7.6 out of 10

Noe Valley

37.7497464380454 -122.431527532421
Great for
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Internet Access
  • Clean & Green
  • Public Transport
  • Safe & Sound
Not great for
  • Parking
  • Nightlife
  • Cost of Living
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Schools
Who lives here?
  • Families with kids
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian

Reviews

4/5
Nov 08, 2013

"One of the City's Most Family-Friendly Neighborhoods"

With its popular 24th Street shopping district, easy commute to the South Bay, and beautiful views, Noe Valley has become one of San Francisco’s most desired neighborhoods.

Living in Noe Valley can shave 15 minutes or more off commuting south, and many Silicon Valley companies have employee shuttles that stop in the neighborhood. The J Church metro train and the 24 Divisadero and 48 Quintara buses are among the public transit options available in Noe Valley.

Numerous shops and restaurants line 24th Street, including a Whole Foods Market, the ever-popular Firefly restaurant, the Noe Valley Bakery, and Phoenix Books. Lovejoy’s Tea Room, a quaint British tea room that remains a favorite for bridal showers, sits around the corner on Church Street.

A second, smaller shopping strip on Church near 29th Street features a Regent Thai restaurant, and Toast Eatery diner, which also boasts a 24th Street location.

Homes in the Liberty Hill area on the neighborhood’s north end — bounded by Liberty, Hill, Church, and Castro streets – offer stunning views and proximity to Mission Dolores Park and generally sell at a higher price point. A lavish Christmas display on 21st Street attracts throngs of spectators each December to Liberty Hill.

Noe Valley enjoys some of San Francisco’s sunniest weather, but conditions tend to get foggier as the neighborhood climbs toward Diamond Heights.

Nearby Dolores Park with its spectacular views, dog run, and free movie nights, remains one of the most popular hangout spots in San Francisco, and the city recently redid the park’s playground as part of a large-scale renovation project.

The median sale price for a single-family home in Noe Valley increased to $1,725,000 million in October 2013, up 23 percent from a year earlier, according to MLS data.

Inventory in the neighborhood has been constrained all year, and the months' supply of inventory (MSI) was 1.1 in October. Throughout 2013, the MSI has ranged from 1.7 in September to 0.7 in May.

While Noe Valley is known for its large number of young families, it remains appealing to a diverse crowd including singles and couples with no children.
Pros
  • Sunny
  • Quiet
  • good shops
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Sep 11, 2011

"Good Affordable Neighborhood"

Okay, so Noe Valley is not quite the hotspot it once was but it still is one of the most affordable places to live in SF area and it definitely feels a little bit safer than a lot of the surrounding areas. Here’s my break down of this neighborhood:

The Pros:

--The Rents: Although not rock bottom, they are pretty moderate with the average room going for about $1200. You can even find some occasional steals.

--The Restaurants: Noe residents are fairly picky, but they definitely have a number of choices to choose from: Firefly is probably the signature restaurant of Noe Valley and it leads the little contingent of about half a dozen high end Italian places that give not only local residents but a lot of visitors good—though somewhat pricey--choices for their dining pleasure. But it doesn’t lack variety here either. More moderately priced like Eric’s (a Chinese place), Fattoush (a Middle-Eastern joint) and Fresca, a Peruvian place, run the gamut of ethnicities and prices. (Not that it would matter anyway with Castro and the Mission just to the north and east.)

--Bars and Pubs: You can also find a number of bars and pubs along 24th street on the northern end including Noe, The Dubliner, my personal favorite, Bliss Bar (a kind of cool Martini style bar)--the point being that if you live here you don’t have to leave the neighborhood to go to a restaurant or find something to do.

Bad Things about Noe:

--Public Schools: James Lick Middle School leaves a lot to be desired. Given that this is often billed as a family friendly SF neighborhood, it is surprising to have such a poor school here. Let me be clear, it isn’t a horrible school, it just is below average. Across the board they rank in the lower half for test scores. (Now there are some religious schools in the neighborhood that are possible alternatives to the public system. Immaculate Conception School is an example of these. The only problem is that it is hard to tell since these schools don’t have to report test scores. And, of course, if you have a problem with you kids being indoctrinated in a particular religious affiliation, this could be a further problem.)

--Crime Worries: I would not call Noe a dangerous place but they do get a fair number of break-in’s and that kind of thing, especially near its borders with the Mission and Castro—that is only to be expected in such a high traffic area.
So, overall, I would say this is a good affordable area to live, but not a great spot in terms of family living because of the schools.
Pros
  • relatively affordable
  • good shops
  • lots of restaurants
  • beautiful homes
Cons
  • poor schools
  • more crime than you might think
  • can get crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Aug 11, 2011

"Suburbia in the City"

Noe Valley has some beautiful, old Victorian homes (much like other affluent, SF neighborhoods) but the price tag isn't quite as high as say, Pacific Heights. It's a somewhat eclectic neighborhood but it is mostly young families with a lot of dogs. The fact that most of the property consists on old, single family homes has much to do with the demographic. It doesn't sound like a tall order, but in a city as dense as San Francisco, finding entire neighborhoods with single family homes is rare. . . finding one that you can afford that isn't scary, is next to impossible. Noe Valley isn't the most ideal neighborhood in SF, but I would live here if I had a baby.
Because it's such a family - oriented neighborhood, there are a ton of great places to eat, but very little to do at night. And, the places are packed pretty much all day every day -- none of these women have jobs, it appears . . . lucky them. Martha and Brothers has great coffee and it's a great place to start off a day in this nabe. Eric's is fantastic gringo asian grub joint on Church street. I highly recommend it for meaters and veggers alike. There's also a really cute Tea Room on Church street if you want to take a quick shopping break in the neighborhood and don't want to deal with all of the strollers in the coffee shops. But, I would be remiss if I didn't mention Firefly. It's one of the best restaurants in SF and if you're in the neighborhood, you kinda have to eat here. Everything is locally grown, fresh and incredible. It's pricey (naturally) but totally worth it.
Noe Valley is really pretty and quiet and almost feels like a small town. There's a lot of great restaurants and a little bit of shopping -- although barely any of the shopping in this nabe is remotely useful. . . .much like the stores in a small town. There's no nightlife and a ton of babies, but if you want to live in Pleasantville right smack in the center of a big city, Noe Valley is your spot.
Pros
  • beautiful homes
  • good shops
  • lots of restaurants
Cons
  • strolller brigade
  • can get crowded
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Aug 04, 2011

"Comfortable, affluent neighborhood"

Located just south of the Castro, Noe Valley is an attractive destination for affluent, single-families and their acceptance of different lifestyles. Most of the community is made up of young white professionals. The neighborhood is also a bit quiet with hills to the north separating the community from noisy San Francisco life.

Most of the residents in Noe Valley are living quite comfortably. Their Victorian houses’ two stories, backyards’ lush and their pets’ well-trained. Shopping is an expanding feature in this neighborhood. On most days, sidewalks are heavily congested with couples and families perusing the bookstores, coffee shops and old-fashioned delis that make the neighborhood so quaint and homey. On 24th Street, one can find a variety of ethnic restaurants, shoe shops, home furnishing boutiques and day spas lining the main shopping hub. If you look closely enough, you’ll see that the district has a phobia of chain restaurants and name brand stores.

At night, the locals have little to choose from. The neighborhood only offers the occasional irish pub and sleek wine bar.

For public transportation, many locals take advantage of the Muni and Bart which are stationed at 22nd street and 24th street, respectively. Traveling downtown can be heavily congested during commute hours with trains jam packed with working professionals. Crime is relatively scarce in the neighborhood.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jul 20, 2011

"A really fun place"

Noe Valley has the reputation of being very family-friendly (but in an annoying way to singles). People often picture hoards of mothers pushing their children in double-wide strollers and ruining the scene for everyone. I'm not saying this doesn't happen sometimes, but singles can also enjoy what the area has to offer.

The neighborhood feels like it's own world because it is separated from the Castro by a few hills to the north. It's basically suburbia with a lot of stuff to see and do. If you want to shop or eat, then head to the main thoroughfare, 24th Street. You have to check out the Noe Valley Baking Company, one of my favorite bakeries in the city. Try the cherry chocolate bread, the rugelach (yum!), or the chocolate covered Noe-o's. Another well-recommended restaurant on the same street is Firefly. You can get a prix fixe for just $36 most days of the week. 24th St. also has a lot of cool shops to browse if you don't want to eat. After eating, head to Billy Goat Park and hike up the steep hills.
Pros
  • lots of restaurants
  • good shops
Cons
  • can get crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jul 09, 2010

"Old Charm, New Money"

About ten years ago, I scoured this region with a friend who wanted to find a place of his own after his roommate got a bit unpredictable, to put it diplomatically. My friend ended up in the Castro, but my memories of quiet little Noe Valley bring me back with the fam. Even the name is cute. After finding parking, which can take months, there are lots of places for retail therapy and some of them aren't corporate. Two spots I like to shop on 24th are Peek A Boutique and See Jane Run. The first is a kids consignment place I like because I can sometimes find shoes and jackets that are new with tags. See Jane Run has a fantastic catalogue I receive, but being there to try on their bras and yoga tops is obviously better than ordering online. My friend Stephanie and I made a trip to See Jane Run and the Noe Valley Baking Co. after the Nike Womens Half-Marathon five years ago. This place has fresh coffee and scones that exude the butter in them. Another thing I like about Noe Valley is that it's sunny here more often than in other SF locales with taller buildings. I do feel a little bit like an intruder there these days, though, because wealthier families with pure bred dogs and children in Phil and Ted's strollers seem to have multiplied. But as long as shops like the cheese place and the Global Exchange stay around, Noe Valley will retain its charm. If they have it, try the cheese shop's Stilton. Take it to a party with some fresh figs and unsalted roasted almonds. Yum!
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jun 21, 2010

"A cozy neighborhood for families"

Noe Valley is a great neighborhood. It has everything you need including public transportation, bars, restaurants, and supermarkets. You can also walk to the Mission, where you can get the most delicious Mexican food. There are tons of young families there, mostly couples with babies, a lot of babies are twins, maybe it is because mothers in Noe Valley have kids really late in life and so have to go through IVF treatment. I'm not sure. It's best not to live too close to the J-train though, which means you should avoid living on Church Street. When it comes around it can be quite loud and even rattle your apartment.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jun 20, 2010

"Perfect place for the family"

Noe Valley is a great place to live in, whether it be with your lover or to raise a family, the area in general is a great place to live in. One thing that makes Noe Valley so great is that it is diverse in many ways. With this said, the diversity is enormous here in Noe Valley, from political views, to ethnicity, to sexuality, etc.

The people are really friendly and you’ll get to meet all sorts of people. For one if you’re raising a family in Noe Valley, you’re not alone because you’ll see many others with their families walking around on the streets. Living here you’ll eventually come to realize that there are many that are just like you, and that is ultimately what makes Noe Valley so friendly, its diverse nature is a plus.

Living in Noe Valley would be great, except the cost of living there is pretty high for most people; it would definitely be a place to live for people who have the luxury to. But living in Noe Valley comes with great benefit as there are various places to eat out at and shop at. You’ll also see a lot of activity in Noe Valley as people are pretty active in the neighborhood.

Although Noe Valley is not really a place of attraction for tourists, it definitely is a place for San Franciscans.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jun 18, 2010

"Too, Too, Too (But Me, Too)"

Everyone complains about Noe Valley—too expensive, too crowded, too aloof, too trendy–yet everyone seems to want to live here. This distinct, singular neighborhood has had its detractors over the years, and yet it still generates an undeniable (and well nigh irresistible) attraction for most of its residents (and wannabe residents). Who wouldn’t want to live on a street where the arduously restored Victorians are inhabited variously by a novelist, a dotcom millionaire, a documentary filmmaker, a New Age healer, a friendly house painter and his family, a graphics designer, and a rock-band drummer, along with their assorted dogs, cats, birds, fish, and reptiles? Where it’s a short walk to great food, boutique- and essentials-shopping and services, and laid-back bars? Where there’s hardly any out-of-area traffic and nary a major thoroughfare in sight (unless you consider Dolores Parkway with its serene palms sprouting from the median a bad thing).Where public transportation is actually an option for commuters? Where the fog is mostly blocked (or diverted north and south) by the surrounding hilly geography? Where crime is low, neighborhood activism high, and hassles (aside from parking) few? What’s not to like about Noe Valley?

That, of course, is a relative question. It's certainly expensive: housing prices have stayed more or less at bubble highs, even during the recent economic downturn, with a two-bedroom condo near shopping and transit lines fetching as much as $1 million, and single-family abodes hitting the $2 million mark and above. Rents have likewise remained stratospheric (don’t even think about a studio here for less than $1,400, with one- and two-bedroom flats going for $2,000 to $2,600 or more--though lease negotiations have lately been possible, for the first time in years). The area attracts more people than can be accommodated by the limited housing (much of it single-family dwellings, with a short supply of apartments and an unreported number of so-called mother-in-law units hidden from the city’s building department). And yes, it’s perhaps a bit crowded (though that’s a relative term if you’re luxuriating in a top-floor studio with private deck and hot tub, wall-to-wall views, and a garage space to park your Smart car or Mini). Also, it can be somewhat off-putting, especially if you’re trying to find a parking spot after 5 o’clock in the afternoon near 24th Street, when it seems half the city is trying to do the same. And don’t even mention trendy—what with Googleheads complaining that the $300 Cydwoq loafers they’re returning at the upscale shoe store just don’t feel right, and web zillionaires sending back their organic green-tea lattes for tasting too “grassy.”

But, if you live in Noe Valley, you’re a tolerant sort, mindful of the many manifestations of mankind—though the area’s residents are, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, overwhelmingly white (more than 80 percent), zooming in on middle age (median: 38 years old) and well-to-do (annual household income of more than $150,000). Besides, cool rules here; few dare to have temper tantrums, honk their horns in a display of road rage, or sigh too audibly when waiting in line. The stress level drops noticeably from other neighborhoods, aided by the laid-back freelance writers, designers, and web developers who work from home or in any number of free-wifi cafes. And if you do become impatient with that mom or dad strollering their child in zigzag fashion down the sidewalk, you simply detour around them.

The neighborhood has undergone a number of incarnations since the mid-19th century, when it was mostly pastureland, part of a larger land grant given to José de Jesus Noé, the final Mexican mayor to preside over what became San Francisco. The so-named Noe Valley (actually, a basin surrounded on three sides by steep peaks and hills) started being developed in the late 19th century and early 20th century, especially so after the earthquake of 1906 (the ensuing great fire never reached the area), when middle-class workers flocked here from the rest of the devastated city. The neighborhood thus harbors many late-Victorian/Edwardian homes in the gewgaw-tortured style San Francisco is noted for, many built side-by-side, often four to six at a time, in typical row-house fashion (good surviving examples remain on Cesar Chavez Street, between Dolores and Church, and on 23th Street, near Douglass).

By the mid-1950s, the area had retained its solid, working-class base, with many small businesses serving the community, along with churches and schools. But the early ’70s began a transformation, when many families fled to the suburbs and the neighborhood was reinvigorated by hippies and young people, who brought with them a new entrepreneurial spirit. This resulting combination of established businesses and newcomers helped to build Noe Valley’s reputation for cooperation and tolerance. Though a few longtime survivors remain (Twin Peaks Properties, with its window display of a Noe Valley some 50 years ago, is one), the businesses today are generally progressive and innovative, catering to a like-minded clientele.

Curiously for such a large and family-oriented neighborhood, there are few parks: Noe Courts at Douglass and 24th, with its single tennis court and basketball court and patch of grass frequently overrun by dogs (though signs remind owners that the leash law is in effect), is often too crowded for enjoyment. Farther up Douglass Street (at 26th) is the more spacious Douglass Playground. Upper Noe Recreation Center lies down the hill and across the open basin and features a baseball diamond and a couple of tennis courts. Schools, however, offer parents some choices: Alvarado Elementary on Douglass and Alvarado streets (a K-5, with a 6 out of 10 GreatSchools rating) and Edison Charter Academy on 22nd and Dolores streets (a K-5 charter school, with a 5 GreatSchools rating), as well as two Catholic schools: St. Paul’s (K-8, at 29th and Church streets), and St. Philip the Apostle (pre-school through 8th, at Elizabeth and Diamond streets). James Lick Middle School, on Noe and Clipper streets, is known for its diverse student body (65 percent Latino, 15 percent African American, and the remaining 20 percent white or Asian) and community involvement. Finally, Theresa S. Mahler Child Development Center (on Church at Hill Street) is a public, year-round preschool for kids 3 to 6 years old.

Public transit is fairly reliable and frequent in Noe Valley. The J-Church makes a mile-long straight run through the neighborhood, emerging from an alley at 22nd Street and continuing till it hits the area’s southern border with Glen Park. Many residents take it to and from their jobs in Civic Center and the Financial District. Two bus lines—the north/south 24 and east/west 48—literally cross paths at Castro and 24th streets and give riders options for travel to other areas of the city. The BART station at 24th and Mission, though technically not in the neighborhood, is close enough to be an option for many Noe Valley residents who commute downtown or down the Peninsula. For the many who own cars here but have no garage space, street parking is the rule, resulting in a nerve-fraying parking shortage, especially near commercial streets. The city’s Department of Parking and Traffic has attempted to alleviate the situation somewhat by issuing “S” and “Z” residential parking permits for certain congested zones at $96 annually.

As for crime here, San Francisco Police statistics underscore that most common are run-of-the-mill disturbing the peace infractions, or (as witnessed in other neighborhoods where on-street parking is common) car break-ins and thefts (especially along 24th Street, Clipper, and Church). Less often, burglaries, robberies, and vandalism are committed. Though no homicides had been reported since 2004, a 30-year-old neighborhood man was stabbed to death in April in a homicide that shocked the locals—and prompted many residents to wonder if the invisible crime shield sheltering Noe Valley (so close to the gang violence of the Mission District) wasn’t about to shatter.

Though Noe Valley takes great stock in itself as a mom-and-pop-shop kind of place, unfriendly to franchises, a couple of name brands have crept in. There’s a Starbucks on 24th Street, and Whole Foods has recently staked a claim on the strip, occupying the space of the formerly cramped, quaintly downscale Bell Market. Because of the literary-minded population here, a number of choice (and independent) bookstores persevere, including Phoenix Books (a new-and-used shop in business since 1985) and Cover to Cover (relocated to Castro Street from 24th, after a reorganization in which customers pledged to support the “indie” with business and, in some cases, loans), the Mystery Book store on 24th (where the faintly fusty atmosphere belies a fine collection of mysteries, from paperback to first editions), and also Omnivore, on Cesar Chavez Street, where the selection focuses on all things gustatory, with new, antiquarian, and collectors’ editions of cookbooks and references on food.

The neighborhood also prides itself of on the one-of-a-kind: The Noe Valley Ministry, a Presbyterian Church on Sanchez Street, also serves as a kind of performing arts center, featuring a chamber music series, a pop-, folk- and blues-oriented music series, visual art shows in the gallery, performance spaces for Irish and Scottish dancing lessons, and meeting rooms for everything from Alcoholics Anonymous to tai chi. There’s also the much-publicized Lovejoy’s Tea Room, a somewhat prissy fantasy of a British tea parlor, complete with mismatched antiques (tables, chairs, teapots, the works) and fussy little sandwiches, cakes, and cookies.

Even though 24th Street is the main drag for shops, restaurants and bars, a smaller, less dense commercial area has always existed on Church Street, with a number of cafes (including the uber-cute Chloe’s, with its breakfast and lunch standards) and ethnic restaurants (such as Eric’s, an outpost of for Chinese cuisine). Clustered around the 30th Street end of Church are a number of specialty shops (including Drewes Bros. Meats and Church Street Apothecary) and assorted eateries—a noodle shop, a northern Indian restaurant, an all-American burger-and-sandwich joint, and an upscale Italian dining room—that reflect the area’s eclectic palates. They also signal that Noe Valley, though outwardly privileged and comfortable, still has an adventurous, inquisitive spirit.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Jun 10, 2010

"Pretty sweet area for families"

Noe Valley is an interesting blend of different types of people. However, prepare to see a lot of families and many strollers on the sidewalk.

The area has a great deal of nice restaurants, and cute boutiques. Apparently, due to the recession, prices in Noe Valley have dropped somewhat and some of the boutiques have gone out of business. There has also been a wave of crime and graffiti. However, still this is a nice area where you can do a lot of shopping for pretty things that you don't really need.

As far as the real estate goes, there are lots of pretty Victorian era homes. This is a great neighborhood for families. There are also a lot of row houses which were built for when this was a working class neighborhood. At this point, however, Noe Valley is pretty heavily gentrified.

One interesting place to check out is Lovejoy’s Tea Room. Lovejoy is really like nowhere I have been before in America. You actually get a nice UK experience with biscuits, tiny sandwiches, and plenty of tea. It’s a perfect place to checkout with female friends or perhaps your mom. Bars in Noe Valley include the Bliss Bar and The Dubliner. Another place that everyone loves is Firefly. This is a fairly fancy, sophisticated restaurant with cute ambiance.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jun 09, 2010

"Will not ruffle any feathers"

Noe Valley is a sweet neighborhood with lots of charm, and the streets seem to be bursting at the seams with babies and puppies. There is a lovely farmer’s market every Saturday between Sanchez and Vicksburg Streets, across from Martha and Bros. Coffee Company. The bars and restaurants of Noe Valley are well established and welcoming—however, they lack the charm of similar places I have visited in Cole Valley or Bernal Heights. I cannot quite put my finger on it—but there is dullness that can permeate Noe Valley. Perhaps in comparison to the eclecticism of San Francisco’s many other neighborhoods Noe Valley just seems, so average. Too normal!

Now, to own a home there is probably a different story as Noe Valley’s residential streets are enchanting. The area’s many hills make bike riding a bit of a challenge—but thanks the J MUNI line, public transportation options are relatively good. Parking is so-so. I like to visit Noe Valley for three reasons: one, Rabat’s shoe store—it’s the best in all of San Francisco with great selection and thoughtful service; two, Eric’s Chinese Restaurant—it is delicious! and three, Lovejoy’s Tearoom, where you can enjoy the luxury of high tea in a saccharine sweet setting.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jun 21, 2009

"Peaceful yet vibrant neighborhood"

Noe Valley is one of those places which once you've lived there, you'll never want to move away. At the same time, you're reluctant to brag about it to your friends in fear that the hidden gem will no longer be a hidden gem. Walking down 24th street on the weekend is one of the best ways to spend a leisurely afternoon. There're all the small shops to browse around and it is probably one of the few places left where the street is not infested with chain stores. One of my favorite resting spots is the Tully's cafe. Although it is a chain coffee shop from Seattle, it doesn't have any of the chain-like elements. And the coffee there is amazing! My favorite brunch spot there is Savor on 24th Street. I've spent so many wonderful mornings there catching up with friends and getting filled with great food. What more can you ask for!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5
Mar 19, 2009

"NICE AND FRIENDLY PLACE TO LIVE"

This valley has a luxurious neighborhood. The environments are clean,
presentable and be well taken case of its residents. Many kinds of
people live here with their own activity which is so variety. The
people is so friendly. Everything is regulated nicely here. This
valley is surrounded by hill that makes the community feel more
peaceful and seems like they were not in the rush city. So peaceful.
This is a nice living place for families with children, couples,
singles even retirees. There are a lot of choice for you to spend your
cash in many kinds of shops. You can easily find food store, clothing
store and many kinds of store to fulfil your needs. You can also find
many kinds of cuisine from different type both local or outter
cuisine. You can truly fulfil your appetite. Sure,this is a very nice
place to live. So welcome and friendly place to live.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"A Beautiful Area"

Noe Valley is a great area of town to be in. Around 24th and Castro you'll be able to find some great shops, specialty stores and some wonderful food. Enjoy Toast and Savor while you're over there. Or get your nails done.

If you're driving and looking to get out of town or to the west side of town, Clipper's a great route to take and comes out where Portola and Market change names. The climb up the hill is a bit steep -- be careful shifting. Remember to enjoy the view when you get to the top because it's another one of those spectacular ones.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 11, 2009

"Something for everyone in Noe Valley"

This prosperous neighborhood has it all and attracts all kinds of people. Noe Valley is home to dot.com millionaires, the working class, and Hollywood film crews ("Sister Act" and "Nash Bridges"). The hills that surround the valley give the community a remote and removed feel, taking one away from the city. As a result, Noe Valley attracts families with kids, dogs, and lots and lots of strollers.

Noe Valley boast many delectable eateries, such as Le Zinc, the neighborhood's own French bistro. On weekends try prix fixe breakfast! Firefly is a local favorite that features Asian, Polynesian, Mediterranean, and California cuisine. But, if you really want to absorb the neighborhood, just grab a cuppa joe at Martha and Brothers, a coconut dried-cherry scone from the Noe Valley Baking Company, and a piece of sidewalk in the sun.

Shopping in Noe Valley includes a cheese company on 24th Street, goods imported from Latin and South America at the corner of Noe and 24th Streets (Global Exchange), and a great secondhand baby and children's clothing store on Castro and 24th Streets (Peek-a-Bootique).

There truly is something for everyone in Noe Valley.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Unranked Streets in Noe Valley

Alvarado St

3.5/5
"Great peaceful place to have a nice family living"
37.7544205026533 -122.422269500483

Hill St

4/5
"Nothing to see here"
37.7560365049929 -122.422128000955

22nd St

2/5
"Exercise in Abundance!"
37.7546911294256 -122.431110674609

25th St

2.5/5
"The main attraction is the places nearby, though there is one good restaurant."
37.7497601171386 -122.432855757545

29th St

3.5/5
"Very little to do, but features some great asian restaurants"
37.7435701000759 -122.428798353563

Army St

2.5/5
"Big, Noisy, Hard to cross!"
37.7473390024678 -122.433004107521
"Important street that connects Twin Peaks with Noe Valley"
37.7486699420061 -122.437578766174
"settle down in the city"
37.7547122648565 -122.435546133651
"Beautiful in everyway."
37.7463845993822 -122.435843216968
"Dolores- Che Romantica!"
37.7481411762997 -122.424713165185