7.0 out of 10

Stuyvesant Town

Ranked 19th best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.7321114768205 -73.9755690021709
Great for
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Peace & Quiet
  • Clean & Green
  • Neighborly Spirit
Not great for
  • Nightlife
  • Shopping Options
  • Parking
  • Eating Out
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Singles
  • Students

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Mar 19, 2012

"Stuyvesant Town – No Longer for the Middle Class"

Stuyvesant Town, created after World War II to provide affordable housing for returning veterans and middle-class New Yorkers, has undergone tremendous changes over the past decade and is now home to people of wealth. Many New Yorkers consider the area the ‘poster child’ for ways in which the interest of profit-oriented property developers are putting the squeeze on everyday working people. Hundreds of once rent-stabilized apartments were warehoused and then renovated which allowed landlords to legally raise formerly stabilized rents. For example, one-bedroom apartments have skyrocketed from $900 per month to $3,000 per month, which is considered ‘market value’ in New York City.

If you move to the Stuyvesant Town area, your neighbors will not be as diverse as they would be in many Manhattan neighborhoods; nearly 75% of residents are white. Asian and Hispanic residents make up about 20% of the population, and only about 3% are black. Interestingly, mixed race couples and families are almost non-existent in S-Town. As for income, most households have two working residents with a combined income of approximately a quarter of a million dollars. So while residents are not ultra-rich, they do tend to be successful white collar professionals, many of them raising children.

Although Stuyvesant Town is now a seat of wealth, the area surrounding it retains much of its gritty, urbane personality. 14th Street – representing the southern border of S-Town – is a wild and wooly mix of college students, low-income families, kids, and recent immigrants. Everyone crowds onto the frequent, but packed, cross-town bus, making commuting a bit of a nightmare.

One plus about this area is that it retains the ‘essential services’ that residents need. Most people travel west to do food shopping, and the buses are always filled with people carry shopping bags from nearby stores like Trader Joes, or Whole Foods and Food Emporium, located near Union Square. Union Square is also home to a three-times weekly farmers market, and you’ll find S-Town residents browsing the stalls of the market early in the morning to get the best picks.

It is also the northern tip of the East Village, so you’ll never want for ethnic restaurants, movies, live theatre, or other things to do. And by the way...for people with concerns about health issues, Stuyvesant Town is a great place to live. It is located very close to a major medical center.
Pros
  • spacious apartments
  • Good transport connections
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Dec 31, 2011

"Stuy Town: A Tree Lined Town with Lots of Quiet for a City Dweller"

If you happen to find yourself in the middle of Stuy Town, the one thing you will notice is the peace and quiet. Comprised of apartment buildings with curved roads going through it, Stuy Town is a lovely compound that is a little retreat from the hustle and bustle of the big city. You are still city bound but for NYC this is country living. Lots of trees and friendly squirrels to be found here. Apt buildings are kept wonderfully clean, and many residents have been living here for many years, giving it that wonderful neighborly feel. The park in its center harbors a fountain and playground for kids which converts to a skating rink in the winter. There are lovely little eateries on the outskirts, and Veniero's the famous yummy Italian bakery is within walking distance down on 11th Street. You can hop on the train and take a quick jaunt to the Village or just walk it when it's nice and warm. Like other parts of Manhattan the summer brings lots of street fairs, so get out your walking shoes and be prepared to shop, shop, shop. A great neighborhood with spacious apts for NY! Great medical facilities are nearby.
Pros
  • Lots of Trees!
  • Clean!
Cons
  • All the buildings look alike so can be confusing finding one
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jan 24, 2011

"Let's Give Em Nothing to Talk About"

Stuyvesant Town, also known and Peter Cooper Village is a large private residential development on the East Side of Manhattan. The area is known as "Stuy Town" to local residents. The exterior of the buildings are not particularly attractive, although some apartments have been updated with new appliances and flooring. At one time there was a long waiting-list to get an apartments here due to affordable rents and relatively large apartments. Since 2006 there have been several financial and contractual issues which have mired the buildings in disputes between tenants and developers. What were once affordable apartments have become luxury rentals with prices out of the reach of most of the middle class.

Stuyvesant town and its sister complex Peter Cooper village stretch from First Avenue to Avenue C, between 14th and 20th Streets. There are 110 combined buildings, 11,250, apartments, and ove 25,000 residents. The neighborhood is bordered by the East River on the east, Gramercy Park on the west, the East Village (Alphabet City) on the south, and Kips Bay to the north. The area is known for Stuyvesant Square, a two-block part surrounded by park surrounded by the oringinal location of Stuyvesant High School, the Beth Israel Medical center, and St. George Church. The complex itself has also become a bit greener with the development of an 80 acre park.

There is no major shopping to speak of, although there are a good number of grocery stores. On nearby 14th Street you can find drug store chains, and banks. If you walk into the Union Square area (about 1/2 mile the west), you will find many shops such as Starbucks, Whole Foods, Barnes and Noble Bookstore, Filene's Basement, and a Best Buy.

For dining, nightlife, and a taste of culture and additional shopping opportunities lie in more hip neighborhoods like the East Village or Greenwhich Village, both within walking distance to Stuy Town.

Transportation to and from the neighborhood is not terrific with the L train on 1st Avenue and 14th being the closest station. You can also walk to the 4,5, and 6 at Union Square or catch the M15 bus on First Avenue.

For myself, the Stuy Town lacks any personality whatsoever, offers zero culture or amenities and is pretty much a neighborhood to walk through on the way to the Village.
Pros
  • affordable apartments
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jan 12, 2011

"Boring, Quiet Neighborhood In A Corner By The Highway"

Every city has a Stuy Town. It's that urban residential area that isn't in proximity to anything important and is nothing but generic apartment complexes jammed under a freeway.

The best part about Stuy Town is leaving Stuy Town, in that it is fairly close to the more exciting parts of lower Manhattan. The apartments are affordable and decent on the inside and you have access to all the basics. It's a quiet area without much happening so if that's you thing, and you're not high on aesthetics (or at least it is not as high on your list as a decent rent) it's a decent place to live.

There are no tourist attractions which is fine because it isn't that easy to get to by train. There is certainly nothing to see here.

At the end of the day, Stuyvesant Town offers nothing more than a place to hang your hat at night and the ability to live in the city within proximity to the better aspects of Lower Manhattan. The rents are okay, the area is mostly quiet. At the same time, there aren't many places to grab some food or a drink and not much entertainment or nightlife to be found anywhere. You're right by East Village though which means not having to go very far to get those things.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
Cons
  • ugly
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Jan 04, 2011

"Newly pricey private residential area"

Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village jointly make a private residential area on the lower east side of Manhattan. This is quite a historical area, especially with regard to the early days of New York City when the Dutch settled. (Peter Cooper founded Cooper Union where Abraham Lincoln gave a key speech.) The development runs from East 14th to East 23rd Streets and is far on the eastern part of Manhattan from First Avenue to Avenue C in Alphabet City. Stuyvesant Square and Stuyvesant High School are very well-known, and Beth Israel Medical Center is in this area.

They started constructing the current apartment buildings in the 1940s, and they were reasonably priced in the past. There are some larger apartments here, but they're decidedly pricey now thanks to a recent sale of the real estate. One-bedroom units go for about $3,000 and up a month. There's controversy here, too. Lawsuits have been filed because the new landlord is trying to charge higher rents of the current tenants.

Personally, I'm not all that fond of this area and wouldn't want to live here, especially since the controversy really rubs me the wrong way. And now that the rents have become so high, I couldn't consider it if I wanted to.
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Dec 29, 2010

"Stuy Town - Ugly as it Sounds"

Stuy Town tried to make a name for itself, and briefly did, as a mecca of affordability. Developers thought they could lure young professionals that want to live nicely without draining their savings and for a few years they did. But it's so ugly, so inconvenient, and so strange that it never fully became the "happening place" developers thought it could.

The buildings are ugly, as is the area, with portions hoving under the monstrosity that is FDR drive. But I think you can still get a good deal and score an apartment nice enough that you temporarily forget you're living in the arm pit of Manhattan.

It's far, far, far from the subway and its only reputation is as a failed real estate enterprise. On the flip side, you're not far from the East Village though and get to live in a much better apartment than you would there...so you get to be close to a cool neighborhood and still have a decent and comfortable apartment.

No reason families should look here. It's really intended for professionals in their twenties that can tolerate living in an ugly, unaccessible place.

It feels unsafe, but it isn't too bad. Even criminals don't want to live here.
Pros
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • really ugly
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
Recommended for
  • Singles
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
Dec 28, 2010

"A Controversial Little Enclave"

Stuyvesant Town used to be heralded in New York as something truly hard to come by: affordable but comfortable housing right in the heart of Manhattan. It was never a particularly attractive little section of downtown’s east side – it’s uniform buildings resemble a prison – but it was known for a long waiting list to get into the fairly large, fairly lovely apartments. Ever since a buying war and contractual issues, however, Stuy Town has simply become known for financial issues and related controversies – this brought to light other rumors pertaining to the apartments not being quite so lovely.

But most residents have debunked these myths, leaving Stuy Town to, at the very least, maintain its reputation for apartments that are still affordable – if not nearly as much as they used to be. The unattractive little neighborhood has, over the years, installed conveniences in order to be self-sufficient, like gyms and grocery stores. Starbucks, delis and drug stores line the immediate perimeter. Stuy Town is all about convenience, though. It is a neighborhood in which to live and run necessary errands. Extras like restaurants, culture, nightlife and shopping lie in cooler neighborhoods like the East Village, which Stuy Town can at least boast being within walking distance.
Pros
  • Conveniences are close
  • spacious apartments
  • quiet
  • Good transport connections
Cons
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
  • Scary at night
  • ugly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Oct 07, 2010

"Nice apartments, so-so neighborhood"

Stuy Town has always been super ugly. It’s basically a huge expanse of angular brick. But, for a long time, it was that rarest of commodities: affordable Manhattan housing.

Now the whole shebang has been bought by Tishman Speyer Properties after a bidding war with other organizations, like nearby NYU, and a fierce resistance from current residents. Tishman promised to make modern, beautiful living spaces from the brick expanse. The entirety of Stuy Town is still super ugly if you’re looking at it from the street. And while many parts of it have yet to be renovated, other parts have been turned into great, incredibly spacious living places. There are some remarkable amenities, like in-building gyms and concierges. The outdoor open spaces have remained unchanged for the most part, which is acceptable if not quite the expected sprawling expanses of green promised by Tishman.

But they are also expensive living places. Stuy Town is no longer an affordable neighborhood. With the new influx of residents, the feeling of the place is different. Some of the very long term residents have remained, but many others have been pushed out, changing the feeling of actual neighborhoody-ness to one of typical Manhattan buildings: a collection of strangers sharing a hallway.

This sense of isolation is not alleviated by the neighborhood. There are drug stores and Dunkin Donuts and a few Starbucks. But there is little nightlife and no "scene" nearby. Stuy Town benefits, though, by its proximity to cooler neighborhoods like the East Village.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Aug 14, 2010

"Desolate Place to Be"

If you want to visit a place that has just condos and expensive apartment buildings, you've come to the right place. Stuyvesant Town is not what people may think it to be. There really is not much going on there except for people going in and coming out of their places.

There are better places to live and visit. If you want beauty, try Central Park.
Pros
  • spacious apartments
  • quiet
  • Good transport connections
  • secluded from the city noise
  • Conveniences are close
Cons
  • really ugly
  • Scary at night
  • ugly
  • While close to more interesting neighborhoods, nothing to do here
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Apr 11, 2010

"Desolate residential area, not much else"

When Tishman Speyer took control of the Stuyvesant Town properties a few years ago, they made a big deal in the press about how they were going to spend millions of dollars on planting new trees and flowers all over the complex. This was a way of underscoring the failed attempt to turn Stuy Town's affordable housing units into luxury condos, a plan that went seriously wrong recently with the purchasers defaulting on their billion-dollar loans. Anyways, how they went about beautifying the complex was by ordering trees and flowers to be delivered and then leaving them above ground for weeks to die. Many of the plants ended up in the compost heap, or died soon after planting, and now that the money for this kind of beautification project has dried up, Stuy Town is as ugly and depressing as it ever was. The 80-acre park is a world unto itself, with apartments that are reportedly very spacious but very poorly maintained. This brick enclave is situated in the middle of Manhattan, and surrounded by neighborhoods that are so much more attractive and interesting, like Gramercy Park, the Flatiron District, and Union Square. The only real advantage to living in the complex is proximity, but otherwise it's hard to see how this desolate area would have become a land of luxury condos.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Apr 04, 2010

"Looks like the projects, costs like a luxury condo"

I don't really get Stuy Town or why these big, ugly impersonal city blocks would be an attractive place to buy a luxury condo. But apparently not everyone agrees with me, for this former low income housing community was bought by Met Life in 2000, with the intention of renovating the rental units for the luxury market and jacking up rent prices accordingly. This plan turned out to be a spectacular failure, as the original tenants resisted eviction, and the plan of converting apartments didn't go quickly enough to pay off the creditors on the purchase loan. As a result, the investors defaulted in January of this year, and Stuy Town is set to remain a rent-stabilized enclave until at least 2017, when it will finally be deregulated. Not quickly enough for Met life, though.

All in all, Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town are an enormous collection of red brick apartment towers that stretch from First Avenue to Avenue C, and cover the area between 14th and 23rd Streets. They are, and they look very much like housing projects, with about 56 residential buildings total. There are about 25,000 residents total, and the towers have their own “peace officers” who police the area.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • ugly
  • really ugly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
Mar 14, 2010

"This place takes a lot of heat"

Stuy Town has been under a lot of scrutiny lately, and I understand why, but what the man is doing over there doesn't really surprise me . . . especially for Manhattan. When I first moved to New York, I looked at an apartment in Stuy Town and I have a number of friends who live there. The neighborhood is not so great. There's a Starbucks, a Blockbuster, a Duane Reade and a McDonalds. That's, seriously, the neighborhood. The rest is just street and it's kind of desolate. But, I can see the appeal of living there, nonetheless. The immediate neighborhood is nothing to sing about but it is in downtown Manhattan so everything is really close and attainable. And, the apartments in Stuy Town / Peter Cooper Village are huge. I don't mean NY huge. They are enormous. They are completely re-done so there isn't a scratch on the wood, a scoff on the stainless steel appliances, a crack in the grout. And, the buildings are really secure. They are really quite nice and the price point isn't that high considering how big and new the spaces are. I know people who live in much smaller apartments for almost twice what the rent is at Stuy Town. And, the apartments accept pets (which is rare), they have concerts in the Stuy Town parks (they have their own parks) and there is concierge, a private gym, and lounges with Wifi. It's really a pretty cush deal even if you aren't one of the lucky few who managed to get a unit before the overhaul. But, I think those rent - controlled lucky ducks are meeting their end -- hence, all the flack that Stuy Town is taking. They're pushing the rent controlled out to redo their apartments and bump the rent up. Again, I don't know why anyone is surprised about this.
Pros
  • quiet
  • secluded from the city noise
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • Scary at night
  • really ugly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Mar 09, 2010

"Caught in the eye of a storm"

Stuyvesant Town or Stuy Town is a residential complex located in lower Manhattan. This complex along with its sister complex of Peter Cooper Village was planned during the time of the Second World War to accommodate middle income New Yorkers. These two complexes occupy a large area of lower Manhattan and extend from 14th Street to 23rd Streets from First Avenue to Avenue C in Alphabet City. Together they are composed of 56 residential buildings which house large apartments and are built in a fashion which is similar to low income housing developments. The only difference is that many of these buildings (which are declared to be eyesores by many New Yorkers) host hoardings that declare them to be ‘No Fee Apartments.’ Rentals here are exclusively managed by the leasing offices of the two complexes.
Both the complexes have parks and leafy alleyways within their boundaries and are served by many delis, supermarkets and restaurants which are largely located on their periphery. The complexes are also well connected by public transport as they are served by public buses like the M15, the M9 and the cross town buses like M14 and M23. They are also accessible by the L train which connects the complexes to the rest of Manhattan and Brooklyn.
Initially these residential complexes which were owned by the Metlife Corporation housed middle income New York families of firemen, policemen, and teachers but in 2006 the Metlife Corporation sold the development to property developers Trishman- Speyer and the property arm of the BlackRock Investment group. These two entities believed that the burgeoning demand for real estate in Manhattan would enable them to convert these rent stabilized apartments into market rent apartments by pricing out the original tenants. However the ongoing recession put paid to their plans and in January 2010 they gave up control of these properties to their creditors. Currently the tenants of these complexes can continue to remain in their rent stabilized apartments for about another five to six years until the real estate benefits granted to the complexes by the city of New York expire.
Pros
  • Stuyvesant Town is very centrally located close to good shopping and entertainment
  • Good transport connections
  • spacious apartments
Cons
  • Scary at night
  • ugly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jan 08, 2010

"Warbly times for residents here"

If you have an apartment in this middle income housing development, you were doing something right at one point. Nowadays, though residents here are dealing with a lot of changes, and things are looking pretty confusing for them at the moment.

The housing projects were recently sold to real estate mogul Tishman Speyer, and attempts are being made at selling remodeled apartments as "luxury" condos. Currently the Tenants Association find themselves at odds with Tishman Speyer, and many likely face a long legal battle so as not to be driven from their own apartments.

If you completely ignore this conflict, this happens to be a nice neighborhood, close to the relatively quite Gramercy Park and the bustling East Village, there is something for both elderly residents and their fun loving visiting grandchildren.
Pros
  • affordable apartments
Cons
  • once affordable apartments made into luxury condos
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Jan 03, 2010

"Community-based neighborhood"

Also known as Peter Cooper Village, Stuyvesant Town, located in Midtown East, has a historic legacy as one of the first, and only, post-war housing communities, low-cost housing built specifically to accommodate middle-class renters - although prices there, as ever, are creeping up. These red brick buildings give a sense of community: combined, the Peter Cooper and Stuy Town developments host 20,000 apartments. The most charming element of the area is perhaps the greenery - the development hosts acres of parkland, giving the neighborhood a sense of bucolic peace despite its rather bustling location. Other amenities include "peace officers" standing as security guards, security cameras, a number of nearby schools (including the prestigious UNIS, the United Nations International School), and the community-based "Town and Village" newspaper, covering issues relevant to Stuy Town and Peter Cooper.

However, Stuy Town life is not ideal. The cheap apartments are increasingly becoming illegally rented out at market rates by MetLife, the owning company, and there have been complaints regarding upkeep and living conditions for the rent-controlled members. Furthermore, Stuy Town can feel stifling for a night owl or partygoer who wants to be in the centre of the action. Overall, however, it's a worthwhile destination for a middle-class family seeking a good community-based neighborhood.
3/5
Mar 20, 2009

"A plethora of schools and red brick"

On the east side of Manhattan is Stuyvesant Town that covers the area east of First Avenue, between 14th and 23rd Street. The neighborhood is a huge residential complex that is also known as Stuyvesant Square. Calling this area a neighborhood is a stretch because Stuyvesant looks like a collection of redbrick apartments with typical housing project style design.

Unlike the “projects” Stuy Town is home to many trees, grass, black squirrels, and twelve parks open to all residents of the area. The park-like area attracts many families to the area. There are many schools in Stuy Town including Salk School of Science, United Nations International School, Immaculate Conception School, and Epiphany School.

A nightclub hotspot in the heart of Stuyvesant is Angel’s Share on 8 Stuyvesant Street. Angel’s Share is an ultra casual bar that has some of the best martini’s in all of Manhattan. Be prepared to wait, because this bar is always busy.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Feb 25, 2009

"Great place to live, boring place to visit"

Also known (perhaps better known) as Peter Cooper Village, this huge private residential complex is home to the lucky few who obtained one of its rent-controlled spaces. This is a gated community that is pretty unique on the isle of Manhattan, and as it is rare to see a middle-income housing development at all, it’s pretty hard to miss this community if you’re in the neighborhood. This is a perfect place for families or retirees on fixed incomes, if you can somehow stick your foot in the door.
In 2006 these apartment buildings went up for sale, and there were some issues with the rent stabilization, though it appears they have been resolved – at least until the year 2017.
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Styvesant Town - A planned community within NYC"

Stuyvesant Town is a wonderful area of the Lower East Side and popular neighborhood for families, young professionals, artists, and the like. A housing development some feel are visually reminiscent of the public housing communities located in the Bronx, Stuyvesant town is a wonderful oasis from harsher city living, providing residents with a world within a world. Developed in the late 1940s and currently home to nearly 12,000 residents, Stuyvesant Town is a great place to live. Convenience is a hallmark of this small enclave, as grocery stores, restaurants, some shopping, schools, and hospitals are located nearby. Beth Israel Hospital is located on First Avenue, and the United Nations International School is located in Stuyvesant Town. The residents of the neighborhood are extremely diverse, though “Stuy Town” is becoming more youthful, both in terms of the influx of young professionals to the well-protected and safe neighborhood, as well as families with children. Apartments in the sprawling complex are nice, with secure doors, checked entry point requiring Ids for entry, and laundry rooms in each building. Units are fairly expensive with 2 bedroom units renting for more $3,000 +. Stuyvesant Towns apartments range in size from one bedroom to 5 bedroom apartments, all overlooking trees, basketball courts, and some over looking the opulent fountain located in the center of the housing development. A beautiful park is also located in “the Oval”and in Fall and Summer months, is happening with outdoor concerts, festivals, and parties. The square is also the site of the weekly organic farmer’s market, offering samples of their tasty home grown delights. Properly named a “town,” this housing community is self-sufficient, even offering a bar within its premises. Though small in comparison to other neighborhoods in this section of Manhattan, Stuyvesant Town is a wonderful to live.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles

Best Streets in Stuyvesant Town

1

Ave C

4/5
"Great weekend spot"
40.7320982916498 -73.974322232954
"Most convenient part of Stuy Town"
40.7323860960655 -73.9807768208766
3

Stuyvesant Oval

2.5/5
"The center of the center"
40.7321334305169 -73.9776926145181
"Down by the River . . ."
40.7309934130759 -73.9754563998818
5

Stuyvesant Walk

2.5/5
"Just a bunch of walkways through a housing complex"
40.7318671982215 -73.9769811547552
"Huge apartments in tenement buildings"
40.7326189297038 -73.9773050997138
7

Peter Cooper Rd

2.5/5
"Nothing but housing"
40.7349130599577 -73.9767014644311

Unranked Streets in Stuyvesant Town

"The crowded loop"
40.7298597189688 -73.9778547351354

1 Ave

2.5/5
"Huge apartments in a weird area"
40.7346139322145 -73.9801280065923

East 15 St

2.5/5
"Not the most exciting street in the city. "
40.7291641467805 -73.9752381677758