7.4 out of 10

Tribeca

Ranked 13th best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.720084861974 -74.0096048127142
Great for
  • Eating Out
  • Neighborly Spirit
  • Safe & Sound
  • Clean & Green
  • Gym & Fitness
Not great for
  • Cost of Living
  • Parking
  • Medical Facilities
  • Lack of Traffic
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
  • Retirees

Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"Tribeca – Cobblestone Streets, Warehouse Living, & Lots of Fun"

TriBeCa, the acronym for the Triangle Below Canal -- is an amazing place to live, if you’ve got the money for it. Once a sea of deserted warehouses, it is one of New York’s livliest and hippest neighborhoods.

Tribeca is bordered to the north by Canal Street, to the south by Chambers Street, to the east by Church Street, and the west by the Hudson River. It is within walking distance to Chinatown, Little Italy, and New York’s municipal area. In addition to residences, you’ll find a grid of factories and warehouse buildings, many of them quite old and ‘built to last.’ A wonderful feature of the area is that zoning laws have kept most buildings low, so you can see plenty of sky even though you’re in an urban setting.

Tribeca is not an area for renters; this is co-op country, most of them pre-renovated prior to sale. And they’re not cheap. Soaring real-estate values – thanks in part to its proximity to prime areas like SoHo -- have changed the face of Tribeca residents from struggling ‘urban pioneers’ and artists to high-income earners.

Children can get an excellent education in Tribeca, both secular and religious. The area is rich with houses of worship that have educational programs, and there are plenty of choices in both private and public schools, too.

Tribeca transportation options are good, but not great. The area is served by two major subway lines (the IRT and IND with stops at Canal and Chambers Streets, and several stations in between). This makes traveling north and south quick and easy, but heading cross town is an ordeal because Chambers and Canal are always traffick-y. The area is a warren of small streets and dead ends, and you can’t really take a ‘back route’ to avoid the congestion on the major thoroughfares.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
  • Celebrity residents
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
  • Not too many subway connections
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Tribeca: Ambience and Film Festivals.. Ooh La La!"

Most people associate Tribeca with one of its most notable residents -- Robert DeNiro, who started the Tribeca Film Festivals. Now that they are well known, people often flock here and admire the lovely cobblestone streets, such as Greenwich, Washington and Harrison Streets. Details like this make this neighborhood a lovely place to stroll through especially during the nicer months. Living here though is definitely for those who can afford it. Given the loft spaces, the rich often feel like they have the space they need both in square footage and in privacy. Transportation is easily accessible, and cabs abound. Things are very pricey in this area but if you are looking for bargains you can always venture in minutes to another part of town. It's best to stroll the streets, admire the architecture, the restaurants and bars, and absorb the personality that is solely Tribeca.

It can be a bit quiet here for some, so you may just want to stay for a short bit and mosey along, but you will definitely get some nice pictures.

Take note that traffic can be a monster in this area due to the proximity of the Holland Tunnel which takes commuters over to New Jersey, but if you don't mind a little bumper to bumper traffic (should you venture there by car) then no matter. You will have a blast of a time regardless.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
  • Celebrity residents
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Trendy & Tranquil Neighborhood For Singles and Couples"

Tribeca is a pretty little neighborhood in the downtown area of Manhattan. Tribeca, which stands for the "TRIangle BElow CAnal" is roughly bordered by the Financial District to the south, Canal Street to the north and extends from Broadway to the Hudson River. You can cross over the West Side Highway and enjoy a nice walk or bike ride along Hudson River park and the River Promenade which stretches from Battery Park City all the way to Riverside Park on the Upper West Side.

Many consider Tribeca to the best best place to live in Manhattan if you can afford it. While it was once a industrial area in the 1960s, artists started coming to the area in the 1970s, attracted by the spacious and bright lofts. As a result, Tribeca became a trendy and hip neighborhood, with rising real estate prices. Today, Forbes ranks Tribeca as one of the country's most expensive zip codes (10013).

Many celebrities have called Tribeca home, the most notable of which was John F. Kennedy Jr. Robert DeNiro opened the Tribeca Grill on Greenwich and Franklin Streets. Many people who come to the restaurant are hoping to catch a glimpse of the famous star but most often run into other out-of-towners who are there for the same reason. Prices are moderately expensive and they are packed for Sunday brunch.

Tribeca is also home to the Tribeca Film Festival also started by Robert DeNiro in 2011 in an effort to foster revitalization of the downtown area in the aftermath of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center through an annual celebration of film and music. The mission of the Festival is to enable both new and established filmmakers to reach a wide and diverse audience and to promote New York City as a vital center for filmmaking. Since 2002, the Festival has shown 1200 films produced in over 80 countries with an estimated total attendance of 3.2 million.

Tribeca has many trendy shops with moderate to expensive prices. Edon Manor on Greenwich Street which carries a wide selection of designer handbags, shoes and accessories and aims to be the Barneys of the downtown area. Gotham Bikes on West Broadway is a fun place to explore when you are in the market for new wheels or accessories. NYC Home and Craft Center on Lispenard Street, is a Pear Paint affiliate offering home-improvement items and varying crafts. Then there my favorite store in just about the whole world,Pearl Paint on Canal Street offering everything an artist could ever need....and then some. Paul Kohn Design on Hudson Street is a 2000-square-foot furnished loft complete with bedroom, living room, and dining area. Then there is Syliva Weinstock Cakes on Church Street. Weinstock is often referred to as the the "Queen of Cakes" by her peers for her elaborate cakes. She is the go to person for sweets by many New York City socialites.

Transportation to the area is good with the 1, 2, A,C,E,N,Q,R all stopping at Canal Street or points near. There will be a bit of a walk when you exit the train station but, in New York City, there is always something to see along the way.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
  • Celebrity residents
  • Quiet and peaceful
  • Good schools
Cons
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Trendy Little Neighborhood For Trendy People"

Tribeca is a hip little neighborhood near Chinatown, SoHo, and Nolita. Many people talk about the "celebrity" presence in the neighborhood but it isn't one of those celebrity heavy fancy neighborhoods like those in the Central Park or on the Upper East Side. It's an expensive residential area with a lot going on around it but probably isn't worth the investment.

Living here is pretty nice if you can afford it. The apartments are nice, the restaurants are great, and the area is peaceful. There are some good schools nearby but not a lot of trains. There really is not much to do here unless you know the hot places to hit up on a Friday night or Tuesday afternoon. The area is close to Chinatown, SoHo, Nolita, and not far from the rest of Lower Manhattan but you will likely have to start walking more.

There really are not any touristy spots in the area except the movie theater and the Tribeca Film Festival a couple weeks out of the year.

Overall, if you can afford it and know people in the area or work nearby, why not? Otherwise, you are much better off living in a less trendy but cheaper neighborhood closer to everything else.
Pros
  • World class restaurants
  • Quiet and peaceful
  • Good schools
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Pretty far from everything
  • Not too many subway connections
  • No nightlife scene
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
2yrs+

"Beautiful, trendy but relatively quiet neighborhood"

Tribeca (which stands for the triangle below Canal Street) is a beautiful part of Manhattan that Robert DeNiro has made famous by naming his restaurant after it and starting a film festival in the neighborhood after 9/11. Tribeca is just north of the Financial District on the west side, so it suffered a bit after the attacks on the nearby World Trade Center.

The neighborhood was primarily industrial until the 1960s. Then, like SoHo, artists started to move into the area, using the empty commercial spaces. As a result, it slowly gentrified and became a hip, upscale neighborhood. It isn't as youthful as SoHo, Greenwich Village, or the East Village, but it has great restaurants and shops. Its proximity to the Hudson River can make it windy, though. A good friend of mine lives there, and whenever I visit her, I get pummeled by the wind as I walk toward the river.

A lot of famous people have lived or live in Tribeca. The most visible famous resident was John F. Kennedy, Jr. He may even be partially responsible for its resurgence, as his presence gave the neighborhood even more allure. Rents are not inexpensive in Tribeca, but you might be able to find something within your price range. It's certainly a great neighborhood to live in for just about anyone.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • Celebrity residents
  • World class restaurants
Cons
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
2yrs+

"A Trendy Place Perfect for Families"

Tribeca is one of New York's most desirable neighborhoods to live in. Spacious lofts in a quiet area that has just the right amount of restaurants and nightlife to make it cool but not crowded. As you can imagine, these factors are evident in the rent and real estate.

The neighborhood is spotless and also charming as the older, downtown neighborhoods tend to be. It's by the river, which means fresh air and access to pier activities like kayaking. Hudson River Park connects parks and gardens along the river for a dose of nature and tons of outdoor activities. The streets, many quaint and cobblestoned, are lined with convenient shopping, boutiques, designer stores, pet shops, laid-back bars and lounges, cool nightlife like Macao Trading Co. and some of New York's best restaurants like Nobu.

Of course, there are plenty of streets that are very modern, so not too quaint or "old New York" but at least a different sight. And the Canal part of Tribeca isn't so desirable but it's no reflection of the rest of the beautiful area. You might not be able to afford to live in Tribeca, but it's definitely worth the visit. It must be the general concensus that the neighborhood is something special, since the very prestigious annual film festival is here.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
  • Quiet and peaceful
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Pretty far from everything
  • Not too many subway connections
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Desirable and Deserted"

Those who say TriBeCa has no nightlife don't know where to go. TriBeCa doesn't broadcast its party scene like other areas in Manhattan, but those In the Know know that TriBeCa is the place to be.

Most of the housing options in TriBeCa are expensive, but you get what you pay for. Awesome lofts and luxury buildings make exciting homes for families of means. The area clears up after business hours, allowing your family to enjoy a nice walk together without navigating through students and tourists.

TriBeCa is an unusual blend of being desirable, yet deserted. It's never very crowded after hours and this calm abandonment makes the area even more attractive to high profile celebraties and people looking to get away from city buzz without a long commute.

Perks of the area include the TriBeCa Film Center (primary home of the annual TriBeCa Film Festival), Nobu (perhaps the best restaurant in the city), TriBeCa Performing Arts Center, and any number of trendy coffee shops and dressy boutiques.

TriBeCa isn't exciting in the way the Villages are. It's exciting because you get to enjoy something most people don't know about yet. In a city like New York, having a secret spot is one of the greatest pleasures of city living.
Pros
  • Celebrity residents
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
  • Quiet and peaceful
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
2yrs+

"Surprisingly peaceful"

I never really though of Tribeca as a neighborhood I’d like to go to until I was forced down that way to attend jury duty. Just taking a walk through the neighborhood convinced me that I should seriously look at it as a place to live.

While there isn’t much in the way of nightlife, the neighborhood does have some trendy goodness. There are some great, low-key restaurants rarely inundated by the tourist crowd. There are a few swanky bars and a few clubs. Upscale retail is huge there, with pet shops outnumbering many other niche ventures.

Walking the streets in the early morning is an absolute pleasure. The streets are clean and the buildings are beautiful. It’s close enough to the water to get some freshness from the river. It’s far enough from the Financial District to stay clear of the hugely busy morning rush.

Residents in Tribeca rare much more mellow than I expected, definitely more a relaxed urban vibe that the yuppie I was expecting. There are lots of families with children. Sharing sidewalks with strollers isn’t usually my favorite thing, but something about the quiet feeling in the streets makes it so I don’t mind as much. It really is a nice, New Yorky neighborhood with a great vibe.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Great downtown living"

One of my favorite things about Tribeca is the Hudson River Park, which is a long strip of interconnected parks and gardens that runs from Battery Park City and up along the Hudson. You can run or bike along the path in real tranquility, away from the usual hassles of the city. There are several piers in Tribeca, where you can play golf or go fishing, and at two of the piers you can actually do free kayaking during the summers (Pier 26 and Pier 64), but you have to get up pretty early in the morning, since there are usually more people than there are kayaks. Known for its large and expensive loft style residences, Tribeca has many great bars and upper end restaurants that cater to the residents. I really like Odeon on West Broadway. Back in the 80's it was supposed to be one of the trendiest restaurants in the city. It has remained popular to this day because they have great food and a chic but not completely pretentious atmosphere. Another draw for me is the Taste of Tribeca, an annual event where Tribeca's finest chefs prepare their signature dishes, and are then available to sample all along Duane Street.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
2yrs+

"This place is really growing on me."

I used to not like Tribeca. I thought it was too far out of the way and there was nothing to do there. It's just a bunch of really expensive lofts with nothing else around and no way to get there. Some of this is still true. But, after I lived there for a bit, I found that the neighborhood is kinda cool. Not my favorite, but it's definitely a likeable place.
All of the buildings in Tribeca are exactly what you hear they are: new, expensive lofts for yuppies. The place I lived was no expensive. Everything is sleek and modern. There's no real hint of old New York . . or even New York in general. But, there's something to be said for having a big sterile space.
Most of the streets are impossible. Forget getting a cab on 6th ave that far down . . it won't happen. And Canal where all the street vendors are is a total zoo and it really sucks when you can't avoid walking down that stretch. It feels dangerous to me even in broad daylight -- and, it smells bad. But, my favorite bar is in Tribeca: Smith and Mills. It's a teeny tiny bar at Greenwich that used to be a Carriage House. It's really old world - -the Jules Verne style bathroom is a patron favorite. The bartenders all have handle bar mustaches and they make some really wild, old school concoctions. The Monday night bartender makes the best hot toddy in the city. All of their food is made on a hot plate behind the bar and it is actually really really good. I've tried nearly everything and haven't complained once. It's got a cool vibe and it's so small it always feels cozy. I saw Ed Burns and Christy Turlington there just a few weeks ago (apparently, they live directly above it).
Tribeca also has one of the Palms (chain, but I still love it) and Macao Trading Co (owned by Employees only) so it's really coming into its own in terms of nightlife. In a couple of years, Tribeca is gonna be really bustling and the celebrities are going to have to find a new place to live.
Pros
  • Loft apartments
  • Celebrity residents
Cons
  • Pretty far from everything
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"It's those lofts"

Tribeca, how do I love thee, let me count the ways--is it those big boxy buildings, the corrugated ceilings, the truly downtown attitude, or the fact of spotting Robert De Niro going to the grocery store? Yes, it's all of those things and more. You can find huge, gorgeous lofts in this area like you can't imagine, but to live in one of them, ah, perhaps you'd have to star in Raging Bull too. This neighborhood suffered some serious setbacks after the September 11 attacks, but was also the site of some major neighborhood revitalization efforts afterward. Two such projects were the Tribeca Film Festival and the Tribeca Film Institute, intended to draw the big-shots, and along with them, some big-shot investors. Another cultural draw is the Tribeca Performing Arts Center which focuses on new dance and theater work. Some of the huge thoroughfares, especially near Canal Street and the congestion off of the Holland Tunnel are truly hate-able. On the other hand, the piers and quietude of the waterfront views are worth falling in love all over again. Bars like the Danube on Hudson Street, a kind of Viennese confection with gold and mosaics, are well worth an evening outing even if you don't live in this area..
Pros
  • World class restaurants
  • Celebrity residents
  • Loft apartments
Cons
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
  • Expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
2yrs+

"For the whippersnapper generation"

Tribeca - the shortened version of the Triangle Below Canal (Street) - was a decade ago the in place to be for artists, graphic designers, gallery owners, and other creative types as the area first became gentrified and moved away from its textiles-manufacturing roots. Not so any longer. This cosmopolitan district, despite its proximity to the low-rent Chinatown, might as well be worlds away: it's at once thrilling, with some of the city's best restaurants, high-end nightclubs, and elegant hotels, and disappointing - it's now a haven for ibankers unaffected by the recession and other bright-eyed financial types, slanting heavily towards the whippersnapper crowd.

That said, if you're young, trendy, and looking to be looked at, Tribeca is still a happening scene, though its status is a bit more "classic" - like, say, Chelsea - than "of the moment" Restaurants like the fabled Nobu - one of the city's top eateries, known for its sushi - make a perfect dinner on the town, followed by oysters, champagne, and cavier at the hard-to-impress Bubble Lounge (if you're awake by dawn, then try the TriBakery for some exquisite hangover remedies that also cure the sweet tooth). Though Tribeca has a few concessions to those ex-bright young things who are now carting around bright younger things of their own (Bubby's on Hudson street is a sweet family diner), the noise and chaos of the area makes it inadvisable for the faint of heart - or ear.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Robert De Niro's hood"

The term Tribeca is an acronym that is commonly used to describe an area located in downtown Manhattan that encompasses a space that lies in the Triangle below Canal Street. This area which was once the manufacturing and warehouse center of the city now is one of the most coveted neighborhoods of the city which is populated with gargantuan loft residences that have been fashioned out of converted abandoned factory and industrial buildings and quaint cobbled streets.
The boundaries of Tribeca extend down south from Canal Street until Versey Street and from Broadway until the Hudson River. The area is home to several celebrities but perhaps its most famous patron is Hollywood actor Robert De Niro who revived the neighborhood after the devastation of 9/11with a string of ventures like the Tribeca Film Festival, the Tribeca Grill and the beautifully restored Greenwich Hotel which is located on 377, Greenwich Street and hosts the excellent Locanda Verde restaurant. In fact Tribeca is home to several fantastic (and expensive restaurants) like Megu, Nobu, Bouley, Upstairs at Bouley , Bouley Bakery, Blau Ganz, the Harrison and many more.
Aside from its many fine dining, shopping and entertainment options, Tribeca is also known for its excellent schooling facilities and the area hosts schools like the P.S. 234 which is a highly ranked elementary public school in New York city and the H.S. 475 Stuyvesant High School which is renowned as Manhattan’s most competitive high school that specializes in Math and the Sciences.
Pros
  • Good schools
  • Quiet and peaceful
  • Celebrity residents
  • Loft apartments
  • World class restaurants
Cons
  • Not too many subway connections
  • No nightlife scene
  • Expensive
  • Pretty far from everything
  • Traffic off the Holland tunnel, and down the West Side Highway and Hudson Street
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
2yrs+

"The outskirts of Tribeca"

I live the farthest east in Tribeca you can get without being in Chinatown, so its missing a lot of the ritzy-ness Tribeca is known for. Which, as a poor college student, its probably for the better. Being at the intersection of Little Italy, Tribeca, Chinatown and the Civil buildings is a pretty great combo (except when State Corrections trucks are right outside your building). When you want a nice (if occasionally over-priced meal) Greenwich Street is a short walk away. If you want to eat cheap, head into one of Chinatown's glorious dumpling houses. Or you can walk a little longer to have a fantastic Italian meal, and burn the pasta-induced calories on the way home. I do here sirens every time I wake up and go to bed, but c'mon, were in New York City...The area can get hectic on weekends cause of Tourists on Canal & Broadway, but for the most part traffic is livable. Even though your pretty far from Central Park, recreation is great, because Hudson Parkway is just a few blocks away.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
2yrs+
4/5
2yrs+

"Great food, shopping, and fun in the city"

Canal Street, lined with shops, offers hours of shopping to a tourist. It’s packed and busy all day long with New Yorkers and out of state folk alike. The merchandise is reasonably priced but not always authentic. It’s a little off-putting when every ten steps someone yells “handbag, handbag, you want handbag miss?” or “Rolex? DVD?” in broken English in your face, but I think it adds to the experience of Tribeca. It’s such a different pace of living than anywhere else I’ve been. There are many subway entrances about, so you’re never far from upper Manhattan or Queens. Little Italy and Chinatown are within Tribeca. These offer endless restaurant possibilities and a steady flow of excitement and fun.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Strange combination of great schools and parks with a decidely non-residential vibe."

The loft, hangout vibe of SoHo didn't translate to TriBeCa where the nightlife and restaurants are trying so hard to emulate. The neighborhood rolls up the streets surprisingly early for NY, probably a holdover from keeping bankers hours.

The schools are really great, with outrageously wealthy PTA members adding perks to the kitty. (eg: The Alvin Ailey dance company comes to the elementary school to teach a dance class, a macbook for every student....)

This is still a neighborhood in flux. The heavy construction in the giant hole down the block is incredibly invasive. Because it is still trying to be the center of the universe, much of the truck traffic is relegated to night hours. The same goes for street construction- the jackhammers start at 9pm and go through the morning.

Overall, you cannot beat the square footage in some of the apartments, but if you are trying to keep up with the Joneses, bring your credit.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
2yrs+

"Featuring the TriBeCa Film Festival"

TriBeCa, or the Triangle Below Canal Street, is best known in our time for the TriBeCa Film Festival. The attraction was created in part to celebrate New York City as a major filmmaking area and the Film Festival has become one of the leading annual film festivals in the world.

In earlier times TriBeCa was known as the center for cotton trade and textiles, but since the real estate boom in the late 1990s this neighborhood has been transformed forever. Streets are lined with chic boutiques, high-end restaurants, and urban bars. Upper income families are flooding the neighborhood and increasing the cost of living. It was reported by Forbes Magazine that the 10013 zip code is the 12th most expensive zip code to live in the United States.

Brunch is as important a meal in TriBeCa as water to a duck. Bubby’s Restaurant on Varick Street is a very popular place for locals, families, and the film crowd, while The Odeon on West Broadway portrays a lovely bistro setting and French comfort food.

The TriBeCa Grand Hotel is the place to stay when visiting this bustling neighborhood. It is hard to get a room when the Film Festival is going on, as the Hotel plays host to many a celebrity.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
2yrs+

"Cool neighborhood, close to downtown assest"

The Triangle Below Canal Street is a pretty cool little slice of Manhattan; it’s close enough to the World Trade Center to have suffered some financial hits after the planes hit, but it certainly maintains its picturesque charm. It’s a fairly residential neighborhood – and it’s close to all the wonders of the twenty-something sect (it’s not far from the Village or the Lower East Side). It’s also close to the downtown area, so if you work downtown but want to be close to the party, then this is a great neighborhood for you.
This is also where you can (obviously) catch the Tribeca Film Festival, one of this country’s biggest film fests.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
2yrs+

"Tribeca - one of NYC's hottest and most expensive neighborhoods."

TriBeCa is one of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the city. Located on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, this bustling neighborhood is filled with great housing, dining, shopping, and nightlife. TriBeCa is a great place for people of all walks of life. Sites in this neighborhood include the beautiful Washington Market Park and the Holland Tunnel, connection New York City to New Jersey. With its large industrial style buildings filled with converted loft spaces, TriBeCa is populated with a cross-section of people, not mention the rich and famous, includes such notables as Kate Winslet and Yoko Ono. During the 70's and 80's, TriBeCa was the stomping ground for many artists and performers, and is known for its influence of the New York City film and acting scene. The TriBeCa Film Festival is held here annually and is normally well-attended, showing some of the most technically advanced independent films made throughout the world. TriBeCa is a scenic neighborhood in a great location, nearby several other popular Manhattan neighborhoods including SoHo and the Financial District. Though filled with a hip and urban crowd, this neighborhood is filled with families and great schools as well as wonderful mobility are hallmarks of this neighborhood. Despite issues caused by the September 11 attacks which caused shockwaves through the city and the world, TriBeCa has maintained an upward slope and is, and likely always will be, a site of creation and innovation.

Transportation:
The 1 or 2 train to Canal, Franklin, or Chambers Streets, or the A, C, E line to Canal or Chambers Streets.

Dining:
Nobu -105 Hudson St.
Danube - 30 Hudson St., between Duane and Reade Streets
Kitchenette - 80 W. Broadway, at Warren Street

Nightlife:
Sugar - 311 Church St.
Church Lounge - 2 Sixth Ave.
The Odeon - 145 West Broadway
Pussycat Lounge - 96 Greenwich Street

Shopping:
Color Me Mine - 116 Franklin St.
Highland Park - 175 West Broadway
What Comes Around Goes Around - 1317 Laight St. 5th floor, Rm 28
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids

Best Streets in Tribeca

"Top street in Tribeca"
40.7200071890725 -74.0091161234254
2

West Broadway

3.5/5
"For people with a lot of money to burn"
40.7178655657994 -74.0073745396778
3

Chambers St

3.5/5
"So much beauty and heritage"
40.7160288972045 -74.0103643505384
4

Duane St

3.5/5
"Expensive and happening"
40.7167017415928 -74.0086296276341
5

Hubert St

3/5
"Good place to call home. "
40.721469407795 -74.0100086060673
6

Hudson St

3/5
"Great for families and the yuppie set"
40.7208030291574 -74.0084354588671
7

Walker St

3/5
"A Great Street"
40.7194972573681 -74.0044382459202
8

White St

3/5
"THE Night Scene"
40.718729405258 -74.0045751918119
9

Franklin St

3/5
"Shopping becomes fun again "
40.7188295680504 -74.006525226897
10

Vestry St

3/5
"Wine and Residential living. "
40.7226944616935 -74.0087820719811

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