7.4 out of 10

Potrero Hill

Ranked 41st best neighborhood in San Francisco
37.7605563407024 -122.399663057737
Great for
  • Internet Access
  • Eating Out
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Medical Facilities
  • Resale or Rental Value
Not great for
  • Parking
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Aug 31, 2011
Editors Choice

"40 Days Neighborhood"

Okay, so Potrero is a little bit like the Bernal Heights area—it is super popular with young couples looking for a relatively close spot to the main areas of the city without supposedly having the crime problems that you expect. If you are a fan of the film, 40 Days and 40 Nights with Josh Hartnett, then this is the hill where the main characters lived (though the other spots were mostly in North Beach and the interiors were shot in Canada—don’t try finding the Laundromat with the hidden Tide—its somewhere in Montreal apparently).

So does Potrero stack to the semi-hype it built up a few years ago?

Rents—Okay, let’s start with rent prices. As far as I can tell from my sampling of rents today, we got the average around $1250/room with a fair number of studios and one bedrooms in the sampling only about 10% with 3 bedrooms.

Crime—Given that the Mission is to the west and Bayview to the south, crime might be a worry and it is especially on the southern low lying end. You’ve got about two thirds the number of crimes reported here as in the Mission. Given that there are only 10,000 residents here, that actually seems to make it worse than the Mission for crime.

A closer look though reveals that the main problem is, as you sadly might expect, on the southern end of the neighborhood bordering Bay View where you have a series of projects. This year, for example, there have been 3 murders in that vicinity. Given that there have only been 32 murders so far this year in the entire city, that means 10% of the murders have occurred in this area.

If you stay on the northern heights you are relatively safe—except for the expected burglaries and break-ins.

So given the crime woes on the south, what does Potrero have to offer?

A Neighborhood Feel—North of the recreation center there is definitely a small neighborhood feel to the tightly packed streets with little corner markets. Like in many areas of the city, the houses cozily push up against one another—but here the combination of the freeway forming a sharp border on the west and the hill creates an even greater feeling of community—sort of like you might get if everyone were living one high rise building.

Restaurants—You can actually find about a dozen or so pretty good restaurants in Potrero. My recommendations would be Pera, a Turkish place (the lamb shish kabob is my favorite); Goat Hill Pizza; and Aperto, an Italian place—all of them around the culinary epicenter of Potrero—Connecticut and 18th.

Bars—As far as the bar scene goes, you will really have to go outside of the neighborhood to find any really great options—but that is no big deal with Dogpatch to the east, SoMa to the north and the Mission to the west. There is of course a dive called Thee Parkside and Bottom of the Hill, both of which feature live music.

Overall?

A good little neighborhood with some quiet nooks that make for a great place to live close enough to the action to jump right in when you feel like it, but not so close that you can never have a rest from it.
Pros
  • Quiet Niches
  • Good Restaurants
  • family-oriented
Cons
  • Crime on South
  • A Bit Cramped
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Aug 12, 2010
Editors Choice

"A View (and Room) of One’s Own"

They say you never really feel as though you live in San Francisco until you can look at it. If that’s the case, then this neighborhood on a hill by the same name satisfies that requirement—as long as you live on its relatively clear northern half. That side faces downtown, with its skyscrapers jabbing the fog and the waters of the bay floating the scene on a cerulean backdrop. As views go, it’s up there with the best in the city—Twin Peaks, Buena Vista Park, even the one looking back from the Marin Headlands, near Golden Gate Bridge.

But views aren’t all Potrero Hill has to offer--and, truth be told, not all parts of the hill offer a drop-dead perspective of the skyline or the bay or San Bruno Mountain to the south. You come here for the sense of neighborhood, the everyone-knows-someone-else vibe. It is a straightforward place, nothing fancy, but with just enough exclusivity—separated by highways on east and west, warehouses to the north and south—to make it feel as if it were its own little town. Even the big chains that have moved in—the Whole Foods on Rhode Island Street, World Gym on De Haro—make concessions to fit in. No one wants to make a big splash here, and that understated character is what gives Potrero Hill its one-of-a-kind charm.

Today, live-and-let-live is part of the area’s ethos. But this was not always your average feel-good neighborhood. The look and feel of Potrero Hill as a place where everybody gets along are contradicted by a past where race (and its concomitant, racism) were a force in daily life. It started out in the late 1800s less pastoral (as its name—“potrero” means “pasture” in Spanish—would imply) and more plebeian: a jumble of segregated working-class hotels, boarding houses, and ultimately small homes. Heavily masculine, it was populated by European laborers who scaled dozens of wooden steps down the eastern flank of the hill to horse-drawn rail cars that delivered them to back-breaking jobs in iron works and steel mills, where they toiled for 10 or 12 hours a day, six days a week. By the 1880s, San Francisco’s heavy industries had gradually relocated south of Mission Creek, the former bay now filled in and becoming the industrial center of the West. The Spreckels moved their sugar refinery here in 1884. By the early 20th century, Del Monte Fruit had constructed canneries and warehouses with railroad tracks to offload boats bearing tropical fruits that came into San Francisco Bay directly onto railroad cars. Starting with German workers, the Central Waterfront hosted businesses friendly to Irish, Chinese, Russians, and Mexicans. Each group separated into its own subdistrict on the hill; mixing of the different ethnicities and races was rare. When World War II broke out, the waterfront hummed with boatbuilding for the Navy, and hundreds of African Americans from the Southern states settled in, changing the neighborhood’s makeup once again. During the unrest of the 1960s, the neighborhood was the scene of disturbances and unruly crowds protesting police brutality or the insensitivity of the mayor’s office to the neighborhood’s racial minority.

Flash forward, past the dotcom and tech booms of the last decades, which effectively changed the face of the neighborhood again. Today, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Potrero Hill is a relatively diverse mix of about 15,000 people, 60 percent of whom are white, 20 percent African American, 10 percent Asian, and the remainder of two races. The residents are on the young side (median age is around 36), and solidly middle class (with a median household income of roughly $70,000 annually). About 40 percent of all residents own their homes, with the remaining opting to rent.

A drive or stroll around the neighborhood reveals a number of activity centers, each influenced by geography, population, and the surrounding businesses. On the northern side, the walls of warehouses along 16th and 17th streets offer a busy medley of cafes, bars, clubs (especially the rock-’n’-roll seven-nights-a-week Bottom of the Hill) nonprofits, outlets, and a gallery or two, including the California College for the Arts’ Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (a bit off 16th, at Eighth and Irwin). Two landmark businesses—Anchor Brewing Co. (maker of the now-famous steam beer) and the San Francisco Bay Guardian (the area’s first alternative weekly newspaper)—make their homes in this somewhat scruffy area.

As the streets climb up Potrero Hill from 16th, the residential character of the neighborhood becomes apparent, as lofts and workspaces give way to condos and homes built anywhere from 5 to 50 to 100 years ago (the farther uphill, the newer and more modern the architecture, though there remain some impressive 1800s period pieces). Victoria Mews is an example of the changing neighborhood; it’s a square-block condo complex (between 19th and 20th and Carolina and Wisconsin) made up of townhouse units that are frequently rented out.

The blocks around 18th and Connecticut form a vortex of sorts for the area, serving as a kind of town center, with restaurants (Aperto, Goat Hill Pizza), shops (including Christopher’s Books), bars (Blooms Saloon), and coffeehouses (Farley’s is a longtime fixture, noted for its community-centered events) clustering in the few blocks here, most of them serving a hip, laid-back clientele. The trend repeats on 20th Street, with a couple of groceries, a deli, and a branch of the public library centered around Connecticut. Not far from here is the Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, a landmark building designed by Julia Morgan (of San Simeon Hearst Castle fame) that serves as a community center, with programs geared toward disadvantaged youth and seniors.

The character of the area changes abruptly after the crest of the hill, however, with the southern slope dominated by anonymous housing developments (much built recently and classified “affordable”) and blocks of declining public housing (the Terrace-Annex projects, on the hill’s southeast flank). Built in 1941, their facades are today uninviting, the yards devoid of vegetation other than dried grass, the balconies a forbidding collection of peeling paint and boarded-up windows. The projects are slated to be rebuilt by 2013 as part of city hall’s Hope SF program.

The parks of Potrero Hill are geared toward residents who enjoy team sports. Jackson Park in particular is committed to baseball (with two diamonds), but also has tennis and basketball courts and a sand-filled kids’ playground. The Potrero Hill Recreation Center (built mainly for the residents of the nearby Terrace-Annex projects) has a baseball diamond, basketball and tennis courts, and a children’s play area with swings and other equipment. The center also has an indoor basketball court and hosts a number of afterschool activities. McKinley Square is small park with particularly pleasant, newly constructed play areas for children and some steep trails on its western side. The stretch of Vermont Street that snakes down from McKinley Square—with its six sharp curves (two less than the more famous one on Lombard in Russian Hill)—is an off-the-beaten-path jewel. Though skinnier and steeper than its more famous relative, it is fun and much less frequented (except for the annual Big Wheel tricycle race in the spring).

Two public elementary schools (K-5) serve neighborhood kids: Starr King on the south side and Daniel Webster on the north; both got a 2 out of 10 GreatSchools rating. There’s also an alternative junior high/high school on DeHaro Street, International Studies Academy (which earned a 3 out of 10 GreatSchools rating). Additionally, Live Oak School (K-8) is an independent elementary school on Mariposa. Adults so inclined can seek out an interesting assortment of places to go for higher learning of all types: California Culinary Academy (where chefs go to get a degree); San Francisco Center for the Book (all about printing and binding books); California College of the Arts; and the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

As for public transportation, four bus lines crawl up and down and all around the hill: the No. 10 skirts the southern and eastern sides; the No. 19 goes pretty much right up the middle; the No. 22 works the northern edge; and the No. 48 goes along the southern base. For quick access to downtown, many residents walk down the hill to Dogpatch and take the “T” streetcar on Third Street.

Because many (if not most) houses have garages (which require curb-diminishing entries), and owing to the steep streets, residents often prefer to drive, so parking can be difficult, even on the most vertically inclined streets. As the neighborhood has become more crowded, the city’s Department of Parking and Traffic has issued “X” and “W” residential parking permits, though the streets on which they are valid vary widely.

Crime on Potrero Hill is moderate and tends to be localized: frequent disturbing the peace and noise violations around bars and clubs; less common are assaults and vandalism near parks and empty lots; occasional robberies on deserted streets, with burglaries in secluded areas with poor lighting. The most common crime in any three-month period in the last years has been car break-in and vehicle theft, with a high number here, particularly on the hilltop and south side. Though the neighborhood is generally considered safe, there have been at least six homicides committed in the last three years.

As for real estate, the area has bounced back from the 2009 slump by about 12 percent, according to Trulia. Single-family homes range from $849,000 (two bedroom/one bath) to more than $1 million for multiple bedrooms/baths. Lofts are generally priced in the $550,000 to $625,000 range, with condos starting from $400,000, especially on the south side of the hill. Rentals, commonly thought of as a bargain here, have been creeping up lately, too: a rare studio can fetch about $1,000, while one-bedrooms start for $1,600 a month and two bedrooms ask $2,200 and up. As for the coveted view, that will cost: expect to add $200 to $500 a month for such an “amenity.” But apartments here generally have a bit more square footage than elsewhere in the city, so you get a little room with your view on Potrero Hill.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Aug 04, 2011

"Neighborhood on the upswing"

Potrero Hill is a somewhat southeastern San Francisco residential neighborhood wedged in between Interstate 280 and Highway 101. It is a somewhat hilly area, rarely visited by the outside public but gets plenty of sunshine. The population is made of mostly white upper middle-class families and single residents who come home to escape from the rigors of busy city life. The community is relatively safe and quiet with wear houses clustered on the district’s borders, almost as if insulating it from neighboring areas.

The neighborhood houses many high-tech professionals considering its proximity to Soma and the Financial District. For those taking public transit, the Muni bus system (lines 19, 22 and 10) serves the neighborhood while the Muni Metro stops at Third Street.

One of Potrero Hill’s best features is at the hilltop, where it gives residents’ views of the San Francisco skyline. The hilltop also acts as a divider between two parts; the North Slope and the South Slope. The north slope is made up of higher income families with more attractive housing options, while the south slope is mostly occupied by public housing projects (which were constructed after WWII). Moreover, the area is dotted with historic buildings, many of them restored to preserve what’s left of the signature era. To the northern end, the neighborhood offers a bit of nightlife with bars, clubs and trendy restaurants lining 16th and 17th street. For shoppers, locals have a couple options with delis, cafes, a pizza parlor and a few grocery stores on 20th street.

Potrero Hill provides plenty of perks for its locals to enjoy. Bottom of the Hill is one of the biggest attractions in the neighborhood offering live music of the indie rock generation. The popular destination draws many young and trendy hipsters. The community also boasts one of the top college prep schools in the area in the Bay School of San Francisco. It’s three-story polished exterior was recently developed in 2005.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jul 18, 2011

"Good for families"

Potrero Hill is a cute area that seems best suited for families. Houses here sit on a large hill (hence the name) and get a great view of the water.

This area has a lot to offer. There are good restaurants, bars, and shops around. Sometimes I come here to get more of a suburban feel without leaving the city. Unfortunately, to get here, I often have to take two buses. The area seems isolated. The transportation is fine for within the neighborhood, but if you want to head northwest, then using public transportation may take awhile. I think a lot of the families in this area have cars.

One fun event that the neighborhood holds in the Bring Your Own Big Wheel race (BYOBW race). Everyone brings their own big wheel and races down the hill. It used to occur on Lombard Street but recently moved to Potrero Hill to be safer.

This neighborhood is sort of a mixed bag. While it does seem family-friendly, there is some crime that occurs at the south end.
Pros
  • family-oriented
Cons
  • isolated
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Aug 16, 2010

"Great living, next to the waterfront and the Mission"

Potrero Hill is a great neighborhood for families residing by the San Francisco Bay. There’s a lot to do here for the families, and for anyone of any age actually. In Potrero Hill you’ve got a recreation center and Jackson Park, great for the kids and young teenagers to spend their time at rather than at home with video games. Potrero Hill is also located near the waterfront, where you can always head towards for a leisurely stroll or walk with your spouse/lover. However, the thing about this is that the waterfront area is quite industrialized, and I’m quite sure those walks won’t be as great as say walking around Fort Mason or the Marina.

In Potrero Hill, there are some good restaurants, cafes, and bars to go to. But if you’re looking for more variety or more in general you can head towards the Mission District which is literally right next door, just across the 101 freeway. ‘

Additionally, Potrero Hill lies between the 101 and 280 freeway, noise factors definitely factors into the living situation, and will mostly be a disadvantage to living here. But that shouldn’t stop you from finding a nice place to live at in Potrero Hill.

Potrero Hill has one of the best views of Downtown San Francisco, if you stand in the middle of some streets in Potrero Hill and face towards Downtown, it’ll definitely be a magnificent view, one could even do so photography work here.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Jun 10, 2010

"A neighborhood that is close-by yet has a somewhat remote feel"

I really like the location of Potrero Hill. You are really close to the Central Waterfront area and conveniently located to the water. This is a good place for families or young couples.

Regardless of the location, you get a feeling for being separate from the city in Potrero Hill. This gives it a relaxing feeling and you area away from the “hustle and bustle” of city life. The streets are clean and the neighborhood feels safe enough. Plus, Potreto Hill’s home prices seem to be on the lower end. As a result, this is a neighborhood that home buyers on a budget should take a look at.

18th Avenue is the main shopping area in Potreto Hill. There is also the Anchor Brewing Company where you can take a tour and sample some beers. Potreto Hill seems to have some decent nightlife too. There is the Bottom of the Hill, which showcases some relatively well known bands.

One negative about this neighborhood is you will see murals of OJ Simpson. He grew up in Potreto Hill. If you are still tired of seeing or thinking about OJ, you wil find this annoying!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jun 09, 2010

"Urban and hilly village"

Potrero Hill always reminds me of a tiny fishing village. Despite its close proximity to the Mission and Downtown, freeways and swatches of industrial zone isolate Potrero Hill. Portero Hill’s main drag is 18th Street. I’ve had fantastic meals at the restaurants Aperto and Baraka, and enjoyed live jazz and cocktails at the Lingba Lounge. Another intriguing area of Potrero Hill is Dogpatch. This used to be primarily an industrial zone but several artists have moved in and are setting up studios. A few bars and cafes have sprouted up, and I’m curious where this development will go.

Another great thing about Portero Hill is the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. They provide services to the public including a free ear acupuncture clinic Monday-Thursday on De Haro Street. There is a great music club in Potrero called Bottom of the Hill that features tons of local bands. The club is nearby a unique sports bar called Connecticut Yankee, and this is a great place to grab a bite to eat. Another very fun place to visit is Three Parkside—a tiki bar meets BBQ joint with live music. And, if you and hankering for an unusual brunch spot on the weekend, check out The Ramp in China Basin. You can drink bloody Mary’s and savor classic brunch fare right on the waterfront with epic views of the Bay!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
May 06, 2009

"Great neighborhood for families"

My husband and I really enjoy living in Potrero Hill. There is a lot for families to do. There are several wonderful restaurants, quaint shops and plenty of amenities. I'd recommend the neighborhood to young couples either planning to have children, or with a few small children. Housing prices are a bit on the high side, but not completely unaffordable, and most housing is quite nice with great city views. The neighborhood is also very quiet and fairly safe. There is not a lot going on for nightlife, but the Mission District is not far away. We really enjoy close access to bus stops, great parks and our local deli, Chiotras. Some other stuff to check out in Potrero Hill: Farley's coffee shop, the Neighborhood House, McKinley Square, Jackson Park, Good Life grocery store, Thinker's Cafe, Aperto, Goat Hill Pizza, Whole Foods Market.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Views and Beauty Abound"

Potrero Hill boasts one of the most windy streets in San Francisco. Look for that section of Vermont that is just as windy as Lombard Street but not nearly as well groomed for tourists. In that way, it's a find.

If you're looking for views, just ride along 19th and 20th and look out into the city down the hill. Fabulous.

For an unexpected treat, head to the dog park over at 20th and San Bruno where the wild flowers dot the hills in the spring the views are just amazing and fun.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 11, 2009

"A community taking notice"

Once considered a very remote and undeveloped community, Potrero has since been discovered. There are a growing number of condominiums and lofts with quaint neighborhood charm.

The shopping district is located between 18th and 20th Streets. Here you will also find great restaurants, cafes, and boutiques, including Ruby Wine, Farley's Coffee, and Goat Hill Pizza. Nightlife boasts great clubs like Bottom of the Hill and Club Cocomo. You might also take a tour of the Anchor Steam Brewery during the day.

Residents are very active in their community and work to know each other. There are many committees and neighborhood watch programs that seem to be working wonders in the area.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Best Streets in Potrero Hill

1

24th St

4/5
"24th btwn Potrero/Guerrero"
37.7532446698729 -122.402286504258
2

26th St

4/5
"Encompasses both Noe Valley, the Mission, and the projects"
37.7506295630928 -122.401294349912
3

Connecticut St

3.5/5
"One of the Best"
37.7504625000233 -122.396340999351
4

Vermont St

3/5
"San Francisco Suburb - Bring your Tricycle"
37.7584529474014 -122.403858453879
5

19th St

3/5
"Surprisingly clean and friendly"
37.7609876044813 -122.401729192602
6

17th St

2.5/5
"Some Good Gems"
37.7648667789596 -122.401142251024

Unranked Streets in Potrero Hill

Missouri St

3.5/5
"nice residential area"
37.7500165000005 -122.395327999944

Arkansas St

2.5/5
37.7611804035974 -122.398336524544

Carolina St

2.5/5
37.7579304451919 -122.399960785286

dee Haro St

3.5/5
"Nice Beautiful area to live in a friendly environment"
37.7586966572787 -122.401012436858