Kerry Barger

PRO

Real Estate Professional with Houlihan Lawrence Global Business Development

  • Local Expert 4,779 points
  • Reviews 11
  • Questions 24
  • Answers 28
  • Discussions 0

About Me

As Houlihan Lawrence's social media coordinator, my job is to help our agents engage with communities across Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess counties on a digital level. Through the use of social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and more, we aim to establish connections with small businesses, nonprofit organizations and those who know these areas the best - the locals! Prior to working with Houlihan Lawrence I served as The Putnam Examiner's Editor-in-Chief, where I wrote stories and interacted with local residents from the county's six towns and three villages. I'm a lifelong resident of Lake Carmel, New York and a 2011 Ithaca College graduate.

My Expertise

Marketing, Social Media, Public Relations, Writing, Editing, Blogging, Photography, Digital Media

My Service Locations

Dutchess County, Putnam County, Westchester County, White Plains

Office

4 Valley Road, Bronxville, New York 10708 (Google map)

Websites

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
May 06, 2012

"Scenic suburbia at its finest."

Myers Corner is a residential hamlet located within the Town of Wappinger with a population of about 7,000 people. It's heavily defined by the feeling of suburbia, with its makeup consisting solely of homes, a handful of schools and a small ballpark. Myers Corners Road and County Road 94 split it into four quadrants, each offering up an opportunity to escape to a more commercial/business-oriented sector like the Route 9 corridor to the west and Dutchess County Airport to the north.

The hamlet may be quiet in nature, but like I said, residents do have opportunities to access amenities, shopping malls, movie theaters, and a slew of different restaurants. Route 9 has a great mix of local and commercial shopping and if you don't like the traffic, Myers Corners is a great alternative if you still want the opion of shopping at your fingertips. Would it be too quite for a college student, college graduate or young professionals? I would say so, but because of its residential atmosphere may be more suitable for younger families, especially those with children.

It's also home to a handful of schools, two of which belongs to Wappingers Central School District. Van Wyck Middle School is situated on the outskirts of Myers Corner, with Roy C. Ketcham High School located directly off of Myers Corner Road. A Dutchess Community College (DCC) satellite campus is also directly off of Myers Corner Road- DCC is one of the best community colleges in the state and the satellite office provides a great alternative to those who don't want to travel north to the main campus through all of the traffic.

Overall, Myers Corner is reflective of a sleepy suburban community built for residential homes. It's low-key atmosphere and lack of hustle and bustle makes it a perfect place for those who like to sit back and enjoy a slower tempo.
Pros
  • Things to do
  • Shopping nearby
Cons
  • Can get congested
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Apr 08, 2012
Editors Choice

"Growing township with recreational opportunities."

East Fishkill is one of the southern most towns in Dutchess County and runs adjacent to the northern border of Putnam County. Three major roadways, Route 52, the Taconic State Parkway and Interstate 84, run through East Fishkill, giving residents many opportunities to escape and access Putnam and Westchester or New York City, Connecticut and Albany. Once a small farm town with little development, East Fishkill has evolved into a budding township with nearly 26,000 residents. This includes clusters of residential neighborhoods, busy intersections and small businesses. With plenty of open space available for development, East Fishkill has only way to go and that's up.

Because East Fishkill borders Putnam County, residents have different options when it comes to deciding upon a school system. Students from East Fishkill can go to Arlington, Wappingers, Pawling or Carmel Central School District. With the exception of Pawling, all offer a sense of attending a big-time school with large graduating classes and college-like atmosphere. Pawling's school district has much smaller class sizes and a more private setting for students. All four of these school, however, offer quality educations and great facilities.

One of East Fishkill's defining features is its wonderful recreational programs offered to youths, young adults and adults for residents and people living out of town. Even though I didn't live in East Fishkill, I participated in its recreational softball league when I was younger. A 60-acre park with various playing fields, walking paths, and pavilions highlight East Fishkill's recreational department with programs occuring through the winter, spring, summer and fall seasons. It makes for a great place to bring up children to go along with its safe environment and strong school systems.

If you enjoy a quieter atmosphere that still offers a wide range of things to do, then East Fishkill may be a place for you to check out. If you like the hustle and bustle of a small city, however, you should check out Poughkeepsie to the north or Westchester County to the south.
Pros
  • Strong recreational programs
  • Safe environment for children
Cons
  • Need a car to travel most places
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Apr 08, 2012

"Budding township boasts growing population and local economy."

Hopewell Junction is a small Hamlet located in the Town of East Fishkill right near the border of Dutchess and Putnam Counties. It used to be a plot of countrified land with a small amount of homes; however, Hopewell Junction now boasts a growing population as well as an evolving community of entrepreneurs, restaurants and other smalls businesses. Though it's located within East Fishkill, over the course of the past 10 or so years it's developed its own sense of identity.

Surrounded by miles and miles of woods, Hopewell Junction is a great place to raise a family due to its safe environment and strong recreational department. On any given weekend you can see baseball, softball, soccer and other sports teams running around its 60-acre recreational facility. The park also contains a walking path, tennis courts, pavilions and sandy volleyball pits. The place comes alive during the summer months and if a sports enthusiast isn't signed up for one of departments many teams (youth through adult), you can head over to the East Fishkill Golf Center which features an indoor dome, batting cages, mini-golf and a driving range.

Local eateries are a memorable feature to living in Hopewell Junction. I attended a wedding reception once at Le Chambord Inn & Restaurant and I was floored by it's delicious-tasting food and old-school rooming style. My family and I travel north at least once a year to visit Muscoot North Restaurant- the bar is home to a bunch of regulars and the food is fantastic. Though it's just food, these eateries really represent the local dynamic of living in this community.

Families have a few options when it comes to sending their children to school when living in Hopewell Junction. Because it's located right at the Dutchess/Putnam Border, children can go to Arlington, Carmel or Pawling schools. Arlington and Carmel offer a college-like atmosphere with large campuses and bigger class sizes, while Pawling creates a more intimate, secluded setting.
Pros
  • Growing in size
  • Private yet it feels like a community
Cons
  • Car necessary
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Apr 08, 2012

"The gateway between Dutchess and Putnam counties."

Stormville is a hamlet located in East Fishkill in the southeast corner of Dutchess County. Although it's located in Dutchess, most residents choose to send their children to Carmel Central School District due to its close proximity; however, some do use the Wappingers Central School District, as well. It's mostly a mix of residential neighborhoods and roads of individual houses atop Stormville Mountain, which is covered with rocky terrain and heavily wooded areas. Stormville is the true breaking point between suburban life and country living, and if you appreciate a quieter lifestyle this is an ideal place for you. It also becomes a popular place for hunters with an abundant deer population and small brooks and streams for fishing.

While there isn't much to do in Stormville besides working with what nature has to offer, it's location gives residents easy access to more signs of life. With Route 52 bisecting the middle of it, Stormville serves as a passageway in between Kent in Putnam County and greater Dutchess County. One can easily access Westchester County and New York City via the Taconic State Parkway, or to Connecticut and Brewster via Interstate 84. Since there's no commercial or corporate business in Stormville, most residents commute into Dutchess or Westchester for work.

This sleepy hamlet enjoys the quieter things in life: the beautiful outdoors and the faint buzz of cars from a distant highway.
Cons
  • No business or nightlife
Recommended for
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Apr 04, 2012
Editors Choice

"Urban center situated along the Hudson River."

Poughkeepsie is one few cities located along the Hudson River and of the largest urban centers north of New York City, with particular parts of Westchester County serving as the exception. Incomparable to a White Plains per say, Poughkeepsie's identity is found in the four or so colleges that call the city home. Students from Vassar, Marist, Dutchess Community College and the famous Culinary Institute of America are dispersed throughout most of Poughkeepsie but all of the action usually takes place in neighboring Fishkill and Wappinger where the commercial strip of Route 9 is located. Whereas other parts of Dutchess may be suitable for families, Poughkeepsie is a place for college-aged students and the occasional young professional (IBM is located in the Town of Poughkeepsie.)

Unlike many neighborhoods in Dutchess, Poughkeepsie is one of the few low income areas with 22 percent of the population living below the poverty line. I think this can be attributed to the lack of industrial and corporate business in the area with jobs in the commercial sector filling the void. This isn't the best place to relocate if you're looking to further your career or look for employment opportunities.

It does, however, have a much better transportation system than most in the Hudson Valley, with the City of Poughkeepsie Transit running throughout the area and the Dutchess County LOOP coming in and going out of the city. The Route 9 corridor, a commercial strip that runs both north and south, contains ample shopping opportunities with the large Poughkeepsie Galleria and South Hills Mall. For about 15 miles, you can find large department stores, restaurants, coffee shops and a variety of other stores on either side of Route 9. It begins with in the depths of Westchester County around Peekskill and runs north into Hyde Park. Poughkeepsie is also home to a Metro-North station along the Hudson line and an Amtrak station that runs into New York City's Penn Station.
Pros
  • Major transportation hub
  • Renowned colleges
  • Public transit
Cons
  • Employment opportunities
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Apr 01, 2012

"Kid-friendly atmosphere with many recreational activities."

What busyness any other Putnam County town or village may experience escapes down the hill via Route 311 into the sleepy town of Patterson. Set with residential communities and a spattering of local "mom-and-pop" shops, Patterson finds a sort of seclusion not seen by other areas on the eastern side of the county. Route 22 opens up into a busier corridor with larger shopping centers and commercial businesses. To the north, one can access Pawling in Dutchess County. Further down Route 22, you're brought into Southeast and Brewster near Interstate 684. A Metro-North train station at the center of town will bring you into mid-town Manhattan in an hour and a half.

The aspect of Patterson that stands out the most is my mind is how kid-friendly it is. It provides strong recreational programs (baseball, softball, soccer) to its residents and anything that's not offered can be found in Kent or Southeast, both of which are less than 10 minutes away. A large recreational facility hosts a variety of different activities for youths, adults and seniors. Thunder Ridge Ski Area, which has become a community staple not just for the town but for the county as well, attracts people from all over the metropolitan area. The Great Swamp covers 6,000 acres and is one of the largest wetlands in New York State- Friends of the Great Swamp offer canoe trips during the late spring.

As it is kid-friendly, it may not be the best place if you're searching for a fast-paced environment. Patterson is the epitome of a laid-back town, so if you're looking to escape the hustle and bustle of, say, a New York City, you've found the right place.
Pros
  • Great elementary school
  • Kid-friendly environment
  • Recreational Programs
Cons
  • Sleepy town
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Mar 29, 2012

"The hub of Putnam County."

With majestic views of the Hudson River and a vibrant main street that serves as the hub of the community, Cold Spring by far epitomizes the local spirit necessary to any municipality. Mom-and-pop shops, local food places and thrift stores compose most of the village's downtown area; however, one can easily access "commercial stores" like Wal-Mart, Shop Rite and Kohls in neighboring Dutchess County via Route 9. Once regarded as a place with empty storefronts and no way to sustain itself economically, a review in the Hartford Courant that went international turned this sleepy village into a bustling tourist destination for those living in New York City. Today, Cold Spring attributes most of its local economy to those traveling north, especially on the weekend during the warmer months. This is made possible by Metro-North's Hudson Line, which can also help you easily escape for a day trip down south. In fact, it's one of the largest producers of sales tax revenue in Putnam County, with many city residents spending their money in Cold Spring's stores and restaurants.

There's a specific beauty about Cold Spring unlike many of the other towns and villages in Putnam County. Scenic views of the Hudson River open up to rolling hills and miles and miles of state land, most of which resides in the Hudson Highlands, an extension of Clarence Fahnestock State Park. A beautiful waterfront gazebo set with benches and a marina make any day almost picturesque, rain or shine. I worked at Fahnestock for years, and I can say there's no better place to go hiking, biking and swimming in the region.

The one downside to living in a tourist destination are what one expects it to be: tourists. Main Street gets pretty busy on the weekends with a swath of New York City socialites looking to get a taste of "country life." This also makes shopping a bit expensive, and you'll need to travel into Dutchess County to get a little more variety. County services are located nearly 35 minutes away in Carmel, accessible by Route 301. The lack of commercial influence, however, makes the community more local-centric, so if you don't mind taking a 15 minute trip north for the necessities, Cold Spring is definitely the place to go.
Pros
  • Local charm
  • Scenic views of the Hudson
  • Great school system
Cons
  • Tourist destination
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Mar 28, 2012

"Wide, open spaces."

People flock to Putnam Valley for its lack of urban sprawl and environmental appeal. The town is surrounded by rolling hills, miles and miles of trees and rocky terrain with an expanse of trails and recreational areas to compliment the landscape. If there's one place that's ideal for nature lovers, outdoorsmen, sportsmen and those who just appreciate quiet, Putnam Valley is definitely the area you're looking for. Accessible by the Taconic State Parkway and Route 301 from Carmel, Putnam Valley makes its name for possessing parts of Clarence Fahnestock State Park, which contains lakes, ponds, trails, etc. The town's huge recreational park doubles as a sports arena and venue for various performances throughout the summer months. There are various summer camps and educational programs to get the community engaged with the community at large. The residents are kind and community-oriented.

While Putnam Valley offers an intimate relationship with nature, there is not much business to compliment the surrounding landscape. Some enjoy the fact that the town encourages developers to lump houses together, others are frustrated with the town's lack of commercial development. There is one intersection in town (Oregon Corners) that holds a glorified deli, bagel shop, doctor's office, etc., but a lack of sidewalks and parking lots makes it difficult to shop in this small sector. Those looking to shop are forced to travel to Mahopac, and those needing county services must travel 35 minutes to the county seat in Carmel.

What Putnam Valley contains in beauty and seclusion it makes up for with a lack of development, both in housing and business.
Pros
  • Peaceful and quiet
  • Great school system
  • Solid recreational programs
Cons
  • Lacks commercial development
  • No shopping
  • Lacks access in and out
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Country Lovers

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