CalTex10

  • Local Expert 1,746 points
  • Reviews 4
  • Questions 0
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Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Nice family neighborhood not too far from the action"

This unassuming neighborhood located in South Austin provides residents with many of the benefits available to those living south of Lady Bird Lake without attracting a lot of attention. It is close to hip and trendy South Congress Avenue, with its many funky shops and popular eateries, as well as a quick ride to Lady Bird Lake and downtown. But it is far enough away to maintain its old-time roots, more affordably priced housing, and quiet streets.

Galindo is located between W. Oltorf Street to the north and Ben White (Highways 290 and 71) to the south, the Union Pacific Railroad tracks to the west and South 1st Street to the east. Homes were generally built in the 1950s and 1960s, mostly in the ranch and bungalow styles so common to Austin. With the continued pressure of growth in the city, and the extreme popularity of the neighborhoods just north of Galindo, change and gentrification are coming to this area of town. One can still find a fixer-upper in the mid-$100s here, with most homes falling in the range of $250 to $300. Because of its state of transition, it is not uncommon to find an older home badly in need of repair next to a beautiful, newly remodeled home occupied by a young Austin tech professional. There are many singles and young couples, as well as young families, many of them Hispanic, living here.

Residents enjoy having the South Austin Park and Recreation Center located in this neighborhood, which provides a playscape, ball fields, tennis courts, and programs for children and adults. Those with dogs take advantage of the open fields to let their pooches get their exercise and social hour. There are many neighborhood favorite hangouts found here, from Torchy’s Tacos to the beloved dive bar, G & S Lounge. With St. Edwards University just a mile away, this is also a great neighborhood for students, who can take advantage of the lower housing costs while still getting to soak up the South Austin way of life.
Pros
  • South Austin Park and Rec Center
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Cheap real estate
  • Peace and quiet
Cons
  • Some rundown homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now
Editors Choice

"Everything great about Austin is here"

Austinites have very strong opinions on what is the best neighborhood to live in, but it is hard to beat Zilker for how it epitomizes what makes Austin so loved and so livable. Located in central south Austin, just below Lady Bird Lake, the Zilker neighborhood has the best of all that Austin has to offer right at its doorstep. Close to downtown and next to Zilker Park, the jewel of Austin’s renowned park system, residents enjoy both the benefits of an urban location and access to prime green space, all within easy reach.

The boundaries for the Zilker neighborhood are Lamar Boulevard to the south and east, Lady Bird Lake to the north, and Rabb Road and Robert E. Lee Road to the west. Homes vary widely here, and one can find small bungalows as well as historic estates and very modern new construction. The convenience and many amenities of this neighborhood come at a steep price, and a medium-sized home will average in the $400s, although it is possible to find a small home for under $300K. This is a great neighborhood for kids, and area schools include Zilker Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School.

Much of what makes Austin popular is found in and along this neighborhood. Barton Springs Road is home to many local favorites, including Chuy’s Tex-Mex restaurant, Flipnotics, where one can get great coffee and great local music and Shady Grove, popular for its outdoor seating and live music. Traveling down Lamar Boulevard brings you to Uchi, a high-end, nationally-touted and local favorite Asian-inspired restaurant. But what sets the Zilker neighborhood apart is nearby Zilker Park, the ultimate outdoor-lovers paradise. Here one finds acres of green space, miles of hike and bike trails, Lady Bird Lake where one can canoe, kayak or learn how to use a standing paddle board, the latest craze. Zilker is home to the Botanical Gardens and Auditorium Shores, where the annual Austin City Limits is held. Also found in Zilker is Barton Springs Pool, the much-cherished spring-fed pool whose constant 68 degree waters keep Austinites cool during even the hottest of summers. Besides the high price tag on housing, there is nothing negative about the Zilker neighborhood, making it a perfect representative of what makes this town stand out from the rest.
Pros
  • Zilker park in your backyard
  • Strong community spirit
  • Great location
Cons
  • A bit expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Up and coming family neighborhood"

This far northwest neighborhood is one of Austin’s up and coming areas, meaning that it is still a neighborhood with some issues of crime and lower property values, but is steadily being transformed. Historically this has been a predominantly Hispanic neighborhood, and there are many long-time residents who remain here.

Often compared to nearby Crestview and Allandale (sometimes Wooten is referred to as North Allandale), Wooten carries many of the same benefits and vibe of these more popular neighborhoods. But because of its spotty reputation, housing prices remain lower. The borders of Anderson Lane to the south and Highway 183 to the east and north and Burnet Road to the west create a small, triangular-shaped neighborhood. Housing prices can range from the high $100s up into the mid-$200s, saving buyers from $50,000 to $75,000 compared to their neighbors to the south. Area schools include Wooten Elementary, which recently implemented a dual-language program. Burnet Middle School and Lanier High School are the other neighborhood schools serving this area.

Area residents defend their neighborhood from those who characterize it as unsafe. The community is strong and committed to continuing to improve the region. It is still convenient to downtown and the University of Texas, and Burnet Road continues to attract new businesses, giving the area a trendier and more interesting feel. Families find the neighborhood to be a good fit, but for those who prefer more excitement than the local bowling alley, it may not be the best choice.
Pros
  • Strong community spirit
  • Diverse population
  • Lower cost housing
Cons
  • A bit far from downtown
  • Pretty run down in some areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Beautiful old-style Austin neighborhood"

For some reason, Austin likes to use the name “Windsor” for its neighborhoods, as two other areas, Windsor Hills and Windsor Park share the moniker. But Windsor Road, the posh neighborhood in central west Austin, shares few qualities with its similarly-named neighbors. Located in the highly desirable (and highly expensive) area next to Tarrytown and Old Enfield, this is one of Austin’s most charming neighborhoods to live in.

The boundaries for Windsor Road are Windsor Road to the south, 35th Street to the north, MoPac Expressway to the west and N. Lamar Boulevard to the east. This largely residential neighborhood is made up largely of small to medium-sized bungalow-style homes built in the 1940s to 1960s. This is a close-knit community, and keep in mind that it is old-Austin exclusive, rather than new-Austin. That means many of the residents are proud of their hippie roots or at least appreciate the hippie lifestyle. Housing prices run high here, averaging in the $500s for a 3 or 4-bedroom home. Many families chose to live here as the area schools are highly regarded, as well as seniors and young professionals. The area schools include Casis and Bryker Woods Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School.

Windsor Road is a bit of an oasis surrounded by major thoroughfares that make it quite convenient to all of Austin. It is very close to downtown and the University of Texas. N. Lamar contains plenty of restaurants and retail, as well as 35th Street. There is a small neighborhood park located within its boundaries, Bailey Park. But also running through Windsor Road is Shoal Creek, which has a popular hike and bike trail that will take you very close to downtown. If you can afford to live here, or if you are lucky enough to find a solid older home with potential, you would be considered lucky to call this neighborhood home.
Pros
  • Great area schools
  • Beautiful homes
Cons
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Family friendly neighborhood on the east side"

This central east Austin neighborhood often gets confused with the other spots in Austin that share the “Windsor” name: Windsor Hills and Windsor Road, and it remains less well-known among Austinites. But it appears that the residents of this neighborhood don’t mind their obscurity, and even prefer it.

Windsor Park is located north of 51st Street and south of Highway 290, with Interstate 35 marking the western border and Manor Road defining the east. This is a largely residential neighborhood, dominated by ranch-style homes with good-sized yards built in the 1950s. Largely overlooked by the rest of Austin, the residents of Windsor Park take pride in their neighborhood and believe it is one of the city’s undiscovered gems. Many original residents still live here, but recently the area has seen an influx of young families with children who appreciate the convenient location, affordable housing prices and east-side vibe. It’s a mixed-race neighborhood comprised primarily of Hispanic households, as well as African-Americans and whites.

Because of its location east of I-35 and somewhat north, housing prices are quite affordable. It is common to find a mid-sized home in the range of mid-to-high $100s. While there are some homes and areas that have fallen into disrepair, most of the neighborhood consists of clean, quiet, tree-lined streets. Neighbors are friendly here and community events are popular, so it feels as if everyone knows each other, and look out for one another. Area schools include Blanton Elementary, Pearce Middle School and Reagan High School.

Despite its much-overlooked status, Windsor Park is very convenient to much of Austin’s action. It is 15-minutes from downtown and the University of Texas. The neighborhood also sits just above the new Mueller development which contains a range of retail shops, although most are national chains. However, local flavor can be found along Cameron Road and Berkman Drive. The neighborhood park, Bartholomew District Park, contains a new playscape and splash pad which is very popular in the warmer months. The Windsor Park branch of the public library is also located here. So while Windsor Park may not offer much in the way of excitement, it has much appeal for those looking for a neighborhood with character and amenities, not too far from the center of Austin.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Close to new Mueller development
  • Quiet, clean, and reasonably priced living
Cons
  • Some areas need work
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nondescript quiet neighborhood"

Windsor Hills (which should not be confused with the similarly named Windsor Road or Windsor Park neighborhoods) is a quiet, mostly residential neighborhood located in far northeast Austin. As many of the areas of this town have experienced in the last ten years, much change and new development has occurred in this area. Previously Windsor Hills felt on the outskirts of the city, but Austin’s feverish growth has come this way as well.
The boundaries for Windsor Hills are E. Rundburg Lane to the south, E. Braker Lane to the north, Interstate 35 to the west and Dessau Road to the east. Located about 20 to 30 minutes from downtown, it is not especially inconvenient, but one does need to rely on I-35, which is frequently congested and quite unpopular with Austin residents. The far north location helps with housing costs, however, and many young families have settled here. A medium to large-sized home can be found in the range of the low to mid-$100s. Area schools include Graham Elementary, Dobie Middle School and Reagan High School.

This largely mixed race neighborhood (Hispanic, African American and white) has a strong and involved community that has worked diligently to maintain and improve the region. Crime has historically been a problem in the southern part of Windsor Hills, particularly along E. Rundberg Avenue. The neighborhood association worked with the city to bring in development that would bring vitality to the area, Pioneer Hills being one such example. Slated to begin construction in 2012, Pioneer Hills is a planned, mixed-use development that will bring new and attractive homes as well as retail stores when it is complete. Currently, residents have access to plenty of shopping, albeit of a suburban nature with lots of big box stores and national chains. So while there is not much of Austin’s unique charm to be found here, Windsor Hills is affordable and convenient.
Pros
  • Inexpensive housing
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • peace and quiet
Cons
  • Far from downtown
  • Not much charm
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"College neighborhood with pros and cons"

The area immediately to the west of the University of Texas (UT) is known as West University, or more commonly, West Campus. Home to many of the over 50,000 students who attend school here, this neighborhood is the one to live in if you want to be in the center of the action without living in a dormitory.

The boundaries for the neighborhood are Martin Luther King Boulevard to the south and 29th Street to the north, N. Lamar Boulevard to the west and Guadalupe to the east. A wide variety of housing can be found here. Single-family bungalow-style homes are common, as are high-rise apartment buildings and condominiums, some old and some new. Interspersed throughout the area one also finds historic mansions. Of course many homes house student organizations, such as the numerous fraternities and sororities that make up a large part of student life at UT.

Housing costs are quite high here as availability is scarce. The average home price for a good-sized (2,000 square feet) home runs in the high $400s. Rents for a one-bedroom apartment start around $1,000 per month. This is a very densely populated neighborhood, and the city has worked to increase density even further to accommodate the never-ending demand for housing.

Being so close to UT means there is no lack of entertainment and shopping available to the residents of West Campus. The stretch of Guadalupe running in front of campus, known as “The Drag,” is home to numerous restaurants, coffee shops, second-hand stores, trendy boutiques, tattoo parlors and of course, the University Co-op where one finds all manner of UT paraphernalia. Being so close to the action also means that the action rarely stops. There is always a frat party to go to, the Drag is always lively, and there are tailgate parties during football season. For those looking for a quiet, peaceful neighborhood, this is not the place for you. But for those wanting to become immersed in college life, there’s no better place to live.
Pros
  • Fun stores and restaurants
  • Great if you don't have a car
  • Next to campus
  • Walking distance to great nightlife
Cons
  • Noisy neighbors are common
  • Scarce parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Country feel within city limits"

Located in far southwest Austin, West Oak Hill is one of the largest neighborhoods in the city. This largely suburban part of town is known for its large housing lots and newer development. People who are attracted to this area appreciate the proximity to wide, open spaces on the western edge of the neighborhood, and the feeling that one is living out in the country while actually being within a few miles of the city.

The boundaries for West Oak Hill generally follow Southwest Parkway and Thomas Springs Road to the north, following the Travis/Hays County line to the south, and William Cannon Drive to the east. There are many single-family homes in the neighborhood, most on large lots with spacious back yards. Many of the homes are fairly new, but tend there is a cookie cutter quality to them.

Townhouses and condominiums arrived more recently. Because of its location on the outskirts of town, housing prices are quite affordable, even for a medium to large-sized home. Housing prices average in the high-$200s here, and condominiums and townhouses average below $100K. Neighborhood schools include Oak Hills Elementary, Small Middle School and Bowie High School.
Many families chose to live in West Oak Hill because of the affordable prices and large lots. One feels they are leaving the big city behind, especially at night when you can hear the coyotes howling. This is the neighborhood for those who prefer a more rural setting, rather than the hustle and bustle of the big city. Not much that keeps Austin weird (or liberal) will be found in these parts. But despite its out of the way feel, residents of West Oak Hill have convenient access to all the big box retail stores, grocery stores, restaurants and country-flavored specialty shops.
Pros
  • Quiet and clean
  • Natural beauty
  • Near the country
Cons
  • Not much Austin charm
  • Far from Downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Old Austin affluence"

While Austin prides itself on having deep hippie roots, it doesn’t mean there are no exclusive neighborhoods here. Of the higher-end areas of town, Tarrytown is probably considered the most venerable. While the far west end of Austin tends to attract new affluent Austin, Tarrytown is the choice of old Austin money.

Located in the heart of the city, Tarrytown is bordered by Lake Austin Boulevard on the south, 35th Street on the north, Lake Austin on the west and MoPac Expressway on the east. Being centrally located, it is convenient to downtown, the University of Texas, and Lady Bird Lake, the symbol of Austin’s heart and soul.

Because of the steep home prices, Tarrytown residents are generally high-end professionals and their families, as well as some old timers who have held on to their homes for decades. While it is possible to find one of the smaller homes in the mid-$300s range, most homes list at an average of $750,000. Schools serving this area include Casis Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School.

Many argue the price tag is fair for such a beautiful neighborhood, with its quiet, tree-lined streets and gorgeous homes. While shopping and eating spots are sparse within the boundaries of Tarrytown, it is close to many popular destinations, such as Hula Hut for margaritas overlooking the lake and Magnolia Café for 24-hour dining.
Pros
  • Historic old homes
  • Great schools
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Charming east Austin family neighborhood"

Located in central east Austin, Cherrywood is a popular haven for young families and professionals who are looking for a central location with some eastside charm. This neighborhood is actually known by several names, including Upper Boggy Creek and French Place. It is bordered by Wilshire Boulevard to the north, Manor Road to the south, Interstate 35 to the west and Airport Boulevard to the east. Historically Cherrywood was made up of farms and orchards, and became developed during a housing boom beginning in the 1930s through the 1960s. Original homes are most commonly small, wood-framed bungalows with some larger ranch-style homes mixed in.

The Cherrywood neighborhood is much loved by its residents, who form a tight community committed to continually improving the area. Many young families and professionals find it attractive, due to the relatively affordable housing prices found here compared to other central Austin neighborhoods. There is a definite Austin vibe found here which the residents encourage through the popular Cherrywood Art Fair hosted here every year. This part of east Austin also has many established local eateries along Manor Road close to the University of Texas that attract many from outside the area, including the Eastside Café, Hoover’s Restaurant and El Chile.

The price of housing has experienced a gradual upswing, but a modest 2/1 bungalow can still be found in the high $100s. A newer, remodeled home would fall more in the range of the mid-$400s. Area schools include Maplewood Elementary, Kealing Middle School and McCallum High School. Residents have worked hard to preserve the neighborhood’s green space and walkability, and there is a strong sense of community. Patterson Park is located here, which includes a pool, new playscape and trails, and plenty of room for both kids and dogs to run around in. All in all, the Cherrywood neighborhood has much to offer, particularly for those who prefer some local Austin flavor.
Pros
  • Great local flavor
  • Strong community spirit
Cons
  • Still affordable
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Full-blown college experience"

The University of Texas (UT) is located in the heart of central Austin and contributes significantly to the nature and personality of this town. The campus comprises over 350 acres in the center, and with about 50,000 students attending school here, back in the day, the university contributed a significant portion of the population of Austin.

The neighborhood surrounding UT is dominated by, not surprisingly, students and student housing. On-campus housing is available in the numerous dormitories located throughout the campus, and approximately 20 percent of students choose to live in them. Opinions vary widely about which are the best, but several have distinct characteristics. Jester is the most well-known and the largest dormitory; it occupies an entire city block and houses around 3,000 students. San Jacinto and Duren are the newest dorms, and therefore most popular. Two dormitories (Kinsolving and Littlefield) are women only, and Creekside is male only. Its best to take the tours offered and talk to other students to determine which is the best fit.

On campus housing is popular with students who enjoy living immersed in the college experience. Keep in mind that dormitory living is often loud, not particularly clean, there are often drunken fools on the weekends (well, mostly on the weekends) and you generally do not get to choose who you live with. But it is convenient, many have dining halls, and all come with a meal plan. While most students chose not to live in a dormitory for their entire college experience, many hold the opinion that it is important to experience it for at least one’s freshman year.

Of course, UT being in the center of Austin means every possible amenity is close by, almost all within walking distance. Guadalupe, or “the Drag” as the stretch along campus is known, contains restaurants, retail shops, bars, coffee shops, tattoo parlors…you name it. It’s easy to get around without a car in this area (and anyway, parking is VERY scarce) and the buses run regularly if you need to get farther afield. Convenience does come at a price, however, with monthly rates averaging around $1,000 – and that’s with a shared community bathroom. Still, you only get to experience college once, so it may be worth it just for the memories.
Pros
  • Everything within walking distance
  • Unique restaurants and shops
  • Walking distance to everything
  • Wonderful public transportation
Cons
  • Loud student living
  • Traffic on Guadalupe
  • Practically no parking
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Up and coming diverse community"

This far northeast/central Austin neighborhood originated as a planned community in the 1960s. It is a mixed-race community, made up of Hispanics, African Americans and whites. There are strong and varied cultural flavors found in this neighborhood, which makes it a unique and appealing area for many. The community has a reputation for its strong and committed neighborhood association, which has worked very hard over the years to maintain the area’s amenities and also bring in additional improvements.

The borders for University Hills (which really has neither hills nor a university) are Northeast Drive to the west, Highway 183 to the east, and Highway 290 to the north. Because it is a bit far from downtown, and does contain some spotty areas, housing prices are quite affordable. Homes range from the low $100s to the high $200s. The ranch-style homes are older, but many are well-kept and retain much of their charm this way. Lots tend to be quite large and shady trees are common throughout the quiet streets. Area schools include Winn and Andrews Elementary schools, Pearce Middle School and LBJ High School.

The pride and joy of this neighborhood is the Dottie Jordan Park and Recreation Center. This facility was slated to be demolished to make way for condominiums back in the 1970s, and the neighborhood successfully fought the city to prevent this from happening. Residents also work to protect Little Walnut Creek and improve the safety of the sketchier parts of the neighborhood. Nearby are also Northeast District Park and Walter E. Long Lake. This is a great neighborhood for those who cherish having space to live in and natural areas nearby, and are willing to put up with the commute into the city to have these benefits.
Pros
  • Dottie Jordan Park and Recreation Center
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Inexpensive housing
Cons
  • Some rundown areas
  • Far from central neighborhoods
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
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"Urban and new but pricey and no heart"

Triangle State can really only loosely be characterized as a “neighborhood.” Comprised largely of massive apartment complexes situated around some urban shopping centers, this is a popular place for students and young professionals. Because of its extremely convenient location and high concentration of retail shops, restaurants and other businesses, housing is quite expensive here.

The boundaries for Triangle State are 38th Street to the south, 45th and 51st Streets to the north, N. Lamar Boulevard to the west and Guadalupe to the east. Triangle State gets its name from the mixed-use development located in the triangular-shaped area formed by 45th Street and the merging of Guadalupe and N. Lamar Streets. This area was a state-owned empty lot for many years, and the nearby neighborhoods, particularly Hyde Park, worked diligently to influence the kind of development that grew up in the space when the state sold the land. The result was a mix of retail and residential buildings situated around large areas of green space that has proved to be quite popular, particularly with the younger set.

The area can’t be beat for amenities, as located within its borders is Central Market, the upscale grocery featuring organic and specialized foods that also includes a café and playscape. Within the Triangle (the name of the mixed-use development) one finds restaurants, retail shops, an Office Max, coffee shops and bars. Centered within the complex is a large open area of green space where a mid-weekly farmers market is held, as well as an interactive fountain popular with kids and lots of room for dogs to run amuck in. All these benefits come at a steep price, however. A one-bedroom apartment starts at $1,200 a month. The Gables Central Park, located next to Central Market on 38th Street, is the other large apartment complex in the area, and also offers plenty of modern amenities. In addition, residents can walk out into the adjacent Central Park area, which has a pond surrounded by a walking/jogging trail. Rental rates are comparable to those found at the Triangle apartments.
Pros
  • Convenient location
  • Meets all your shopping needs
  • Close to UT
Cons
  • Expensive housing
  • Not much Austin charm
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Suburban Hispanic neighborhood"

This far south Austin neighborhood has a suburban feel to it with an Hispanic twist. A bit far from the center of the city, but close to some of the many amenities of south Austin, this is a great neighborhood for families who are looking for less expensive housing options. Most homes here were built in the 1970s, so it is an established neighborhood, but not an old one. The ranch-style homes are shaded by large trees, and most have sizable yards, making them particularly appealing to families with children.

The borders for Sweetbriar include William Cannon Drive to the south and E. Stassney Lane to the north, S. First Street to the west and Interstate 35 to the east. Housing prices average in the mid-$100s for a medium to large-sized home. Area schools include Pleasant Hill Elementary, Bedichek Middle School and Crockett High School. With I-35 running down the eastern border, there is quick access to all points north and south. On the other hand, things can get loud and the highway is one of the busiest and most congested in the country. South First also has many amenities, such as shops and restaurants, but one does need to travel north from Sweetbriar to get to the heart of this retail district.

Overall, this is a great affordable neighborhood and quite appealing to families. As south Austin continues to attract attention and grow, Sweetbriar will likely be influenced by these changes, but perhaps not for several years. Whether this is a good thing or a bad thing depends on one’s point of view.
Pros
  • Inexpensive housing
  • Family firendly
Cons
  • Far from downtown
  • I-35 on the border
  • Lack of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Neighborhood fighting for improvements"

The St. Johns neighborhood is an historically African American community that has roots back to the Civil War. It has been through some struggles over the years as it suffered from neglect and related issues of crime and decay of abandoned houses and buildings. But the community’s ties are very strong, and the residents are committed to working with the city to bring improvements to the area.

Straddling Interstate 35, the boundaries for the St. Johns neighborhood are E. Koenig Lane to the south, Highway 183 to the north, Middle Fiskville Road and Eastcrest Drive to the west and Cameron Road to the east. While many central east Austin neighborhoods have experienced a surge in interest and gentrification, this trend has been slow to come to St. Johns. Inexpensive housing prices have made it affordable for many lower income families, and currently residents are largely Hispanic and African American.

One can’t help but be impressed with the perseverance of the St. Johns community. It was their efforts that induced the city to pave the roads, build a park and clean up the creek that runs through the area. In 2000, the city built the J.J. Pickle Elementary School as well as a community center, which includes the St. Johns branch of the public library system and a recreation center. Also brought into the area was a police substation and health clinic.

Housing prices remain quite affordable in the area, averaging in the mid-$100s, but ranging from $60K all the way up into the high $400s. Area schools include J.J. Pickle Elementary, Metz Middle School and Reagan High School. Because of the spotty reputation of the neighborhood, this is not an ideal area to raise a family. However, those looking for inexpensive housing in a central location will find this neighborhood worth looking at. It is very convenient to downtown and the University of Texas. The area’s proximity to I-35, which runs through the neighborhood, makes all destinations north and south quite accessible. If one is willing to live here while the neighborhood continues to work on improvements, it could be a good investment as well.
Pros
  • Convenient location
  • Inexpensive housing
  • High community spirit
Cons
  • Impoverished areas
  • High crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Small college town feel"

This neighborhood takes its name from the small, liberal arts college that is located in this area called, you guessed it, St. Edwards University. Often overshadowed by its bigger and louder cousin to the north, the University of Texas, St. Eds (as it is affectionately called by the locals) adds a quaint, academic quality to the neighborhood.

Bordered by Ben White Boulevard to the south, E. Oltorf Street to the north, South Congress Avenue to the west and Interstate 35 to the east, this neighborhood is perfectly situated to be convenient to all of Austin’s hot spots, but not so close to be overrun and overpriced. There are many older homes in this part of town, as well as many apartment complexes to accommodate the student population. One can still find a nice 3-bedroom home in the low to mid-$300s here. Area schools include Travis Heights Elementary, Fulmore Middle School and Travis High School.

Although many students live in the area, the St. Edwards neighborhood doesn’t feel like a student ghetto. It has a more quiet, residential feel to it, although not in a suburban way. There are a mix of residents who live here, including families, professionals, seniors, artists and musicians in addition to students. South Congress, with its trendy and hip retails shops and restaurants is nearby, as well as Zilker Park and the Blunn Creek Greenbelt in Travis Heights. All residents of the neighborhood, not just the students, can also enjoy the amenities of the beautiful St. Edwards campus.
Pros
  • Beautiful St. Edwards campus
  • Still affordable
  • Very close to SoCo
Cons
  • A bit far south from the main action
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"All of Austins charm in one place"

The residents of this charming and historic neighborhood love their neighborhood, care about politics, and love their dogs (and other pets as well). Travis Heights (no one really calls it South River City) in particular provides a perfect snapshot of all that is unique, quirky and charming about Austin. Located just south of Lady Bird Lake and close to the heart of the city, this is a popular and desirable neighborhood to live in.

The boundaries for the South River City/Travis Heights neighborhood are W. Oltorf to the south and Lady Bird Lake to the north, South Congress Avenue to the west and Interstate 35 to the east. It is very convenient to downtown and Lady Bird Lake, as well as all the trendy and hip retail shops and restaurants found along newly rejuvenated South Congress Avenue. It is here one can find great eclectic vintage stores, a popular costume shop (Lucy in Disguise With Diamonds)and other local clothing and gift shops. Restaurants run the gamut from fine Italian dining at Vespasio to Magnolia Café where one can get breakfast 24-hours a day. Big Stacy and Little Stacy Park offer plenty of open space and trails, along with a pool that is open year-round.

The neighborhood has roots back to the late 1800s, and development took off here in the 1920s. One finds many small, older bungalow-style homes here as well as a few mansions and apartment complexes. Housing is pricier here than in less popular and convenient neighborhoods, and even a smaller home fetches in the low $400s. For a larger and newer remodeled home, expect to easily pay in the mid-$600s to $800s. Area schools include Travis Heights Elementary, Fulmore Middle School and Travis High School.

People from diverse backgrounds settle here, including artists, professionals, students and families. Basically those who are attracted to the “Keep Austin Weird” vibe that is strong in this area.
Pros
  • Strong community spirit
  • Nightlife
  • Great shopping and restaurants
Cons
  • Pricey housing
  • Lots of tourists
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Funky old-time Austin charm"

The South Lamar neighborhood is one of those areas in Austin that give south Austin its reputation as a unique, funky and eclectic town. While the South Congress neighborhood reigns number one for its coolness factor, it’s more of a new Austin cool, while South Lamar retains an old Austin cool. One has to be willing to look past the warts to see the charm of this neighborhood. But if you keep an open mind, you’ll find the area has much to offer.

Because it is located a somewhat far south, housing prices in the area remain affordable. Single family homes are not plentiful here, as apartment complexes and condominiums dominate this neighborhood. Its boundaries are Highway 290 (Ben White Boulevard) to the south, W. Oltorf Street to the north, South Lamar Boulevard to the west and the railroad tracks to the east. Homes average in the mid to high $200s, but when exploring the area one will find a mix of older traditional homes, new and modern remodels and run-down homes all within the same block. Area schools include Zilker Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School.

South Lamar has quick access to all the major hubs of the city, including downtown, the University of Texas and Lady Bird Lake. However, there is much to be found without traveling outside the neighborhood itself, as Lamar Boulevard is teeming with retail businesses, restaurants and entertainment venues. It is here one finds the Alamo Cinema and Draft House (watch a movie while you eat and drink) as well as the Broken Spoke, an Austin institution where one can learn to two-step and gentlemen still ask the ladies to dance. There are a range of funky retail shops, including some colorful second-hand stores, plenty of bars and authentic Mexican restaurants. Here one finds Matt’s El Rancho, an old-time Tex-Mex restaurant as well as Olivia’s, a favorite with the trendy, foodie set. Basically, one can pretty much find it all in South Lamar.
Pros
  • Housing prices within reach
  • Access to restaurants and entertainment
  • Old school social scene
Cons
  • South Lamar traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Historic neighborhood needing more attention"

Rosewood, located in central east Austin, has a long history as one of Austin’s oldest African American neighborhoods. In the 1940s and 1950s, many local businesses had established themselves in the area, and the community, while segregated from the west side of Austin, was strong and vibrant. The neighborhood unfortunately experienced decline around the 1970s, and crime increasingly became a problem.

Efforts to revitalize the Rosewood neighborhood have continued over the past few decades, with some success. The city of Austin worked with the neighborhood to develop a neighborhood plan in 2001, with the goal of improving the neighborhood, attracting local businesses and increasing safety in the area. The boundaries for this oddly shaped neighborhood are generally Manor Road and Martin Luther King Boulevard to the north, Webberville Road and Oak Springs Drive to the south, Northwestern Avenue and Chicon Street to the west and Airport Boulevard to the east. As would be expected for a neighborhood in transition, housing prices remain modest here. One can easily find a home for under $100K in this area. Schools servicing this neighborhood include Oak Springs Elementary, Kealing Middle School and Eastside Memorial High at Johnston.

Rosewood has some nice amenities, including Rosewood Park, which is also home to the Rosewood Recreation Center. There is a swimming pool, ball fields, tennis court and playground in the park, and the recreation center offers programs and classes year-round. Also located in Rosewood is the Boggy Creek greenbelt, with lovely trails for walking or biking. In 1999, the Millenium Youth Entertainment Complex opened in Rosewood to provide east Austin youth a safe place to go within their neighborhood. The facility has an indoor roller skating rink, bowling alley, arcade, movie theater and food court, covering over 55,000 square feet.
Pros
  • Strong community spirit
  • Inexpensive housing
  • Rich history
Cons
  • Higher crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Mix of both urban and residential charm"

This north Central Austin neighborhood is one of the more coveted areas to live in, particularly for those who love the charm of old Austin but enjoy the benefits and amenities of newer development as well. The center of the neighborhood contains mostly modest residential homes while the outskirts are filled with a varied mix of retail shopping and restaurants. It is a neighborhood that has experienced some transition in the last ten years, but a carefully planned and deliberate kind of transition.

The boundaries for Rosedale are North Loop/Hancock Drive to the north, 38th Street to the south, Shoal Creek to the west and Lamar Boulevard to the east. It is perfectly situated for easy access to downtown, the University of Texas, as well as Lady Bird Lake and some of the newer developments in the northern part of town. Homes were largely built in the 1930 and 1940s, giving homes a charming, historic feel. Many of the original houses were small bungalows, but the large lot sizes allow for expansion. Popular with the upwardly mobile, many young families and professionals find Rosedale attractive. There is a popular neighborhood park found in the center, Ramsey Park, which has a large pool, two playscapes, tennis courts and ball fields.

The sense of community is quite strong in Rosedale. Residents share a commitment to preserve the integrity of the neighborhood, and have worked hard to insure that new retail development along Burnet Road is compatible with the look and feel of the area. Housing prices are higher here than other neighborhoods further out, with homes averaging in the mid-$400s, and ranging up into the $600s and even higher. Area schools include Bryker Woods Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School for those south of 45th Street and Highland Park Elementary, Lamar Middle School and McCallum High School for those north of 45th Street. If one can afford it, this is an ideal neighborhood for those who appreciate the look and feel of old Austin.
Pros
  • Revitalized Burnet Road
  • Ramsey Park
  • Great location
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Satellite location for UT housing"

When one thinks of the Riverside neighborhood in Austin, one characteristic comes to mind: students. This neighborhood is a huge haven for the undergraduate population of Austin, housing students from the University of Texas, St. Edwards University and Austin Community College.

Bordered by Lady Bird Lake to the north, E. Oltorf to the south, Interstate 35 to the west and Pleasant Valley Road to the east, this is one of the most densely populated neighborhoods in the city. The area is dominated by apartment complexes, and it seems new ones are being built all the time. Envisioned as an off-campus area for students by the University of Texas back in the 1970s, two shuttle bus lines continue to make this area popular with students looking for housing less expensive than found nearer to campus. In the mid-1990s the area became popular with recent immigrants from Mexico and Latin America and Asian countries, giving the area an international vibe.

But all this concentrated living, coupled with years of neglect, have given this neighborhood a shady reputation. Crime tends to be higher here, and there are areas that feel unsafe. However, Riverside also contains some older, more charming areas within its borders. The larger of the single-family homes run in the mid-$300s, and of course there are many townhouses and condominiums available here. Area schools include Sanchez Elementary, Martin Middle School and Austin High School.

The best that the Riverside neighborhood has to offer is convenient access to downtown and the University of Texas. It also sits just south of Lady Bird Lake with its many hike and bike trails. Roy G. Guerrero Park is nearby, which is currently underutilized but could become another source of Austin pride in the future.
Pros
  • Lots of fellow students
  • Shuttle to UT
Cons
  • Lots of loud students
  • A little shady
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Will be great when Roy G. Guerrero Park is finished"

This southeast Austin neighborhood covers a large area just south of Lady Bird Lake and a few miles east of Interstate 35. It contains a great deal of new construction, many of them apartment complexes and condominiums, with some residential areas as well. This neighborhood gets mixed reviews, partly because some areas are considered less safe than other parts of Austin, and there is not much in the way of Austin’s character and charm to be found here.

The boundaries for the Pleasant Valley neighborhood include Lady Bird Lake on the north, E. Oltorf Street to the south, S. Pleasant Valley Road to the west and Grove Boulevard to the east. Because of its mixed reputation and location in southeast Austin, housing prices are lower here than in many other parts of the city. Almost all homes, both old and new, can be found for under $200K, many of which were built between the mid-1970s and mid-1990s. But it is the rental properties that dominate this area, largely to accommodate the student population which finds this neighborhood conveniently located. The East Riverside campus of Austin Community College is found within the Pleasant Valley neighborhood, and many University of Texas students can be found along E. Riverside Drive. Area schools include Allison Elementary, Martin Middle School and Eastside Memorial High School at Johnston, which has had a troubled history.

Despite its bland reputation, residents in the northern part of the neighborhood have easy access to underutilized parts of Lady Bird Lake as well as up and coming Roy G. Guerrero Park, for which the city has grand plans. Housing is cheap here, and students will find themselves in good company. It’s probably not ideal for families. But for those willing to put up with the negatives, this neighborhood has potential.
Pros
  • Close to Roy G. Guerrero Park
  • Good for students
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to Lady Bird Lake
Cons
  • Some sketchy spots
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"East side suburbia"

This established residential neighborhood is located in far east Austin, with homes largely built in the 1960s. It is a diverse neighborhood, with mostly African-American and Hispanic families living here. Most would describe this as a quiet, suburban neighborhood made up of modest-sized homes and apartment complexes. There are not many distinguishing characteristics to this area, which for some, may contribute to its appeal.

The Pecan Springs-Springdale neighborhood is bounded by Manor Road to the northwest and E. Martin Luther King Road to the south, and Highway 183 to the east. Somewhat removed from downtown and other main hubs of the city, its proximity to major thoroughfares make it accessible to all parts of Austin. There are parts of the neighborhood that are considered rather sketchy, with some homes in need of repair. But the neighbors are friendly and the sense of community is strong. There are several undeveloped tracts of land within the neighborhood as well. Depending on what happens with them could significantly influence the character of this area in the future.

Because of its location in far east Austin, housing prices are very affordable. An average-sized home can be found in the range of the low to mid-$100s, which is becoming increasingly difficult to find in Austin. Neighborhood schools include Pecan Springs Elementary, Pearce Middle School and Reagan High School. There is one park located within the neighborhood’s boundaries, Pecan Springs Park. A fairly quick trip Just west on 51st Street is the recent Mueller development, a carefully-planned community with a large shopping center and parks and open space.
Pros
  • Close to Mueller development
  • Friendly neighbors
Cons
  • Some sketchy spots
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Not much to recommend it"

This southeast Austin neighborhood is something of a mixed bag. The commonly held generalization about Austin is that neighborhoods east of Interstate 35 are less safe and attractive than those to the west. The Parker Lane neighborhood sits just east of I-35, and it does carry the reputation of being somewhat unsafe. For this neighborhood, it means locking your doors and not walking out alone at night. Compared to dicey areas in larger cities, however, Parker Lane is pretty tame.

Housing prices are also subject to the same comparisons, but by Austin standards, Parker Lane does offer some inexpensive housing options. A modest-sized home can be found for under $100K, while a large, newly remodeled one range in the mid to high $200s. There are a variety of residents who call this area home, including retirees, young families and singles. Its proximity to St. Edwards University on the other side of I-35 means that students often choose to live here for the convenience and affordability of Parker Lane.

However, there is not much in the way of Austin’s charm and funkiness to be found in this neighborhood. It has a rather non-descript, somewhat suburban feel to it. But Parker Lane does have Mabel Davis District Park within its borders, which has a large pool and playground. Its most unique feature is the skate park, which attracts skate enthusiasts from around the city. The neighborhood is also accessible to Austin’s main attractions by way of the interstate, including downtown, the University of Texas and Lady Bird Lake.
Pros
  • Skate park at Mabel Davis District Park
  • Low housing costs
Cons
  • Sketchy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Historic Austin charm"

There are many charming historic neighborhoods to be found in Austin, but Clarksville may take the prize as one of the most sought-after neighborhoods to live in by those who appreciate Austin’s unique qualities. This tiny neighborhood (only 9 square blocks) was originally founded by a freed slave in the late 1800s. Located within the larger Old West Austin neighborhood, Clarksville is a distinct separate area.

The boundaries for Old West Austin are Enfield Road to the north, Lady Bird Lake to the south, MoPac Expressway to the west and N. Lamar Boulevard to the east. The boundaries for Clarksville are Waterson Avenue on the north, W. 10th Street to the south, MoPac on the west and West Lynn to the east. Practically everything that matters in convenient to Old West Austin/Clarksville; it is next to downtown, across from Zilker Park along Lady Bird Lake, and convenient to the University of Texas. Homes are older but very well preserved, and retain their unique and historic charm. Urban living at its finest can be found here. Of course, all these qualities come at a steep price. For example, a small, 800-square foot bungalow (not uncommon in this neighborhood) can still fetch $300,000. The average housing price is over $500,000 (and up to $1 million for a large mansion). But there are also more affordable condominiums to be found, and the neighborhood also provides some affordable housing units for low-income families. Area schools include Matthews Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Stephen F. Austin High School.

There is a varied mix of residents living in Clarksville/Old West Austin, including young professionals, families and students. Basically, all who are attracted to the eclectic, historic and artistic feel of the neighborhood. There are many local Austin businesses within walking distance in this neighborhood, including Jeffrey’s, one of Austin’s finest dining establishments as well as Nau’s Drugstore, which offers grilled hamburgers and milkshakes in a setting straight out of the 1950s, which is when it first opened. Whole Foods, located on the outskirts of the area, got its start in Clarksville in 1979 as the Clarksville Natural Grocery. There are neighborhood parks, such as West Austin Park, found here for those wanting the intimacy of a small, family-oriented park and pool. With so much to offer, it is no wonder that so many wish to settle in this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Great access to parks
  • Unique Austin feel
Cons
  • Small houses
  • Expensive real estate
  • Parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"Historic and a bit quirky"

This historic neighborhood located in west central Austin is called Old Enfield because, well, for one, it is quite old. Homes here date as far back as the late 19th century, and many colonial style mansions can be found along the wide, tree-lined streets. Residents have made retaining the old world feel and integrity of the neighborhood a priority, and it is reflected in the well-preserved older homes.

Located between 24th Street to the north and Enfield Road on the south, MoPac Expressway on the west and Lamar Boulevard to the east, this neighborhood is very convenient to downtown and has access to all parts of Austin by way of the thoroughfares that make up its borders. Interspersed throughout the large mansions are smaller, modest-sized bungalows that were largely built in the 1950s, as well as newer condominiums and apartment complexes. There are many amenities available to Old Enfield residents, including Pease Park, a large park that runs along the length of Shoal Creek. There are trails, open fields, a playscape and an off-leash area popular with dog owners. It is also the site of the annual Eeyore’s Birthday Party, a true Austin tradition.

All this convenience and attractiveness come at a steep price, with homes averaging in the $600s-$700s. However, it is possible to find a small, and less expensive, bungalow-type home in the high $200s for those who value location over square footage. Area schools include Casis Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School. While many residents have lived here for 25 years or more, there are also young families, students and singles moving in. For those who love being able experience living amidst history in a beautiful neighborhood, and don’t mind paying a premium for the privilege, Old Enfield is the perfect spot.
Pros
  • Eeyore's birthday party
  • Great schools
  • Close to downtown
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"Oasis near the University of Texas"

As the name describes, the North University neighborhood is located directly north of the University of Texas (UT) campus. This old, historic neighborhood contains many large, older homes on large lots, on wide, tree-lined streets. Because of its proximity to the university, this is a popular neighborhood for faculty and staff of UT. There are also many students who choose to live here in one of the many apartment complexes found in the area. The boundaries include 38th Street to the north, 27th Street to the south, Guadalupe to the west and Duval Street to the east.

The history of the North University neighborhood dates back to the late 1800s, and many of the homes in the area are from the early 1900s. Residents work hard to preserve the historic nature of the area, and even the newly remodeled homes remain consistent with the arts and crafts styled bungalows that dominate the neighborhood.

All this convenience and uniqueness of the homes comes at a steep price. Rents are high and housing prices are among the most expensive in the city. While a modest-sized home in need of remodeling may be found for the low to high $200s, the larger homes range from the high $400s into the high $600s. While the neighborhood is ideal for families, many are priced out of this market. For those that do live here, the area schools include Lee Elementary, Kealing Middle School and McCallum High School.

Obviously, this neighborhood has much to recommend it. Not only is it convenient to the University and downtown, there is quick access to all points of interest in Austin. There are a few neighborhood parks tucked away within the North University boundaries, including Adam-Hemphill Park which has a short greenbelt, Sparky Park, a pocket park on the grounds of a former electric substation, and Eastwoods Park, which includes ball fields, picnic tables and walking trails.
Pros
  • Historic feel
  • Close to UT
  • Close to nightlife and shopping
Cons
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Good area to raise your kids"

The North Shoal Creek neighborhood is one of those north central Austin neighborhoods that provides a nice place for families to raise their kids, somewhat affordable housing and isn’t too far from the heart of all the action. The fact that it has been known by several different names (Northtowne, Northtowne West, Allandale Estates, Allandale Place, Northwest Terrace and Cottages of North Shoal Creek) reflect the lack of definition this neighborhood has sometimes experienced.

Located above Anderson Lane, North Shoal Creek is just a bit too far north to retain much of Austin’s funky and unique character. Its borders are W. Anderson Lane to the south, Highway 183 to the north, MoPac Expressway to the west and Burnet Road to the east. Most of the homes were built in the 1960s and 1970s, and the residents are largely young and old families, who are attracted to the pleasant and slower pace of this neighborhood. Housing prices are still affordable here, and a modest home can be found in the high $100s to low $200s. Many older homes are being bought and remodeled, so some renewal is occurring as well. Area schools include Pillow Elementary, Burnet Middle School and Anderson High School.

While some may consider the North Shoal Creek neighborhood bland and boring, with W. Anderson Lane to the south there are some interesting shops and entertainment establishments to be found in The Village Shopping Center and Northcross Mall. Alamo Cinema and Drafthouse is there, Terra Toys, a local (i.e. non-chain) toy store as well as some interesting restaurants. There is also a lovely newly remodeled branch of the public library system in the neighborhood. For those interested in checking out the roller skating scene, Playland Skate Center is found here -- and it's not just for the kids!
Pros
  • Green and clean
  • Cheap and high qaulity housing
  • Many restaurants and shops
  • Peace and quiet
Cons
  • A few miles from downtown
  • A little less trendy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Eclectic and funky in the north part of town"

For those looking to live in the central part of Austin, the biggest challenge is finding something attractive and affordable. Sure, the rents at Bluebonnet Court on the edge of Austin’s highly desirable Hyde Park neighborhood may be low, but you also have to live in squalor with transient neighbors.

The North Loop neighborhood just north of Hyde Park is one option for those looking to enjoy a neighborhood with an Austin vibe in a convenient central location without breaking the bank. Defined as 51st Street to the south, W. Koenig Lane to the north, North Lamar to the west and Airport Boulevard to the east, this is a neighborhood with strong Austin roots and an active community. For years it sat in the path of flights leaving Austin’s main airport, rendering it less attractive to those who didn’t care to have their conversations interrupted every few minutes. But when the airport moved south, North Loop’s desirability skyrocketed.

Still, it is possible to find homes more affordable than in neighborhoods a bit closer to Austin’s core. Most homes were built in the 1950s and are modest but well-built and charming bungalows that average in the mid-$200s. Schools in the area include Ridgetop Elementary, Lamar Middle School and McCallum High School. This is a neighborhood popular with young professionals, small business owners and families who are attracted to the area’s funky vibe. There is an eclectic mix of retail shopping and restaurants found here, some of which have withstood the test of time, such as the long-standing Mrs. Johnson’s Donuts, serving donuts since 1948.

North Loop is the kind of neighborhood that is able to support a local bookstore, Monkeywrench Books, which describes itself as “an all volunteer, collectively-run radical bookstore.” You’ll also find vintage second-hand shops, a lingerie store, rocker pizza parlour and of course, coffee shops. You’ll feel at home here if you love to soak up Austin’s weirdness on the central north part of town.
Pros
  • Great eclectic vibe
  • Vintage shops
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Inexpensive and quiet, but thats about it"

The charm and vibe that permeates Austin is found largely in the central part of town, and areas directly north and south of it, with South Austin winning the “Keep Austin Weird” trophy. As one moves farther from the center, much of Austin’s character gets diluted, and this is certainly the case with the North Lamar Neighborhood.

The boundaries for this neighborhood are W. Rundberg Lane to the south, Braker Lane to the north, North Lamar to the west and Interstate 35 to the east. Surrounded by a major highway and thoroughfare, the neighborhood just off these roads is surprisingly quiet and residential. There are modest-sized bungalows and several apartment complexes lining the wide, tree-lined streets. Due to its far north location, housing prices are rather affordable, certainly by Austin standards. It is still possible to find a small home below $100K in this neighborhood, with prices averaging in the low $100s. Area schools include Walnut Creek Elementary, Dobie Middle School and Lanier High School.

Some view the North Lamar neighborhood as somewhat unsafe, most likely due to its proximity to E. Rundberg Lane, one of Austin’s more seedy streets. While much of the retail areas include unattractive strip malls, there are still some local gems to be found. There are some interesting Asian grocery stores and restaurants along Lamar, as well as another location of Chuy’s, one of Austin’s favorite local Tex-Mex establishments. Being close to Lamar Boulevard and I-35 make access to other parts both north and south easy to get to, but a bit far. Those that live here will find everything they need, in an affordable neighborhood, but without much of Austin’s cool vibe.
Pros
  • Quiet neighborhood
  • Cheap housing
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
  • Crime along Rundberg Ln.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Upscale but sterile condo living"

While south Austin is the heart of the “Keep Austin Weird” vibe, the far northwest part of town is the polar opposite. This area is the epitome of the higher-end, suburban, white collar trend that characterizes much of Austin’s newer development. The North Burnet neighborhood contains the Domain, Austin’s latest upscale shopping mall, that defines much of this area.

The boundaries for this neighborhood are Walnut Creek on the north, Highway 183 to the south, MoPac Expressway on the west and Metric Boulevard to the east. There are not many single-family homes to be found in this neighborhood, as it is dominated by apartments and condos. All the development here is fairly new, and the rental complexes tend to offer much in the way of attractive amenities, such as pools, tennis courts, fitness centers and some walking trails. Homes tend to be large, and are priced in the range of the mid-$400s. Businesses dominate in this part of Austin, and many of the new tech companies, such as Google and Facebook can be found close to here.

The funky charm that characterizes much of Austin’s vibe is pretty much non-existent in the North Burnet neighborhood. Many refer to this part of town as “south Dallas” and it is usually not meant as a compliment. While attractive and new, it is also rather sterile, having a stereotypical suburban, concrete feel. If you love shopping at the major national chains, particularly those with an upscale bias, then this is the perfect place to settle. If you are looking for an area with more of Austin’s traditional heart, stay away from North Burnet.
Pros
  • Great shopping
  • Nice restaurants
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Has a Dallas feel
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Needs a better name"

The rather generic name for this Austin neighborhood is fitting in some ways, as there is not much that distinguishes this area. Located (where else?) in far north Austin, this rather large neighborhood is a mixed-race community with a higher proportion of rental properties than most other areas.

The North Austin neighborhood is bounded by Highway 183 to the south, Kramer Lane to the north, Metric Boulevard to the west and N. Lamar Boulevard to the east. Most of the properties were built in the 1970s, so this is an established neighborhood. The quality of the neighborhood is spotty, with some nice, newly remodeled homes in some areas while other areas contain rundown houses badly in need of repair. Safety is considered an issue here, as crime is higher in some parts of the neighborhood than places further south.

Despite the negatives, there are signs that this area is experiencing steady improvement. It is somewhat convenient to downtown, close to some major highways and thoroughfares, and there has been significant development to the north that will continue to increase the attractiveness of the far north neighborhoods in Austin. Housing prices remain in the modest range, starting in the mid-$100s and going up to the mid-$200s. Area schools include Woolridge and Barrington Elementary Schools, Burnet Middle School and Lanier High School. For those looking for affordability and are willing to live in a neighborhood in the midst of transition, North Austin is worth a look.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • Run-down homes
  • High crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Neighborhood badly in need of help"

Despite the fact that Austin’s rapid growth has resulted in many previously problematic neighborhoods being transformed, there are many areas, particularly on the east side of town, that still struggle. The Montopolis neighborhood is one of them. Located in far southeast Austin, this is an area with a reputation for high crime and high poverty.

The boundaries for the Montopolis neighborhood are Montopolis Drive to the west, Highway 183 to the north and east, and Highway 71 to the south. This is a predominantly Latino neighborhood that has made efforts to band together as a community to bring improvements to the area. Housing prices remain lower than much of the city, with homes averaging in the low $100s. Area schools include Allison Elementary School, Martin Middle School and Eastside Memorial High School at Johnston. The high school in particular has suffered from low academic performance for many years, and calls for its closure regularly occur.

If the city and Montopolis residents can achieve better success in their efforts to revitalize this neighborhood, this area has the potential to be a highly attractive neighborhood. It is close to Roy G. Guerrero Park, for which the city has grand plans to make into another Zilker Park, has quick access to major highways and can therefore be convenient to downtown, and it will likely continue to be affordable for some time. If one is looking for a long-term investment, this could prove to be a good area to settle in.
Pros
  • Roy G. Guerrero Park
  • Super cheap housing
Cons
  • Run-down homes
  • High crime
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
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"Natural escape right next door"

The McKinney neighborhood is a rather odd, boomerang-shaped area that sits up against McKinney Falls State Park. Located in far southeast Austin, there is a definite suburban vibe to this part of town. It is bordered by E. Ben White Boulevard (Highway 71) on the north with Montopolis Drive and McKinney Falls marking the eastern border. St. Elmo Boulevard is the southern border for the west part of the neighborhood.

The more established part of the neighborhood is found in the north, just south of Ben White Boulevard. Here one finds older homes on larger lots, with lots of shady trees. The southern part of the neighborhood that sits nearest to McKinney Falls State Park is newer, with smaller homes and lots. Housing prices are lower here, largely due to the distance from downtown. A good-sized home (around 2,000 square feet) can be found in the low to mid-$100s. Area schools include Blazier Elementary School, Paredes Middle School and Akins High School. This is a nice, clean and affordable neighborhood, one that is good for raising a family. It is probably less attractive to young and single professionals who are interested in Austin’s entertainment and retail districts.

The McKinney neighborhood will be just about perfect for anyone who loves being close to a natural area with plenty of wildlife and open space. There are some peaceful hiking trails and camping sites located within the state park. One primary attraction of McKinney Falls State Park are the falls themselves, which are a popular spot for fishing and swimming (assuming the area is not in a drought). Part of Austin’s charm lies in the fact that such a large natural area can be accessed so close to the city.
Pros
  • McKinney Falls State Park
  • Affordable housing prices
  • Peace and quiet
Cons
  • Some unsafe areas
  • Somewhat inconvenient
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Convenient to UT and affordable too"

This far central east Austin neighborhood can be found by taking Martin Luther King (MLK)Boulevard east from the central part of the city, well past Interstate 35, which cuts Austin into its east and west corridors. It is an older, well-established neighborhood with both residential and commercial properties filling the community.

The boundaries for the MLK-183 neighborhood are Springdale Road to the west, Highway 183 to the east, and the railroad tracks to the south. Much of the northern border consists of MLK Boulevard, but the neighborhood also stretches up to Loyola Lane with Hwy 183 as the western border. Because of its location in far east Austin, housing prices remain affordable here. The area is also subject to some transition, as newer developments are being built here to accommodate Austin’s growth. A small, older ranch-style home can for found for the mid-$150s, while newer homes tend to fall in the low $200s. Area schools include Norman Elementary, Garcia Middle School and LBJ High School.

This historically mixed-race neighborhood (Hispanic and African American) has much to offer those looking for affordability and a reasonable commute to downtown and the University of Texas. One finds both low-income housing and new, modern homes here. While some may characterize it as somewhat unsafe, long-time residents will tell you otherwise, especially compared to other urban areas. Springdale Park is found within the neighborhood, and the Morris Williams Golf Course is just on the other side of Highway 183.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
Cons
  • Less safe than other areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5
Just now

"Convenience and potential"

One of the first things those new to Austin need to learn about this neighborhood is how to correctly pronounce it and sound like a local. For reasons unknown to most Austinites, the street and neighborhood of Manchaca is pronounced “man-shack.” If one says it the way it is spelled “man-chak-ka” everyone will know what you are talking about, but they’ll give you that look that says, “You’re not from ‘round here, are you?”

Once one gets past this peculiarity of the Manchaca neighborhood, there is much that this area has to offer. Bordered by Ben White Boulevard (Highway 290) to the north, Stassney Lane to the south, Manchaca to the west and S. 1st Street to the east, this neighborhood is located in south Austin, but not too far south. While only a 15-minute drive to downtown, and a short distance from trendy and hip South Congress Avenue, being located south of Ben White Boulevard means housing is a bit more affordable here.

Housing prices average in the low $200s for a small to medium-sized home. Most were built between the 1970s and 1990s, making them established homes, but not old. Neighborhood schools include Joslin and Odom Elementary Schools, Covington and Bedicheck Middle Schools, and Crockett and Travis High Schools. Many families choose to live here due to its affordability and convenience. There are some less attractive, somewhat run-down homes to be found scattered in the South Manchaca area, but the trend is toward upgrading existing homes and new development.
This would be the neighborhood for those who need less expensive housing while still having convenient access to Austin’s core. It is also for those who want a neighborhood that carries some Austin flavor and character. In other words, not a sterile suburb. Taco joints are plentiful along Hwy 71/290, and shopping and restaurants are plentiful, if not particularly unique.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • Some crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Overlooked and neglected part of town"

While generalizations are often risky, Austin’s east side has long had the reputation for being the less attractive side of town, more subject to crime and run-down neighborhoods. While it is true that many of the neighborhoods found east of Interstate 35 are enjoying improvements and gentrification, unfortunately, the Johnston Terrace neighborhood has so far not been a beneficiary of this trend.
Located between the Austin NW railroad tracks on the north, Highway 183 on the south and east, and Airport Boulevard to the west, this neighborhood struggles with high poverty and higher crime rates than the rest of the city. There are many run down homes found here, some of which should simply be torn down. Trash litters yards and the streets, reflecting the lack of community pride.
However, there are some residents of this neighborhood who are fighting to turn it around. The city of Austin has been involved in supporting neighborhood planning efforts to create a vision for the neighborhood to reduce crime, promote a stronger sense of community and build a more vibrant neighborhood.

The area has potential if the neighborhood can succeed in turning things around. It is accessible to downtown and Lady Bird Lake, and housing prices are affordable, although costs are rising. Average home prices are around the $150s for a modest-sized home. Located within its boundaries is East Austin College Prep, an open enrollment charter school that has been working to collaborate with the neighborhood to encourage positive socio-economic change to the area.
Pros
  • Organized community
  • Cheap rent
Cons
  • High crime
  • Run-down homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A unique and special neighborhood"

Residents of Hyde Park love their neighborhood, so much so that they would gladly storm city hall to preserve its unique historic integrity should it ever feel threatened. This neighborhood, with its turn-of-the-century architecture, is filled with residents who enjoy walking their dogs down its tree-lined streets, waving to neighbors relaxing on their front porches. One finds spacious Victorian-style mansions next to modest bungalows housing college students and many recently renovated expanded bungalows that still retain the look and feel of the area.

Hyde Parkers pride themselves on supporting the neighborhood businesses that allow this neighborhood to be a self-contained oasis in the midst of the city. There are several restaurants as well as a bakery, laundromat, gym, wine bar, grocery store, local retail businesses and even a cheese shop within its borders, all within walking and biking distance to all residents.

Many would love to live in Hyde Park, but finding an affordable means of doing so can be challenging. Homes can range from the mid-$200s for a fixer-upper all the way into the $800s, with prices averaging around the mid-$400s. Local schools include Lee Elementary, Kealing Middle School and McCallum High School. Located just north of the University of Texas, it is bordered on the south by 38th Street, on the north by 51st Street, and by Guadalupe and Duval Streets to the west and east.

Despite the high housing costs, Hyde Park manages to retain the feel of its hippie days, and residents tend to be very active in the community, both within the neighborhood as well as the local political scene. Residents have been known to regularly do battle with developers working on nearby properties, promoting mixed-use developments and the inclusion of green space.
Pros
  • Strong tight-knit community
  • Lovely tree-lined streets
  • Great walking neighborhood
Cons
  • Expensive housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Rocky history, but up and coming"

With roots stretching back to the early 1900s, the Holly neighborhood on Austin’s east side has a long history. This predominantly Mexican-American neighborhood has suffered from neglect in the past, and now is becoming more of a victim of its own success. Gentrification is coming to this neighborhood, but opinions vary on whether or not this is a good thing.

Located in central east Austin, the Holly neighborhood is bordered by Lady Bird Lake on the south, East 7th Street on the north, Pleasant Valley to the east and Chicon to the west. Its proximity to the open space of Lady Bird Lake and quick access to downtown give the Holly neighborhood an ideal location. So why is it a neighborhood in transition? Largely because of the presence of the Holly Street Power Plant, which originally began operating in 1960 until its closure in 2007. Residents of this area suffered from noise and pollution for years during the plant’s life. When they were finally able to get the city to close it down, the attractiveness of the neighborhood increased dramatically. The result has been new development and remodeling of existing homes, but often at the expense of longtime residents, who find it increasingly difficult to afford to live here.

Homes are typically smaller in size, and some can be found in the range of $150-$200. But the market is driving prices up, and homes are also reaching the low to mid $300s. Area schools include Metz Elementary, Martin Middle School and Eastside Memorial High School. The city has plans to convert the 22 acres that held the Holly Street power plant into parkland, further increasing the future attractiveness of this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Cultural diversity
  • Great potential
Cons
  • Small house sizes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Not much personality, but pretty convenient"

Not to be confused with the more upscale Highland Park neighborhood, Highland can best be described as a neighborhood found in the midst of several retail establishments. Centrally located and convenient to downtown and the University of Texas, this is an area that offers much in the way of affordability and access to all necessary amenities. What is doesn’t provide is a lot in the way of Austin charm and character. But it has more personality than your average suburban neighborhood, so for those looking for affordability and convenience without heading to the sterile suburbs, Highland could offer a good compromise.
The boundaries for the Highland neighborhood include Highway 183 to the north, Denson Drive and Airport Boulevard make up the southern border, North Lamar largely defines the western edge and Interstate 35 marks the eastern side. The modest-sized homes found here were largely built in the 1950s and 1960s and some can be bought in the low $100s. One can even find a newly remodeled home for less than $250,000, making this area an attractive choice for young families and professionals. Schools in the neighborhood include Brown and Reilly Elementary Schools, Webb Middle School and Lanier and McCallum High Schools.

One element of the Highland neighborhood is its easy access to a variety of retail areas. Some are rather nondescript strip malls, but other newer developments offer some ethnic diversity, particularly the growing Asian community of central north Austin. While Highland Mall is found within the borders of this neighborhood, it is dying a slow death, and will soon become a satellite location of the local Austin Community College. Overall, Highland offers a lot in the way of convenience and affordability, and a little in the way of local entertainment and character.
Pros
  • Convenient location
  • Not too expensive
Cons
  • Mall is dying
  • Not much personality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Not so great, but neighborhood is working on it...."

While Austin has a reputation for being a town that is hip, funky and diverse, that is not necessarily the reason why every single person chooses to live here. For those that are attracted Austin’s proud weirdness reputation, there are many central and south Austin neighborhoods to be found. But for those who end up in this town because it is a vibrant and growing city, a nice, affordable place to live may be all they need. That is where neighborhoods like Heritage Hills fit the bill.
Located in northeastern Austin, Heritage Hills (sometimes called Woodbridge) is an affordable, suburban neighborhood without a distinct personality. Its boundaries are Rundburg Lane to the north, Highway 183 to the south, Cameron Road to the east and Interstate 35 to the west. Housing prices remain modest in this area, with home prices averaging in the $150s to low $200s. Area schools include Hart Elementary School, Dobie Middle School and Lanier and Reagan High Schools.

Because of its location near two major highways, residents have convenient access to much of the surrounding area. The drive to downtown is approximately 20 minutes; however, traffic on both I-35 and Hwy 183 can be heavily congested at times. Heritage Hills’ proximity to crime-ridden East Rundberg also give this neighborhood a somewhat unsafe designation. However, area residents are actively working with the city to encourage improvements to the neighborhood, including efforts to beautify the neighborhood park, North Acres Park, and combine Heritage Hills with the adjoining neighborhood of Windsor Hills. A formal neighborhood plan was recently adopted with a vision toward steering the area into a diverse community with plenty of open space and attractive retail shopping centers. For those wanting to settle into what could become a vital, renewed neighborhood in the future, Heritage Hills could be the perfect place for those able to wait for the transformation.
Pros
  • Organized community
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • High crime rate
  • High traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Live on a golf course in the center of town"

This modest-sized neighborhood in central Austin shares many of the characteristics of its well-known sibling to the west, Hyde Park. Situated in prime central real estate just north of the University of Texas, close to downtown, and bordering the main highway of I-35, this neighborhood is largely dominated by the nine-hole municipal Hancock golf course contained within its borders. An older established neighborhood, homes originally date back to the early 1900s.

Bordered by 45th Street to the north and 32nd Street to the south, Duval Street on the west and I-35 on the east, homes tend to run on the pricey side for such an ideal location. Quaint bungalows dominate the tree-lined streets, with a few apartment complexes interspersed throughout. One finds many professionals from the University living here, as well as students and some families. Houses tend to be more modest in size, yet average home prices fall in the mid-$300s. Schools serving this area include Lee Elementary and Ridgetop Elementary, Kealing Middle School and McCallum High School.

Hancock residents can take advantage of the neighborhood shops and restaurants found in Hyde Park. Shipe Park is near the north end with a playground and swimming pool, as well as the historic Elizabet Ney Museum, and Eastwoods Park is located on the south end. It is also convenient to the large Hancock Shopping Center, which contains a newly renovated HEB grocery store, fitness club, chain restaurants and stores that together pretty much provide everything anyone should ever need, making it possible to never have to stray far from the boundaries of this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • Buying is expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"East side gem"

This east-side neighborhood is something of an undiscovered gem. Conveniently located just north of Lady Bird Lake, and a short drive to downtown, it is not surprising that new development has started creeping into this area. There is a strong and vibrant Hispanic culture and community found here, giving this neighborhood a diverse and colorful atmosphere.

Bordered by Oak Springs on the north and Lady Bird Lake on the south, Pleasant Valley to 7th Street mark the northwestern edge with Webberville Road on the far west, and Airport Boulevard to the east. It is a neighborhood in transition, like so many in Austin, with older homes sharing the streets with new tear-downs and new, more expensive, development. One can still find an affordable home here, however. Housing prices average in the $150s, which is a great value for such a convenient location. Neighborhood schools include Govalle Elementary, Kealing Middle School and Johnston High School.

This is the neighborhood for those who enjoy living amidst Austin’s east-side vibe, with its strong Hispanic roots, colorful houses and plethora of taco joints, in a convenient and affordable location. The area does carry a reputation for a higher level of crime than found in some of the more gentrified neighborhoods, but this is not an unsafe area, especially compared to other big cities. It is a great neighborhood for young families with children, as the area is surrounded by city parks, including Govalle, Metz and Rosewood Parks. Roy G. Guerrero Park is also close by, a 326-acre park that the city plans to develop into another recreational area similar to Zilker Park.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
Cons
  • Some sketchy feeling areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Quiet and affordable but not much else"

This modest, suburban neighborhood in northeast Austin, while somewhat nondescript, offers something for those looking for a diverse community with affordable housing prices. While somewhat removed from the center of Austin’s main hubs, it is a manageable 20 minute drive (non-peak times) to downtown.

Originally a small farming development dating back to the 1800s, one can still find hints of its history at the old Fiskville Cemetery. But generally the neighborhood is largely made up of modest-sized homes and many families with children. Georgian Acres is bordered by East Rundberg on the north, Highway 183 to the south, north Lamar on the west and Interstate 35 on the east. Homes can still be found here in the low $100s, making it an affordable suburb for many. Area schools include Barrington Elementary, Webb Middle School and Lanier High School. Beware of East Rundberg Lane, which has a reputation for being a high-crime area, making this part of the neighborhood less attractive.

Overall, this is a quiet suburban neighborhood that offers convenient access to plenty of shopping and restaurants, albeit bland and nondescript. Its affordability makes it attractive to many young families, who make up a large part of the population here. It is also a quick drive to Round Rock and Pflugerville to the north, both growing cities offering many opportunities for shopping and recreation.
Pros
  • Cheap real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"Great if you love to shop"

This far northwest Austin neighborhood is notable for its convenient location to a couple of major roadways in town, giving it fairly quick access to points both north and south. Without traffic (and this is an important qualifier), it is a manageable 15-minute drive to downtown. This is a neighborhood that appeals to those looking for newer housing construction and proximity to plenty of retail establishments. It is not for those seeking to immerse themselves in Austin’s offbeat and funky side, as not much of Austin’s character can be found here.

Located at the intersection of Highway 183 (which forms the western boundary) and MoPac Expressway (which forms the eastern boundary), with W. Braker Lane marking the northern limits, some would consider this a rather sterile environment. But for others, it is a shopping heaven. Almost every national retail chain typically found in cities is located here. There are a few shopping complexes in the area, including the Arboretum area, where one can also find second locations for a few of Austin’s local eateries. Farther north is the fairly recent and upscale outdoor shopping mall, The Domain, which caters to the newer, high-end of Austin’s residents.

It is not a diverse neighborhood by any means, and is dominated by apartment complexes and condominiums. The housing complexes typically offer many attractive amenities, such as pools, fitness centers, tennis courts and walking and jogging trails. But for young professionals, particularly those working for some of the nearby high-tech businesses, the Gateway neighborhood can be a good fit.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Family-friendly at the expense of some cool factor"

This far south Austin neighborhood is pleasant, affordable, and somewhat non-descript. It is not so far south that the commute to Austin’s center, including downtown, the University of Texas and Lady Bird Lake, is terribly inconvenient. But it is far enough away from these points that the core elements of Austin’s personality, its funkiness and coolness, gets a bit watered down.

Located below W. Stassney Lane and above William Cannon Drive, with its western border falling somewhat east of Brodie Lane and South 1st Street marking the eastern border, Garrison Park is made up of nice houses, friendly neighbors, nice restaurants nearby…basically everything one needs for a pleasant living experience. This is not the place for those looking to immerse themselves in Austin culture or seeking the action of the music and arts scene. It is more for those looking for a nice neighborhood to raise a family that is fairly convenient to the core of the city. Many Hispanic families call this area home, as well as young families, couples and seniors, who maintain a strong sense of community here.

Housing remains fairly affordable in this part of town, with prices averaging in the low $200s for a modest-sized home. Schools servicing this area include Cunningham and Odom Elementary schools, Covington Middle School and Crockett High School. Located in the midst of this neighborhood is Garrison Park, which includes a playground, picnic areas, ball fields, and a swimming pool popular with families.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Cheap real estate
Cons
  • Not much Austin personality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Suburban eastside neighborhood but close to a natural area"

Although it is becoming increasingly difficult to find, there are still neighborhoods in Austin with affordable housing prices. Franklin Park in the far southeast side of Austin is one such neighborhood. Bordered by East St. Elmo Road on the north, between E. Stassney Lane and E. William Cannon Drive on the south, Interstate Highway 35 on the west and Nuckols Crossing Road on the east, this area is somewhat removed from the heart of Austin’s core, but has other advantages to offer.
The biggest attraction of the Franklin Park neighborhood is its proximity to McKinney Falls State Park, a lovely wilderness and oasis just a few miles outside the city center. For those who love being able to get away and relax amidst the woods and wilderness, Franklin Park would be ideal. There are hike and bike trails, two sets of falls, and camping and fishing all available at McKinney Falls, and it is just down the street from Franklin Park.

The western part of the neighborhood that sits along I-35 has a higher concentration of apartment complexes, and is less attractive for families due to its unsafe reputation. But farther east from the highway there are more single-family ranch-style homes, all moderately priced. This is a predominantly Hispanic neighborhood, many of them families, who have formed a tight-knit community. Housing prices average in the low $100s, making it very affordable. The area schools include Houston and Rodriguez Elementary schools, Mendez Middle School and Travis High School.
Pros
  • Close to McKinney Falley State Park
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to major highways
Cons
  • Not much personality
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
3/5
Just now

"Nice, but lacks personality"

This neighborhood in far southwest Austin is made up of some newer suburban housing developments. The result is an attractive area with several lovely large homes, large trees and manicured lawns. Many families chose to live in East Oak Hill as well as young couples and professionals, and there is a friendly community vibe found here.

The neighborhood boundaries are roughly the Barton Creek Wilderness Park to the north, William Cannon Drive to the south, Escarpment Boulevard to the west and MoPac Expressway to the east. For a suburb, it is one of the more conveniently located ones, particularly due to its convenient access to MoPac and Highway 71. There is a range of home prices to be found here, as low as the $200s and all the way up to the $800s. Schools in the area include Oak Hill and Patton Elementary schools, Small Middle School and Austin High School.

This is a good neighborhood for those looking for a nice-sized home and lot, new construction and modern neighborhood amenities. For those who find such suburban neighborhoods somewhat sterile, East Oak Hill would not be a good fit. But for those who don’t mind having to do some driving to get to work or the nearby shopping areas, and who find newer developments appealing, this is a great neighborhood. Austin’s mid-to-upscale shopping mall, Barton Creek Mall, is a few minutes away, there are several familiar popular chain restaurants in the shopping areas off the main highways, and the Barton Creek greenbelt is easily accessed from here. In many ways, East Oak Hill offers an idyllic scene in which to settle.
Pros
  • Beautiful new homes
  • Close to mall shopping
Cons
  • Lacks much of Austin's personality
  • A bit out of the way
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"An inexpensive way to live off South Congress"

Some might call the East Congress neighborhood the lowly step-sibling of hip and trendy part of South Congress (SoCo) to the north, but for some, that is what they prefer about it. Located south of Ben White Boulevared from the bustle and excitement of the South Congress corridor, one can easily access the popular restaurants, clubs and shops found there. But when you feel like retreating, you can find peace and quiet in your East Congress home.

Boundaries for the East Congress neighborhood are State Highway 71/US Highway 290 to the north, East Stassney Lane to the south, South Congress Boulevard on the west and Interstate Highway 35 to the east. Its location farther south, and thus farther away from the heart of the action in the city, help keep housing prices at a more affordable level, particularly to young couples and families. Housing prices average in the $170s, and the area is dominated by moderate, older homes. The neighborhood schools are Galindo Elementary, Bedichek Middle School and Travis High School.

There is plenty of convenient shopping along Ben White Boulevard (Hwy 71), although the stores are pretty standard and lack most of Austin’s unique personality. This is a neighborhood for those who like the funky vibe of Austin, but don’t necessarily need to be immersed in it, who like the convenience of the proximity to the major highways, and who don’t mind commuting a bit.
Pros
  • Convenient access to thoroughfares
  • Cheap housing
Cons
  • Not much personality
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Downtown, eastside style"

Austin has taken great pains to be deliberate about influencing the effects of growth to the various neighborhoods to insure that the historic quality and nature of each area is preserved, even as the city experiences explosive and continuous growth. The East Cesar Chavez neighborhood is a tightly knit community who have worked together to protect the character of this area as revitalization efforts are underway.

The boundaries for East César Chávez neighborhood are the alley between East 6th and East 7th Street on the north, Chicon on the east, Town Lake on the south, and Interstate Highway 35 (IH-35) on the west. Because of its central location, the East Cesar Chavez neighborhood contains some prime real estate, but its location east of I-35 rendered it less attractive to growth in the past. Home prices average in the mid-$200s, and one can find some homes in the $100s, albeit in need of serious upgrading. Schools in the area include Sanchez Elementary, Martin Middle School and Austin High School.

It is convenient to downtown, the University of Texas and the hike and bike trails around Lady Bird Lake. For this reason, in recent years, new businesses have been attracted to the area, as well as young professionals and those Austinites who prefer neighborhoods that carry a distinct Austin flavor. This is a neighborhood for those who appreciate a mix of old and new, and are not intimidated by remnants of seediness and a less-than-stellar reputation for safety.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
Cons
  • Some seediness
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Just now

"Ultimate Urban Living"

As recently as the 1990s, Austin’s downtown still retained something of a smaller-town feel. While 6th Street has been famous for decades as a hip clubbing and music corridor, downtown was more about offices and entertainment, but not residential living. But efforts to promote more residential development (condos and apartments) have successfully transformed downtown into a haven for the young, hip, urban professional.

This is the neighborhood for those who want the ultimate urban experience from where they live. Not only are you close to all the action in terms of restaurants, clubs and music, but downtown also sits right above Town Lake with its extensive hike and bike trails. One can also rent a canoe or kayak and paddle down the lake, or try out Austin’s latest craze, the stand up paddle board.

Technically defined as the area bordered by 19th Street to the north, Town Lake to the South, and Lamar Boulevard and I-35 to the west and east, the area’s residences are dominated by condominiums. Prices range from the $200s all the way up into the million dollar mark. Not many families chose to live downtown, as there are many fine residential neighborhoods nearby. For those children who do fall within these borders, the area schools include Matthews Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School.

Serious efforts have been made to mold Austin’s downtown neighborhood into one that is pedestrian friendly and allow residents to stay within its borders and find everything they need. There are drug stores, dry cleaners, hair salons and a vast array of retail stores. Large department stores have fallen by the wayside, however, but a full-sized Whole Foods is found right in the heart of the area at 6th Street and Lamar Boulevards.
Pros
  • Coolness factor
Cons
  • Cost of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Hip...but not too hip"

Relatively undiscovered gems in the neighborhood scene are becoming increasingly scarce as Austin continues to grow in population and popularity. The Dawson neighborhood, located south of the much more visible South Congress (SoCo) neighborhood, remains one of those gems. Populated by those who cherish the old Austin vibe, this quiet neighborhood is home to young families and professionals, as well as long-time residents of the area.

The Dawson neighborhood is bordered by Oltorf Road to the north, Ben White/Highway 290 to the south, South First Street on the west and South Congress Avenue on the east. Located across South Congress is St. Edwards University, making this the perfect neighborhood for students of this private university. Because it is farther south from the heart of Austin’s hubs, housing prices have not accelerated as much as other similarly attractive neighborhoods. The average home price runs in the mid-$200s. Schools in the area include Dawson Elementary, Fulmore Middle School and Travis High School.
Residents of Dawson are a tight-knit group, and enjoy their proximity to the hip and trendy SoCo neighborhood without having to put up with the noise and energy of that scene. As more and more people become aware of its charms, which include lovely tree-lined streets, local businesses and restaurants, and strong hippie roots, Dawson risks losing its laid-back vibe. This is a neighborhood to move into sooner, rather than later.
Pros
  • Close to the action but still quiet
  • Close to SoCo and Downtown
Cons
  • A little bit far south
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
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"The place for young families who want to retain some hipness"

Original residents of the Crestview neighborhood remember when the main thoroughfares were paved with gravel and their location was considered on the far outskirts of Austin. It’s a far cry from its current reputation as being a convenient, centrally located neighborhood with quick access to downtown Austin and the University of Texas to the south, and the growing retail shopping meccas to the north.

Located between Justin Lane to the south and Anderson Lane to the north, Lamar Boulevard and Burnet Road to the east and west, Crestview offers an ideal place to settle to those looking for a quiet, friendly and family-oriented neighborhood close to (but not too close) to Austin’s urban core. Homes tend to run on the smaller side (just over 1,000 square feet), but offer younger buyers the chance to buy an affordable home in the mid-$200s that can be expanded upon later. Area schools include Brentwood Elementary, Lamar Middle School and McCallam High School.

Much of the unique character of the Crestview neighborhood lies in the 1950s historic charm that still prevails in the area. The Crestview Shopping Center is a time-capsule in itself, where one finds a local MiniMax grocery store and charming Crestview Barber Shop, complete with the red and white barber pole. Proximity to the revitalized Burnet Road gives residents easy access to many hip and trendy restaurants, shops and boutiques that are transforming this area into a more and more desirable destination.
Pros
  • Strong community feel
  • Family friendly neighborhood
  • Peace and quiet
Cons
  • Far from Downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Rather bland, but certainly affordable"

For those looking for a neighborhood that can provide less expensive homes in a suburban setting close to some of Austin’s major arteries, then Coronado Hills may fit the bill. This is not the neighborhood for those who chose to live in Austin for its funky vibe, eclectic art and music scene, and liberal sensibilities. This area is more for those looking for a nice-sized home for their family, complete with a yard, among quiet streets, in a clean, well-kept neighborhood.

Located between Highways 183 and 290, with Cameron Road on the west, Coronado Hills has easy access to all parts of Austin by way of these highly trafficked thoroughfares. Be aware that traffic on Highway 183 in particular can get heavily congested during typical rush hour times. This largely Hispanic neighborhood enjoys some racial diversity, as families are attracted to the area for the affordable housing prices, which average around $130,000, far below the city’s average. The area schools include Andrews Elementary, Webb Middle School and Reagan High School.

In a nutshell, Coronado Hills is a fine and affordable neighborhood for families. It is easily overlooked because it doesn’t have much in the way of character, but on the other hand, there’s not much to complain about either. Being set in the midst of the intersection of three major highways could be considered a negative, but residents report that traffic noise is generally not a problem here.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
Cons
  • Highway noise and traffic
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Illustrates Pros and Cons of Revitalization"

This small Austin neighborhood is another on the east side in a significant state of transition. Because of its prime location just across the Interstate from the University of Texas, and close to downtown, the Chestnut area was ripe for this kind of attention.

Bounded by Martin Luther King Boulevard to the north, 12th Street to the south, Chicon to the west and the Northwest railroad tracks to the east, if one was unaware of Austin’s east/west divide, this would seem to be the perfect spot to settle in. For those willing to experience living in the midst of a gentrifying neighborhood, it actually may be perfect. This is an historically African American and Hispanic neighborhood that suffered from years of neglect. It had a reputation for higher crime, and many residents lived below the poverty line.

Efforts by the city and area residents lead to a concerted effort to improve the Chestnut neighborhood and make it a much safer and attractive place to live. The results, at least in some parts of the neighborhood, have been quite dramatic. New businesses have been attracted to the area, rundown homes have been torn down to make way for new development, all giving Chestnut a newer, hipper feel. Housing prices remain more affordable than other parts of the city, particularly those so close to the action. An older fixer-upper can be bought for the low $100s, while some of the newer remodeled homes run in the mid-to-upper $200s. No schools are found within this small neighborhood’s boundaries, but nearby are Campbell Elementary School, Kealing Middle School and McCallum High School.

Like so many east Austin neighborhoods experiencing rapid improvements, the results have had both good and bad points. Crime is down, the area is experiencing some economic regrowth, and new families, young professionals, and business owners are moving in. But all this growth often comes at the expense of the lower-income residents who have long called Chestnut home, who find they can no longer afford to live in what has become a much more livable neighborhood. Still, for those who are looking for a central Austin neighborhood with lots of character, and don’t mind the mix of sketchy and new, Chestnut warrants some serious consideration.
Pros
  • Diverse neighborhood
  • Cheap real estate
  • Close to campus and downtown
Cons
  • Some unsafe feeling areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"Up and Coming East Austin Neighborhood"

For those looking for a diverse neighborhood, close to downtown Austin, the University of Texas, hike and bike trails, great restaurants and some local flavor and color, and affordable housing prices to boot, the Central East Austin neighborhood is the perfect match. So what’s the catch?

This is a neighborhood in transition, having suffered for years from high crime rates and decrepit real estate. But the area’s proximity to the central hubs of the city, along with the increasing need for more affordable housing, have drawn attention to Central East Austin. Historically this area was the center of the area’s African American population. But in recent years the demographics of the neighborhood have been changing, and now one finds recent college graduates, artists and families moving in alongside longtime residents.

Bordered by 7th Street to the south, I-35 to the west, Martin Luther King Boulevard to the north and Northwestern and Rosewood Avenues and Chicon Street to the east, this neighborhood is ideally located for those preferring to be close to Austin’s action. Because it is a neighborhood still in the midst of transformation, it is possible to find a 3-bedroom home for under $200,000. But affordability does come at the price of questionable safety and rundown homes scattered throughout the area. The local schools are not highly regarded, making the neighborhood less attractive to families with school-age children. Still, for those wanting to get in early to what is clearly a soon-to-be an up-and-coming neighborhood, the negatives are worth overlooking.
Pros
  • Affordable homes
  • Strong and close-knit community
  • Close to campus
  • Great culture and history
Cons
  • Still in transition
  • E. 12th and Chicon
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"1950s Austin Charm"

The explosive growth and popularity of Austin has helped this town continue to thrive even in the midst of difficult economic times. But it has also priced much of the central part of the city out of the range of many young families. The Brentwood neighborhood, located in north Central Austin, offers some hope for those wishing to remain near the heart of Austin without breaking the bank.

Bordered by Burnet Road and Lamar Boulevard to the west and east and 45th Street and Justin Lane to the south and north, this is a neighborhood that is still experiencing some transition from its 1950s roots. Many of the homes are modest one-story bungalows that were originally purchased by GIs following World War II for their families. Some original residents remain, but the area has become increasingly popular with young professionals and families who have gradually revitalized the area. It is still possible to find a relatively inexpensive fixer-upper here, and prices generally average in the $300s. Area schools include Brentwood Elementary, which recently became a dual language (Spanish-English) school, Lamar Middle School and McCallum High School.

Brentwood’s quick and easy access to downtown Austin, the University of Texas and Town Lake allow residents to enjoy the benefits of living in central Austin while also living in a thriving family-friendly neighborhood. The Burnet Road corridor offers many popular eateries and shops for those hoping to stay close to home.

One landmark that helps preserve some of Brentwood’s history is the nearby Crestview Shopping Center, where one feels they have stepped back in time as they shop at the local Mini Max grocery store or go for a haircut or shave at the Crestview Barber Shop. Locals pride themselves on preserving the quaint and funky feel of Austin by supporting these longtime institutions.
Pros
  • Friendly neighbors
  • Away from downtown noise
Cons
  • Not as trendy as some other areas
  • Not much nightlife nearby
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"Great for kids, professionals and chickens"

Located south of Town Lake (or Lady Bird Lake, as it was named in 2007), the Bouldin Creek neighborhood is yet another area in Austin that strives to retain its roots, both the historic and eclectic kind. Extending from the lake south to Oltorf Street, and bordered by South Congress Avenue to the east and South First to the west, this neighborhood dates back to the turn of the century. The historic Green Pastures Restaurant, located in the heart of the neighborhood, occupies the former 1894 mansion home of John Henry Faulk, a famous Austin writer and activist.

With its long history, one can still find some of the original 1920s and 1930s style bungalows along the tree-lined streets. Many hip young couples and families are attracted to this neighborhood, with chickens frequently being seen in the yards of neighbors alongside a new million dollar remodel. The local schools include Becker and Travis Heights Elementary Schools, Fulmore and O. Henry Middle Schools and Austin High School.

Bouldin Creek residents enjoy close proximity to Auditorium Shores (site of the annual Austin City Limits music festival) and the many hike and bike trails found in the nearby greenbelt. Also nearby is the Long Center for the Performing Arts and the Palmer Events Center, so residents can enjoy the annual reggae festival one week and the opera the next.

While Austin’s explosive growth has resulted in gentrification in almost all areas of the city, Bouldin Creek has managed to retain much of its funky, old Austin feel. Residents pride themselves on supporting local businesses, from coffee shops and cafes promoting organic and local flavors to Mexican bakeries and tattoo parlors. With its eclectic mix of businesses and residents, there is not once ounce of suburban feel to this neighborhood.
Pros
  • Access to nightlife
  • Close to the lake and Downtown
  • Old charming houses
  • Great unique shopping experience
Cons
  • Can get overcrowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"Parks and Green Space and an Urban Location"

For those who want to take full advantage of Austin’s reputation as an outdoor-lover’s paradise, the Barton Hills neighborhood is the ideal location. With its northern border abutting spacious Zilker Park, which embodies Austin’s heart and soul, and home to the famous spring-fed Barton Springs Pool, residents have easy access to much of what makes Austin unique. Bordered on the south by Highway 360 and on the east and west by Barton Creek and Mopac respectively, this centrally located neighborhood has access to all that Austin has to offer.

The area schools of Barton Hills and Zilker Elementary, O. Henry Middle School and Austin High School make this neighborhood a popular one with families. The hilly streets feature ranch-style homes with apartments and condos mostly found on the western edge along MoPac. The neighborhood is primarily a residential one, with few commercial establishments within its borders. But just a few minutes away along Barton Springs Road are many popular Austin restaurants such as Chuy’s and Shady Grove. Downtown is a quick 10 minute drive away, and thoroughfares such as Bee Caves Road to the west and Lamar to the east provide access to several extensive shopping centers where both national chains and locally owned stores can be found.

All this convenience and local personality comes at a price, however. Home prices average a steep $400,000 to $500,000 for a single family home, and when one comes on the market, it usually doesn’t take long for someone to snap it up.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Perfect place for the outdoors type
  • Short ride to Downtown
Cons
  • Expensive place to live
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"More Affordable Central Austin"

Allandale is one of the many neighborhoods located near the central part of the city but far enough away to offer lower housing prices and less congestion. It is conveniently located near the main hubs of town, such as downtown, the University of Texas and Zilker Park, but not so close that one has to deal with urban headaches such as sparse parking, traffic and late-night carousers.
The Allendale neighborhood boundaries are generally considered MoPac on the west, Burnet Road on the east, West Anderson to the north and North Loop to the south. This is a popular neighborhood with families, with single-family homes dominating the area and a few apartment complexes scattered throughout. Home prices average around the mid-300s, but can range from $200,000 up to $600,000. The schools serving this area (Gullet Elementary, Lamar Middle School and McCallum High School) have excellent reputations for providing high quality academic experiences and strong parental involvement.
There are many great community amenities located in Allendale. The city-run Northwest Recreation Center offers facilities for indoor and outdoor sports as well as public spaces for meetings and community gatherings. The Shoal Creek bike trail runs the length of the Allandale neighborhood, offering serious cyclists a means of commuting all the way to downtown Austin. The nearby neighborhood park offers an Olympic-sized swimming pool, playground, duck pond and picnic areas. Burnet Road has enjoyed some recent revitalization, with new restaurants and retail establishments transforming this corridor into a hip and popular destination while still retaining some of its old Austin feel.
Pros
  • Educational facilities
  • Family firendly
  • Low crime rate
Cons
  • Expensive real estate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish

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