area from feeling cut off from the action.
Pros
  • Close to parks and Botanic Gardens
  • Many shopping options
  • Close to downtown and Cherry Creek
  • Elegant, historic mansions
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"An excellent family neighborhood"

I have lived in a couple of the nearby neighborhoods. Cory Merrill is mostly a residential neighborhood, with very nice homes. South Denver is popular with many residents, including college students and families. Washington Park is nearby, which is a wonderful park space with beautiful gardens. It is also handy to DU, and many grade schools, public and private.
The proximity to Bonnie Brae means that there are great dining options. The Colorado Blvd border of course contains retail stores. There is good access from here to the major traffic corridors, so it is a quiet neighborhood but does not feel cut off from anything. I personally prefer the neighborhoods further north, because I like to be closer to downtown. But the people that I know who live in this part of town simply love it and don't wish to live anywhere else.
This can be a pricey area to live, but that is true of many city neighborhoods. The schools and parks here make this a desirable area. This neighborhood is very close to the extremely moneyed neighborhoods of Belcaro, Cherry Creek, Polo Club, etc. so it's only to be expected that this is not a place to find major real estate bargains. However, prices here are not nearly as high as the wealthier areas to the north, so those with a decent income will find this to be an excellent place to raise a family.
Pros
  • close to parks and schools
  • Family-friendly
  • safe neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"A wonderful neighborhood for anyone"

I have lived in one of the neighborhoods surrounding Congress Park area for most of the past several decades, and I can't recommend it highly enough. It's a great neighborhood with close access to the best of the city, and home and rental values that cover almost all income levels. Toward the southwestern end lies Congress Park itself. This is a small park by neighborhood standards, but it's extremely nice. There are open green spaces, sports fields and a swimming pool, surrounded by beautiful homes and treelined streets. But if that's just not enough park, Denver Botanic Gardens is right across the street, and Cheesman Park and City Park are both within a couple of minutes' drive! You won't be lacking for places to walk, jog, picnic, etc.
Much of the residential portion of Congress is made up of expensive brick bungalow homes. If you have the income to live on these blocks, you would be hard-pressed to find a better neighborhood. 7th Avenue Parkway in particular has a breathtaking strip of beautiful homes.
But if you can't quite afford those, there are many other options. North of 12th Avenue, many rentals make living much more affordable. 12th Avenue itself offers some wonderful little stores and restaurants which add to the charm and utility of this area. Along the Colorado Boulevard strip, there are both old and new apartment buildings with a broad variety of characters and amenities. The 13th and 14th Avenue strip also has many apartments for rent. This stretch of both Colfax on the north and Colorado Blvd on the east has some good little neighborhood shops, bars and restaurants.
Parking here is much more workable than in the neighborhoods just to the west, but this is still close enough to downtown to be very convenient. National Jewish Hospital lies on the southwest corner of Colfax and Colorado. This is one of the top respiratory hospitals in the world. People come from all over the country to seek treatment here. It's a cutting-edge research center, so the hospital offers employment opportunities right in the neighborhood. Overall, I doubt if anyone who moves to this neighborhood would ever regret it.
Pros
  • beautiful residences and a range of options
  • many open green spaces
  • Quiet yet close to downtown
Cons
  • Need to car or bus to grocery store
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Mixed neighborhood close to older suburbs, adjacent to golf course"

Home prices are very low here, and many amenities could make this a very attractive neighborhood to some people. I would not want to live here, but that's just a personal preference. I'm so heavily biased toward the east central neighborhood where I've lived most of my life that this area doesn't suit my tastes. But for people who want affordable residential neighborhoods set a bit apart from the crowded city blocks, this could be a good option.
It's much closer to Denver than the outlying suburban areas, so it is a good option for commuters. This strip is actually good for those who work either downtown or in the DTC area, because it is convenient to either. There is a nice golf course very close by, and many spots here have great mountain views.
The reason I noted that this is a mixed area is because it lies along the old industrial areas of south Santa Fe Drive. There are many areas of industrial development with warehouses, train cars, trucks, etc. However, off the main strip lie quiet residential areas with single-family homes, apartments, and condos. Home prices are low, but some of these spots are much nicer than the generally poor reputation of West Denver would suggest. There are quiet homes with lawns and the aforementioned beautiful views. If your heart is in the suburbs but you don't want to deal with the long commutes, this is a good spot to consider.
Pros
  • handy to city and suburbs
  • great views
  • good home values
Cons
  • gritty areas of old industrial development
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
Just now

"Walking a fine line"

Cole neighborhood has been a depressed area for decades, and is one of the high-crime areas of the city. But it might be poised for a comeback. It's near some great areas of revitalization in the neighborhoods surrounding downtown. And it could be a terrific investment, because it's a truly historic neighborhood in a great location with low home prices. Cole is jam-packed with adorable Victorian-era homes. It is minutes from both downtown and City Park. The neighborhood has become increasingly diverse, which seems to be injecting new energy and life into the area.
There are some new businesses opening up, and the neighborhood is consistently attractive to those looking for home bargains. But crime is still a major concern. Robberies are frequent. This neighborhood is worth watching, because of the great homes and the feel that new life is slowly infusing the old neighborhood. I would seriously consider moving here if the changes that have taken place in nearby Curtis Park start to spread outward. If you decide to start house-hunting here, all I can say is be very selective. But on the whole, this place has great potential and I am confident that the area will come into its own, with the cooperation of both long-time residents and new investors.
Pros
  • close proximity to downtown/City Park
  • beautiful Victorian bungalows
  • low housing costs
Cons
  • crime
  • uncertainty about direction of home values
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Needs some TLC"

It's a bit strange how there's a strip of areas running east from just north of downtown that has not seemed to keep pace with the rest of Denver's development. Logistically, this is a prime location. It is handy to the main arteries of Colorado Bouldevard and Martin Luther King Boulevard. It is very handy to downtown, to City Park, and not one but two golf courses. It has quiet streets, and is filled with the cozy detached bungalow housing that makes many Denver neighborhoods so desirable. Home prices are very low by city standards, and this is an old established family neighborhood. And yet...
While the area is full of little gems and promise, it's not quite what you'd expect. Improvements and maintenance in this neighborhood are only mediocre. It's hard not to want to like it, but it's not a very safe neighborhood. It's very close to downtown and other lively neighborhoods, but somehow feels isolated from that lively activity.
If you are willing to make a short drive to reach great shops and restaurants, this could be a good spot. But the bigger chance you would be taking is on home values and safety. It's so hard to say what the local markets will do in the coming years. But if you're a bit adventurous in this sense, then it might be worth looking into as a residential neighborhood. I would be very cautious about buying a home here, especially if there are children to consider. Clayton could be a really terrific neighborhood, but it's not quite there yet.
Pros
  • Good deals on housing
Cons
  • possibly unsafe
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"Civic and public spaces just south of downtown"

Civic Center contains courts, museums, the main public library, and a few restaurants. Most of the time, people don't think about housing in this neighborhood, but that is starting to change becuase of some high-end condo development here.
If you want to search for apartments in this neighborhood, you will be looking at the area that comes to a point south of 12th Avenue, the other borders being the main thoroughfares of Broadway and Speer. And you will probably have better luck if you look for "Golden Triangle", which is another name for this neighborhood. Actually, when locals mention Civic Center, odds are they are referring to the area of the state capitol building, the City and County Courthouse, and the broad swath of column-flanked green park space in between. They might also be including the area of the Denver Public Library and the Denver Art Museum stretching west from 13th and Broadway.
A lot of this area is still covered with the small pay parking lots that are filled with people who are going to the courthouse for work or jury duty. But this area has also been the target of a lot of recent development, mostly stemming from the prime location and the new Art Museum building. Some extremely high-end condos have been built to the south.
The activity in this area is cultural, thanks to the museum and library, and public/civic, thanks to the park. The museum houses a huge variety of collections and has some areas geared toward children as well as adults. The view from the glass walkway that runs over 13th Avenue at the 2nd story level is worth the price of admission alone. Go during a snowstorm if you get the chance, because you will be standing in midair, in a glass tunnel, just like a figure in a snow globe. The park itself is a nice space for festivals and other events, but is also unfortunately a gathering spot for large numbers of downtown's homeless population.
It is a fun area to visit. There's a great local restaurant called Pint's Pub just west of the Art Museum, which is a brewpub with a huge collection of single malt scotch. And of course, being that close to downtown means that residents have any activity they want available to them.
Pros
  • Proximity to downtown
  • City and County Building lights display at Christmastime
Cons
  • Heavy traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"Lively lifestyle and great location"

This area is in the thick of city activity, but has a different vibe than Cheesman Park and Capitol Hill to the north. The stretch of Colfax and particularly of 17th Ave running through this neighborhood has great restaurants and bars, and of course the proximity to City Park is a huge plus. This area lies right around Presbyterian St. Luke's hospital, where my niece and nephew were born, and St. Joseph's medical center. These are major area hospitals, and there is a lot of activity here because of that.
Investments have been made in the apartment housing in this neighborhood. There are some great apartments here at reasonable rents. I believe that a lot of work has been done here. This is both the result of the general revitalization efforts in Denver over recent decades, and the relocation of Childrens' Hospital. Childrens' used to be near St. Luke's, but moved east to the new Aurora medical campus. This move relieved some of the congestion and provided some new development opportunities.
The northern end of this neighborhood used to be a very dangerous place. It has improved, but there are still some spots to look out for. Parking is tough and crowded. Overall, though, this area is a great place to live, work, dine out, and party.
Pros
  • Excellent hospitals for health care and jobs
  • great local businesses
  • very handy to downtown
Cons
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Beautiful east central neighborhood with access to the best of the city"

This neighborhood has played a big role in my life growing up, and it still does. I grew up in an adjacent neighborhood, so City Park was a frequent destination for family outings. We went for picnics, visits to the zoo, and trips to the museum and planetarium. I went to East High School. This is a beautiful old building (dating from 1909, if I recall the cornerstone inscription correctly). Tourists used to walk by and ask whether it was a school or a museum.
Today, I still live near the park, and love spending time there. I usually go to photograph the classic view of the lake and pavillion, with the city skyline and mountains providing the backdrop. I also go to join the many other runners who take advantage of the miles of jogging paths that wind through the park and around Ferril Lake.
My mom took an apartment in the southern strip of this neighborhood after her retirement. She may decide to move again, because rents there, while never cheap, are rising precipitously each year. This neighborhood has been revitalized, and there are many restored homes and new condos that have gone up. It is a beautiful Denver neighborhood, handy to all of the dining, shopping, and other activity of the east central neighborhoods and downtown have to offer.
Pros
  • Park has open space, museum, and zoo
  • Handy to other great neighborhoods
Cons
  • Relatively high housing costs
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
Just now

"Our mellow answer to Rodeo Drive"

The Cherry Creek district is the high-end shopping and business district, with some residential neighborhoods in the mix. If you like designer boutique stores and restaurants owned by famous people, this is the place to be. Cherry Creek mall is popular with locals and tourists, and the streets to the north of the mall are also lined with shops and restaurants. But not all of Cherry Creek shopping is expensive. The Colorado Blvd and 6th Ave borders have more typical retail districts. 6th Avenue in particular has nice little places to shop.
The heart of Cherry Creek itself also has shopping for more average-income people, with mid-priced stores mixed in with the high-end shops and spas. Denver really isn't the kind of place to support an entire district of wildly expensive and glitzy shops, and Cherry Creek reflects this. You can spend a lot to dine here, but you can also find one of Denver's oldest neighborhood bar/restaurants. Duffy's Cherry Cricket has been here for most of the past century, and is an inexpensive, casual place known for some of the best burgers in the country. That's the kind of place that takes the edge off of the upper-crust exclusive feel and makes this a fun neighborhood to hang out in.
There are offices along the southeast section of Cherry Creek drive and Alameda. The northern and eastern ends of the neighborhood have a lot of residential buildings. There are single-family and apartment/condo options. As you might imagine, costs are high.
Traffic is very heavy here, on the busy streets that form Cherry Creek's borders and in the smaller streets in the neighborhood, where it costs money to even pull over and park at a curb.
The Cherry Creek trail is a long path for walking/jogging/cycling and is one of Denver's hundreds of miles of pathways for outdoor exercisers. People who come here might be surprised to see that hard-core fitness enthusiasts run or ride bikes even in the worst of winter weather.
Pros
  • safe neighborhood
Cons
  • Tons of traffic around Cherry Creek North and the mall
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"The best of city living and green spaces"

Cheesman Park has everything to offer residents. Call it "Capitol Hill lite". I lived close to here for years (in Capitol Hill), and my grandmother has lived in this neighborhood for a long time, walking in Cheesman Park every nice morning of the year. If you like Capitol Hill, but it's a bit too hipster/crowded/noisy for you, then look into this neighborhood.

Cheesman Park has a great diversity of housing and residents. Around the park and the Botanic Gardens there are very upscale and beautiful old brick homes. There are also some newer, high-priced condos. To the west of the park is a very nice residential neighborhood with detached single-family homes. It's not cheap, but it's a great place for families. Other areas, particularly the strip north of the park between 13th and Colfax, have much more affordable rentals. There are some senior living buildings here as well as other apartments.

Cheesman Park has been a gay hangout for decades, and the neighborhood is still very LGBT friendly. Like Capitol Hill, there is such a great mix of people that absolutely everyone is accepted in this gorgeous neighborhood. There is plenty to do, as well. There's the retail strip of Colfax, and it is just minutes from Capitol Hill and downtown. The Botanic Gardens has always been gorgeous, and renovations have recently been completed there. And the Park itself is a wonderful old green space, with plenty of history. It's a popular place to work out and hang out.
Pros
  • Close to dining, nightlife, downtown
  • Diverse Community
  • Dog Friendly
  • Excellent green space
Cons
  • Not a lot of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
Just now

"A neighborhood worth considering-low real estate prices and good promise"

First of all, if you're looking for information on this area, there's a point of confusion that you should be aware of. The Chaffee Park neighborhood is not the same as the neighborhood around Chaffee Park, the park! So be careful. Chaffee Park neighborhood is north of I-70 (see map). Chaffee Park (the park) is actually south of here in Sunnyside. They are close, but they are different neighborhoods.
I have mixed feelings about this neighborhood, but it's an area I want to keep an eye on. I don't have much more familiarity with it than as a driver. On the one hand, it's just sort of "North Denver", which means a sort of former-suburbia-cum-low-rent city fringe neighborhood. There are some cute little houses, but the area is a bit run down, and years ago I would say that there's not much more to it. But I think that is changing.
For one thing, there are some North Denver neighborhoods that have really hit their stride (Montbello, for example). Some of these places have gone from ghetto to nice family neighborhoods over the last decade or so. Chaffee Park is really in a prime spot for this kind of upgrade.
Another reason to think that this might be a hidden gem is the area to its immediate south. Sunnyside, Berkely, etc. have become really hot lately. So much so that real estate prices are skyrocketing. So as a spot right across the highway from all of this trendy stuff, it's poised to go up in value, rather than down. And the home prices are extremely attractive here. You can buy a house in the mid-high 100's. Homes in the neighborhoods to the south are running about twice that. And they are cute, single-family homes, with yards, etc. Lots of them have been remodeled. Regis school is also nearby, which is another plus.
There are some parks with nice open spaces and views of the mountains. The neighborhood is heavily residential, so the best dining and shopping is probably in Berkely or Sunnyside. I think this area has great potential, but be careful about the block you decide to settle on.
Pros
  • Low housing cost
  • adjacent to great shopping, dining areas
Cons
  • borderline neighborhood
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Classic eclectic Denver, a great laid-back urban vibe"

I lived in the heart of Capitol Hill for six years (near 11th and Penn). Like many locals, I love this neighborhood dearly. It is a truly quintessential Denver city neighborhood. It has seen boom-and-bust times. Decades ago, most of it was a pretty dangerous neighborhood, with lots of drugs and crime. Some of that still exists, but that's just one of many facets of Capitol Hill, and I was never afraid while living there. This neighborhood is for anyone who likes a mixed urban vibe.
It's adjacent to downtown and has access to everything. When I lived there I was reluctant to leave it. This is partly because everything I needed was already within walking distance, and partly because I wouldn't give up my parking spot without a very compelling reason. I had a car available to me, but either walked or took the bus to school at Auraria or work downtown because it wasn't worth the hassle to pay for downtown parking and then try to find a spot when I got home at night!
All of the buildings are brick or stone, and the streets are lined with huge old trees. Open spaces are minimal/nonexistent, but it's a great place to walk. It's been popular with students and young carreer singles for a long time because of the affordable rents and easy access to downtown. Rents are rising, and it's now not the clearest choice for cheap rents in a decently safe neighborhood, but it's still very affordable and most buildings have a lot of character. The many rentals are mixed in with very high-priced old homes and condos. The whole neighborhood is very pet-friendly, which is another bonus.
There are so many little neighborhood restaurants, bars, stores, and historic buildings (the Molly Brown House among others) that there is always something to do. Many shops and bars (Wax Trax, FashionNation, Buffalo Exchange, The Snake Pit, Pandora's, and on and on) are small places that have been beloved by locals for years. All of it is cheap, too!
If you want a quiet neighborhood with big lawns for the kids to run, then this place won't suit you. But if you love the city, you'll love it here.Everyone is accepted here. It's a neighborhood for students, gays, punks, young, old (although mostly young), hipsters, crazies, freaks, and the straight-laced. Nobody's surprised by anyone else in Capitol Hill. It's all just part of the scene.
Pros
  • affordable
  • great mix of people
  • access to downtown/Auraria colleges
  • friendly, mellow Denver people
  • LOTS to do!
  • safe neighborhood
Cons
  • dog-eat-dog fights for parking
  • costs are slowly rising
  • sometimes TOO youthful and energetic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
Just now

"Lively, exciting, artsy, beautiful old neighborhood."

Berkely is one of the hottest neighborhoods in the city, and for good reason. Berkely is one of the best examples of a revitalization district. It arrived along with other neighborhoods in the Highlands district as one of the trendiest spots in Denver for artists, entrepreneurs, and residents. Astonishing changes have taken place here within the last decade. This are is full of wonderful old homes and commercial properties, some of which date back to the Victorian era.
This is really my kind of neighborhood. It's established, but it's vibrant, exciting, and eclectic. There's a little of everything. Many of the old homes have been restored, and the upgrades are continuing. The neighborhood is thriving even in this real estate market. There are still some run-down blocks, but a lot of it is great for living, dining, shopping, and getting a lot of local color.
Residential streets are crisscrossed with commercial retail streets, so it's a perfect area for walking from home to shopping, dining, or galleries. The businesses that thrive here are small local establishments. You can find any kind of food or quirky little store you want. The Tennessee arts district is kind of the hub of the eclectic, artist area. The Tennesee Arts Walk stretches for blocks on either side of 44th Ave, and has a lively First Friday each month that is starting to rival the older and larger Santa Fe one. I actually prefer the Berkely one.
You really can find everything here. It's a family neighborhood with brick homes, big trees and lawns, schools, restaurants, etc. But there's a major artsy-hipster vibe, too, which is where the neighborhood vibe comes from. There are tons of galleries, mixed together with little shops, marijuana dispensaries, etc. I said a bit of everything. I guess the only thing you won't find here are major big-chain department stores and restaurants.
Housing and rents have gotten high in Berkely, unfortunately. That's to be expected since the city housing market has remained pretty strong in the metro area even as suburban area values have dropped. The most expensive areas (not counting really wealthy neighborhoods) are these old, tree-lined brick home places that Denver proper is full of, so rental and purchase bargains are getting increasingly harder to find here. If I could find one, I'd probably be living there already. But that goes hand-in-hand with a revitalization district that is so trendy. It's one of Denver's best neighborhoods, though, whether for living or visiting.
Pros
  • Great vibe
  • Lots to do
  • Eclectic, exciting
Cons
  • Cost of living continues to rise
  • Some bad spots still
  • Heavy traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"Great place to live if youre uber-rich, good place for dining or medical spas even if youre not."

Belcaro is a beautiful neighborhood, with amazing homes and tree-lined streets. It's one of Denver's great old neighborhoods. There are a few ways to subdivide this neighborhood to talk about it. Actually, this can be confusing.
If you are looking into real-estate here, you need to be aware that many realtors and other sites will consider the north border of Belcaro to be E. Exposition Ave. Obviously this is less than half of the area covered by other sites, like this one. Most of the area north of Exposition is actually referred to as "Polo Club", because of the dizzyingly moneyed Polo Club North residential neighborhood. This area is surrounded by a high brick wall. I have visited it a few times, being lucky enough to have done some pet-sitting here, and it is a wonderful place. It's not just a rich neighborhood, but a truly beautiful one. Instead of the grossly-ugly, beige-siding-stamped-out-cookie-cutter-McMansion-rich-family neighborhoods that you see now, where the houses look just like every other "community project" neighborhood houses, except bigger, most of these homes are truly stately brick mansions. It's frankly amazing. If you can afford to raise your family there, then go for it.
South of Exposition is another beautiful and wealthy neighborhood. It's expensive too, and the only reason it doesn't stand out at the most exclusive place in the area is because it borders even more posh neighborhoods.
I used to live on Mississippi and Bellaire, just a stone's throw from the little southwest leg of Belcaro shown on the map. I did my grocery shopping and other errands at Belcaro shopping center which lies on the Colorado Boulevard stretch. The businesses here are long-established and have low turnover. You can get groceries, home supplies, and there are also cosmetic spas along both the Colorado stretch and the Cherry Creek Drive.
The northern point is mostly offices--many medical or cosmetic, as I mentioned, because this is getting into the posh Cherry Creek business area. Colorado Blvd is all commercial, mostly retail of various kinds.
The southwest corner is referred to by locals not as Belcaro, but as Bonnie Brae. Visit and you'll know why. This was settled by wealthy and pioneering Scots in the late 19th century. Practically everyone in Denver loves to head to Bonnie Brae for dinner and/or ice cream sometimes. Bonnie Brae Ice Cream and Bonnie Brae Tavern are long-established local favorites, but you can find every kind of food here whether you're in the mood for ice cream or sushi. It's a great place for residents who can afford to live here, but the local restaurants are also good for those of us who can't.
Pros
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • safe neighborhood
Cons
  • Few can afford to live here
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"Bad neighborhood - pass it by"

I hate to say it, but avoid Barnum West, especially if you have kids. It's attractive because of the really low home prices and the fact that there are many old homes with lots of potential. But you get what you pay for. There are many old family businesses, too, which is cool, but still... It's a bad neighborhood with lots of crime. It's a neighborhood that I want to like, but it is just too dangerous for me. I think that if the economy recovers, this area could become the next big thing, but things are way too unstable for that to happen anytime soon.
This is really a place that, for the most part, I just drive by anytime I get on the 6th Ave Freeway. It's in that depressing-looking part of town that you see as you head toward the mountains. From the south side, (when you go down W Alameda Ave) it's scary looking, as well. The views from that neighborhood would be great if it was a place that you would choose to live. If you're adventurous enough to live in a sketchy part of town (and you don't have kids), then it might be worth looking into. But, sorry to say, I would give it a miss.
Pros
  • Potentially great homes
  • Good city/mountain views
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
2/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"A neigborhood with potential, but just too scary"

Barnum is one of Denver's old neighborhoods, with wonderful older homes. Some of these neighborhoods have been restored and revitalized, and it would be hard to think of a better place to live. Unfortunately, Barnum is not one of these neighborhoods. There have been some recent efforts, but it's still a sketchy place. I've lived in Denver most of my life but have only driven past or into Barnum briefly.
It has an interesting history. Most of the neigborhood was bought by P.T. Barnum in (I think) the 1850's to use as winter quarters for the circus performers. It was later annexed to the city. Lots of the homes there were built in that era. Sadly, it has become very run down. I noticed some news stories recently saying that a volunteer group was starting a project to go in and restore some of these homes, so maybe that's a good sign. but there are still lots of run-down areas and gang activity, high crime, etc.
On the plus side, there is a park with gorgeous views west toward downtown and the mountains. Houses there are inexpensive and full of potential. I think this neighborhood might be a great investment, but of course it really depends on where the economy is headed in the near future. Someone with knowledge of construction and remodeling, who is able to wait for the home values to rise over the years might be very tempted to invest here. I definitely would not recommend this for anyone with kids. Barnum has potential, but it's not really a safe place.
Pros
  • Gorgeous views
  • Great old homes
Cons
  • High crime
  • bad spots
Recommended for
  • Singles
WelcomeToBarnum
WelcomeToBarnum Just curious -- if you've only driven past or into Barnum briefly and have limited personal experience with this neighborhood, where are you getting your information from to write a review? Also, PT Barnum did own the land briefly in 1878, but it was never meant to be home for his circus -- it was a development investment -- and he also gave some of it to his daughter, Helen Buchtel (think Buchtel Blvd) for $1. The Denver Public Library Western History and Genealogy Department has lots of great info if you're interested in researching the neighborhood more thoroughly.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"A historic neighborhood with a mix of everything"

The Baker district is definitely for those who love the urban vibe. It's an old, eclectic neighborhood with mixed industrial, commercial, and residential spots. 6th Ave and Broadway have shops and restaurants. These are the small, independently owned kind of retail establishment. This means it's a great place to try everything and find the little gems that are your favorites. There are places (such as The Hornet) that have been local favorites for a long time, and some new places that are opening up. I've never lived within the Baker borders, but have some favorite restaurants there, and I used to visit a friend with a gorgeous Victorian in that neighborhood.
Baker has seen lots of ups and downs over the decades. It has had its time as a neighborhood to be avoided, but it has also seen a surge in popularity. Some of the reclamation and upgrade projects have hit roadblocks since the economy has tanked (especially the old Gates Rubber Company project on the South end of Baker).
Nonetheless, it's a wonderful neighborhood. The great old Victorian homes are a major attraction, and lots of them have been refurbished. Denver's real estate market has stayed pretty strong, so it's tough to find a bargain in the metro area, but there are still some pockets in Baker with affordable living spaces.
Overall, there are still some sketchy areas in this neighborhood, but there are also some fantastic spots for living, shopping, and dining. It's definitely a good place to live and hang out once you get familiar with the neighborhood. If your heart is in the suburbs, this is not the place for you, but if you love city life, you'll probably love Baker.
Pros
  • Historic buildings
  • Urban vibe
Cons
  • Heavy traffic
  • A couple of pockets to avoid
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"College Campus, Major Sports, and Family Fun"

First of all, this is not a residential area, so don't look for an apartment here! Lots of the surrounding areas have great apartments, but Auraria proper has no housing. That said, I'll talk about what they do have.
Most of Auraria is taken up by Auraria Campus. This is a huge campus that actually has three schools: University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College (Metro to locals), and Communitiy College of Denver. I went to UCD, and later worked there as a researcher, so one way or the other I spent about nine years on Auraria Campus. They have done some major building projects since I was working there. I'm glad to see that they completed a new science building, because that needed some updating.
I recommend this area if you're thinking about going to school here. The campus is nice, with grassy areas to study in warm weather, and indoor places to lounge in cold weather. The Tivoli building was a brewery about 100 years ago and is now a student center, administrative offices, food court, bar, and movie theater. Auraria is right across Speer from downtown Denver, so there are lots of options for eating/shopping/socializing in your off-hours.
This is not a typical college campus, becuase it's not a self-contained unit with school buildings, student housing, cafeteria, etc. It is a "commuter college" area, meaning that there is no on-campus housing, and students are from all over the city. There have been some student housing buildings that have opened farther south on Speer in recent years, but it's still not a typical "dorm student" college atmosphere. There are lots of non-traditional students, and influences from both Denver and around the world, which is a great way to experience higher education.
The burritos at the little stand by the library are old favorites of just about everyone. They are cheap, tasty, and huge, so they are great starving-student fare.
Parking has always been kind of a pain. Everyone's commuting which means that parking can be hard to come by. The light rail and bus lines go right by the campus, though.
As for the rest of the neighborhood, there's the Pepsi center and the football stadium. The Nuggets play at the Pepsi center, the Broncos at the stadium, and there are major music shows at both.
There is also Six Flags Elitch Gardens (a big amusement park). The views of downtown and the mountains are wonderful from there and from the campus. Finally there's Downtown Aquarium. This is a really fun place, with a restaurant and bar. Each has one wall that is actually the wall of the biggest aquarium tank. It's fun, but expensive, so only go if you're in the mood to splurge. If you go in the late afternoon (after 3:30 or 4:00, I think), you can get a discounted entry because they will be closing soon, and then you can hang out for happy hour at the bar which stays open.
It's hard to use any of the website's ranking for this neighborhood, because most of the rankings are for residential areas. There are no residential options here, so most of them don't apply. But overall, I would recommend the campus for anyone considering going to school here. For families, Six Flags, sports games, and the aquarium are good for a day or evening out.
Pros
  • Downtown-adjacent
  • Lots of education options
  • Entertainment
Cons
  • Parking
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Students

Best Neighborhoods to Live In

Best Cities to Live In

Tell everyone what you love about your neighborhood!

Leave a Review

Have a question?

How are schools? Is the area safe? What about public transit options?" Why not ask our community of locals!

Ask Now

Selling or Renting Your Home?

Maximize the selling price of your home by sharing what you love about your suburb to increase its appeal...

Leave a Review

Corporate Relocation Manager?

Enable your employees to share local knowledge in a private, trusted environment with those relocating... while building community.

Learn More