NatM

  • Local Expert 3,508 points
  • Reviews 15
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Beautiful place to live if you can afford it"

One of the most affluent neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Manhattan Beach is home to Kingsborough Community College and a huge beach park. The housing in Manhattan Beach mostly consists of huge detached single-family homes with green lawns and private garages. Many have beautiful views of the water, and some even have their own swimming pools. This is a fairly isolated town, as it's mainly surrounded by water. The properties that are referred to as "ocean-block" are the most expensive. This town has a strong, unified community; many of the families here have been around for generations. However, in recent years, there has been an influx of Russian developers who buy homes to "flip" them. One of the biggest problems with living here is that it is very isolated and it's a highly residential area... which means that there are very few restaurants and even fewer stores. There are some staples on Oriental Boulevard and West End Avenue, but it's a pretty sad variety. So, while it's not for everyone, the people who do live here usually like that it's so quiet. Another thing to note is that during the summer, the beach gets very crowded, making parking impossible. However, most private homes have their own garages, so it isn't too much of a problem - unless you want to go to the beach.
Pros
  • Quiet & private
  • Home to Kingsborough Community College
  • Beautiful beach park
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Fairly isolated
  • Few shops & restaurants
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Peaceful suburban neighborhood"

Red Hook is a quiet and affordable community that was once very isolated. It is still pretty isolated, but the past few years have brought changes that have upset some longtime residents and inspired new residents to move here. For starters, this was a very small town with small, family businesses and where everyone knew each other. This became a place for artists, where there were unique shops and restaurants. Now, there's an IKEA and a Fairway. This beautiful neighborhood was a popular choice for retailers, developers, and newcomers, because it had beautiful views of the city skyline, and cheap property prices. Yet, it has still largely remained isolated, probably because it's hard to get to. The G train is a nightmare and the F train, which is often described as "within walking distance" is actually a rather scary trek around highways and under bridges away. There is bus service, but it's rarely on time and it takes forever. While it is pleasant and definitely has its perks, Red Hook isn't for everyone. A lot of people think that they will like the solitude, but they end up missing the bustling atmosphere of other parts of the city and leave.
Pros
  • Quiet & private
  • bar/restaurant life
  • IKEA
  • view of the Statue of Liberty from Fairway
Cons
  • Termite problems
  • Prone to flooding
  • cobbled streets could use a repaving
  • you need a car - unless you have eternal patience required to live with only the G train
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
luigylebron
luigylebron WHAT THE HECK ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT?
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Peaceful, affordable, & diverse"

Located south of Park Slope, Sunset Park is a great neighborhood where you will find that almost everything is cheaper than it is in Park Slope and Manhattan. The brownstones, apartments, condos, and co-ops here are more affordable and roomier than they are in other places in the city. Sunset Park also has a huge number of dollar stores, where you can buy just about anything for 99 cents. There are also plenty of discount clothing stores. Sunset Park is also an ethnic working class neighborhood that has large Chinese, Hispanic, and Indian communities. This diversity is also reflected in the town's stores and restaurants. As many people here have written, Sunset Park has its own Chinatown with countless Chinese restaurants and shops with traditional Chinese goods. On Eighth Ave, you can find just about anything that is Asian. On Fifth Ave, you can find almost anything you need or want to eat from Latin America. Sunset Park (the park, not the neighborhood) is also a great place for residents to relax. Lots of neighborhood kids swim there during the warmer months. There are plenty of schools in Sunset Park, including one public elementary school that has a magnet school.
Pros
  • Highly diverse population
  • Lots of public schools, including a magnet school
  • cheap haircuts available
  • cheap last minute items (hosehold, school,clothes,etc.)
  • dim sum!
  • no shortage of dollarstores
  • People still hold the door open for strollers and family life is respected but not a gimmick
Cons
  • Not much of a nightlife
  • No high school
  • long train ride into the city
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Peaceful suburban neighborhood"

Located south of Park Slope, Windsor Terrace is a quiet and pleasant town that borders Prospect Park and the Greenwood Cemetery. This tiny neighborhood is gaining popularity with young families and retirees as it is just as family-friendly as Park Slope for far cheaper housing prices. However, as more people are showing interest in the neighborhood, prices are rising. While most of the housing here is in the form of symmetrical row houses (many of which have porches and backyards), there are also some condos and apartments, which were developed during the last housing boom. The town also has plenty of small businesses, where residents can find just about anything they need, but there aren't too many upscale shops, chains, or big-box stores. Windsor Terrace residents usually head to Prospect Park for recreation. They also go shopping or watch a movie at the Pavillion Cinema. With two subway stations and a few buses that run through the town, Windsor Terrace has fairly convenient public transportation options. The commute to Manhattan takes about forty minutes, so it is a slightly longer trip than the one from Park Slope. The school district in Windsor Terrace is pretty good; P.S. 130 in particular does consistently well.
Pros
  • Quiet & private
  • Good school district
  • cool neighborhood staples, such as book shops and groceries
Cons
  • Boring
  • Prices are skyrocketing
  • Not too many trendy or big-box stores
  • out-of-the-way location
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best neighborhood, but its slowly improving"

Gowanus is a primarily industrial neighborhood full of warehouses and manufacturing plants. During the past decade or so, the government and private developers have invested money, converting old warehouses and factories into trendy condos, lofts, and townhouses. The Gowanus canal is known to be polluted with toxic chemicals, but the federal government has pledged funding dedicated to cleaning up the canal. To date, housing prices are relatively cheap in Gowanus, which is why so many young people, artists, and young families have flocked here. There are a lot of artists' studios and performance spaces, and during the Artists Walk that is held here every year, the public is allowed to visit hundreds of local artists' studios. While this area doesn't have the best reputation, it is slowing being revitalized as more trendy stores, restaurants, and bars open here. Once the land is cleaned up, a Whole Foods is going to open here as well. There is also a nice park here, and the public transportation is convenient. There are four subway lines, and the commute to Manhattan takes about half an hour, making it an attractive option for young professionals who have to go to Manhattan every day.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Near cool neighborhoods: Redhook, Park Slope, Carroll Gardens
  • New bar/restaurant scene popping up
Cons
  • Dirty & rat-infested in some areas
  • Rather ugly
  • Very Industrial
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Fairly typical Brooklyn neighborhood"

Located between Canarsie and Marine Park, Brooklyn's Flatlands neighborhood boasts a well-maintained community with multicultural residents and businesses. This community also has a very interesting history. It was once an important stop on the Underground Railroad and was later a favorite hangout for the Mafia. Today, it is a very peaceful and safe community with eclectic stores and restaurants that demonstrate its diversity. The Flatlands is known as a "double ticket" town, where residents have to take the bus in order to get to the subway. The commute to Manhattan takes about an hour, which does deter some daily commuters from choosing to live here. There are private express buses that make daily trips to the city, but they are much more expensive than public transportation (and in effect, they take longer - especially when there is traffic). Most residents get around by driving or taking the bus. Although this isn't the best choice for commuters, this town has a lot to offer. There is a lot of shopping nearby, particularly at Kings Plaza Mall, but the area around the mall isn't the greatest or safest. There is a very wide range of pricing for homes in the Flatlands, but overall, it's very affordable.
Pros
  • Relatively low housing costs
  • Diverse population
  • Lovely tree-lined streets
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Great neighborhood, but hard to access"

Greenpoint is a somewhat isolated town in Brooklyn, mainly because of its poor transportation links. As a result, developers have largely stayed out of Greenpoint, allowing residents to preserve the qualities that have made it such a charming place to live. As other reviewers have already stated, this is a unique town with a strong sense of unity and community pride. There are families who have been around for generations. There are diverse immigrant communities, but the majority has always been the Polish. In recent years, a lot of young people have moved here in search of the next up and coming neighborhood and affordable housing costs. During the past few years, a lot of hip restaurants, quirky bars, and trendy shops have formed here in response to the growing hipster population. At the same time, as most of the other reviewers have said, there is an incomparable selection of Polish restaurants here. This town definitely has the hip and mellow vibe that Williamsburg has, but it's cheaper, cleaner, and more family-friendly with great schools. Still, you should note that I said "cheaper," NOT "cheap." Prices here have dropped during the past few years and it's certainly cheaper than the city, but prices are still steep. If you're looking to save money, try looking on the eastern end.
Pros
  • close to McCarren Park, Williamsburg
  • enjoy the Williamsburg bar scene without having to hear it from your apartment
  • quaint, clean, affordable
  • cheap jewery shops
Cons
  • residents are often forced to take the G train
  • it's ugly
  • kind of smelly in parts
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Affluent Orthodox Jewish community"

Midwood is a fairly affluent Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn, where the religion and culture can be seen in nearly every aspect of life. There are dozens of synagogues and yeshivas in this neighborhood, and most stores are closed on Saturdays, in observance of the Jewish Sabbath. Although there are quite a few stores, particularly on Avenue M, Coney Island Ave., and Avenue J, the area is mostly residential. The vast majority of the stores that do exist here are Jewish. There are lots of kosher restaurants and stores; there are even kosher pizzerias. While there are some rental properties, co-ops, and multi-family homes here, the vast majority of the housing options in Midwood are single-family detached houses. Smaller homes, apartments, and condos tend to be unpopular here since most families are very large (in keeping with Orthodox tradition). While most of the kids in this town attend local yeshivas, Midwood does boast an excellent public school system. P.S. 193 and Midwood High School are particularly well regarded. This is a very quiet town. Traffic can get pretty bad on the busy commercial streets, but it gets very quiet on the weekends as stores close on Saturdays and the Orthodox Jewish residents don't drive on the Sabbath.
Pros
  • Excellent schools
  • Strong sense of unity
  • Family-friendly
Cons
  • Not very diverse
  • Boring
  • Most stores are closed on Saturdays, which can be inconvenient for some
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"One of my favorite areas in Brooklyn"

Located in northwestern Brooklyn, Prospect Heights offers an interesting and unique mix of old and new. The neighborhood has a convenient location, close to some of the best and most popular Brooklyn attractions, including Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Public Library, and the Underhill Playground. Prospect Heights will become even more well known once the Barclays Center opens next year and the Nets begin to play there. This town has become somewhat of a hotspot in Brooklyn, as developers invest more money and more retailers move here. Another point of pride for residents here is the fact that the crime rate has dropped amazingly, giving more people confidence to move here. Housing options are plentiful, and range from well preserved brownstones to town houses, co-ops, and apartment complexes. The pricing here varies; there are affordable low end homes and homes with prices that are comparable to Manhattan prices. The busiest streets in Prospect Heights are on Washington and Vanderbilt. There are lots of shops and restaurants. Access to public transportation is amazing. There are nine subway lines, the Long Island Rail Road, and a number of buses. The commute to Manhattan takes about 30-40 minutes. In my opinion, the major problem with living in Prospect Heights is the school district. The schools here are mediocre; one is doing so badly that the city is thinking of getting rid of it altogether.
Pros
  • Will soon be the home of the Nets
  • Interesting mix of old and new
  • Huge improvement in crime rate
  • lots to do and see - Botanical Gardens, etc
  • up-and-coming bar scene
  • year-round greenmarket at Grand Army
Cons
  • Mediocre schools
  • far from Manhattan, but rent prices don't reflect it
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Quiet waterfront community"

Historically known as a Russian community, Sheepshead Bay now has a far more diverse population. While the vast majority of the residents are still white, they come from a multitude of different countries and there is now a large Asian minority. The town's shops and restaurants, particularly those on Emmons Avenue, are reflective of the town's growing diversity. The housing options are also pretty diverse here: there are both attached and detached one- and two-family homes, as well as condos and co-ops. This is a waterfront community where you'll regularly see scenic cruise boats and fishing boats at the docks. It is also close to Manhattan Beach, Coney Island, and Brighton Beach. Public transportation options aren't as varied, but they are convenient, with two subway lines and express buses that run to the city. For drivers, Sheepshead Bay has easy access to the Belt Parkway. The school district is pretty good. P.S. 254 and P.S. 206 consistently report excellent scores, but the high school is just okay. A big draw for residents here is the town's affordable real estate prices, which dropped even more after the real estate boom ended. This isn't a cheap town, but homes here are relatively cheaper than comparable properties in other towns.
Pros
  • Close to the beach
  • Right next to Marine Park
  • Diverse housing options
Cons
  • Parking is problematic in some areas
  • Mediocre high school
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
funcrusher3000
funcrusher3000 Historically Russian? That's totally false, the influx of Eastern European immigrants to Sheepshead only started in the 80s.
Sep 24, 2015
Add a comment...
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Eclectic & family-friendly"

Almost everyone associates Park Slope with stroller traffic. There are A LOT of young families with little kids. However, Park Slope is much more than just a town of new families. It's an eclectic mix of the old and new. You will see gorgeous brownstones and other examples of beautiful architecture. There are also funky bars, trendy shops, and nice restaurants. The housing choices are wonderful, albeit on the expensive side. There are the aforementioned brownstones, townhouses, and luxury apartments, including some with great views of the city. However, if you look carefully, you may be able to find some deals if you look farther from Flatbush Ave. The population is diverse, the town is pretty safe, and the residents are very friendly. This is also a very eco- and health-conscious neighborhood. There are a lot of restaurants that serve dishes prepared with organic or locally sourced ingredients. There is also the Park Slope food cooperative. Park Slope also boasts a pretty convenient location; the subway ride to Manhattan takes about a half hour. A lot of residents relax at Prospect Park (which is right next to Park Slope) or they take their kids to the Botanical Gardens or the Brooklyn Museum.
Pros
  • Incredibly family-friendly
  • Very eco-friendly
  • Cool bar and off-the-beaten-track music scene
  • Odd Twin, boutique clothing stores
  • The green lung of Prospect Park
  • Lovely old world architecture brownstones and Victorian Mansions that border Prospect Park
  • The Park Slope Food Cooperative
Cons
  • Lots of strollers
  • Next to no parking
  • a bit on the expensive side
  • Could do with some more subway connections
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Hipster capital of Brooklyn"

Located close to Bed-Stuy, Greenpoint, and Bushwick, Williamsburg is Brooklyn's answer to Manhattan's East Village. In fact, a growing number of people are finding it better than the East Village as it is cheaper and more spacious. It has a very diverse hipster population as well as Hasidic Jewish and Hispanic enclaves in South Williamsburg. Williamsburg boasts an incredibly convenient location; Manhattan is just over the Williamsburg Bridge, an incredibly short drive or a ten minute subway ride away. In fact, many young commuters even elect to ride bikes or walk over the bridge. Rents here are not cheap, but they are cheaper than they are in the city, and they drop as you move away from all the action on Bedford. Try south of Metropolitan or way up north. I have to agree with the previous reviewers: if you live too close to Bedford, it's noisy, crowded, expensive, and dirty. The best parts of living in Williamsburg include the hip art and music scenes, the incredibly variety of restaurants, a plethora of hip stores, and the funky bar scene. There is definitely no shortage of things to do in Williamsburg. That said, I wouldn't say that it's the best place to raise a family, but it certainly is a fun place for young people.
Pros
  • Home to artists and art galleries
  • Many good restaurants and bars abound
  • The neighborhood is populated by a diverse population
  • Shoe Market
  • sidewalk book sales
Cons
  • Area near the water is littered seemingly deserted new condo developments
  • Noisy at night due to late night revelers who take their party out on the street
  • the weekend shopping crowd can be a little much
  • Crime continues to be a worry
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Great residential area"

Fort Greene is an incredibly hip, up and coming area in Brooklyn that attracts hipsters, artists, and foodies. At the same time, Fort Green maintains its sense of history with well maintained brownstones and the oldest park in Brooklyn. The population is a pretty good mix of Caucasian and African American, with a smaller percentage of Asian residents. While this area offers relative affordability, it certainly isn't cheap, with some of the higher end properties starting in the millions. In fact, as the area gains popularity, prices are continuing to rise. Still, many feel that it's worth it because of the area's incredible array of restaurants (especially along DeKalb Avenue and Fulton Street). There is also the BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) theater and Fort Greene Park, where many of the locals take their kids when the weather is nice. The school district in Fort Greene is pretty good; many parents speak highly of the Ronald Edmonds Learning Center. However, the area is best known as the home of Brooklyn Technical High School, one of the few schools in New York City that bases admissions decisions on the results of the Specialized High School Admissions Test. Public transportation is very convenient; residents have access to the Long Island Rail Road, 9 subway lines, and a couple of buses.
Pros
  • Very convenient transportation options
  • Great schools
  • Highly diverse population
  • cool bars, restaurants
  • cool cat neighborhood personality
Cons
  • Overpriced in some areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet Italian community that loves Christmas"

Located between Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst, Dyker Heights is a quaint suburban town with a primarily Italian population, numerous Catholic churches, an abundance of mom-and-pop shops, and a reputation for its Christmas light extravaganza. Most of the action in Dyker Heights takes place on 13th Ave, but don't expect anything too trendy or big-box. The businesses here are small family-owned places where the owners know your name. While most of the residents here are Italian, there are small clusters of Asian and Hispanic residents as well. The majority of the homes here are simple single and two-family homes, but Dyker Heights is also known for the strip of elaborate mansions on 11th Avenue. Bound together by their pride in their community, the residents work hard to maintain their homes. They also take pride in the Dyker Lights, the countless extravagant and ornate Christmas lights and decorations that Dyker Heights residents put up each year. These lights and festivities attract thousands of tourists each holiday season. In other seasons, residents relax and have fun at Dyker Beach Park or they hit the neighborhood's public golf course. There is also the junior golf center, where kids can learn to play for free. The major problem with living in Dyker Heights is that there is no subway service here. There are express buses to Manhattan, but they cost more and are subject to traffic conditions.
Pros
  • Lots of recreational activities for residents of all ages
  • Strong sense of unity
  • Christmas Lights
  • Very quiet, friendly
Cons
  • Not too diverse
  • No subway service
  • Boringly residential
  • Far from Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Rapidly growing into a hotspot"

In the past, downtown Brooklyn was mainly known for being Brooklyn's civil, retail, and business center. However, private investors have spent billions of dollars on developing new apartment complexes and encouraging new businesses to build here as well. More than half of the homes created by the development boom are rentals, which have been in high demand after the foreclosure crisis hit many parts of Brooklyn. The apartments here range from affordable to upscale. The area's increasing popularity isn't surprising considering the area's numerous attractions. Residents have easy access to some of Brooklyn's finest neighborhoods, including Carroll Gardens and Brooklyn Heights. It is also a commuter's dream: a dozen subway lines run through downtown Brooklyn. There is no shortage of places to shop or eat; downtown Brooklyn includes the Fulton Street Mall, the farmer's market in front of Borough Hall, and the Metro Tech center, where a lot of bankers and financiers now work. Starting next year, residents will also be able to watch the Nets play at the new Barclays Center. You can take your kids to the BAM Cultural District for music lessons or to the YMCA on Atlantic Avenue for swimming classes. There are no public schools at the primary level in this area, but there are private schools and there is a pretty good school nearby in Brooklyn Heights.
Pros
  • Relatively low housing costs
  • Lots of recreational activities
  • Incredible variety of subway options
  • Junior's
  • plenty of places to spend money
Cons
  • No public elementary schools
  • too many chain stores and restaurants
  • traffic/lack of parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cheap & affordable, but not very safe"

Located on the Queens-Brooklyn border, Cypress Hills is a vibrant immigrant community where residents have worked to reform the town's negative image. When I was younger (about 15 years ago), my father worked near Cypress Hills. Whenever I went to visit him at work, he would tell me to take a cab there because it wasn't safe to walk around alone - even during the day. Even today, Cypress Hills is part of a larger area of Brooklyn that has a terrible reputation for public safety and consistently sees increases in robberies. This may be caused by the fact that Cypress Hills is generally a lower class neighborhood with many public housing projects and affordable housing developments. Rentals are hard to come by; most of the housing here is in private homes. Many of the homeowners were able to purchase their homes because the prices are very cheap and because they have received subsidies from the government. You'll see that the majority of people here use food stamps. The schools in Cypress Hills are mediocre at best, so I am not convinced that this is the best place to raise your kids. However, there are plenty of recreational activities, such as visiting Highland Park, which is huge and filled with great amenities.
Pros
  • Highly diverse population
  • Lots of ethnic food & shopping options
  • Very affordable housing
Cons
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • Weak school district
  • No upscale or trendy stores
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Interesting town thats getting better"

Once one of New York City's most upscale then one of its most dangerous neighborhoods, Crown Heights is now one of the city's most diverse and affordable suburbs. This unique neighborhood covers an area of about two square miles and includes a historic district that is protected from development. While there used to be dangerous levels of tension between the neighborhood's Jewish and Caribbean communities, resident coalitions have worked together to improve relations between these two groups. An influx of young white professionals has also added to the town's diversity. Another factor that attracts new residents is the town's lush greenery: there are plenty of parks and trees are everywhere in this family-friendly town. Public transportation options are convenient and diverse. There are also lots of shops on busy streets like Franklin Avenue and the neighborhood has a multitude of interesting museums and cultural sites. The Brooklyn Children's Museum is especially popular. The crime rate has dropped as the town has improved. Real estate prices in Crown Heights are very low; an increase in condo development and a wave of foreclosures has pushed prices down and created more affordable housing options. The public school district that serves Crown Heights is excellent. The elementary and middle schools are almost all wonderful. As for the high schools, Medgar Evers High School is great, and Clara Barton is pretty good too.
Pros
  • Very diverse population
  • Close to other great towns
  • access to the lovely Prospect Park, Brooklyn Botanical
  • Inexpensive real estate
  • Great school district
Cons
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • close to some unsafe neighborhoods
  • constant traffic jams in front of all liquor stores
  • has its own worrisome (though decreasing) crime rate
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Better to play than to stay"

Sea Gate is an isolated private community on the edge of Coney Island in Brooklyn. Boasting a private beach club, it is separated from the rest of the island by a big fence that is manned by private guards. Coney Island is best known for its beach and a boardwalk lined with pleasant, although shabby, food stands, games and rides. In recent years, developers, with support from the city, have worked to revitalize this once deteriorating area with renovations, restorations, and new constructions. There is a new amusement park and the aquarium, which was really worn down when I was there last, is finally being renovated. People still go to KeySpan Park to root for the Cyclones. Families hang out at Kaiser Park. In Sea Gate, most of the housing is in the form of detached Tudor houses with two or three storeys. The population in Sea Gate is mostly Russian and Orthodox Jew, while the rest of the island is predominantly African American. In the rest of Coney Island, there are public housing projects, low cost housing developments, small private homes, and large co-op and condo buildings. In Coney Island, the housing, for the most part, is incredibly cheap. Prices have gone up over the past few years, particularly with the revitalization efforts, but they are still far more affordable than most comparable New York City towns. As far as the school district, P.S. 100 and Mark Twain middle school are supposed to be great, but the rest of the schools aren't too good.
Pros
  • Ongoing revitalization efforts
  • Cheap housing
  • Wide variety of recreational activities
  • carnival stuff
  • great timeout from the rest of the city
Cons
  • Gets overcrowded during the summer
  • Shopping is limited
  • Most of the schools aren't that great
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Fairly typical suburb"

Located along the industrial piers just north of Red Hook, the Columbia Street Waterfront District is a narrow strip of multi-family homes and community gardens. The population here is predominantly white and Hispanic. A far more diverse collection of hipsters, artists,and families have moved in during the past decade. This neighborhood is known to be slightly more upscale than Red Hook, but it's not really my style (that's just me though). Although this is a waterfront area, it has a very industrial feel and the views are mostly of the cranes. Still, an increasing number of people seem to find its semi-industrial vibe appealing. There are stores and restaurants here, but nothing that would really draw attention from tourists or outsiders. There are a few trendy businesses and there are a few bars in town too. One thing that it has in its favor is the diversity and convenience of the public transportation options. There are about ten subway lines that run from the Columbia Street Waterfront District to Manhattan. There are also buses that residents can take to downtown Brooklyn or Park Slope. The community gardens here are also a big draw; they are lovely and open to the public. This is also a very safe neighborhood.
Pros
  • Lots of transportation options
  • Community gardens
  • Very safe
Cons
  • Boring
  • Still in the process of gentrification
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
JohnViega
JohnViega WTF-- where are these ten subway lines that you speak of??!!! Last I checked, you have to walk at least half a mile just to get to the F/G from pretty much anywhere in the neighborhood.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Up & coming town in Brooklyn"

Located in Central Brooklyn, Clinton Hill has been experiencing tremendous growth and change during the past few years. While the town was once known for being poor and run down, the residents of this lovely town have worked with the city to bring culture and businesses here to spark growth and attract more residents. Home to the Pratt Institute, Clinton Hill has a wide variety of housing options. There are buildings in almost every imaginable style and there are gorgeous mansions that add to the neighborhood's elegance. As a result of all of the improvements in the neighborhood, developers have been investing in Clinton Hill as well. New housing developments offer modern affordable housing. Residents have a lot of reasons for choosing to live in Clinton Hill. There are plenty of shops and restaurants on Myrtle Avenue, the town's main artery. There are numerous and diverse choices on other streets as well. A food co-op for residents has been planned and many residents work together on a community garden. There is a community organization that gives legal assistance to residents. That isn't to say that this is a perfect neighborhood; it still has quite a way to go. The town's public schools are barely mediocre and there are still a lot of robberies. The transportation options are inconvenient, making it a poor choice for people who have to commute to Manhattan every day.
Pros
  • Growth of trendy shops & restaurants
  • Developing neighborhood
  • Spacious, affordable appartments
  • close to Pratt
  • cool nearby bar scene
Cons
  • Inconvenient transportation
  • Mediocre schools
  • Robberies
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Charming suburban utopia"

Carroll Gardens is a pleasant and unique neighborhood in Brooklyn. Predominantly Italian, the neighbors are united and unusually friendly, primarily because many of the families here have been around for generations. Most of the residents are involved in community organizations or the neighborhood association. There are a lot of elderly residents, but there are still plenty of young families and children too. Caroll Park is lovely, and the area also has plenty of shops, bars, and restaurants. You can find anything Italian on Court Street and there are plenty of trendy options on Smith Street. The housing here is cheaper than in Manhattan, Cobble Hill, or Brooklyn Heights, but it is far from cheap. This area is known for its lovely brownstones with gardens. Public transportation is pretty convenient, and the trip to midtown Manhattan takes about half an hour. The Carroll Gardens school district is excellent. P. S. 58 is particularly good. Overall, Carroll Gardens is an excellent choice for young professionals who are seeking a long term home for their families. It is also a great option for retirees who want to live in a place with a small town vibe, lovely parks, and neighbors who know their names.
Pros
  • Fantastic restaurants and boutique along Smith Street
  • Great architecture which is dominated by historic brownstones
  • Lots of trees and a distinct neighborhood feel
  • Excellent school district
Cons
  • Subway connections are not often reliable especially on the weekends
  • No large supermarkets in the area but gourmet delis abound
  • Supposed to be one of the safest neighborhoods but petty crime is on the rise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet suburb thats commercial & residential"

Canarsie is a peaceful and pleasant town that's had a rough time of it lately. This was one of the towns that was hit the hardest during the recent foreclosure crisis and recession, resulting in a lot of displaced workers and landlords with tenants who can't afford to pay the rent. The lower housing prices have also resulted in a lot of development in the area, which has angered many longtime residents. Even though prices have dropped, sales are still very slow and there are a lot of properties that are lingering on the market. Residents can enjoy activities such as playing or fishing at Canarsie Pier and its playground. There is also Canarsie Park, which is huge and very well maintained, where residents can play basketball, tennis, baseball, or soccer. You can find lots of shopping on Rockaway Parkway, near the L train. The school district is excellent. All of the elementary schools are very well regarded. The high school is terrible, so it will soon be replaced by a series of smaller schools. One subway line does go near Canarsie, but it isn't easily accessible from a lot of places in the town.
Pros
  • Great school district
  • Water views
  • Affordable (lots of foreclosures)
Cons
  • Resale values dropping
  • Hard to get around without a car
  • Terrible high school
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best neighborhood, but its slowly improving"

For years, Bushwick has been trying to shake its bad reputation for crime and poverty. Even today, more than half of the town's residents receive public assistance. There are still lots of neglected lots and decaying buildings, and the crime rate isn't good although it has improved a lot. However, the residents and the city have worked (and are still working) hard to transform Bushwick into a trendy hotspot like its neighbor, Williamsburg. A lot of artsy hipsters have come here, drawn by the cheaper rents and the potential they see in the neighborhood. Bushwick now has a hip art scene, and graffiti art is on display throughout the city's streets. There are also lots of diverse restaurants, a reflection of the town's increasing diversity. A lot of residents take their kids to Maria Hernandez Park to play or browse the farmer's market. Most of the housing here is in multi-family private homes. Single-family homes are hard to come by, but rentals are pretty easy to find, particularly in the multi-family homes. Homes that are located closer to WIlliamsburg are pretty expensive, but they are still much cheaper than properties in Williamsburg. There are a lot of public schools in Bushwick, but for the most part, they are pretty mediocre.
Pros
  • Cool graffiti art
  • Cool bars/restaurants popping up
  • cheap cab ride from Soho/LES
  • Close to Hipsterville Williamsburg
  • inexpensive rent
Cons
  • Mediocre schools
  • elevated J/Z train is loud/annoying
  • crime rates
  • Still gentrifying
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Dont live here unless you have to"

Located in east Brooklyn, Brownsville is a tiny area of about one square mile. Interesting fact: Brownsville had the first birth control clinic in the nation. Today, Brownsville is well known for pretty negative reasons. With eighteen public housing projects that house about a quarter of the town's population, Brownsville has the largest concentration of public housing developments in the United States. The rest of the town's population mainly lives in low cost housing developments. Since this is such a low income area, Brownsville has one of the highest crime rates in New York City. While the city is working to improve the town's safety rating, progress has been slow. The city is also promoting change by allowing developers to bring more businesses to the area. However, it will take much more time before Brownsville is up to par with the rest of the city. The main reason why people choose to live in Brownsville is that it is cheap. While $1,500 can usually get you a one-bedroom apartment in most of the outer boroughs, it can get you a three-bedroom in Brownsville. Two subway lines run through Brownsville, and it only takes about a half hour to get to midtown Manhattan.
Pros
  • Cheap housing
  • City is trying to develop the area
  • Historically significant area
Cons
  • Ugly
  • high crime rate
  • impoverished area
Recommended for
  • Singles
RogerC1
RogerC1 It takes longer than a half-hour to get to midtown Manhattan; it's more like 50 min. to an hour.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not a residential area"

Brooklyn Navy Yard refers to an industrial waterfront park on the East River. It has a small cluster of historical homes that are known as Admiral's Row because they were once naval officers' homes. Once used as a supply depot for the Union army during the Civil War, this area has become the focus of a major real estate controversy because developers feel that the area should be developed while preservationists want to restore the homes, which have been horribly neglected. Things started to get a little better after Mayor Bloomberg announced that the city would spend millions to expand and improve the yard. The city is also expected to spend millions of dollars in order to bring a large supermarket and some other needed businesses to the area while also preserving important buildings. The vast majority of the area's residents live in three public housing developments that border the yards. The main reasons why people choose to live here are that they like living in a historically important area, and that the rent is somewhat affordable by New York City standards. However, it is pretty under-served commercially and inconvenient as the nearest subway station is a twenty minute walk away. In my opinion, there are far better and more convenient places to live that are in the same price range.
Pros
  • Historically significant
  • Somewhat affordable
Cons
  • Boring
  • Industrial, not residential
  • Long walk to the subway
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Best of Brooklyn"

Brooklyn Heights is a beautiful neighborhood that boasts unparalleled views of New York Harbor and Lower Manhattan. This town isn't cheap by most standards, but it offers an affordable option to Manhattanites who are used to paying exorbitant prices for real estate. This neighborhood is protected as a historic district, and it boasts a wide variety of early architectural styles. The park in Brooklyn Heights is absolutely gorgeous; it has well maintained green grass, a playground, views of the city's skyline, and up close views of the Brooklyn Bridge. At the entrance to the park, there is the renowned Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory, right across the street from New York's best pizzeria. There are also some great restaurants in Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens. Head over to Montague Street, the town's main commercial area for shopping, banks, and some cheaper dining options. Public transportation is super easy; there are a number of subway lines that run in/around Brooklyn Heights, and lower Manhattan is just one stop away. This makes Brooklyn Heights a very popular choice for people working on Wall Street. There isn't much of a school district here. There are a bunch of private schools; the town's only public elementary school is excellent. There are no middle schools, so most parents elect to send their kids to school in Fort Greene or Manhattan.
Pros
  • Brooklyn Bridge Park
  • Relatively affordable (for NYC)
  • gorgeous brownstones
  • quick access to Manhattan
  • the Promenade
Cons
  • Only one public elementary & no middle schools
  • Expensive (for Brooklyn)
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"One of my favorite areas in Brooklyn"

Located near Coney Island in south Brooklyn, Brighton Beach is a popular oceanfront community with a lovely boardwalk. Just over one square mile, this is one of the only affordable waterfront communities in New York. Its quirky charm also helped maintain property prices during the recent foreclosure crisis and recession. While prices dropped in most places, they actually went up in Brighton Beach. The population in this town is primarily Russian, but there are good numbers of Hispanic, Middle Eastern, and Caribbean residents too. Most businesses here feature Russian signs, and there are a lot of small Russian stores and restaurants. One of the problems with this neighborhood is that there isn't enough parking. This becomes even more of an issue during the peak summer months when outsiders flock to the beach. There are a lot of doctor's offices in this town, so you don't have to worry about health care. There are co-ops that start below $200,000 and private homes that run into the millions. Brighton Beach has excellent schools: P.S. 225 and I.S. 303 have great reputations. The high school isn't as good though. There are diverse stores, great restaurants, and a nice nightlife. Public transportation options include two subway lines and a number of buses. The commute to Manhattan takes under an hour.
Pros
  • Relatively low housing costs
  • Diverse population
  • Beautiful beach
Cons
  • Rather long commute to Manhattan
  • Mediocre high school
  • Overcrowded during the summer
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Jewish capital of the U.S."

Located in southwest Brooklyn, Borough Park houses one of the biggest Orthodox and Hasidic Jewish communities in America. There are also significant numbers of Irish and Italian residents who live here, but it is primarily known as a Jewish community. The town has hundreds of houses of worship, most of which are Jewish. Jewish tradition permeates through every aspect of life in Borough Park. Here, you can find the Living Torah Museum, countless Jewish shops and kosher restaurants, and homes decorated with Jewish ornaments during Jewish holidays. Even the big chain stores in this neighborhood close on Saturdays because of the Sabbath. In keeping with the Jewish tradition of raising large families, this is a safe and very family-friendly neighborhood. Borough Park has an unusually strong sense of unity; there are a lot of volunteer organizations that serve the community. There is a volunteer security team and a free service to help residents with car trouble. One major problem here is overcrowding due to the prevalence of large families. These families need all the space they can get, so houses are getting bigger. Another problem is the lack of affordable housing in the neighborhood. However, residents and town officials are working on plans to introduce some low cost housing developments.
Pros
  • Strong sense of unity
  • Quiet & safe
  • Unique sense of tradition
Cons
  • Not diverse
  • Shops & restaurants are mostly Jewish (con for outsiders)
  • Overpriced housing
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Trendy & pleasant"

Formerly known for drugs, prostitution, and other crimes, Boerum Hill has transformed into a trendy and family-friendly community. The town is located close to downtown Brooklyn, Park Slope, and Cobble Hill. The neighbors are extremely friendly in this tightly knit community and together, they work to keep the neighborhood clean, safe, and happy. While the neighborhood is known for its brownstone, brick, and Tudor private homes, there are also some upscale town houses, condos, co-ops, and apartment complexes. The homes cover a wide range of prices, with some of the nicest homes going for millions. Homeowners work hard to maintain their properties. Most of the action in this small town takes place on Atlantic Avenue, where there is a lot of heavy traffic, but the rest of Boerum Hill is quiet and residential. The town is also dotted with cute and chic boutiques and trendy restaurants. There are lots of ethnic businesses as well. Boerum Hill is also home of the annual Atlantic Antic, a huge street fair with food, rides, and music. The schools in Boerum Hill are pretty good; the Math and Science Exploratory School has spectacular rankings. Boerum Hill also boasts an amazing array of transportation options, with ten subway lines stopping at different stations in the town.
Pros
  • Diverse transportation options
  • Great schools
  • Great food & shopping
Cons
  • Overcrowded in some areas
  • Overpriced in some areas
  • Problems with parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A quiet town thats perfect for families!"

Located on the southern coast of Brooklyn, Bergen Beach is a quiet and upscale residential area. This town has very friendly people and a small town vibe. The public schools here are good, and there are a lot of private schools. Almost one thousand children participate in athletic programs run by the Bergen Beach Youth Organization. One of the best things about Bergen Beach is its multitude of parks. McGuire Park is incredibly huge and has a wide variety of activities. The town's playground has close to one acre of basketball and handball courts. There are lots of shops and restaurants that range from small bagel shops and delis to nice Italian and trendy sushi restaurants. There's great shopping on Ralph Avenue. King's Plaza is nearby as well, but the neighborhood around there isn't that good. The commute to Manhattan takes about an hour by car, depending on traffic. Express buses to the city run daily. There are some subway stations nearby, but residents have to take buses to get to the stations. Most of the homes here are two-story single family or two-family houses. Availability of rentals is limited. The biggest problem around here is that parts of Bergen Beach were created by a landfill, some of the streets are prone to flooding.
Pros
  • Lovely views
  • Lots of parks
  • Quiet and private
Cons
  • Boring
  • Prone to flooding
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Average suburban town"

Traditionally known as Brooklyn's Little Italy, Bensonhurst is a quiet residential neighborhood that is still predominately Italian, but that now has a more diverse population with large numbers of Asian, Middle Eastern, and Russian immigrants. During the last real estate boom, countless condos and housing developments were constructed, prompting homeowners to band together to stop overdevelopment of the neighborhood. As the foreclosure crisis tempered new developments, it also stabilized prices that had been skyrocketing. There are lots of small businesses, particularly on Bay Parkway, 18th Ave, and 86th Street, with a large number of ethnic shops and restaurants. There are still lots of Italian places in Bensonhurst; I love Villa Paradiso. There are also Italian cultural festivals and celebrations held in this town. The school district here is okay and it's improving a little each year. One reason for Bensonhurst's popularity is the reasonably short commute to Manhattan. There are three trains and lots of buses that run here. While most of the neighborhood has easy access to the Belt Parkway, it can be a traffic nightmare for driving commuters. Also, parking can be problematic, particularly in the town's busier areas. Overall, it's a pretty good and safe suburban neighborhood, but I'm not convinced that it's worth the money.
Pros
  • Increasingly diversified population
  • Quiet & safe
  • Lots of good Italian restaurants
Cons
  • Boring
  • No parking
  • Overpriced housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Underrated community that will likely improve in a few years"

Famous as the hometown of rap legend Notorious BIG (Jay-Z's grandmother also lived here), Bedford Stuyvesant (Bed-Stuy) is a large, predominantly African American community in central Brooklyn. However, during the past decade or so, the neighborhood has become increasingly diverse as the crime rate declined and the subway conditions improved. In particular, the number of white residents has multiplied exponentially. New condos and upscale housing developments have been constructed, and this is a strong area for renters. This community is filled with brownstone homes that are very competitively priced; prices here were always relatively low, but they dropped even more during the foreclosure crisis. However, this is such a large neighborhood with so many different kinds of homes that it's hard to say what the average price is. The neighborhood is becoming a popular choice with young professionals and students studying at Pratt, which is nearby. However, crime remains a concern for some prospective buyers as the neighborhood is having a tough time shaking its bad image. Still, this is a town with a lot of charm; there are diverse Zagat-rated restaurants and quaint stores, particularly on Lewis Avenue. There is great shopping at Fulton and Nostrand.
Pros
  • Charming restaurants & shops
  • Becoming increasingly diverse
  • Fun cultural history
  • inexpensive real estate
Cons
  • Bad reputation
  • crime rate remains something to worry about
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Lovely, peaceful & affordable"

Bay Ridge is an interesting town with quiet residential areas, a bustling nightlife, and plenty of recreational activities, shops, and restaurants. The homes in Bay Ridge cover a wide spectrum of styles and prices. The housing here is mostly made up of single family homes on tree-lined streets, but there are also a lot of co-ops and some apartments. It's very safe; the neighbors in Bay Ridge are friendly and look out for each other. The population is mainly Italian, Greek, and Irish, but there is a good number of Arabic speaking residents as well. It also has a huge elderly population because this is a town where people stay their whole lives. There is no shortage of things to do with lots of restaurants that serve ethnic foods, nice parks, and a lovely pier where people fish. Most of the action takes place on 86th street, and there are more than one hundred bars in this town. While there are subway stations and an express bus in Bay Ridge, the commute to Manhattan is lengthy. Drivers have easy access to major highways, but parking can be challenging. People often compare Bay Ridge with Park Slope; while Park Slope may be trendier, it is also far more expensive. Overall, this is a nice, affordable community with a lot to offer.
Pros
  • Nice restaurants; lots of bars
  • friendly neighbors
  • quiet, inexpensive
Cons
  • Quite a commute to Manhattan
  • far from civilization
  • not much to do
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse & affordable working-class community"

Located in southwestern Brooklyn, Bath Beach was once a Hamptons-like summer resort community for New York's powerful and elite. There isn't an actual beach there anymore; it was paved over to make a highway, but the residents still enjoy access to great recreational areas like Bath Beach Playground and the waterfront promenade located next to the Belt Parkway. Decorated with an ocean motif, the playground has lovely gardens, playground equipment for children, basketball courts, and roller hockey courts. The town's businesses are mostly small family shops and some chain stores. However, there are big-box stores like Best Buy and Toys R Us nearby at Caesar's Bay. The population in Bath Beach has also changed a lot over the years. Although it was once a predominantly German and Italian town, Bath Beach now has a far more diverse immigrant population of Hispanic, Chinese, Arab, and Russian immigrants. The main problems with living in Bath Beach include the noise from the elevated subway trains that pass through the town and the long commute to Manhattan. While public transportation options are numerous and diverse, the commute is still pretty time consuming. Overall, this is a fairly typical suburban community that boasts affordable housing and a peaceful environment.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Ethnic shopping
  • Beautiful water views
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse and affordable"

Woodhaven is a small working-class community of about one square mile. The town's population is mostly Hispanic, but it also has a good mix of white, Asian, and African American blue-collar working families. The town's diverse stores and restaurants, particularly on Jamaica Avenue, are proof of its rich ethnic diversity. The residents have worked hard to keep their town well maintained; they work to fight graffiti and push for repairs and renovations of public spaces and on the elevated subway rails that pass through the town. The homes in the northern section of Woodhaven tend to be larger and more expensive. A lot of the homes there have nice driveways, garages, and porches. There are also low co-op buildings, but rentals are fairly hard to come by. There are some rentals in private homes. Each year, there is a great street fair on Jamaica Avenue. Woodhaven's residents can also enjoy easy access to Forest Park, where they can enjoy a variety of fun recreational activities such as swimming, tennis, golf, and outdoor concerts. Housing here has always been fairly affordable, but prices have dropped even more during the recent foreclosure crisis. There are plenty of transportation options, with two subway lines and several bus routes passing through the town.
Pros
  • Diverse population with ethnic food options
  • A lot of transportation options
  • Fairly affordable
Cons
  • Some areas are overcrowded
  • Parking can be problematic in some areas
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Nice suburban town"

Located in eastern Queens, Utopia is a lovely and quiet suburban community. Housing prices here skyrocketed during the last real estate boom and stabilized slightly during the recent foreclosure crisis, but they are still pretty high. This neighborhood boasts some excellent schools, access to two of the borough's nicest parks, and proximity to a public golf course. At the same time, it is a little known area, which is often considered to be part of Fresh Meadows. Even its library is called the Hillcrest library. During the housing boom, many of the homes in the area were renovated or rebuilt, which adds to the town's pleasant appearance. The population is also changing; while it was once a predominantly Irish and Italian town, there are more Russian and Asian families living there now. There are excellent public and private schools nearby; many families choose to send their kids to the Holy Family School and PS 173 and PS 178 are both excellent. The town has a long tradition of community softball games that are played on Sundays during the spring, summer, and fall at the Utopia Playground. Utopia is also very close to St. John's University.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Access to 2 nice parks & a golf course
  • Diverse
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to the city
  • Rising, often overpriced, housing costs
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best town in Queens, but it has an interesting history"

Located in southeastern Queens, St. Albans is a fairly typical suburban community but it has a fascinating cultural history. About three square miles, it is the hometown of Ella Fitzgerald and Roy Campanella. The population has some diversity but is still overwhelmingly African American. There is a very wide range of housing options, but most of the homes are pretty cheap (at least by New York City standards). Prices dropped even more as this area was hit hard by the recent foreclosure crisis. This town has had a bad reputation for crime and drug use, but it has improved in recent years. Still, as the crime rate improved and more developers worked on the area, the town became overcrowded, causing new problems. For example, noise and parking became issues for residents. While there are shops and restaurants on both Linden Boulevard and Farmers Boulevard, there certainly aren't too many trendy or upscale stores. Residents do enjoy access to Roy Wilkins Park and the Black Spectrum Theater. The town's school district is nothing to brag about; its schools usually perform below average. Transportation is also pretty inconvenient. There are buses, but there is no subway stop and the Long Island Rail Road lines that run nearby require transferring at Jamaica in order to get to Manhattan.
Pros
  • Interesting history
  • Affordable
  • Diverse
Cons
  • Some areas are overcrowded
  • Lack of diverse public transportation links
  • Bad reputation for safety
Recommended for
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best town in Queens"

Located close to JFK International Airport, Springfield Gardens North is a lower class community. It is generally considered to be shoddier than Springfield Gardens South, but then again, none of the neighborhoods that are close to the airport are all that great. The population is very diverse with a pretty good mix of African American, Caucasian, Haitian, Hispanic, and Guyanese residents. There is a very wide range of housing options, but most of the homes are pretty cheap (at least by New York City standards). Most of the action in Springfield Gardens North takes place on Merrick Boulevard or Farmers Boulevard, but there isn't great diversity in the shops and restaurants, and there certainly aren't too many trendy or upscale stores. There aren't too many recreational options either. The town doesn't have a very good reputation for safety either and the school district is nothing to brag about. The town's proximity to JFK International Airport can be good or bad. While people seem to like the restaurants at JFK, they also complain because of the heavy air traffic noise. Overall, this is probable one of the worst towns in Queens, and the biggest thing it has going for it is its cheap prices.
Pros
  • Diverse population with ethnic food options
  • Affordable
  • Close to JFK
Cons
  • Noise from the airport
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • Mediocre schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
MarcoM
MarcoM THE COMMENTS here are simply NOT TRUE. ROCHDALE is one of the great area of Jamaica Queens and this is 2014. It has a nice park, 2 malls, it's own power plant. The Apartments are beautiful etc. It has it's own security etc. You don't hear crimes etc in the surrounding area etc. I don't know why the 3 people in here wrote these stupid comments. These comments were written in 2009 and 2011 so I can see why.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Typical suburban community with some noise issues"

Located close to JFK International Airport, Springfield Gardens South is a middle class community. It is generally considered to be better than Springfield Gardens North, but in all honesty, none of the neighborhoods that are close to the airport are very good. The population is very diverse with a pretty good mix of African American, Caucasian, Haitian, Hispanic, and Guyanese residents. There is a very wide range of housing options in very different price ranges, which accounts for the community's economic diversity, but most of the homes are pretty cheap (at least by New York City standards). Most of the action in Springfield Gardens South takes place on Merrick Boulevard or Farmers Boulevard, but there isn't great diversity in the shops and restaurants, and there certainly aren't too many trendy or upscale stores. The town is reasonably safe but doesn't have a very good reputation because of Springfield Gardens North's reputation. The school district is okay. The town's proximity to JFK International Airport can be good or bad. While people seem to like the restaurants at JFK, they also complain because of the heavy air traffic noise. Overall, it's a fairly typical suburban community, but it isn't one of the better towns in Queens.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Close to JFK
  • Ethnic food options
Cons
  • Boring
  • Noise from the airport
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
AnasAbabou
AnasAbabou We are into our second year here. Our street has many decent retired quite elderly. We don't hang much in this neighborhood. It's beautiful during the day, nice morning Breese, quiet and has a very nice Park with a lake. At night is also quite, Idk about safety I either drive my car or take my dog out at night. I don't feel safe walking without the dog at night. Bjs walmart etc is a 10 minutes drive away but around the neighborhood everything is limited and boring, I would never live here without a car. From what I see, the area is 90 % Jamaicain unfortunately. I like to live with a little of every race. That is another reason why the neighborhood is so limited . the airport noise is the least of my problems. Can barely even notice it that's how much I got used to it. The nightmare in turn, is in the summer!!! OMG everyday someone has a party and they bring an actual DJ with actual NIGHT CLUB SPEAKERS that penetrates your home and vibrates all your walls and you can't even hear a family member talking to you. They start at 3 pm and it only get louder from there as the booze kick in the music gets even louder till at least 5 Am, and the music of choice? All Jamaicain booty music and the DJ yelling through the mic BUA BUA BUA. I an live perfectly here, with the Jamaicans, with JFK and everything else, but this summer party nightmare. Forget it! Infact I'm writing about it now and it's January, that's how much I'm tromatized and want to find a solution before summer.. We like living here and the summer party nightmare is really gonna Push us out. We have to go to bed with those speakers vibrating through our bodies and ears.. Idk how older people go through it. Or if there are sick people or even worst imagine you invite your in-laws for dinner, sitting on the table and BRRAA BBWAA BRRAA and you can't even have a proper conversation. I lived around all new York City and with the whole world, name it and I have never gonne through this. The funny part is, now n winter and spring you don't even hear nothing! It's like no one lives here. It's like people hibernate and come out wild in July.
2yrs+
BenjiS
BenjiS hahah - that was an awesome review! I hope you move soon!! good luck!
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Very convenient location & great food"

While I'm not crazy about any of the towns in this area, Woodside definitely has a lot going in its favor. Rent is unbelievably cheap (for New York City), and there are plenty of inexpensive restaurants and public transportation connections in Woodside. By subway, the commute to/from the city should only take about 20 minutes. If you opt to spend more on the Long Island Rail Road, it should take about 10 minutes. Transportation options abound here. All of these factors make Woodside a very popular choice for young professionals who are looking for a short commute and cheap rent. Woodside also boasts one of the city's most diverse populations, which translates into diverse food and shopping nearby as well. While it is historically an Irish neighborhood, today it houses a huge mix of ethnic populations. Woodside is also very safe and there has been a lot of development in the neighborhood. However there are few parks or recreational activities. Another problem is that there is a lot of noise from the trains that pass through Woodside. In short, I think that it's a great place for young professionals to get started before having families or settling down.
Pros
  • Close to Midtown Manhattan
  • Diverse population
  • Good public, private and parochial schools
Cons
  • Lack of green spaces
  • Has a gritty, industrial feel especially around Roosevelt Avenue
  • Too busy at times
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best town in Queens"

Located close to JFK Airport and Brooklyn, South Ozone Park is a lower-middle class community. The population is very diverse with a pretty good mix of Bangladeshi, African American, Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and Guyanese residents. There is a very wide range of housing options in very different price ranges, which accounts for the community's economic diversity. Most of the action in South Ozone Park takes place on Rockaway Boulevard, but there are also plenty of shops and restaurants nearby on Liberty Avenue in Richmond Hill. Locals also frequent the Aqueduct Flea Market. The town is reasonably safe but doesn't have a very good reputation because of the Lufthansa Heist story; today, the biggest problems are with parking, graffiti, and theft. There are lots of schools in this area, but they are fairly mediocre. The town's proximity to JFK International Airport can be good or bad. While people seem to like the restaurants at JFK, they also complain because of the heavy air traffic noise. Overall, it's a fairly typical suburban community, but it isn't one of the better towns in Queens. Most people would tell you that you'll find better deals in better towns elsewhere.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Close to JFK
  • Fairly affordable
Cons
  • Noise from the airport
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Underrated community"

South Jamaica is a historically underrated area in Jamaica, Queens. There are single and multi-family homes and apartment buildings on the neighborhood's tree-lined streets. While the population is pretty diverse with Latin American, Caribbean, Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi immigrants, the majority of the residents are African American. In fact, South Jamaica has the largest African American population in all of Queens. The town's ethnic stores and restaurants are proof of its incredible diversity. Decades ago, this neighborhood had a terrible reputation for violence and drugs. While the town worked to improve safety and developers swooped in during the last housing boom, it has had a hard time shaking its bad image. Prices are reasonable for New York City, but this is primarily a result of its poor reputation. Transportation options are pretty good, with access to three subway lines on Archer Avenue and the Long Island Rail Road station on Sutphin Boulevard. Residents can take buses to either station. There is also an AirTrain Station on Sutphin Boulevard that provides service to JFK Airport. Baisley Pond Park is great for recreational activities; it has tennis courts, basketball courts, playgrounds, and biking / jogging paths.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Ethnic food options
  • Many new or upgraded properties available
Cons
  • Boring
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • Mediocre schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Typical suburban community with some noise issues"

Located in southeast Queens, close to the Nassau border, Rosedale is a quiet suburban community that is predominately African American with some Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian residents. A lot of outsiders mistakenly believe that this is a Long Island town. The neighborhood is also very close to John F Kennedy International Airport, so air traffic noise tends to be a major issue for Rosedale's residents. While there are buses and the Long Island Rail Road is nearby, there is no subway service to Rosedale, so most of its residents have cars. As a result, a lot of the people who live here are people who work in Long Island, rather than Manhattan. As for recreation, there is a pretty nice and well maintained park as well as a nice public library. There are plenty of stores and restaurants, and residents also have easy access to the options in neighboring towns. Most of what you need is in walking distance. Rosedale also has a pretty good public school system. In short, this is a fairly typical suburban town, but I'd never live here just because I'm pretty sensitive when it comes to noise.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Access to a nice park
  • Plenty of stores & restaurants
Cons
  • Noise from the airport
  • Hard to live here without a car
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet and inaccessible"

While I'm not much of a fan of any of the towns on the Rockaway Peninsula, I have to admit that these waterfront towns are lovely. Seaside is no exception, with its waterfront high-rise apartment complexes. This town has an important cultural history, as it has been featured in books, TV shows, and movies. This is an incredibly safe and tight-knit community. During the peak summer season, the town tends to get very crowded with visitors, but the locals can enjoy peace and privacy during the rest of the year. This is a very peaceful town that offers a good escape from city life but its isolation results in problems such as a difficult commute to schools and a ninety minute commute to Manhattan. This is a fairly expensive place to live: housing prices are steep, particularly near the beach. Still, this town is lovely and well maintained. It is known for its colorful bus shelters. The town also has restaurants and shops, but there isn't a lot of diversity. This town, like other towns on the Rockaway Peninsula, is also prone to damage from storms.
Pros
  • Beautiful water views
  • Quiet & private
Cons
  • Long commute to the city
  • Boring
  • Far from schools
Recommended for
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Underrated & super clean town next to Brooklyn"

Located close to Brooklyn, Ridgewood is a small and lovely neighborhood that boasts a very convenient location and easy transportation. It is less than twenty minutes from Manhattan by subway and is extremely clean and well maintained. This tightly knit community has numerous civic organizations that are committed to maintaining the town's pleasant aesthetics. Evidence of this can be seen throughout Ridgewood on its clean, wide, tree-lined streets. A majority of the homes here are multi-family homes so there are lots of rentals available. With so many renters, Ridgewood does have a problem with parking; most parking spaces cost an extra $100-$200 a month. Ridgewood's population is a healthy mix of German, Romanian, Austrian, Polish, and Slovenian blue-collar and white-collar working families. The town is fairly safe and has lots of ethnic stores and restaurants. The town also has a small-town vibe, with plenty of small town activities for residents. Its convenient location also allows residents to enjoy the activities and amenities of numerous other towns. Another great thing about Ridgewood is its multitude of private and public schools, most of which are pretty well reviewed. The neighbors are friendly, and many of the town's residents live here their whole lives.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Friendly neighbors
  • Very well maintained
  • quiet New York neighborhood
Cons
  • Serious lack of parking
  • far from downtown Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
JaneB
JaneB Its population is MOSTLY hispanic.
2yrs+
wartman
wartman As of this writing, the population of Ridgewood is mostly Latino in the part that borders Brooklyn (the south and west sides). The eastern and northern parts are primarily Eastern European. Scattered across both areas is an increasingly noticeable demographic often referred to as "hipsters" (but in actuality they're just young people looking for a reasonably affordable and safe place to live that has good access to public transit).
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Diverse and affordable"

Located in south-central Queens, Richmond Hill is a quiet suburban community with a diverse population of Caribbean and South Asian immigrants, as well as the largest Sikh population in New York City. The town's restaurants reflect this diversity as there are plenty of ethnic food choices. There are also many ethnic festivals that take place throughout the year. The area features numerous traditional wood-frame houses in Victorian, Tudor, and Craftsman styles, most of which are single family homes. The homes are mainly located on quiet tree-lined streets. There are however some multi-family homes, and overall, housing in Richmond Hill covers a pretty wide range of prices. Residents enjoy easy access to Forest Park, where they can enjoy a myriad of recreational activities such as swimming, tennis, golf, outdoor concerts, and a myriad of other fun activities. While the area is serviced by three major subway lines, the commute to Manhattan takes about 45 minutes. Still, Richmond Hill is a popular choice for working professionals with families because it offers a quiet and affordable option. The neighborhood is also close to JFK Airport, which has historically been an issue because of the air traffic noise, but FAA regulations have mainly resolved this problem.
Pros
  • Great ethnic restaurants and festivals
  • Diverse housing options
  • Close to JFK airport
  • Good for Indo-Carribean eats
  • Great Diversity
Cons
  • Boring
  • Some areas are often crowded
  • 40 -50 minutes away from Midtown
  • Poor schooling options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
BenjiS
BenjiS I wouldn't say "diverse" per se. It's Indian or Carribbean. Mainly Indian.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nice area for shopping"

Located in central Queens next to Forest Hills, Middle Village, and Elmhurst, Rego Park is a small suburban community of about one square mile. While the population is predominantly Russian, many of its residents are Asian, Latin American, and native-born Americans. This is a pleasant and safe community with good schools, lots of stores, and convenient transportation options. While the town offers fairly affordable housing when compared with Manhattan, it still has some of the highest prices in Queens - particularly in the Crescents area. Residents enjoy shopping at the small family-owned businesses that have been around for ages, as well as the variety of stores offered at the Rego Park Center mall. Century 21 and Kohl's opened here just a couple of years ago. While rentals are hard to come by, there are plenty of single-family homes and both low and high-rise co-op buildings. The neighborhood also has gorgeous single-family Tudor and colonial homes in the Crescents area. Rego Park residents can also enjoy its proximity to Flushing Meadows Corona Park, one of the city's largest parks, which houses Citi Field (formerly Shea Stadium) where the Mets play, the tennis center where the U. S. Open is held, the Hall of Science, an art museum, bike paths, a huge steel globe, gorgeous sculptures, an ice skating rink, and a wildlife center with a children's farm.
Pros
  • Highly diverse population
  • Ethnic food options
  • Lots of transportation options
Cons
  • Boring
  • Faily expensive housing prices
  • Traffic can get pretty bad
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet suburban community near a nice park"

Located in north central Queens, Queensboro Hill is a diverse suburban community that is close to Flushing. Main Street, the area's major road, has become increasingly commercial and less residential during the past few years. Main Street is also where the New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens and the Flushing branch of the Queens library are located. The library can get overcrowded, but it is spectacular; it offers collections of periodicals, books, and DVD's in several different languages. Free classes on various useful subjects are offered frequently. This area also boasts a huge variety of different ethnic cuisines. In particular, there are loads of Asian restaurants because of the area's growing Asian population. At the same time, Queensboro Hill also houses quiet residential areas that are filled with single-family private homes. Residents also have access to Kissena Park and the Botanical Gardens. You can take one of the local buses to the subway or Long Island Rail Road station, both of which are found on Main Street in Flushing. While the commute to Manhattan takes about an hour, this neighborhood is still a popular choice with commuting professionals who have families.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Access to Kissena Park
  • Close to Flushing, where lots of ethnic restaurants and stores are
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to the city
  • Fairly expensive home prices
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet and family friendly community near Long Island"

Located close to Long Island, this Queens community evolved from a primarily Caucasian population of German, Irish, and Italian residents to a more diverse neighborhood with African American, Hispanic, and Asian residents. This is a very stable neighborhood with a good school district and several churches that are more than one hundred years old. While it has some apartment buildings and garden apartments, most of the housing is in the form of single-family private homes. There are lots of businesses on Harry Van Arsdale Jr. Avenue, as well as elder care and child care facilities. While Pomonok is still a good distance from Manhattan, there are diverse public transportation options. You can take the bus to the subway on Main Street in Flushing, or you can take one of the town's express buses. While shops and restaurants in Pomonok are not very diverse, there are many more options just a few minutes away in Flushing. This is a pretty safe town, with few major crimes. There are some cases of auto theft, but that's fairly hard to avoid when you are living in New York City. Still, there isn't much a nightlife in or near Pomonok, so it isn't a very good choice for young singles who are looking for a party town.
Pros
  • Consistent; many life-long residents
  • Diverse population
  • Very friendly, close-knit community
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to the city
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Average suburban community"

Located south of Flushing, this Queens community of housing developments offers easy access to major roads such as the Long Island Expressway, Parsons Boulevard and Kissena Boulevard. There are thousands of apartments in the brick complexes, which are unique because they also have ample parking lots. One of the factors that draws people to this community is its proximity to several major universities including the Rabbinical Seminary of America, Queens College and the CUNY law school. Pomonok also has a number of religious institutions, including a Lutheran church and a Chinese Baptist church. There are lots of businesses on Harry Van Arsdale Jr. Avenue, as well as elder care and child care facilities. While Pomonok is still a good distance from Manhattan, there are diverse public transportation options. You can take the bus to the subway on Main Street in Flushing, or you can take one of the town's express buses. While shops and restaurants in Pomonok are not very diverse, there are many more options just a few minutes away in Flushing. Still, there isn't much a nightlife in or near Pomonok, so it isn't a very good choice for young singles who are looking for a party town.
Pros
  • Consistent; many life-long residents
  • Close to several universities
  • Close to Flushing, where lots of ethnic restaurants and stores are
Cons
  • Boring
  • Fairly long commute to the city
  • Bad reputation for safety
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse middle-class community"

Located close to JFK Airport and Brooklyn, Ozone Park is a blue collar community where residents tend to stay their whole lives, so everyone knows each other and there are families with several generations all living here. The population is very diverse with a pretty good mix of Irish, German, Italian, African American, Hispanic, and Asian residents. There is a very wide range of housing options in very different price ranges, which accounts for the community's economic diversity. Homes are primarily pre-war single or multi-family homes. One part of Ozone Park is a village of Tudor-style homes. While there are few new constructions in Ozone Park, a lot of homes were renovated during the last housing boom. While the town has mostly small family businesses, there are plenty of shops and restaurants nearby on Cross Bay Boulevard and locals also frequent the Aqueduct Flea Market. The town is fairly safe; the biggest problems are with parking, graffiti, and people who illegally rent out their basements (adding to the parking problems). There are lots of schools in this area, but there are still problems with overcrowding, again because people keep illegally renting out rooms and basements.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • A lot of transportation options
  • Lots of schools
Cons
  • Long commute to the city
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
sohrab88
sohrab88 Richly Middle Class

http://www.richlymiddleclass.com

Careers & Jobs,Finances,Health and Beauty,Just Us Men, Just Us Women,life style,
Parenthood,Real Issues,Romance,The Recipe box etc know abilable here.
Relationships and Politics,
Small Ways to Take Control of Your Finances,
Don’t Mistake Silence for Strength,
Career verses Motherhood,
A little time for me,
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Affordable waterfront community"

Howard Beach is divided into two main parts by Cross Bay Boulevard: there is Old Howard Beach on the east side and New Howard Beach on the west side. Old Howard Beach is a predominantly Italian community which is fairly isolated and more affordable than New Howard Beach. Located close to JFK Airport, this community has many bungalows and single family private homes that date back to the days when the area was a beach resort community. In this waterfront community, residents tend to stay here their whole lives, so everyone knows each other and there are families with several generations of people who live here. Old Howard Beach has lots of fantastic seafood and Italian restaurants on Cross Bay Boulevard. There are also numerous water activities, such as boating or fishing. One of the problems of living here is the noise from JFK, which has improved over the years, but is still noticeable. The other main problem is public transportation. There is an AirTrain stop and the A train stops here as well, but it still takes over an hour to get to Manhattan, making it pretty inconvenient for daily commuters. However, there is plenty of parking, so most of the residents own cars.
Pros
  • Beautiful water views
  • Consistent / doesn't change much
  • Friendly neighbors
Cons
  • Boring
  • Lack of diverse public transportation links
  • Often hit hard by storms
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Nothing special"

North Corona is a lower middle-class neighborhood that is located in Central Queens, near Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. It is extremely diverse; it has a predominately Hispanic population with small percentages of African Americans, Italians, and Asians. While the neighborhood has improved dramatically over the past few decade, it still has a reputation of being unsafe. Still, it definitely has gotten better and more young professionals are turning to North Corona and its neighboring towns because of its low housing prices and convenient access to the subway. The 7 train runs right through the heart of North Corona, which isn't always a good thing as the noise from the overhead subway can often be annoying.

The Langston Hughes Library and the Black Heritage Reference Center are two great places to visit for some educational entertainment. North Corona is also close to Flushing Meadows Corona Park, one of the biggest parks in New York City. This gigantic park includes Citi Field (formerly Shea Stadium), the tennis center where the U. S. Open is held, the Hall of Science, a museum, an ice skating rink, and a wildlife center. North Corona is also a culturally important neighborhood because famous musicians such as Louis Armstrong and the Beatnuts used to live here.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Ethnic food options
  • Access to Flushing Meadow park
Cons
  • Boring
  • Parking can be problematic in some areas
  • Bad reputation for safety
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Beautiful upscale neighborhood"

While I'm not much of a fan of any of the towns on the Rockaway Peninsula, I have to admit that Neponsit Belle Harbor is lovely. This is a tiny eight by four block area filled with beachfront mansions and lovely private homes. This is an incredibly safe and tight-knit community. During the peak summer season, street parking is prohibited so people let their neighbors use their driveways. People often even leave their keys in their cars so that others can move their cars for access to the driveway or street. One thing to note is that if you're not into participating in neighborly rituals like these, you probably shouldn't live here. While the beach is open to the public, the restrictions on street parking largely serve to keep outsiders from using it. An overwhelming majority of the people here are Caucasian. There are a few Asian and Hispanic residents though. This is an expensive place to live: housing prices are steep and the homeowners' association collects voluntary dues to pay for maintenance of public areas. There isn't much to do here other than enjoy the beach and relax. Another important thing to note is that only the A train runs to the Rockaways, making it difficult and time consuming to commute to the city. There used to be a Long Island Rail Road stop, but that was shut down years ago.
Pros
  • Beautiful water views
  • Strong sense of unity
  • Very well maintained
Cons
  • Poor public transportation links
  • Pretty far from the city
  • Often hit hard by storms
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Typical middle class town"

Located halfway between Jamaica and Brooklyn, Middle Village is a small and quiet residential area of about 2 square miles. Most of the housing in Maspeth is in the form of small single family homes, and the residents work to limit the number of multi-family private homes in town. Having long been known as a predominantly Italian town, Middle Village has also seen and influx of Polish, Irish, and German residents. This is a really consistent town: most people stay here their whole lives, so there are families with several generations of people living here and the census reports show that the population barely changes. This is a town where the people not only know each other by name; they also know their parents' and grandparents' names. The town's strong sense of unity extends to banding together to oppose excessive development or construction; they want the town to stay the same. Most of the action in Maspeth takes place on Metropolitan Avenue. There are a lot of small family businesses but there has been an increase in the number of upscale spas, trendy restaurants, and chic bars. The school district is pretty good. There is a very good public library and a lot of parks.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Consistent / doesn't change much
  • Very friendly, close-knit community
Cons
  • Boring
  • Lack of diverse public transportation links
  • Lots of cemeteries
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Just okay, nothing extraordinary"

Located in western Queens and close to Brooklyn, Maspeth is a small and diverse residential area of about 2 or 3 square miles. Most of the housing in Maspeth is in the form of small single family homes, but a good number of multi-family private homes were built during the last housing boom. There are few apartment buildings, but you can find rentals in multi-family homes. The population is a mix of Asian, Polish, Irish, German, Lithuanian, and Italian residents. Most of the action in Maspeth takes place on Grand Avenue. There are a lot of family businesses that have been around for a long time. Diners and pubs are numerous. There are also a lot of resident associations and organizations that foster a sense of community pride. The school district is pretty good; P.S. 58 is particularly well regarded. There is a very good public library that has books, newspapers, and DVD's in several different languages. The major problem with living in Maspeth is transportation. There are a few buses that run through the town, but you have to take a bus to get to the subway station. Also, Maspeth is one of the few Queens towns that do not have express bus service to Manhattan.
Pros
  • Diverse population
  • Small town vibe
  • Private & quiet
Cons
  • Poor public transportation links
  • Often crowded
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Cosy but isolated family town"

Located south of Ozone Park in Howard Beach, Lindenwood is a peaceful neighborhood with lots of orange and red apartments and two-family homes, as well as some garden co-ops. There are some townhouses too. This town is known for being very family-friendly, but some of the apartments are not - most don't allow dogs either. There are plenty of small shops and restaurants, and a lot of locals frequent the Lindenwood Shopping Center. I like the Lindenwood Diner myself. While the majority of the residents are Caucasian (Jewish, Irish, and Italian), the neighborhood has seen an influx of Hispanic residents. The town used has one church and one synagogue. The prices are pretty low for what you get; the area was hit hard by the foreclosure crisis, which brought prices down. However, some still feel that it's pretty overpriced considering its rather inconvenient location. The only public transportation available here is one bus line. You have to take the bus to Ozone Park to catch the subway, and it takes over an hour to get to Manhattan, making it pretty inconvenient for daily commuters. The school district is okay, but not spectacular and there is a nice local library.
Pros
  • Family friendly
  • Quiet & private
Cons
  • Long commute to the city
  • Far from the subway
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Pleasant & underrated suburban community"

Part of Jamaica, Laurelton is a peaceful neighborhood with lots of lovely Tudor homes, as well as garden apartment co-ops. Despite the fact that it is part of New York City, it feels like a small town as it is just a little over one square mile and has no high-rise buildings. While the majority of the residents are African American with an increasing immigrant population, this is a unique community as it is the city's only census area in which the black population has a far higher income than the white population. The town used to have a large Jewish population, but today, it is filled with Christian churches. This town's ethnic diversity is reflected in the food: the restaurants and shops feature different ethnic foods. The prices are pretty low for what you get; the area was hit hard by the foreclosure crisis, which brought prices down. Rentals are hard to come by in Laurelton. There is a strong sense of unity in this town: there are various block organizations and civic associations. The school district is okay, but not spectacular. There are parks, where live music can be enjoyed during the summer. There is a nice local library. While shopping choices are limited, it's close to malls and other areas with better shopping. Public transportation links are limited. There is bus service and a Long Island Rail Road station, but there is no subway station.
Pros
  • Ethnic food options
  • Very friendly, close-knit community
Cons
  • Boring
  • Lack of diverse public transportation links
  • Mediocre schools
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
MarcoM
MarcoM JAMAICA QUEENS has some of the most beautiful neighborhoods areas in New York city, but people who don't know much about Jamaica and only been in the few areas that need some improvement and the commercial areas think these are only Jamaica, and they are WRONG BIG TIME. Laurelton is one of the neighborhoods that prove that, it is BEAUTIFUL, ELEGANTE with suburban feeling. JAMAICA QUEENS has a lot of affluent people who live in it but people who don't know much about it have some time not so good view about it.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Tiny Jewish community"

This tiny community east of the Van Wyck is just about one square mile. The vast majority of its residents are Orthodox Jewish, which is reflected in the community's synagogues, kosher restaurants / markets, and Jewish schools. It's very hard to find houses here, but it's easier to find apartments or co-ops. For recreation, residents can go to Flushing Meadows Corona Park, which isn't too far away. There is a good number of shops on Main Street, Parsons Boulevard, and Union Turnpike, which are the three main roads. However, many of these businesses operate on a traditional Jewish schedule, so it may be hard to find something that's open on a Saturday. This is a very tightly knit community with a strong sense of pride and unity. The school district is pretty good for elementary schools, but the junior high and high schools aren't that great. As stated, there are some excellent parochial schools, and there is an excellent high school, however it's only open to very talented children. Public transportation links are diverse and convenient during the day. However, you should note that few trains to Kew Gardens run late at night.
Pros
  • Strong sense of unity
  • Lots of parochial schools
  • Access to Flushing Meadow Corona Park
Cons
  • Many businesses closed on Saturdays
  • Slight sense of isolation
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Ethnically, economically, and geologically diverse community"

Adjacent to Forest Park, Kew Gardens is an interesting neighborhood with lots of hills and curves, on which there are lovely Tudor and colonial homes, as well as pre-war co-op buildings. Despite the fact that it is part of New York City, it feels like a small town with lots of small mom-and-pop stores in its tiny downtown area. While the majority of the residents are either white or Hispanic, the population is becoming increasingly diverse as more Asians and African Americans are moving here. This ethnic diversity is reflected in the food: the restaurants and shops feature just about any kind of ethnic food. One of the best parts of living in Kew Gardens is that you can enjoy easy access to Forest Park, where you can enjoy swimming, tennis, golf, outdoor concerts, and a myriad of other fun activities. The housing in Kew Gardens comes in a wide variety of prices; co-ops start at around $150,000 while private homes run into the millions. The school district is very good for elementary schools, but the closest high school has not received very good reviews. Public transportation links are diverse and convenient during the day. However, you should note that few trains to Kew Gardens run late at night.
Pros
  • Beautiful foliage
  • Access to Forest Park
  • Convenient location
Cons
  • Boring
  • Late night transportation is hard to come by
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Great airport, bad neighbor"

John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) is the busiest international commercial and freight airport in the country. There are close to one hundred airlines that fly in and out of JFK's eight passenger terminals. Terminal 5, the Jet Blue terminal, is gorgeous. AirTrain stops throughout the airport and connects to the city's subway station. A lot of buses also travel to the airport. As JFK is one of the busiest airports in the world, this causes many problems for people who live near the airport. For starters, residents in neighboring towns in both Queens and Nassau frequently complain about the noise from planes flying overhead. In particular, they complain about the noise from overnight flights. Several communities in both counties have banded together to complain about the problem. Other issues with living near JFK include concerns over pollution and the threat of terrorist attacks, as there have been quite a few false alarms in the years since 9/11. Another issue that bothers the airport's neighbors is the traffic on the Van Wyck and the Belt Parkway. Both highways are prone to heavy traffic, which is made worse by the cars heading to/from the airport.
Pros
  • Affordable housing
  • Convenient for airport employees
Cons
  • Noise pollution from JFK
  • Traffic
  • Terrorist threats
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Peaceful suburban neighborhood"

Jamaica Hills is a peaceful and lovely residential area in Jamaica, Queens. There are homes in many diverse styles with beautiful lawns and flowers on the neighborhood's tree-lined streets. In fact, the Jamaica Estates Association keeps a tight rein on homeowners by enforcing building codes and pushing homeowners to maintain their properties. The association also collects optional fees for a private security service. The huge range of architectural styles that you can see in Jamaica Estates can be attributed to the housing boom, when many developers rebuilt homes. There are some apartments and co-ops, but the vast majority of the homes here are single-family houses. The population is pretty diverse, but the majority of the residents are modern Orthodox Jewish or South Asian. Prices are reasonable for New York City, but this is definitely not a cheap neighborhood so residents tend to be a little older. During the last housing boom, demand far outpaced supply so housing prices soared, but they stabilized again during the foreclosure crisis. Transportation options are pretty good, with access to the subway on Hillside Avenue and the LIRR station on Sutphin Boulevard. Residents can take buses to either station. The school district is pretty good and there are some great private schools nearby as well.
Pros
  • Reasonable property taxes
  • Optional private security service
  • Lovely tree-lined streets
Cons
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
MarcoM
MarcoM JAMAICA ESTATE IN SOUTH JAMAICA QUEENS is a wealthy/ upper middle class neighborhood. One of the most beautiful areas of New York city. A lot of the houses are breath taking , stylish and elegante. Jamaica Estate also has a part that is building condo apartments, just a great area to live.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse & affordable"

Jamaica covers quite a large area of Queens, and the quality of life really varies from section to section. There are extraordinarily expensive upscale homes in some areas while other areas are pretty dingy and not very safe. Throughout the area, there are lots of apartments, co-ops, and private homes on tree-lined streets. While it is predominantly African American, the population is diverse with a pretty good mix of Hispanic, Arab, Asian, and Caucasian residents. There isn't much in the way of shopping, other than some supermarkets and pharmacies, but there are more options in the towns nearby. It does have some great pizza places and delis - try Double J right next to the university for some awesome sandwiches. The main draw for people in Jamaica is the fact that it's the county seat and home to St. John's University. Many of the borough's courthouses and administrative buildings are in Jamaica. If you own a multi-family home, you can attract student tenants. Transportation options are pretty good, with access to the subway on Hillside Avenue and the LIRR station on Sutphin Boulevard. Residents can take buses to either station. There is a great park and a well equipped library.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Diverse population
  • Diverse housing options
Cons
  • Boring - no nightlife
  • Bad reputation for safety
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Peaceful & diverse"

Jamaica Hills is a peaceful residential area in Queens. There are lots of apartments, co-ops, and private homes on tree-lined streets. The population is extremely diverse, with a pretty good mix of Hispanic, African American, South Asian, and Caucasian residents. There is a huge Muslim Center. Prices are reasonable for New York City, but this is definitely not a cheap neighborhood so residents tend to be a little older. During the last housing boom, a lot of developers built multi-family homes and housing prices soared, but they stabilized during the foreclosure crisis. Transportation options are pretty good, with access to the subway on Hillside Avenue and the LIRR station on Sutphin Boulevard. Residents can take buses to either station. The school district in Jamaica Hills is excellent. P.S. 132 in particular is very well regarded. Middle School 216 is in Fresh Meadows, but is the zoned school for kids at PS 132 and is excellent also. While there isn't much in the way of shopping, there are stores for staples and there are more diverse shopping options in neighboring towns. The downside is that it tends to get pretty boring in Jamaica Hills as there is little to no nightlife. Still, it is a safe and quiet neighborhood that is excellent for families.
Pros
  • Very diverse population
  • Great schools
Cons
  • Boring
  • Overcrowded in some areas
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Town with incredible food"

Jackson Heights is an incredibly diverse neighborhood in Queens, with a pretty even mixture of South Asian and Hispanic residents. The variety of food here is absolutely incredible; I could write an entire review just on the restaurants in Jackson Heights. Visit Little India for fantastic Indian food, Pio Pio for the world's best Peruvian chicken, Tawa's Nepali Hut for Nepalese street food, or Cannelle Patisserie for some awesome desserts. There are plenty of options for shopping too - particularly on 82nd street. As a previous reviewer stated, nearly every subway line runs through this neighborhood. There are also several bus routes that go through the area, so public transportation options are definitely very diverse. However, this is not a town in which you want to own a car. Parking is hard, particularly on the main streets where most of the restaurants and shops are located. While there are a few major highways nearby, the traffic on those roads is usually awful. The landmarked garden community area is a source of pride for residents. The co-ops and homes here are lovely, but getting permission to repair/renovate in this area can be time consuming. Jackson Heights is a great choice for people who are looking for affordability and convenience.
Pros
  • Relatively low housing costs
  • If you love ethnic foods then this is the neighhborhood for you as it is home substantial Latin American and South Asia populations and thus is equipped with many ethnic restaurants and grocery stores.
  • Jackson Heights is well served by nearly all of New York City's subway lines and hence getting into the city is an absolute breeze.
  • The Garden district is really quite pretty and reminiscent of England
Cons
  • The garden communities are mostly landmarked so owners need permission to make repairs.
  • Residents often complain that the main streets like 74th street are very messy and not very clean and in fact the main subway station of the area, Roosevelt Avenue/ 74th Street has often been voted as the dirtiet subway station of the entire network.
  • Though the Garden district is populated with lush private gardens the area lacks good public access green spaces, the neighborhood has only one public access green space in the form of Travers park
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Town closest to Manhattan"

Hunter's Point is a rapidly evolving section of Long Island City that is just one subway stop from Manhattan. Just five minutes from Grand Central, this is about as close to midtown as you can get in Queens. The quality of life here really varies by the specific part of the town and the amount of money you want to spend. There are homes and rental properties in virtually every price range. The areas that have been recently redeveloped are stunning and well maintained. However, homes in those areas have extravagant prices, where two-family brownstones in the national historic district can cost millions. There are also rather decrepit homes and apartments that are reasonably cheap (for New York City), but these are generally in pretty dismal condition.

Throughout Hunter's Point and all of Long Island City, you will find everything from ethnic restaurants to luxurious restaurants and trendy bars. There are lots of diverse options on Vernon Boulevard. Lounge 47 is a popular choice with locals. For unrivalled views of the water, try the Riverview Cafe. Public transportation choices are numerous with several subway lines, two Long Island Rail Road stops, and several buses all in the area. All in all, this is a wonderful place for young, single professionals who want a shorter commute to the city without paying Manhattan prices.
Pros
  • Incredibly close to Manhattan
  • Lots of redeveloped properties
  • Diverse transportation options
Cons
  • Unsafe in some areas at night
  • Overpriced in some areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Underrated waterfront neighborhood in Queens"

Howard Beach is a waterfront / waterview community that has been traditionally underrated. The population is primarily Italian and Jewish. A good percentage of the residents are there for life, so you see a lot of retirees and older residents. There are diverse housing options, including co-ops, private homes, condos, and garden apartments, all in a wide range of prices. Cross Bay Boulevard is the heart of Howard Beach, where you'll find tons of restaurants and stores. However, the diversity of the stores isn't great; there aren't too many trendy stores for upscale shopping. The prices in Howard Beach are diverse (mainly due to the fact that there are so many different kinds of housing), but a lot of its residents love it because it offers Long Island-style living, but with far lower property taxes. Unsurprisingly, a lot of the recreational activities have to do with the water. There are boat clubs, fishing stores, etc. Some of the problems with Howard Beach include the fact that many outsiders associate it with the mafia, and the commute to Manhattan takes an hour or more. Another important issue is the fact that the homes here are prone to flooding.
Pros
  • Waterfront - lovely views & beach
  • Diverse housing options in a wide range of prices
  • Low property taxes
Cons
  • Homes prone to flooding
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Quiet neighborhood in Queens"

Formerly called East Jamaica, Hollis is a quiet residential area that is divided into two main subsections: Hollis and Holliswood. The population of Hollis is predominantly African American, but more Asian and Hispanic people have been moving there in recent years. There are lots of childcare facilities and adult day care or assisted living facilities because this is a working class neighborhood, so there are few stay at home parents and caretakers. Public transportation options aren't exactly diverse: a couple of buses and a Long Island Rail Road line run through Hollis, but the vast majority of the residents in Hollis own cars. As others have stated, this town takes pride in the quality of some of its notable former residents. It is the hometown of numerous rappers, Mario Cuomo, and Colin Powell. Most of the "action" in Hollis takes place on Jamaica and Hillside avenues, but even those main arteries are pretty low key. There are primarily fast food restaurants and diners, and very few chic or trendy restaurants. There is a pretty well equipped library that has diverse materials to serve the diverse population. This is a quiet, low key residential neighborhood, suitable for families and retirees. It's not really a trendy place for young singles.
Pros
  • Good library
  • Lots of early childcare centers
Cons
  • Boring
  • Lack of trendy restaurants & stores
  • Few public transportation options
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Home to the Red Storm"

Located in central Queens, mainly in Jamaica but partly in Flushing, Hillcrest is a small and diverse residential area. Its bordered by Union Turnpike, Hillside Avenue, 164th Street and Jamaica Estates. Most of the housing in Hillcrest is in the form of single and multi-family private homes. The population is a mix of Asian, Jewish, Russian, and Hispanic, with a majority of African American residents. There isn't much in the way of shopping, other than some supermarkets and pharmacies, but there are more options in the towns nearby. It does have some great pizza places and delis - try Double J right next to the university for some awesome sandwiches. The main draw for people in Hillcrest is the fact that it's home to St. John's University. If you own a multi-family home, you can attract student tenants. On the other hand, if you're looking to rent, it isn't hard to find a reasonably priced place in Hillcrest. While the neighborhood isn't the best in Queens, it's quiet and the neighbors are relatively friendly. The school district is okay, and there is a very good public library on Union Turnpike. It has books, newspapers, and DVD's in several different languages.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Close to 2 big towns
Cons
  • Boring
  • Students can get rowdy
Recommended for
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Suburban peace"

Glendale is a lovely middle class community with a strong sense of unity. This is definitely more of a town for homeowners than it is a town for renters. Residents tend to stay for the long haul, and contribute to keeping the neighborhood clean by maintaining their homes and streets. The civilian patrol helps to keep the town's crime rate low and residents have a no-tolerance policy for graffiti. There is a homeless shelter that is run by volunteer residents. This is a highly family-oriented town. Most of the housing consists of single or multi-family private homes. The school district is pretty good, and there is a fair selection of private and parochial schools with competitive tuition rates. There are parks, playgrounds, and a great public library. There is public transportation, but most of the residents own cars. There are plenty of stores for shopping and lots of restaurants for dining out. In short, Glendale is not for everyone. It is not a place for singles or young people looking for a bustling night life. However, it is a great place for families with children and retirees.
Pros
  • Very safe
  • Strong sense of unity
Cons
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Beautiful views but beaten down & inconvenient"

I'm not much of a fan of any of the towns on the Rockaway Peninsula. Far Rockaway used to be a luxurious summer resort community like the Hamptons or Martha's Vineyard. Over the years, it deteriorated in condition, leaving it with decrepit houses, poorly performing schools, and terrible crime rates. Its poor condition and lack of popularity is ironic, considering the fact that it is located on the water, has beautiful beaches, and is located just over one hour from Manhattan. One important thing to note is that only the A train runs to the Rockaways, making it difficult and time consuming to commute to the city. There used to be a Long Island Rail Road stop, but that was shut down years ago. The population consists primarily of Orthodox Jews, but there are also many African Americans and Russians. While Far Rockaway housing is relatively cheap and the town has worked to clean up its image, its reputation is still pretty bad. This was also one of the towns hit hardest by the recent mortgage crisis, and foreclosures brought the home prices down quite a bit.

While the town is improving every year due to the efforts of town officials and residents, it will be a while before it can attract a huge influx of residents. The main problems are its crime rates, the long commute to the city, and the fact that this area is often hit the hardest by storms, tornadoes, etc.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Beautiful views
  • Beach
Cons
  • Boring
  • Bad reputation for safety
  • Long commute to Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the best part of the Rockaways"

Hammels used to be a summer beach community with boardwalks, a dock, and a nice hotel. Over the years, it deteriorated in condition but ironically, ended up with a more permanent population (as opposed to summer residents). Its poor condition and lack of popularity is ironic, considering the fact that it is located on the water and just over one hour from Manhattan. One thing to note is that only the A train runs to the Rockaways, making it difficult and time consuming to commute to the city. Hammels has been known as a pretty unsafe neighborhood because its main housing was designed to be somewhat of a tenement housing project. While Hammels housing is cheap and the town has worked to clean up its image, its reputation is still pretty bad.

While the town is improving every year due to the efforts of town officials and residents, it will be a while before it can attract a huge influx of residents. The main problems are its crime rates, the long commute to the city, and this area (like most of the Rockaways) is often hit the hardest by storms, tornadoes, etc.
Pros
  • Beautiful views
  • Cheap housing
Cons
  • Unsafe
  • Often hit by storms
  • Long commute to Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Overcrowded and diverse"

East Flushing is a small and diverse community where residents can enjoy convenient public transportation links, diverse housing options, one of the best hospitals in Queens, access to the area's two major airports, and proximity to Queens College. The population is pretty diverse, with a good mix of Caucasians, Hispanics, Asians, Indians, and African Americans. The majority of the residents are Greek, Asian, and Hispanic. The school district is fairly good, and the town boasts an excellent public library with collections in several different languages, such as Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Greek. While there are more seedy bars than restaurants, there are more options in neighboring Flushing. While it isn't the most dangerous area in New York, safety is still a concern - particularly with the large number of dive bars in the area. Still, this is a very residential area and it certainly isn't what one might expect of New York City, but it offers a fairly cheap option for people who want to live in Queens. The downside is that it can get boring and that this is hardly a very pretty area.
Pros
  • Cheaper than Flushing
  • Good library
  • Diverse
Cons
  • Overcrowded
  • Not many good restaurants
  • Too many bars
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diversity & Convenience"

East Elmhurst is a small and diverse community that boasts some of the best aspects of life in Queens. Residents can enjoy the convenient and numerous public transportation links, affordable housing, relatively easy commute to Manhattan, proximity to the area's two major airports, and access to Flushing Meadow Corona Park. While there are some high rise apartment complexes, most of the housing in East Elmhurst is in the form of single and multi-family homes. The population is incredibly diverse, with a good mix of Italians, Greeks, Hispanics, Asians, and African Americans. The school district is fairly good, and the town boasts an excellent public library with collections in several different languages, such as Chinese, French, Spanish, and Hindi. You can also visit the Langston Hughes library and the Black Heritage Reference Center. This is a very residential area and it certainly isn't what one might expect of New York City, but it offers a fairly cheap alternative for people who want suburban living without going too far from Manhattan. The downside is that it can get boring and that this isn't the most aesthetically pleasing area of New York.
Pros
  • Affordable
  • Close to airports
  • Convenient public transportation links
Cons
  • Boring
  • Not visually appealing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Town thats like a mini UN"

Elmhurst in an incredibly diverse neighborhood in Queens, with a mixture of Asian, Caucasian, and Hispanic residents. The main strip on Broadway has a huge Asian supermarket as well as many good Asian restaurants, bakeries, and grocery stores. It is also close to Queens Blvd with a lot of big box stores (Target, Best Buy, Queens Plaza mall, Queens Center shopping mall, etc). So in terms of shopping and eating out, Elmhurst is extremely convenient. Around the area of Elmhurst Hospital (one of the best known hospitals in Queens), there are many vagrant-looking people. While it would be unfair to say that this fact alone makes the town unsafe, it certainly does serve to make it less pleasant. Also, the only subway stop in Elmhurst is a local train stop (R, M), which makes the commute to the city a little longer. At the same time, the town boasts easy access to the Long Island Expressway and the Brooklyn - Queens Expressway. The rent and housing prices, as well as the cost of living in Elmhurst are very low, but the low-income immigrant population does make certain aspects of living here rather inconvenient. For example, the wait at the hospital can be extraordinarily long and the streets and recreational areas (such as parks and playgrounds) are very crowded.
Pros
  • Ethnic shopping
  • Diverse food
  • Fantastic ethnic restaurants and mall shopping options
Cons
  • Downright Ugly in parts
  • Hardly any green spaces
  • Poor schooling options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Convenient, cheap, and culturally diverse"

The small Ditmars-Steinway area of Astoria is incredibly diverse; while the population is predominately Caucasian, there are also significant numbers of Hispanic, Asian, and African American residents. Residents are also diverse in age, with retirees and young people all choosing to live here. The stores and restaurants also offer diversity: there are trendy cafes and small family stores in the same area. The people here love food, so you can find just about every cuisine without leaving the area. The housing prices in this neighborhood are far from cheap, but they offer excellent values for their unique combination of location, size, and quality. Transportation is easily accessible, and the commute to Manhattan takes under twenty minutes, making it even more desirable to professionals and commuters. The school district is very good and Astoria Park has gorgeous views of the city's skyline. While there are plenty of houses, condos, and co-ops, a large percentage of the rental properties in this area are small apartments over commercial properties. Each spring, there is a neighborhood street fair, and lots of people visit the Bohemian Beer Garden. The major problem with the area is that the air quality is supposedly bad because of the neighborhood's power plants and the nearby airport.
Pros
  • Highly diverse population
  • Very short commute to Manhattan
  • Great food choices
Cons
  • Bad air quality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"One of my favorite parks"

Flushing Meadows Corona Park is one of the largest parks in New York City. It was shown in many movies, including Men in Black, and was the site of two world's fairs. This huge park includes Citi Field (formerly Shea Stadium) where the Mets play, the tennis center where the U. S. Open is held, the Hall of Science, an art museum, bike paths, a huge steel globe, gorgeous sculptures, an ice skating rink, and a wildlife center with a children's farm. The park is a symbol of so many aspects of New York. There are two time capsules buried in the park to represent parts of modern civilization to be shared with people in the future. The park's artificial lake is the largest lake in New York City. Aside from the numerous activities already mentioned, the park also offers a very special play facility for kids. It was designed to accommodate children with special needs, and has lots of recreational and educational activities that all kids can enjoy. The only problems with the park are that it can get crowded at times and some people irresponsibly litter in the park. While the city does a pretty good job of keeping it clean, it can be quite a challenge with a park this large.
Pros
  • Diverse activities
  • Beautiful looking area
  • Get plenty of exercise walking around
Cons
  • Litter
  • Too busy at times
  • Too many people at times
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse town in Queens"

Corona is a lower middle-class neighborhood that is located between Flushing and Jackson Heights. It is extremely diverse; it has a predominately Hispanic population, with small percentages of African Americans, Italians, and Asians. While the neighborhood has improved dramatically over the past few decade, it still has a reputation of being unsafe. Still, it definitely has gotten better and more young professionals are turning to Corona and its neighboring towns because of its low housing prices and convenient access to the subway. The 7 train runs right through the heart of Corona.

The Langston Hughes Library and the Black Heritage Reference Center are two great places to visit - particularly with kids, so that you can teach them about history. Flushing Meadows Corona Park is one of the largest parks in New York City. It was shown in many movies, including Men in Black, and was the site of two world's fairs. This huge park includes Citi Field (formerly Shea Stadium), the tennis center where the U. S. Open is held, the Hall of Science, a museum, an ice skating rink, and a wildlife center. Corona is also a culturally important neighborhood because musical icons from Louis Armstrong to the Beatnuts have lived here.
Pros
  • Access to Flushing Meadow park
  • Diverse population
  • Musical / cultural history
Cons
  • Noisy
  • Bad reputation for safety
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Quiet neighborhood between Whitestone & Bayside"

Clearview is located between Whitestone and Bayside. This area includes the Clearview Golf Course, a public course that is reasonably priced and very popular with residents. The area is adjacent to the Cross Island Parkway and the Clearview Expressway, with very easy access to the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. Clearview is just off the Throgs Neck Bridge and is less than five minutes from the Whitestone Bridge. Travel by car is really simple, but public transportation options are limited; residents need to take the bus to the Bayside Long Island Rail Road station. If the LIRR is too expensive, they can also take the bus to the subway station in Flushing, but the bus ride will take about 45-50 minutes. Clearview is very close to the Bay Terrace shopping mall and Restaurant Row on Bell Boulevard, so there are plenty of options for shopping and eating out. For me, the biggest problem with living in Clearview is the pricing. As the town is located on the waterfront and most of the homes are multi-family private homes, townhomes, condos, or co-ops, prices are steep. Homes located on or near the golf course are even more expensive. Still, if you can afford it, this is a great neighborhood.
Pros
  • Great public golf course
  • Close to major highways
  • Close to Bayside's Restaurant Row
Cons
  • Costly home / rent prices
  • Possible highway noise
  • Few public transportation options
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Peaceful suburban neighborhood"

The hometown of stars like Lena Horne and Jackie Robinson, Cambria Heights is a clean and quiet suburb on the border of Queens and Brooklyn. While the town used to have a heavy Russian and Italian population, it is now a predominantly African American town. While this isn't a very exciting place to live, it is a peaceful place to raise a family. Cambria Heights has a large variety of shops, some quaint restaurants, playgrounds, lots of free parking, and an excellent school district that includes some great magnet schools. This middle class neighborhood also has a very well stocked library housed in a modern facility. The library's collection includes materials translated into French and Haitian Creole, and Wi-Fi Internet access is available throughout the library. The neighbors are friendly and all pitch in to keep the neighborhood clean. The major problems with living in Cambria Heights include travel time for commuters and the lack of recreational and/or nightlife activities. While there are numerous public transportation options available in and near Cambria Heights, it still takes quite a bit of time to travel to Manhattan. Still, the rest of the town's qualities and the fairly reasonable home prices make it a popular choice with young professionals with families.
Pros
  • Lots of free parking
  • Close to Long Island
Cons
  • Boring
  • Far from Manhattan
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
MarcoM
MarcoM LOCATED IN JAMAICA QUEENS, it is one of the best areas of New York city. The houses are stylish, and elegant. Cambria Heights has a charm that is unique simply beautiful.
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not the nicest suburb in New York"

First things first. Many people confuse this area with another suburban town called Brookville, which is located in Nassau County (Long Island). The Brookville that is located in Queens is next to Rosedale, Springfield Gardens, and Laurelton. The population of this town is predominantly African American.

While transportation options are limited in Brookville itself, there are lots of options in Rosedale and Laurelton. Thus, public transportation options are fair, with a number of buses, three subways, and two Long Island Rail Road stations nearby. While transportation options are limited in Brookville itself, there are lots of options in Rosedale and Laurelton.

For recreation, there is a beautiful and well equipped park on Brookville Boulevard. The major problem with living in Brookville is that it is adjacent to John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport, which causes a lot of problems for residents. The biggest issue is with the noise - you constantly hear the noise from the planes passing by overhead. The other issue is that some of the major roads and highways that run through or near Brookville get congested with airport traffic.
Pros
  • Diverse transportation options
  • Beautiful park
Cons
  • Noise pollution from JFK
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small & quiet island in the Rockaways"

Broad Channel is a small island development that’s about a mile long. It has parks, the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, and a lovely beach. Like many other communities in the Rockaways, it has access to the A train, but it’s still quite a trek to Manhattan, so it probably isn’t the best choice for someone who has to commute to the city every day. At the same time, however, many of its residents like Broad Channel because it is so isolated. You’ll see a lot of retirees and some families with children. There’s a small elementary school and the library is tiny, but it’s part of the Queensborough Public Library System, meaning that if you don’t find what you need, they can put in an interlibrary loan order to borrow it from one of the other libraries in Queens. The two main parks in Broad Channel are Broad Channel Park and Gene Gray Park. Gene Gray is older, but it’s lovely. Broad Channel has lots of sporting facilities – a baseball field, basketball courts, etc. Broad Channel is a nice place to live if you are looking for something apart from the city without actually leaving the city. However, it does get a bit boring and you should be aware that flooding and other damage from storms are common occurrences here.
Pros
  • Peaceful
  • Strong sense of community
Cons
  • Isolated
  • Boring
  • Often hit by storms
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small & diverse neighborhood in Queens"

This is a very small and quiet neighborhood with a very diverse population of Greeks, Asians, Jews, Latin/South Americans, and African Americans. No one group predominates; there is a pretty even distribution. There are lots of multi-family homes and rental properties, which can cause traffic and problems with parking in some of the busier areas. The school district is okay; residents are particularly proud of Archbishop Molloy High School. There are no hospitals in Briarwood, but there are some large hospitals in nearby towns. There is a small, but fairly well stocked library. There are also numerous small stores and restaurants, but there isn't much in the way of upscale shopping. For recreation, people can go to Forest Park.

While the majority of the residents do own cars, there are a lot of public transportation options, wiht numerous buses and two subways stopping nearby. Two Long Island Railroad stations are also within walking distance. However, it is important to note that these aren't short commutes. By car, several highways are easily accessible and JFK Airport is pretty close to Briarwood as well. Rent prices have gone up during the past few years, but they are still cheaper than the prices in nearby towns such as Kew Gardens.
Pros
  • Highly diverse population
  • A lot of transportation options
Cons
  • Boring
  • Pretty far from the city
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small and private beach town"

This is a predominantly (99.5%) white neighborhood of less than two square miles. The vast majority of the residents are Irish or Italian. There are a lot of seasonal residents, but most of the people here are here all year-round. Most of Breezy Point is a gated community with no public schools (there are both public and private schools in nearby Belle Harbor though). It is really safe. There are some restaurants and a bar in town, but it is a pretty boring place to live. There are lots of private beaches and there is a surf club, where residents can purchase discounted access to the pool. There are homes in diverse styles and in a very wide range of prices, with some luxury homes going into the millions. Residents have to pay the Breezy Point co-op's common charges, which generally include fees for maintaining the beach and the common areas. While there are a couple of buses, including one run by the co-op, there are few public transportation options. Most people take the ferry to lower Manhattan; it takes about an hour, but it runs on a regular schedule and isn't too expensive. Still, Breezy Point may not be the best choice for people who have to commute to the city on a daily basis.
Pros
  • Gated for safety
  • Quiet & Private
  • Very friendly, close-knit community
Cons
  • Not diverse at all
  • No public schools
  • Generally expensive home prices
Recommended for
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Small & boring area in the Rockaways"

Bayswater used to be a lovely beach resort with lots of luxurious hotels and quaint motels. Over the years, it deteriorated leaving strings of decrepit homes and a rapidly dwindling population. Its poor condition and lack of popularity is ironic, considering the fact that it is located on the water, just an hour from the city and has pretty reliable subway service (despite the fact that only one subway line runs here). Still, a huge percentage of the homes in this area are vacant and the prices are extremely low, considering that it's still a part of New York. Developers betting on its potential have begun nicer housing developments with more modern conveniences and very low prices. They are also trying to develop more shops and restaurants to boost the local economy and to attract more residents. Town officials are also taking steps to try to make the area safer (while it isn't the most dangerous town in New York City, safety is still an issue).

While the town is improving every year due to the efforts of town officials and the numerous developers who have invested in properties here, it will be a while before it can attract a huge influx of residents. The main problems are that it has a very long commute to the city, and this area (like most of the Rockaways) is often hit the hardest by storms, tornadoes, etc.
Pros
  • Quiet
  • Very cheap home prices
Cons
  • Often hit hard by storms
  • Boring
Recommended for
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Small & Friendly Suburb"

This is a fairly typical small New York suburb. There are lots of families and retirees, meaning that there are plenty of activities and business that cater to those demographics. It borders on Nassau County, which means that it's closer to Long Island than it is to Manhattan. There are diverse transportation options, but it can still be quite a commute to the city. The people are generally friendly and there are a lot of neighborhood events, but it is certainly not a trendy place for young people or singles. There are restaurants and shops in neighboring towns as well, so it isn't isolated, but it still gets pretty boring.

The school district is pretty good, and the area is clean and quiet. More residents have been getting FIOS lines put in, and cable Internet is pretty standard here. The cost of living is typical for a New York suburb. There really isn't a whole lot to say about this area; if you are looking for a unique or chic place to live, then this isn't for you. On the other hand, if you are looking for a small, quiet suburban town where you can live in peace with your neighbors, then consider Bellerose- Floral Park.
Pros
  • Activities for families & retirees
  • Friendly neighbors
Cons
  • Boring
  • Very small
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not great now, but check back in a few years"

Arverne-Edgemere used to be a beautiful luxury beach resort. Over the years, it deteriorated leaving strings of decrepit homes and the Ocean Promenade, which is supposedly the longest boardwalk on the East Coast. Its poor condition and lack of popularity is ironic, considering the fact that it is located on the water, just an hour from the city (by subway), and has excellent subway service. Still, a huge percentage of the homes in this area are vacant. Many developers have caught on to its potential, building low-cost luxury housing developments that boast modern conveniences and rock bottom prices. They are also trying to develop more shops and restaurants, to boost the local economy and to attract more residents. Town officials are also taking steps to try to make the area safer (while it isn't the most dangerous town in New York City, a large number of robberies take place here every year).

While the town is improving every year due to the efforts of town officials and the numerous developers who have invested in properties here, it will be a while before it can attract a huge influx of residents. If you have money to spare, it may be a good long-term investment, but it isn't a very nice place to live yet.
Pros
  • Under continued development
  • Very inexpensive home prices
Cons
  • Boring
  • High crime rates
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Beach Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Up & coming neighborhood"

Fresh Meadows is another Queens neighborhood that has been undergoing numerous changes since the last housing boom. For the most part, if you're looking to buy a home, you're going to see a lot of very old houses that are in desperate need of renovation, and you will find new constructions or houses that have been completely redone. The schools in Fresh Meadows are very well ranked, and it is generally a quiet, safe neighborhood. If you get a two-family home, you can rent to Saint John's University students. There are also thousands of rental properties available in this area. There are apartment complexes, garden apartments, and co-ops. There are also lots of shops, two movie theaters, and plenty of restaurants. The diversity of the stores reflects the diversity of the residents: you'll find everything from Kosher food to Asian and Latin American. Residents also head to Cunningham Park to relax during the warmer months.

However, this is not a perfect neighborhood. One of the biggest problems is that there is no subway station in the area. This makes it hard to commute to the city, since you will have to take a 30-40 minute bus ride to the subway station in Flushing.
Pros
  • Relatively close to St. John's University
  • Wide range of rental properties
  • Many new or upgraded properties available
Cons
  • No subway or train nearby
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
MartinOleshM
MartinOleshM I have lived in Fresh Meadows for over 25 years. I would agree that it is far from perfect but I do dispute some of the characterizations made. The area covered by the name Fresh Meadows is quite large and therefore it is hard to generalize. I am most familiar with my own area near Cunningham Park. While the area was developed around World War II for the most part, the quality of the construction is such that if a house has been reasonably maintained, it may be far from desperate need of renovation. The real estate values are high and even tear-downs go for over half-a-million dollars. The area has been subjected to McMansionization and some of the architecture is pretty garish. The older houses were part of a subdivision and therefore there is a unity to the neighborhood that the recent construction has disrupted. In my particular area, just south of the Fresh Meadows apartments, a mega-development, the housing stock is almost exclusively one family detached houses on decent sized lots. There is no subway nearby but the Q-46 down Union Turnpike takes you to Kew Gardens-Forest Hills and the E and F trains, a twenty minute or so ride.
Sep 16, 2016
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diverse and affordable"

I may be slightly biased here: I have never been much of a fan of this area. Rent is unbelievably cheap (for New York City), and there are plenty of inexpensive restaurants and public transportation connections in Sunnyside. By subway, the commute to/from the city should only take about 10-15 minutes. All of these factors make Sunnyside a very popular choice for young professionals who are looking for a short commute and cheap rent. Sunnyside also boasts one of the city's most diverse populations, which translates into diverse food and shopping nearby as well. There is a very cheap movie theater in the neighborhood, but its state is appalling. At the same time, Sunnyside also has terrible parking and is very dirty and ill maintained. The neighbors are mainly unfriendly and the area doesn't seem safe. Every night, I see at least a dozen drunk men wandering the street. While they are mostly harmless, Sunnyside isn't exactly a place where I'd want to raise a family. In short, I think that it's a great place for young professionals to get started before having families or settling down. It may be inexpensive and convenient, but in my opinion, it is far from ideal.
Pros
  • Wide variety of cheap dining options
  • Affordable rents
  • Multicultural neighborhood that offers a wide array of diverse restaurants
  • Very close to Midtown Manhattan
Cons
  • Cabs are hard to come by
  • The commercial area around Queen's Boulevard is quite grotty
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Beautiful area in Forest Hills"

Forest Park is an area of Forest Hills, which is one of the most interesting areas in Queens. It houses the incredibly large and well equipped Forest Park, as well as the Forest Hills Gardens residential community, where you'll find beautiful prewar apartment buildings and lovely Tudor style homes. There are tons of shops nearby in Forest Hills: Austin Street has chic and trendy stores, while Metropolitan Avenue is more casual and has more big-brand and antique stores. There are plenty of delicious & diverse dining options on both streets, as well as on Queens Boulevard. Metropolitan has more parking. In good weather residents and visitors head to Forest Park, where they can enjoy countless activities that range from swimming to tennis or golf. Outdoor concerts are held here during the summer.
Transportation is incredibly convenient, as there are three subway lines, a Long Island Railroad stop, several bus routes, as well as many highways and major roads that pass through Forest Hills.

The residents are predominantly Jewish. There are many families and older residents. The neighborhood is extremely safe, with crimes rarely occurring here. There are also many good schools in the area, especially the Montessori School in Forest Hills.
Pros
  • Unbelievable # and diversity of activities available
  • Lots of transportation options
  • Eclectic shopping & dining choices
Cons
  • Long commute to the city
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Trendy but traditional town thats popular with young and old"

In my opinion, Forest Hills is one of the most interesting areas in Queens. You'll find older apartment buildings with fairly cheap rent just a few minutes from luxury apartments with elevators and doormen. There are tons of shops in Forest Hills: Austin Street has chic and trendy stores, while Metropolitan Avenue is more casual and has more big-brand stores. There are plenty of delicious & diverse dining options on both streets, as well as on Queens Boulevard. Residents also frequent Forest Park, where you can enjoy countless activities that range from swimming to golf. Concerts are held here during the summer.

Transportation is incredibly convenient, as there are three subway lines, the Long Island Railroad, several bus routes, as well as countless highways and major roads that pass through the neighborhood. The residents are predominantly Jewish, with some Hispanic and Asian people mixed in. There are many families and older residents. The neighborhood, particularly the Forest Hills Gardens area, is very safe. I've rarely heard of any crimes occurring here. There are also many good schools in the area; many of my friends send their kids to the Montessori School in Forest Hills. Forest Hills has something for everyone.
Pros
  • Amazing shopping options
  • Access to Forest Park
  • Wide range of apartments & homes
Cons
  • Some areas are overcrowded and/or overpriced
  • Parking can be problematic in some areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
AngelN
AngelN This is very outdated. There's no cheap rent in Forest Hills. Average 1-BR non-doorman is $1,850+. There are four subway lines, not three. And it hasn't been predominantly Jewish for many years. It's very, very, VERY saturated with Chinese immigrants now.
Jan 22, 2016
QueensR
QueensR Excellent schools. Very well connected to the rest of the city. Lots of green. Great neighborhood feel without being the suburbs. Great community!
Apr 12, 2016
Add a comment...
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Clean & Quiet neighborhood in Flushing"

Bowne Park is a small park in Flushing, Queens. It has a fairly large pond, where residents often feed the ducks. You will also see plenty of joggers, and people riding roller blades or bikes. There are basketball courts, and there is a shuffleboard area. It is pretty clean, and during the winter, neighborhood children go to the park to play with the snow. During the summer, the kids line up to buy ice cream from the ice cream truck that circles the park. The people who live around the park watch out for each other. It's common to see a homeowner tell people not to litter or to be quiet after hours. The area is also relatively safe (but it's still part of New York, so you should definitely exercise common sense when it comes to safety precautions). There are pretty good schools in the area and plenty of shops and restaurants when you go south a few blocks to Northern Boulevard or about 6-7 minutes east to Francis Lewis. There is a lot of parking on the side streets, but it can be tough to find parking right next to the park. Overall, this is a pretty nice place to live - particularly for people with children or retirees.
Pros
  • Cleanliness of the park
  • Lovely jogging trails
Cons
  • Mosquitos during the summer
  • Often crowded - particularly the basketball courts
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Excellent suburban town with one of the citys best school districts"

While Douglaston/ Little Neck is far from being a bustling place to live, this is still one of the most popular towns in Queens. It offers the quality (library and school district) of a Long Island town for the relatively low taxes of Queens. There are numerous bus lines and there is the Long Island Railroad. Parking can be troublesome, particularly on the blocks near the railroad stop or on Northern Boulevard, but there are lots of spaces on the side streets. There are plenty of restaurants and specialty (pet, art supply, etc.) stores within walking distance on its main artery, Northern Boulevard. Northern Boulevard, is also where the public library and post office are located. Due to the influx of Korean immigrants and businesses during the past few years, there are plenty of Korean restaurants. Sushi Family is phenomenal, casual, and reasonably priced, and Juice for Life has incredible smoothies and health foods. There is also a billiard hall on Northern Boulevard. While this is far from the trendiest town in Queens and certainly may not be for everyone, this is a wonderful place to have a family - without paying an arm and a leg in property taxes.
Pros
  • Wonderful library
  • Close to the shops in Great Neck and Manhasset
Cons
  • Getting overcrowded, leading to congested main roads
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"One of my favorite suburbs"

Many people confuse this area with Bayside, its neighbor to the north. Oakland Gardens is a wonderfully clean and quiet area with a small collection of stores, restaurants, and excellent schools. In particular, many of the area's families choose to live here because it is home to highly competitive Cardozo High School. Many of the homeowners in the area rent rooms or apartments to students studying at Queensborough Community College. Cunningham Park is the area's main recreational spot; many of the residents have picnics or barbecues here during the summer. However, it's hard to get a nice spot, so always go early! There is little in the way of shopping, but the shops in Fresh Meadows or Bay Terrace are within a short driving distance away. There are plenty of bus stops, it is hard to get to most places unless you drive. However, the neighborhood offers easy access to the Long Island Expressway. Despite the fact that it is such a small and quiet town, parking is pretty hard to come by - particularly near the co-op villages. I'm told that on certain streets, you can hear the noise from the highway, but I've never heard it myself. The area's residents tend to be families with children or retirees, and most are very friendly.
Pros
  • Cunningham Park
  • Plenty of quick options for food
Cons
  • Too many co-op and apartment buildings make it hard to find parking.
  • Few healthier dining options
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Up and coming neighborhood"

College Point is another town that is marked by a wide range of ethnically and economically diverse neighborhoods. A number of developers and construction companies have been developing the areas closest to the water because the land was so cheap. Formerly filled with factories and warehouses, College Point now boasts a number of modern shopping centers and large stores like Target and BJ's. There are some lovely and newly constructed apartments and townhomes that are reasonably priced. The one thing to watch out for is that in order to maximize profits, the vast majority of these developers have tried to squeeze in as many homes as possible, resulting in homes that are far narrower than what you would usually expect. There are also some very well ranked public schools in the area. It also has excellent transportation routes for cars (the Van Wyck, the Cross Island, and the Whitestone Bridge are all easily accessible).

On the other hand, public transportation options are sparse. The nearest subway is in Flushing. Also, most of the areas that haven't been developed yet are filled with decrepit homes or industrial parks.

Basically, if you can find a nice sized home in one of College Point's better areas, it is a great place to live.
Pros
  • Relatively low housing costs
  • Rapidly growing
Cons
  • Lots of construction
  • Narrow buildings
  • Rather hard to get to
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Not my favorite part of Queens; Better to visit than to live."

Murray Hill is a small area of Queens, between Flushing and Auburndale / Bayside. It is a commuter's haven, with tons of apartments for rent within walking distance of the Murray Hill Long Island Railroad station. For those who don't want to spend the extra money on the LIRR, they can walk about 10 minutes to the subway station in Flushing. There are also many bus routes that pass through this area, but for the most part, everything is in walking distance.

The biggest issues in this area are safety and parking. While many of the gangs that others have written about are things of the past, safety remains a large concern for residents. There are a lot of bars in the area, so car accidents (particularly those caused by drunken drivers) happen relatively often. Seeing strange men urinate in the street is also a common sight.

The area immediately surrounding the train station is predominately filled with Korean restaurants. For those who favor Korean barbecue or seafood like myself, there are plenty of options. Most of the restaurants have valet parking as well. However, as I said earlier, most people prefer to visit Murray Hill, rather than live there. My husband and I visit there frequently for the food, but we've never considered living there.
Pros
  • Walking distance of almost everything
  • Great food
  • Lots of transportation options
Cons
  • Unsafe
  • No parking
  • Too busy at times
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Quiet & comfortable - great for commuters!"

While I'd have to agree that Auburndale is far from exciting, I've always had a soft spot for it. As a previous reviewer wrote, it's located between Bayside, Flushing, Clearview, and Fresh Meadows. There are numerous buses nearby and there is the Long Island Railroad. Parking can be troublesome, particularly on the blocks near the railroad stop or Northern Boulevard. However, the rent prices are relatively inexpensive and there are some great schools nearby. There are plenty of restaurants and specialty (pet, electronics, home furnishings, etc.) stores within walking distance on Northern Boulevard. As many others have stated, the public library here is wonderful - it has everything from new releases in several different languages to both foreign and domestic films on DVD. There is also Waldbaum's and Raindew on Francis Lewis, and the larger malls in Flushing, College Point, and Bayside, are all less than a 10-15 minute car or bus ride away. While this is far from the trendiest town in Queens and certainly may not be for everyone, there are plenty of young couples, singles, and family who want a quiet and convenient place to live - without paying an arm and a leg. The neighbors here are also much friendlier than those in Flushing. All in all, it's a great place to live if you are looking for a peaceful home.
Pros
  • Wonderful library
  • Right in the middle of some very popular towns
Cons
  • A little too quiet
  • Far from the subway
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Fabulous choice for professionals who commute to Manhattan"

The quality of life in Astoria / Long Island City really varies by the specific part of the town. The areas that are closer to the water are stunning, well maintained, and safe. However, those areas are plagued with problems such as extravagant prices. On the other hand, the other parts are poorly maintained, decrepit, and less safe, but are infinitely more reasonably priced.

Throughout Astoria and Long Island City, you will find everything from ethnic restaurants to four or five star luxury restaurants and trendy bars. While it may be far from downtown Manhattan, it is about as close to midtown as you can get in Queens. It is about 10 minutes from Grand Central. Unfortunately, most parts of Astoria and Long Island City have horrible parking accessibility, so many residents choose to sell their cars and stick to public transportation. Those who do own cars are primarily the ones who can afford to pay for private parking spaces.

All in all, this is a wonderful place for young, single professionals who want a shorter commute to the city without paying Manhattan prices. If you can afford to live in one of the nicer areas, you'll love it. On the other hand, I'm not a huge fan of the shoddier areas.
Pros
  • Beautiful views of the NYC skyline from some areas
  • Very short commute to Manhattan
  • Fabulous ethnic restaurants in the neighborhood's many diverse ethnic enclaves
  • Good subway and bus connections
  • Many good schooling options
Cons
  • Huge difference between parts of the city
  • Poor shopping
  • Noisy
  • Few big supermarkets though the neighborhood does have many small grocery stores and delis that sell a large variety of international foods and eats
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Mecca of diverse food & shopping"

Flushing is an extremely diverse neighborhood that consists of a bunch of different ethnic areas. There are different subsections for the town's different racial populations - Indian, Korean, Chinese, Jewish, etc. As a result, there are plenty of ethnic restaurants and stores. Downtown Flushing has also become filled with newly developed malls, apartments, and condominiums, so the landscape is changing. There is a plethora of brand-new ethnic food courts, and sparkling new homes with every modern convenience. On the other hand, there are far too many homes, restaurants, and stores. The fact that many of the homes and apartments are new and well-equipped make them expensive. The only homes that are affordable are usually pretty dirty and old. The people in Flushing are generally not very friendly; people rarely speak with their neighbors unless there is a problem. Another problem is that it isn't a very safe neighborhood; it isn't a good idea to walk around at night. Cars are often stolen or broken into.

Some of the benefits of living in Flushing include the numerous public transportation options. There are plenty of buses, the subway, and the Long Island Railroad. There are also many cabs, but people are advised to use established car services, as the gypsy cabs tend to be unsafe. Flushing is also very close to LaGuardia Airport and most parts of Flushing are less than 25 minutes from JFK Airport.
Pros
  • A plethora of diverse ethnic restaurants
  • 99 cent stores and beauty supply shops galore
  • Many newly constructed apartments and shopping malls
Cons
  • Streets are far too crowded; very heavy pedestrian traffic in main areas
  • Traffic signs change frequently, causing people to get confused and/or get tickets.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Suburban bliss"

Bayside is a quiet, upper middle to middle class town that boasts everything from a lovely marina on the bay to great schools and diverse restaurants. You can visit the Bay Terrace mall for some casual shopping or take a very short ride to Manhasset to browse luxury goods. Couples, families, and friends haunt "Restaurant Row" on Bell Boulevard, where you will find everything from fabulous pasta to spicy Cajun or yummy sushi. There are Irish pubs and rowdy sports bars, and even a saloon.

For those with families, there are plenty of great schools in Bayside. Cardozo is a very good high school. On the other side of town, Bayside High School is also worth considering. The libraries are clean and well stocked. There are also many nice parks and playgrounds scattered throughout the town. You can go roller blading or running alongside the Cross Island Parkway and the Bayview Marina or have barbecues at Alley Pond Park. During the winter, be sure to take your kids to see the famous homes (one is on 32nd Avenue near Bell Blvd. and the other is on 26th Avenue near Francis Lewis). You'll be amazed by the decorations.

The neighbors are friendly, the schools are good, the shops are trendy, and the restaurants are diverse. There is something for everyone in Bayside.
Pros
  • Bay Terrace mall
  • Restaurant Row
  • Lots of transportation options
Cons
  • A long bus ride to most places
  • Some areas have little parking available
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"A quiet town thats perfect for families!"

I'd have to disagree with some of the other reviewers who have complained about the transportation. This neighborhood houses mainly families and retirees, and just about everyone who lives here owns a car. It really depends on traffic, but that's the case for all of New York. It also really depends on the specific area of Whitestone that you're coming from/to. That said, I've never had any problems getting anywhere with my car. From where I live, it takes just 20 minutes to get to Manhattan, 15 minutes to Nassau County, 15 minutes to the Bronx, 20 minutes to Brooklyn, and half an hour to New Jersey. On the other hand, it does not have the best public transportation links to the subway, but there are plenty of buses.

Whitestone also has some of the best public schools in the city. P. S. 209, JHS 194, PS 79, JHS 185... there are plenty of schools including some with great kindergarten programs. This is also a safe neighborhood with clean parks, playgrounds, and many small stores. There are also some great restaurants in Whitestone. The people are usually very nice and they're often eager to help, but at the same time, few will bother you if you prefer to be left alone. I will say that while there are some bars, there isn't much of a nightlife, so it isn't really suitable for someone who is looking for that. There is a wonderful movie theater and bowling alley.

Other than that, after living in Whitestone for more than twenty years, I'd recommend it to just about anyone.
Pros
  • Convenient access to most highways
  • Very friendly neighbors
  • Quiet and clean
Cons
  • Few restaurants deliver to this area
  • Hard to live here without a car
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

Best Neighborhoods to Live In

Best Cities to Live In

Tell everyone what you love about your neighborhood!

Leave a Review

Have a question?

How are schools? Is the area safe? What about public transit options?" Why not ask our community of locals!

Ask Now

Selling or Renting Your Home?

Maximize the selling price of your home by sharing what you love about your suburb to increase its appeal...

Leave a Review

Corporate Relocation Manager?

Enable your employees to share local knowledge in a private, trusted environment with those relocating... while building community.

Learn More