LadyGrace

  • Local Expert 3,993 points
  • Reviews 22
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"zoo heaven"

Anyone who has been to the National Zoo is familiar with Woodley Park. That’s because this is where you get off the Metro train for your visit. It is one of those places in DC which is beautiful, a tourist trap, and safe as well. Of course, having the tourists swarming all over the neighborhood can be annoying, but for most residents it is a fair trade for the privilege of living near those beautiful Pandas and other animals. Hey, being able to take your kids across the street to the zoo whenever you want is a pretty cool thing. It wouldn’t surprise me if there are some children who have grown up here and gone on to study animals for a living.
If you want to live here, there are multiple options. One of them is to purchase one of the beautiful single family homes which have been kept up for generations. The other option is to go into one of the fashionable new high rises. Depending on the size of your family, and your financial means, one might be better for your family than another. One disadvantage of a house though is keeping up your yard with the tourists around. However, it is still a great place to be.
Pros
  • beutiful homes and views
  • Great location
  • Pandas! Who doesn't love a panda?
  • Pretty (and pretty expensive) apartments and townhouses
Cons
  • Cost of home ownership
  • Parking
  • traffic
  • Massive throngs of tourists
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"beautiful gem"

If you have a lot of money and like your quiet, Woodland-Normanston Terrace is an attractive option in the District. Driving through, you would swear that this neighborhood is in the middle of the suburbs, far away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Well, it is away from the hustle and bustle, but it is still in the city. A short drive will get you right into the middle of everything Washington. Because it is a purely residential neighborhood, you won’t be able to go to the corner store to pick something up at a moment’s notice.
Never mind that though, it is a tradeoff. People who live here have huge houses, with ample yards. The kids can play ball with each other in the yard, and even on the sidewalk. Because of certain dignitaries who live here, including the Vice President, there is no toleration for mayhem. Woodland-Normanston Terrace doesn’t have the problems you associate with the big city. In general, DC schools are not very good. But if you can afford to live here, chances are you do not care. After all, houses go for over a million dollars here, and most of the neighborhood kids go to private schools.
Pros
  • quiet, tree lined streets
  • Safe, safe, safe
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"prestigious neighborhood"

People live in West End because it is a happening place. Some embassies are there, and it is close to the heart of the DC social scene. Steps away to Dupont Circle and Georgetown, West End is pricey. But it isn’t as busy as Dupont Circle or Georgetown, largely because it is less famous with the tourists. High rise apartment and condo buildings are offset by parking garages, shops, and fine restaurants. If you want a night on the town then West End is a great place to be. Rent is however quite high, so unless you make six figures the chances are you’ll be priced out of the market.
If you’re lucky enough to be able to afford the rent, West End is a pretty cool hangout. You can go steps outside your door, and purchase whatever you need. For many, this is the essence of city life and quite convenient. People here do tend to have cars but they don’t use them much. Instead, they take the Metro to work and back. Due to the embassies, this neighborhood is really safe, because security is of necessity fairly tight. Unfortunately, it might be too busy to make a nice environment for children.
Pros
  • plenty to do
  • close to Georgetown without the expense
Cons
  • noise
  • Parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"great place for family"

Wesley Heights is another one of those well-heeled neighborhoods located near everything, but not IN everything. An early subdivision, it is made up of very large single-family homes and a few subdivided condos. It is definitely a hideaway for the rich, because the homes are very expensive. These beautiful homes are surrounded by yards on large lots. The streets are lined with trees, and some residents enjoy gardening. Even though it is close to American University, there aren’t any students due to the rents being entirely too high. Furthermore, the neighborhood is quiet. There is a Metro station that serves American University, but it isn’t terribly convenient to Wesley Heights. Some busses go through here, but I would suggest that someone living here have a car.
Because of the affluence and quietness of this neighborhood, there is almost no crime. While Georgetown suffers from some crimes of opportunity, we don’t see that so much in Wesley heights, largely because people don’t normally drive through here without a good reason. In addition, there are usually burglar alarms and a strong sense of community. Political action is important to these folks, as they want to maintain the quality of their lives. As the old saying goes, the squeaky wheel gets the oil.
Pros
  • fabulous homes
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"center of the universe (sort of)"

The National Mall. Just the mention of this lovely part of Washington puts every potential tourist in awe. The Mall is where all sorts of things happen: the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, and the White House. It was here that Martin Luther King JR delivered his “I have a dream” speech, and the fireworks rise over the Potomac every year on Independence day. It is also a mecca for tourism every year. Sometimes it gets so choked with people that you can hardly breathe. And, it is a popular protest site.
If you like to be in the middle of everything, to go out your door and be able to get everything you need, and if you have loads of money, you might be able to live on the Mall. There aren’t too many places to live, but for the right person it can be pleasant. Nothing is really big enough for families though, and anyhow with all the crowds I’m not sure I would recommend that anyway. Too easy for a kid to get lost. Nonetheless, there are plenty of services here. The crime rate is fairly low, mostly crimes of opportunity. Any time you have enough tourists, someone will be unable to resist the opportunity to steal things.
Pros
  • historic views
  • location
Cons
  • noise
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"hopeless."

Unless you are truly desperate, Washington Highlands is not where you want to live. For a long time it has shared the reputation of being the worst part of the city, and it is the area where there are more rapes and murders per capita than just about anywhere else in the whole country! Seriously, you shouldn’t go here unless perhaps you want to go into the one gated community in the whole area. Personally, I wouldn’t even do that because outside the gates, chaos reigns.
The rest of the neighborhood is public housing complexes. This includes the worst one in the country and it is here that there is a lot of hopelessness. People get killed regularly, and nobody seems to want to do anything about it. Drugs and prostitution are everywhere. To make matters worse, the schools stink to high heaven. Something like a quarter of teenagers don’t graduate high school, and almost none get anything past that. As a result, they need minimum wage jobs. Compounding the probem is the fact that there are almost no jobs available anywhere, not even the minimum wage ones. I guess it is no wonder that so many end up living off the government and selling drugs to get by. Don’t expect the government to fix Washington Highlands any time soon.
Pros
  • rumors of future improvements
Cons
  • crime
  • poor housing choices
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"college town"

Van Ness is the area immediately surrounding the Metro station of the same name. like many in the District, it has a lot of students. This is because it includes the University of District of Columbia, the local community college. On must note that this is going to mean a lower quality of student than you’ll see at American University or Georgetown. Expect the student residents to enjoy a good amount of beer on the weekends. Housing here is expensive, so several students are going to live in each dwelling.
This isn’t all bad though. There are loads of restaurants here, and they aren’t the super tony type you see in Capitol Hill either. Instead, they are the nice homey restaurants you’d take your family to without breaking the bank. Furthermore, the Van Ness Metro station leads to most points in the city, so wherever you’re commuting to, you can get there quickly. In fact, the locals have a shorter commute to work here than in many other neighborhoods. To me, that’s worth paying for, so long as you don’t mind the college students. Another good thing is that Van Ness is very safe. Besides property crimes, not much goes on around there.
Pros
  • international elegance
  • Metro Station
  • Safe
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"best of both worlds"

Upper Chevy Chase is the quieter twin of Chevy Chase DC and MD. While the other Chevy Chases have a lot of shops and amenities, Upper Chevy Chase is almost like their bedroom community. If you want the amenities of the other neighborhoods but prefer quiet, this is a nice place to consider within walking distance. Due to its being quieter though, and less famous, the real estate prices are somewhat lower than those across the neighborhood boundary. You might say Upper Chevy Chase is a neat place for those who want the Chevy Chase, but can’t quite afford it.
Many of the houses here are detached, and have nice big yards. They aren’t as big as the ones in Chevy Chase, but smaller families will still enjoy them. Warm weather will still see people enjoying time outside the house, gardening, having a cookout, and playing in the yard. Because the neighborhood is just off of the beaten path, there’s more parking and although the traffic still isn’t good, it is better than in surrounding neighborhoods. As I see it, that’s a more than fair tradeoff for not having the grocery store on the corner of your block. Crime is almost nonexistent here, and almost exclusively nonviolent property crime.
Pros
  • always something to do
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"a religious calm"

University Heights derives its name from Catholic University, a very large Christian school which borders the neighborhood. Due it its location, University Heights has a very large catholic population, along with its related commercial concerns. There are several parish churches here, and even a large Franciscan monastery. To say that this neighborhood has diversity in the walks of life of its residents is an understatement. Of course, if you aren’t Roman Catholic you might feel a bit out of place here. Potential residents will need to understand the very homogenous atmosphere here.
In addition to the monks, University Heights does have a large student population. These students will often rent a house and cram in several room mates. Although you might expect there to be a lot of noise as a result, it is actually not too bad. Many of the students are studying to be priests, and this keeps a lot of the chaos of students at bay. After all, if seminarians get into too much trouble, they’ll be kicked out. One sad thing though is that, due to the high percentage of Catholic religious, there are few children here per capita. This really is a shame in my opinion, because University Heights would be a great place to raise your kids.
Pros
  • educational opportunities
  • Mix of residential and commercial
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"improving for the long term"

Truxton Circle has a checkered past and a promising future. It has long been absorbed in the minds of the people by Shaw and some other bordering areas, but recently has regained its separate identity. Like too many places in DC, the rocky eighties didn’t do it any favors. Fortunately however, many of the beautiful row homes have survived, and they make up the bulk of the housing stock in the neighborhood. There are a few condos as well, and these are the result of a bit of redevelopment. For a long time Truxton Circle has been plagues by violence, and fortunately this does seem to be changing. Likewise, the drug dealers and hookers are no longer so prominent on street corners.
Truxton Circle has been a Black neighborhood for a long time, but it is integrating this way as well. This isn’t always well received, because the changing demographics all too often drive up prices in the area. For now though, we do see a return of children playing in the neighborhood. They no longer have to stay inside out of fear for their safety. Overall, this is a decent place to consider, just keep in mind it isn’t perfect yet.
Pros
  • friendly atmosphere
Cons
  • some crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"dangerous place to live"

People who like quiet and safe neighborhoods aren’t likely to find it in Trinidad. This neighborhood has one of the worst reputations for crime in the city. To be sure it isn’t the absolute worst (that’s across the Anacostia), but there is nonetheless a lot of violence. In the eighties, when crack cocaine hit DC hard, Trinidad was one of the worst hit. There’s been some improvement in the neighborhood recently, but still it isn’t the world’s safest place to be. Because of housing prices being what they are in DC right now, some middle class people are starting to move in—much to the chagrin of long time residents, who will soon be priced out of their homes.
Nowadays there’s a neighborhood coalition to try and get rid of the violence, both through community policing and by bugging the city government to do something. How long that’s going to take, who knows, but right now the danger isn’t just after dark: people get shot in broad daylight. If you have kids I strongly suggest you think twice about moving here: you aren’t going to want them outside playing at all. If you’re alone however, it might be worth it. Just make sure you have a dog and a burglar alarm handy.
Pros
  • artistic atmosphere
Cons
  • Crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
Just now

"quirky community"

Tenleytown is a really neat place to hang out near American University. A national historic district, Tenleytown is full of beautiful old homes. But unlike many others like this, the neighborhood does have plenty of shops and restaurants. In fact, you can find just about anything you might need here. Multi use buildings combine retail with living space, and a night out on the town is very much possible here. In fact, plenty of people enjoy a nice drink after work before settling in for the night. There is a Metro station, and as a result many residents don’t need a car unless their employment or recreation take them into farther afield or more obscure areas.
Lots of families live here, and it is no wonder: unlike much of the District, the neighborhood public schools are actually quite good. One reason for this I am sure is the strong community in Tenleytown: they have no time for underachievement, and without enough money to pay for private school, these residents can put a lot of pressure on the local politicians. They aren’t as political as their counterparts in Takoma, but that doesn’t mean they don’t serve as the squeaky wheel that gets the oil.
Pros
  • community
  • Schools
Cons
  • Traffic on Wisconsin Avenue
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"nice hangout."

If you like a place where the neighbors are friendly and the politics active, you’ll love Takoma. This is the area that stopped the Beltway from being built closer in, cutting the community in half. It is also a great place to be if you are a vegetarian or a liberal, as there are plenty of appropriate hangouts for those of that persuasion. Notably, there is a farmer’s market which is there every week during the summer months, helping you to eat local and purchase healthy options for your dinner table.
Like Chevy Chase or Georgetown, Takoma has a bunch of really great restaurants. Unlike those neighborhoods however, they aren’t ridiculously expensive, just good hometown cooking. Most things you need will be in walking distance here. In addition, Takoma has its own Metro station, so if you work closer to downtown getting there won’t be a major problem.
Takoma has a really strong sense of community, and is very safe to walk, even at night. In fact, the night life is significant here, due to the bars and restaurants available—and the bars aren’t trashy, either, but a nice place to hang out if that’s your idea of a good time.
Pros
  • Great long term outlook
  • Metro Station
  • strong civic organizations
Cons
  • serious politics
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Stronghold against crime!"

Stronghold is another one of those examples of what a community, bent on keeping larger problems out and the good guys in, can do. In the eighties the people of Stronghold were affected somewhat by the crack epidemic. But unlike many other locales, it wasn’t overcome by the problems. Neighbors banded together and patrolled, ensuring that the hoodlums stayed out of the area. This is one of the places where neighbors look out for one another, and where families are able to grow up in peace. In fact, this is such a great place for children that you’ll see the young families out with baby strollers! Need to go out for a “date” with your life partner? Hire one of the local teenagers, or even let a grandmother do what they do best.
Stronghold is close to Catholic University, as well as the Old Soldier’s Home, and as a result there is a considerable amount of community. The grounds of the latter are a great place to sunbathe, or to take your puppy for his…daily outing. Through the neighborhood association you will find there are social events, especially in the summer. In spite of its location, there aren’t too many students here due to the availability of housing.
Pros
  • neighbors
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"community wins :)"

If you lived in the DC area during the eighties and nineties, you probably remember Stanton Park as one of those “not too nice” areas near Capitol Hill. There were plenty of drugs and crime, among other things to worry about. Now however, this isn’t the case in Stanton Park. Instead, its proximity to both Union Station and the government areas of the city have helped revitalize the neighborhood into a nice, middle-class integrated locale. Apparently, it was once home to Obama before he became President.
In spite of its location though, Stanton Park is still reasonably priced. One reason might be that its proximity to Union Station, along with the paucity of on street parking, keeps some people away. After all, car owners would like to be able to live somewhere without paying an arm and a leg for the privilege of parking it! And tourists tend to be really rude about parking where they shouldn’t, too. Regardless of the reason though, the best reason for living in Stanton Park is its strong sense of community. Many people have lived here for quite some time, and the strong community association was what ultimately revitalized the place. Residents demanded attention from law enforcement and eventually got it. Just comes to show how even a corrupt city government can be motivated.
Pros
  • quiet, tree lined streets
Cons
  • far from the center of things
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Lifestyles of the possibly poisoned?"

Spring Valley is one of the lesser-known neighborhoods that you need to make a fortune to live in. And for that reason, a lot of important people live there. Unlike Georgetown, or Dupont Circle, the neighborhood has a quiet, suburban feel. And there are services here in Spring Valley, from gas stations to supermarkets, and even some sit down restaurants. However, these amenities are more your down-home style, rather than the highly upscale and trendy ones you see in places like Georgetown. For this reason, Spring Valley stays rather quiet. There isn’t much public transportation either, further reducing the incentive to just wander over here.
Largely for these reasons, a lot of important people live in Spring Valley. This has included Cabinet members over the years, and several ambassadors live here too. One of these is the ambassador from Syria. With the kind of quiet and exclusivity that Spring Valley affords, we shouldn’t be surprised. After all, there’s plenty of space for him and his security detail to blend in: important if you’re from a volatile country like Syria. Anyhow, residents love to have fun, and will throw parties in those hugely opulent houses and yards of theirs. Just do be careful with the kids playing in the dirt, on account of arsenic contamination.
Pros
  • community
Cons
  • arsnic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"lovely place to hang out"

Southeast Waterfront is a thriving little community south of the Capitol building, but north of Buzzard Point. It is one of the first areas to go through redevelopment back in the fifties. Sadly, DC didn’t do a good job of it the first time, so they’re having to do it again. Nonetheless, this is just a nice place to be. The crime rate is low, and there are some surprisingly fine restaurants: dinner cruises leave port at this point in the city, since the coming together of the Anacostia and Potomac make a fairly wide channel. Better yet, it is close to downtown via public transit, which is abundant in the area. They even have their own Metro stop.
After work, a lot of people go sit on their balconies and enjoy watching the sun set. If you live in a place that’s high enough, you can see the skyline which includes some of the most beautiful buildings in the world. Many of these apartment/condo buildings have parties and other social events throughout the year, and this helps build a strong sense of community. There’s a nice little Marina here too, though many of the middle class residents of the neighborhood cannot afford to own a boat.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • improved housing
Cons
  • not many stores in the area
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"nice and quiet"

South Central DC is a typical DC neighborhood in North East. Like most of them, it is pretty safe: just the occasional theft or burglary take place here, so it is pretty quiet. Of course, quiet is true in other ways as well. There is only one road with significant amounts of retail or food service, and this can be a bit seedy. Houses however are generally in good condition, because residents take care of their homes. Because Howard University Divinity School is in the confines of the neighborhood, there are very high quality young African-American young people living there. Needless to say, there are some students living in the homes here, but not the noisy and annoying type.
A nice park in the middle of the neighborhood makes for a great place to go jogging, or for walking your dog, after work. You might say the place invites an active lifestyle in this way. Because people are proud of where they live, the sense of community is strong. If there’s something they need to get out of city government, the citizens know how to get it. Of course, a closer Metro stop might be nice for the commuters. Unless of course, they want to stay more suburban.
Pros
  • well built homes
  • High percentage of the residents own their homes
Cons
  • could be safer
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"a disappointment"

Skyland is one of those white elephants of urban renewal, the results of which nobody really knows. What do I mean? For the last ten years the City has been seizing and purchasing land to build a huge Town Center development. It would be mixed use, with shops, recreation and even residences. If it succeeds, this will be the best place to live in Southeast, since everything will be right there. And I might add, the rents will be sky high. OK, maybe not as bad as Adams Morgan and such, but definitely higher than the rest of the area. Eventually they’ll build this, we hope, but who knows.
For now, Skyland is a typical neighborhood in Southeast. There’s a smattering of houses, and some of them are pretty run down. Not much retail or restaurants exist, as most of it is being moved out for the redevelopment. Not much public transportation is here; surprisingly there’s no Metro station yet. So for now, Skyland is a barren wasteland with little to do. And a punchline on how ineffective DC government has been with revitalizing Southeast. Personally, I wouldn’t consider the area for residential occupancy, until and unless the apartments are built. You might be OK going into here for commercial property.
Pros
  • government wants it revitalized
Cons
  • not much has happened yet
Recommended for
  • Hipsters
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"what neighbors can do together..."

If you visit Shipley, you will quickly notice something different about it: newer, yet still affordable, homes and apartments. This is because not long ago the worst housing projects were torn down and new complexes put up. With the “projects” all but gone, the crime rate has fallen. Those tenants needing the cheapest housing had to go elsewhere. Yet because of the way city government planned it, one can’t call Shipley Gentrified so much as improved: it remains working and lower middle class. Perhaps the strongest attribute of the new Shipley is the strong sense of community. Neighbors love to help one another out. If you have kids, a neighbor with kids might help you have a night on the town. Instead of being afraid for your stuff if you have a vacation, neighbors will keep an eye on it for you.
Unfortunately, the good parts of Shipley are accompanied by many of the disadvantages so common in Southeast: most notably, the lack of shopping. So far, retailers haven’t gotten the message that Shipley is an improved neighborhood, and so residents still have to leave the area to buy almost anything. There aren’t even so many restaurants! So long as you have a car though, the community is worth it.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • revitalization grant
Cons
  • not many stores
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
Just now

"Park-like for sure"

Shepherd Park is a nice neighborhood where diversity is the name of the game. It is home to blacks, whites, Jews, Christians, immigrants and native-born citizens. Located up against the Maryland line near Silver Spring, it is a residential community with reasonably priced homes. Probably the biggest asset of Shepherd Park is a very strong civic association, which advocates with the local ANC (city government agency) for what the citizens need. This is the sort of place where people sit on their porches in the evening, where kids play in the yard, and backyard barbecues with a bunch of friends over are the norm during the summer time.
After work, you will see a bunch of people out jogging, or walking their dogs, or walking with a baby stroller. Everyone enjoys the community, and they all strive to keep it safe. Your typical weekend will see the moms running errands, and taking their kids from one Saturday activity to another. Many people work at the nearby Walter Reed Medical center. It will be interesting to see what happens when the center closes next year. My assumption is that, given the strong sense of community, the neighborhood will band together and life will go on.
Pros
  • strong civic organizations
Cons
  • commute
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"safe for the area"

River Terrace is a small neighborhood just on the eastern side of the Anacostia. It is low middle-class to poor, with plenty of garden apartments as well as cheap houses. Unfortunately it also has some affordable housing. River Terrace isn’t as desperately poor as most of the area east of the Anacostia, and this is largely because some major companies have operations there. Plus, it is easy to cross the river into areas with more business. In spite of this however, there are almost no services in River Terrace, and residents have to leave the area to get much more than a cup of coffee. Not as many transportation routes are here either, because this neighborhood is sort of tucked away between major roads.
Other complaints you hear from residents revolve around an ancient coal-burning power plant. This plant doesn’t have many environmental filters on it, as it was built before such things were required. Although the city doesn’t run it all the time (just when there is higher than normal usage), the soot and pollution are spewed all over the area. Nobody likes breathing this in, of course. One wonders what happens to plant workers when they aren’t needed, too. Overall, this keeps River Terrace less attractive to live in.
Pros
  • low crime rate
  • community spirit
Cons
  • coal fired power plant
  • uncertain future
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"A place to start out"

Randle Highlands is one of those neighborhoods that form a reasonably well-off pocket in the middle of hopelessness. Located in Southeast, it is surrounded by some of the poorest neighborhoods in Washington. Unlike its neighbors however, Randle Highlands is a reasonably safe area, with little more than property crime to worry about—so long as you stay in the neighborhood. Leave the neighborhood, and there’s all kinds of trouble for you to run into. The neighbors however are young and middle-class, making Randle Highlands a place where people start out their adult lives. Unfortunately, they don’t tend to stay very long.
It is interesting that with such a transient population, the neighborhood hasn’t deteriorated. However, this could be because there isn’t any so-called affordable housing there, which keeps the rental prices a bit higher. Another disadvantage to the neighborhood is that, because residents tend not to stay long, the sense of community is fairly weak. There aren’t many public transit routes through here, and very little business (typical of Southeast, unfortunately). For this reason, it is necessary for most residents who can afford it to have a car, and this is the most common way that they get to work. If you can’t do better, consider Randle Highlands. You can certainly do worse.
Pros
  • reasonably priced housing
Cons
  • mixed quality
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Queen of quiet"

Queens chapel is a nice bedroom community type neighborhood. It has a few small shops and restaurants, but not many. Mostly, it is just a bunch of middle class families who like to have it quiet and go about their business. Being close to Catholic University, there are plenty of professors who live there. Notably, Queens Chapel is popular among families with kids. And why not? There’s a really nice, state of the art rec center for them to play in after school. The crime rate is very low, almost exclusively petty thefts. Nobody has to be afraid walking around there at night. Of course, there isn’t much to do in the neighborhood late at night, but that’s OK.
Just outside the perimeter of the neighborhood you will find the Fort Totten Metro center. This station has three lines running through it, so with a very small surface commute residents can get many places in the city quickly. That sure takes some of the bite out of being so far away from the heart of town. The Metro center is also why it is good that the neighborhood is safe, as those who might work a later or earlier shift than most don’t need to be overly worried about getting mugged.
Pros
  • recreation center
Cons
  • not much business
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Howard Lite"

Pleasant Plains is one of the best Black neighborhoods in DC. Adjacent to Howard University, it plays home to many Howard students, faculty and staff. In keeping with the tradition of academic excellence, Pleasant Plains has one of the best public schools in the country: Banneker High School. This is a Magnet school for very bright young Washingtonians. Also, there have been recent new developments put up, both residential and commercial. They have a supermarket and some nice sit-down restaurants, among other things. Because of the university, there is plenty of public transportation.
In an interesting twist, Pleasant Plains is almost a closed community. By this I mean that nearly everyone is connected to Howard, and it is hard to break in socially if you are not. Of course, this also keeps gentrification at bay, as there are easier places to move to in the city. Professors and staff don’t really make a whole lot of money, in comparison to their peers in other industries. One thing that is nice here however is that there is very little in the way of drugs or other crime. With the exception of some property issues and alcohol-related problems, the neighborhood is safe.
Pros
  • proximity of Howard University
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"quiet and family friendly"

If you want to be close to everything, and still have plenty of space to escape to, Petworth is a good place to look. Located on both the green and yellow lines, Petwoth is primarily residential. Most of it is single family homes, with a smattering of apartments close to the Metro station. However, in spite of its mainly residential character, Petworth does have a small amount of commercial property. You can buy groceries and medicine here, and as of recently there are some sit down restaurants. These are mostly your down-home, unassuming style eateries that cater to the typical family taking a time out. Petworth isn’t quite up against Rock Creek Park, but from most places in the neighborhood it is within walking distance.
What Petworth is best known for is its overall neighborliness. Residents love to sit out on the front porch and wave at the neighbors as they walk by. Summer brings nice backyard barbecues, and the local teenagers will happily babysit your kids so you can get a night out. Most of the population is professional, but they either prefer more green space or can’t afford more prestigious neighborhoods. Often, families live together in the neighborhood, both in the same residence and distributed over multiple properties.
Pros
  • brick homes
Cons
  • lots of work left to do
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"Heartbeat of Washington"

Penn Quarter is one of those neighborhoods that really defines Washington in the mind of most tourists. Several very posh hotels are there, including the Willard Intercontinental and the JW Marriott. Several museums line its streets, drawing scores of tourists during the summer months. While the tourists are there, you can pick up a quick lunch at one of the famous food carts. Just don’t trip on the tourists in the process. Because it is a tourist area, many of the restaurants are over priced for what you get. Then again, they do tend to be very good as well. Heavy foot traffic means that there are few crimes, mainly pickpocketing and other property crimes of opportunity.
If you like living near the heartbeat of DC, you can live in one of the high quality apartment and condo communities. Do be aware that there is a lot of traffic and plenty of noise, however. If this isn’t something that bothers you, and you like being in the middle of everything, then you may well enjoy Penn Quarter. Also, public transportation in this area is excellent, with a couple Metro stations and several busses running through. You can get anywhere in the city pretty fast from here.
Pros
  • central location
  • always something to do
Cons
  • noisy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"depressing"

Penn Branch is a highly variable neighborhood in the area east of the Anacostia. As one resident once said, this is a sort of forgotten part of town because few retail establishments are likely to set up shop there. Sadly all recent attempts at attracting major chains have failed due to the poverty of the market. In any event: Penn Branch is a mixed income community, with a combination of public housing and fairly well-kept, large homes. To say that this causes tension is an understatement. Neighborhood hoodlums like to attack the nicer areas and loot them for whatever they can find. Recently a string of burglaries targeting nicer areas has given the police a real headache.
With that said, Fort Dupont Park along its edge gives Penn Branch residents somewhere nice to go for recreation on the weekend. Leaving the neighborhood for most shopping and dining however is a necessity. Fortunately, many in Penn Branch either have cars or are good at finding everything by bus, so this isn’t a huge problem for most of them. Schools are abysmal, and those who can afford to will homeschool their kids or send them to some sort of private schools.
Pros
  • some decent homes
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"changing for the better?"

Park View is one of those neighborhoods in DC that has some beautiful old buildings mixed in with the not so beautiful. Some nice brick buildings are so blighted they’re boarded up, but the neighborhood is improving. Nowadays the community organization is very active, and they are pushing the police to get the crime problem under control. You might say that this neighborhood is good or bad depending on the block you’re on. There are however hopeful signs. The neighborhood association is trying to block several liquor licenses, and putting up signs which tout the heritage of Park View. Usually this is a sign that the neighbors want some positive development. Actually, there’s getting to be some, just not enough yet to stabilize the neighborhood.
Park View is best considered lower middle class. Many residents work at the hospital and make a decent living. However, this hasn’t kept Park View from having its fair share of affordable housing. In fact, a new complex is being put up. Hopefully the market rate units which are also being put in will help balance the bad influences. It will be interesting to see how Park View manages to maintain its identity, and improve its reputation.
Pros
  • new solutions
Cons
  • old problems
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"nice place to raise a family"

The Palisades is an older neighborhood in DC, and a nice one. Built before the days of high rise condos and cramped apartment buildings, it was laid out as a beautiful subdivision during the Victorian era. Originally a primarily residential area, it has now taken on the character of an entire suburb. There are plenty of restaurants and retail space, so purchasing what you need on the way home is possible. Unfortunately there aren’t any Metro stops, so you will have to use the busses or private automobile to live here. Not that that is a big drawback: once you get home, you can expect peace and quiet.
In addition to the usual neighborhood amenities, there is even a museum to visit if you like that sort of thing. After school, your children can play outside and not worry about being in danger except perhaps for passing cars. Once rush hour is over though, this isn’t a problem. Perhaps the only drawback of living here is that it is susceptible to the problems with DC traffic. But with such scenic surroundings, who cares. The crime rate is almost nonexistent, and people love to jog and walk their dogs. Nice place to live.
Pros
  • view of Potomac
Cons
  • far from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"public housing"

Northeast Boundary has an interesting name drawn from its geography: although it is east of the Anacostia, it is actually the boundary between Northeast and Southeast. The neighborhood is sadly typical of many east of the river, full of blight and crime. In fact, it is one of those places where there is a lot of gun violence. People tend not to leave their houses at night, for fear of their lives. There is also a lot of poverty with its requisite subsidized housing. Generally the locals have a sense of hopelessness, and this doesn’t seem to be changing any time soon.
Public transport is not as good here as in many other neighborhoods. It is a small backwater where nobody goes. There are almost no jobs in the neighborhood, and with the exception of a liquor store and a cheap restaurant, no services. Drug trafficking and prostitution have been intractable problems for years. Overall, the area has been resistant to redevelopment and attempts at improvement. Having most of the area dominated by the projects of course does not help. Nearly everyone has a high school education or less. Outsiders are generally unwelcome. It is safe to say outside capital is also unwelcome.
Pros
  • art gallery
Cons
  • high crime rate
  • Lack of owner occupied homes
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
Just now

"empty nesters paradise"

One might call North Portal Estates a suburb just by driving through. Surprisingly though, it is just inside the DC city limits. It has all the typical characteristics of a suburb: larger houses with decent sized lawns, families with kids, and wide avenues for the cars. Residents are well-heeled and, it seems, politically connected. One time recently they got a city policy waived for their neighborhood because they didn’t like it. There is almost no crime here, partially a result of their semi suburban location and partially because of their political connectedness. Either way, it is quite remarkable.
Not that the place is perfect: residents have to leave the area to get just about anything. There is almost no commercial real estate here, and using the Metro requires that one cross the border into Maryland. Not too many busses come around either. Many residents like it this way, but I am sure others wish they didn’t have to jump into the car for everything.
Another interesting twist: there aren’t that many children. Instead, North Portal Estates is an enclave mostly of empty nesters and retirees. Maybe that is why they are so politically active. Whatever the reason, this is a quiet backwater of a very big city.
Pros
  • lovely homes
  • Park system nearby
Cons
  • not a lot of public transportation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Family friendly"

North Michigan park is a nice, quiet neighborhood near Catholic University and Fort Totten. The latter is a huge Metro center with three of the four lines going through it, so from here you can get just about anywhere in the city just by hopping a train. Not only is it convenient, it is also safe with little other than some petty theft taking place. Because of the university of course there’s some college-kid related noise, but nothing major: Catholic University students tend not to be as wild as your average state university kid. Besides, they are a great resource for shoveling snow and watching the kids on date night.
There aren’t a lot of restaurants or stores in North Michigan Park itself, but there are plenty in the Fort Totten area as a whole. So while you might not have a grocery store next door, there will be one where you can get to it fairly quickly. Most homes are single family dwellings, with the exception of course of college dorms. Walk the streets in the evening and you’ll see people walking their dogs, or going out for a family stroll (baby carriage in tow). Kids have plenty of space to play, and the recreation center is state of the art.
Pros
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"the world at your doorstep"

North Cleveland Park is a unique neighborhood. It has several embassies, including Austria and the UAE, along its streets. Then, it has apartment buildings, condos, single family homes and even some nice office buildings. Needless to say, North Cleveland Park is quite a diverse area. There is a really nice international flavor due to the embassies, and often the ambassador and or embassy staff live in North Cleveland Park. One result of this is that there are ethnic restaurants from nearly every spot on the globe, making this a paradise for the adventuresome eater.
North Cleveland Park is also a really posh place to live, with some of those houses selling for a million dollars plus. Nearly all the cheaper housing is gone, and rents are sky high. The presence of foreign dignitaries means that there is considerable security, because these distinguished individuals have to be kept safe. Needless to say, nobody stays around very long if they are up to no good.
There is a very large Metro station in North Cleveland Park, so if you don’t work in your neighborhood it is easy to make your commute every morning. In addition, plenty of shops and even full sized grocery stores are close by, allowing you to purchase groceries and other needs on the way home.
Pros
  • elegant atmosphere
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"just north of everything"

North Capitol neighborhood is the center of the universe for many public corporations, the Government Printing Office, and a number of veteran’s services. During the work day you will see people bustling about, going from one place to another. Government workers, nonprofit employees and yes, lobbyists run the place. Because of its close proximity to the Capitol, North Capitol is one of those places that you go in order to transact business with the feds. Office buildings mean coffee shops and sandwich nooks for a quick lunch in the middle of the day.
There are a lot of transit routes in and out of the neighborhood, and because of its proximity to the Capitol and White House, both Capitol Police and the Secret Service have jurisdiction. There isn’t a huge amount of housing, but there is some. Most of it is in high rise condo and apartment buildings, though a small selection of single family homes is also available. Surprisingly for the location, prices aren’t too bad. However, you’ll have to wait for a vacancy, which isn’t particularly easy. Getting places is not hard, though there isn’t a grocery store. You will have to leave the neighborhood to get food, so thank goodness for public transportation.
Pros
  • close to jobs
Cons
  • traffic!
  • not many places to live
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"up and coming"

Near Southeast has had a remarkable transformation in recent years. About ten years ago, it was primarily made up of industry and public housing complexes. Along with this came poverty, crime, and overall hopelessness. But, when the Nationals needed a new stadium the city government saw an opportunity. They put a lot of money into building the ball park, and earmarked the waterfront for a nice recreational area. Public housing projects were knocked down, and in its place there are new mixed income housing complexes. A new hotel has gone up, and bars and restaurants are slowly coming into the area. There should be a grocery store soon. Main drawback to living here is its seedy reputation, even though that is a thing of the past. You’d have to leave the neighborhood in order to buy most things at the moment, but with very heavy public transportation coverage, that isn’t so bad. Another concern is that the ball park does make things pretty loud on game nights, and snarls the traffic. Then again, given the ramps onto the interstate are on the edge of this neighborhood, at least everyone will be out fairly quickly. Near Southeast then is a work in progress, but it is nonetheless up and coming.
Pros
  • great for baseball fans
  • always improving
Cons
  • success remains to be seen
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"changing for the better"

Near Northeast is one of those neighborhoods with a gritty past that is nonetheless improving rapidly. Once a real ghetto, nowadays there are some increasingly fashionable establishments frequented by young professionals. In an interesting twist, whites come into the neighborhood for these watering holes, but the neighborhood remains primarily black. One side of the neighborhood is actually Gallaudet University, which is the national university for Deaf people. For this reason, a lot of students do live here where they can easily get to classes on time. Do be aware, deaf people may make more noise than they are aware of, but don’t take it personally since they genuinely don’t know. Besides, it probably isn’t much worse than a bunch of drunk frat boys anyway.
Once known as an area with lots of rapes and murders, Near Northeast has become much safer as well and very few such attacks happen anymore. That isn’t to say that it is perfect, but you certainly can do much worse. Anyway, there are two Metro stops into there and plenty of busses serving the area. All kinds of establishments in the neighborhood means you can pick up some groceries on the way home from work, or relax with a beer at the local bar.
Pros
  • new businesses
Cons
  • old problems
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"stable and community oriented"

While most neighborhoods in Southeast are plagued by crime, blight and overall neglect, Naylor Gardens is an exception. For sure they have some crime issues, but compared to most other neighborhoods in the area they do really well. Mainly theft of various sorts. Most of the neighborhood is controlled by a unique apartment complex of that name. what makes it unique is that it is a coop: a cross between traditional apartments and condominiums. For the most part the neighbors love their complex, and as a result the neighborhood is incredibly stable. This in turn keeps crime largely in check, and about the only thing that happens, happens along the street.
Rent here is quite low for what you are getting, and it is very convenient to everything you might need. For one thing, there’s a nice little shopping center on the corner which everyone likes to use, and for another the Metro busses are plentiful. Lots of government workers and retirees live here. Because of the coop there is a very strong sense of community: rent and fees are put into a common pot to keep things maintained. Furthermore, the board makes sure that everyone is happy with how things are going. If you want a stable neighborhood with adequate amenities then, this is a place worth checking out.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • recreation center
Cons
  • some crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"quite a cleanup"

Navy Yard is primarily commercial and industrial, although this is changing. Recently some apartments and townhouses have gone up, but before that nobody lived here except military personnel. It is served by a direct Metro stop, so access is pretty easy. Before there was any general housing, the Navy Yard area was just a bunch of nightclubs and bars. Many of these establishments weren’t exactly the sort that “respectable” people would want to visit, but mostly catered to clientele on the margins of society. Along with these bars, prostitution and drugs were rampant.
Like many neighborhoods however, the Navy Yard is being redeveloped and taking on a new life of its own. Professionals are beginning to move in, especially those with government jobs or who do contract work in the area. Many of the old bars are disappearing too, because with the revitalization a lot of the crime is no longer tolerated. That isn’t to say however that this is a great place to live. Because of the industrial character of the surroundings, you’ll still have to deal with a lot of pollution. Also, two highways come together not far from there, so there’s a lot of noise. Lastly, traffic from the Nationals Baseball stadium can make for some interesting times during the summer.
Pros
  • major improvments are underway
Cons
  • reputation
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"up and coming?"

Not long ago Mount Vernon Square was a forgotten neighborhood. And it is no wonder: it sits at the corner of two wards and three police districts. In such a no-man’s land, you would expect there to be problems with vacant lots and prostitution. For a while this was true. Yet in recent years, Mount Vernon Square has been shedding such a reputation. One by one the vacant lots have been cleared and had buildings put up in their place. Nice condos have replaced blighted, boarded up bungalows. The neighborhood association is doing quite a bit as well, getting the local police to increase patrols and rid their area of prostitution. Apparently, they have had considerable success.
Of course, Mount Vernon Square still doesn’t have a huge amount of services, and a few vacant lots still remain. But with the neighborhood groups as strong as they are, there’s good reason to believe that this will not be the case much longer.
Two other things bear mentioning: the new DC convention center just opened up in Mount Vernon Square, and with it a lot of jobs were added to the area economy. Because the neighborhood has been neglected so long, many people can afford to live and work here. Also, there are two Metro stops close by, so commuting out of the neighborhood for a job is quite easy.
Pros
  • improving
Cons
  • still has a lot left to do
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"a pleasant place to live"

Mount Pleasant is a neighborhood with a lot of diversity. All races are represented in significant numbers, though whites are about half. Rich, poor and middle class live here, which is quite unique for the DC area. Beautiful old row houses line many of the streets, with some condos and apartments mixed in as well. Mount Pleasant Avenue, the commercial district, has a wide variety of shops and services catering to each of the constituencies in the neighborhood. In fact, walking up and down there will give you quite a view of the diversity that is our country as a whole.
Because there are so many services, residents can pick up groceries on their way home from work, and get to walk several places. In fact, there are even several churches in the neighborhood for those who are so inclined. Metro busses and trains take residents all over the city to their jobs and doctor’s appointments. When they come home, there isn’t much to fear about walking to the house, as the neighborhood is pretty safe. During the early evening hours you will see people walking their dogs in the park, and mornings often include the local joggers taking advantage of the same scenery.
Pros
  • diversity
  • constantly improving
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Family friendly"

Michigan Park: a nice, middle class neighborhood with reasonably priced housing and quiet streets. It is close to the Maryland line. While many nearby neighborhoods are primarily residential, that is not as true with Michigan Park. The Roman Catholic Church has significant influence, because there is a religious community in its boundaries, with the requisite chapel. At certain times of day, you can hear the church bells. Catholic University is close by, giving you many options for quality child care courtesy of the students. Also a result of the university, there are plenty of restaurants and grocery stores near the school, which are a long walk or a short bus ride away. Additional shopping is just on the other side of the Maryland line.
One advantage of having the Catholic Church having such a presence is the really low crime rate: in fact, even petty theft is fairly rare here. Like much of the surrounding areas, Michigan Park is made up of a lot of single family homes with yards. There is also a good deal of green space. Schools are reasonable, though many residents can afford private school. Lastly, if you get sick here it is a short drive to the hospital at the center of the neighborhood.
Pros
  • reasonable priced housing
Cons
  • ambulances disrupt traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Family friendly"

McLean gardens: a posh, postwar development where the doorman keeps the bad people out and the good people safe. Near a Metro station, it has access to whatever you need quickly and easily, even though you will be leaving the development to get them. This is an area which isn’t outrageously expensive, but nonetheless very nice and quite safe. Part of this of course is that a large proportion of he neighborhood is made up of condos, which means that many residents are also capable of home ownership. It is a bit farther away from American University, so there aren’t so many students here. There’s also a sizeable buffer from the noise and craziness that accompanies many universities. Many of the people who live here are singles and young married couples. Children, however, would be welcome here as there is space to play and breathe. Goodness knows a safe neighborhood is a great one for a family. Even though few students actually live here, they are close enough that you could hire one to babysit the kids while you go out on the town. Overall, this is really a great place to live as a young professional, with or without kids.
Pros
  • family friendly
  • history
Cons
  • Hope Diamond curse?
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"dont even think about it"

Like many places east of the Anacostia, Mayfair is low income and primarily Black. In fact, there is a huge public housing complex right in the middle of the neighborhood. With such establishments come drugs and crime, along with a very low level of education. And these residents are largely forgotten, as they don’t have any shopping or restaurants in the area. About the only good thing about this neighborhood is the fact it is close to two different Metro stations. Normally Metro stations attract revitalization and commercial areas, but that doesn’t seem to be the case here in Mayfair.
I’ve heard people say that Mayfair is sufficiently unsafe that there is no reason to go there unless it is where you live. From what I’m seeing, living there isn’t worth it either. If you have very little money, then go ahead and live there. However, I definitely would recommend a burglar alarm, dead bolt locks, chains, and a large dog. Just might save your life and/or property. You might be able to purchase free standing homes and renovate them, but to expect a huge profit is unrealistic. The park is pretty, but not always safe after dark, because it is a good place for druggies and prostitutes to hang out.
Pros
  • low cost of living
Cons
  • high crime rate
  • housing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
Just now

"Cathedral Bells..."

Massachusetts Avenue Heights is a place where residents can watch the happenings of our great nation, as it is measured through weddings, funerals, and special events. You see, it borders the National Cathedral, and our Vice President has his house here too. If you are the type who would rather not get traffic jams on the weekends or during special events, you might consider somewhere else. But then again, you’ll get a front row seat for a lot of things. In addition, the crime rate is essentially nonexistent, and you can walk the streets without any real fear. Be prepared for a scenic walk, too: there are few private residences, but with the Cathedral and the Naval Observatory here, plenty of trees and grass can be found. Expect security to be tight as well, due to a heavy Secret Service presence.
To purchase groceries and other necessaries, you will have to go to neighboring communities. But since Massachusetts Avenue Heights is in the middle of everything, this is not a major drawback. Furthermore, the Metro is close by. It is a nice place to live, if you can get or afford housing there: prices are about the same as Adams Morgan or American University Park.
Pros
  • close to everything
  • cathedral
Cons
  • hard to find housing
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"a long way to go"

Marshall Heights is a neighborhood with a lot of poverty and crime, but one which is fighting for better things. They have a really good community group, the Marshall Heights Community Development Corporation. This group provides many services, but most notably it helps first time homebuyers purchase their first home, helps current homeowners get help so that they don’t lose their homes, and assist with job placement. In addition, MHCDA holds GED, or High school diploma by exam, classes. The view of the entire community is that the high illiteracy rate has got to be reduced, because with the ability to read comes more jobs and higher salaries.
On other factors however Marshall Heights doesn’t do too well. There is still a high foreclosure rate, and the rate of violent crime is very high. They’ve had two homicides this month, and several sexual assaults. For this reason, gentrifiers are afraid to move into the neighborhood. Improvement is going to have to come from the inside, as efforts to get GED’s, improve education and get better jobs pay off. Perhaps some development will do the neighborhood some good, especially if they tear down blighted houses and build some retail, providing jobs. Otherwise, Marshall Heights won’t be safe anytime soon.
Pros
  • cheap
  • community spirit
Cons
  • violent crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
Just now

"middle-class oasis"

Manor Park is one of the middle class neighborhoods backed up to the Maryland state line. It is filled with lovely detached housing and duplexes which house single families and provide a decent sized yard. Like many neighborhoods in the area, there are few services for residents unless you drive across the state line, but this doesn’t deter most of them. Being close to Catholic University, there are a few students, but Manor Park is far enough away that there shouldn’t be too many of them. On the other hand, professors do live there along with their families. This is a great place to raise your children, as they love to play in the yard after school, or go to any of the several parks in the area. Summers will find residents indulging in backyard barbecues and overall neighborliness.
Manor Park did fall on hard times in decades past, but the residents are eager to put that behind them. So, they are fixing up the houses and settling in for long term residency. In fact, this is something of a tradition in the area. Of course, location does work in their favor pretty well since most of the surrounding area is middle class or even well to do.
Pros
  • quiet
  • long term residents
  • roomy
Cons
  • no apartment complexes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
Just now

"up and coming"

Logan Circle is one of those historically black neighborhoods that, except for a brief period in the seventies, has remained that way. Like many, it has experienced ups and downs, but right now the trend is definitely up. Although Logan Circle itself is largely residential, with little retail and few restaurants, this is not the case everywhere in the neighborhood. Rather, the area we refer to more as Shaw is home to plenty of jazz clubs, night life, restaurants and even a Whole Foods! Needless to say, there is something for almost everyone in the area, except for the most trendy people. That constituency is better off with Dupont Circle or Adams Morgan, where the trendiest, most upscale establishments are. Overall, Logan Circle is a middle class Black neighborhood, although since it is close to Howard University there are some students. That wouldn’t stop ME from living there, but if you like your quiet then as a total package Logan Circle may not be your thing.
A lot of the big old houses became apartments and even boarding houses. Although many of these have been renovated back to their original use, nonetheless those smaller units are great for singles and students. Any way you go though, Logan Circle is a nice historic neighborhood to consider.
Pros
  • growing and rebuilding
  • new life
Cons
  • still recovering
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"dog lovers paradise"

For dog lovers the Lincoln Park neighborhood might as well be paradise. Before work and in the evening the whole park area is full of dogs, who are freely allowed to run and play. Neighborliness reigns supreme with joggers taking the perimeter of the park and enjoying their leisurely exercise. Long considered to be the border between the nice areas of Washington and the ghetto, Lincoln Park is fast losing that distinction in the wave of redevelopment. Condos are going up, and single family homes are also being revitalized. One thing about a nice park though is that it serves as a community gathering place, helps strengthen those ties and if well used, there isn’t much opportunity for it to be used as a place for crime.
On the down side, there is a public housing project on the far side of the park; this will discourage too much more gentrification. Then again, from what we are seeing, perhaps the low and middle income communities will be able to coexist here for the sake of walking the dogs and taking a jog in peace. Because it is close to the Metro, Lincoln Park is a great place to commute from if you don’t mind the diversity of the neighborhood.
Pros
  • a place for dogs
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • few stores
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"sense of hopelessness"

Lincoln Heights is another one of those poor communities east of the Anacostia, where a lot of hopelessness reigns. You see, it has been blighted for a long time, and the crime rate is sky high. Several homicides were reported there in the past week, and burglaries are abundant. In a down economy, people will do whatever it takes to survive. In addition to the more violent crimes, Lincoln Heights has a lot of issues with drugs and prostitution; one local park was facetiously called “needle park,” because of all the junkies who hang out there. The city has tried to clean it up, but who knows how long that will last. Lincoln Heights is also unfortunately full of public housing projects, although the city is trying to change that too by having “mixed income” developments. The few other examples of this I’ve heard of however, did not work out well due to the differing lifestyles of the groups and a mutual mistrust. Lincoln Heights is home to a lot of single mothers and high school dropouts. I know the district is trying to change this by building a new school. However, it isn’t as much the building that matters as the people inside it. Overall, not a place you want to hang out.
Pros
  • rec center and park
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"Community with character"

LeDroit Park is a neighborhood with lots of character and quite a history. It was an early subdivision and, even though it was outside Howard University, restricted to whites only. Nowadays, it is a lovely, middle-class black neighborhood, full of both professionals and students. Since the neighborhood was planned as a subdivision, there isn’t much commercial property there. However, it is quite picturesque, with unique row homes. You’ll be within walking distance of nearly everything, including a Metro station. Naturally, because of its proximity to Howard University, there are some homes occupied by groups of students, which has its disadvantages.
Some famous people have lived in LeDroit Park, including Duke Ellington (famous jazz musician) and Jesse Jackson, the social activist of recent years. Now a historic district, the neighborhood boasts some interesting murals depicting Black history and community togetherness. This is quite a change from its past in segregation!
To live in LeDroit park then is to live in the middle of history, especially the history of desegregation and racial equality. Being next to Howard University, the neighborhood is quite convenient for professors and students alike, and it draws some of the best and brightest young Blacks from around the country.
Pros
  • part of history
  • near Howard University
Cons
  • students
  • narrow streets
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Just now

"little known treasure"

Lanier Heights is an historic neighborhood with a strong sense of community and an activist neighborhood association. Recently the activists have fought a war over the potential to make Lanier Heights an official historic district, with varied (and much debated) results. One can easily understand why such a battle is being fought, however: development is going on all around the single-family homes of Lanier Heights, and not everyone is going to be happy about that. The declaration of an historic district would essentially stop most development, including the construction of new condo or apartment complexes.
Regardless of the outcome of this campaign however, Lanier Heights does have some important advantages. Being right next to the amenities of Adams Morgan, residents can walk to any sort of restaurant or shop they desire. And close by you will find both the National Zoo and two Metro stations. While this does mean an uptick in tourism during summer, there is plenty of space for everyone. Like surrounding neighborhoods, Lanier Heights has decent public schools. Because housing is more reasonable, it is mostly occupied by young professionals. For those fortunate to have children, there are plenty of private schools in addition to the public ones. In short, Lanier Heights is a nice place in the middle of the city.
Pros
  • community
  • neighborhood amenities
Cons
  • tourists overrun the place in summer
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
Just now

"only good for golf...maybe."

You’d think Langston, being home to some important amenities, would be stable. But it isn’t. Just outside its borders you will find the stadium where the Washington Redskins used to play, but don’t anymore because of Langston’s bigger attraction: the golf course. To say that this golf course is in an unlikely location would be an understatement: normally, we consider golf courses something that you would only find in posh suburbs as part of an exclusive country club. But this is not the case: Langston Golf Course is in one of the more crime-ridden parts of the city, to the extent that the management is obliged to provide heavy security even during daytime. It is even more astonishing to think that the presence of a golf course has not attracted any gentrifiers at all: the golfers come in from elsewhere in order to play a game. Sure, there are some jobs, but this is about all that the course lends Langston.
Housing is extremely cheap, and also run down. Loads of homeless people and drug activity plague the area, and it is dangerous even during the day time. If you leave anything inside your car, expect it to be stolen. Going there for golf? Travel in a group and don’t take unnecessary things with you.
Pros
  • golf course
Cons
  • blight
  • housing project
Recommended for
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
Just now

"red light district!"

Like many communities near the Arboretum, Langdon is full of low income people. There are subsidized housing units, although there are also a number of single family homes as well. Langdon might be said to have a split personality, with both industrial and residential sides. In addition, it is backed up to the biggest park in the city: the national Arboretum. It is hard to see why such a beautiful place is full of so much blight and sadness, but that’s the way things are.
Apparently, Langdon attracts a lot of unsavory influences: in addition to being full of drugs, it is also a sort of red light district. Single females without such intentions would be wise to stay away from there at night. Schools are really bad, with many of the kids dropping out of high school. Teenage motherhood is way too common. Good role models are few and far between. Needless to say, this isn’t a place I would recommend for raising children, and unless you work in the area and want really cheap housing, there isn’t much to commend living here. If you must live there, make sure that there is tight security in your home, and I would recommend getting a dog.
Pros
  • recreational oppertunities
Cons
  • prostitution rampant
  • poor quality housing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Idyllic"

Imagine a place where middle class families purchase homes, and after three generations it is still in the family. Where the residents care about their community, and strive to make it better. Grandparents watch their grandkids during working hours, and after school the older ones play ball in the streets and community centers. Everything that the community needs is very close by, and the crime rate is really low. A neighborhood that is both suburban, and yet so close to the city that a short Metro ride will get you just about anywhere to work. Somewhere that is preferable to the suburban community just across the state line. Imagine that, and you’ve described Lamond Riggs.
The residents are known for one of the most active community associations, and this shows. In fact, they have gotten developers not only to come and build things, but to do it in such a way that preserves community while meeting important needs. Taken together, you can see that the neighborhood is extremely stable, and probably will remain that way for the foreseeable future. Surprisingly, the housing isn’t that expensive by DC standards, and yet it is in pretty good condition. This is probably an outgrowth of Lamont Riggs’ strong sense of community: you take care of what is yours.
Pros
  • very safe
  • easy commute
  • community spirit
Cons
  • fewer services
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Not in my neighborhood!"

Kingman Park is a place where class warfare is very much in evidence, where people who want to be left alone like to live. In essence, you can’t do much of anything in the Kingman Park neighborhood because they will protest, and they have carried this so far as to create a disadvantage to themselves and others. One might say they are part of the reason DC has such horrible traffic.
Economically, they are middle class blacks, and the neighborhood is still fairly safe. Schools are decent: there are two charter schools which in turn improve the public schools around them due to competition. Activism has kept the neighborhood safe, because less desirable influences have been unable to gain a foothold here. Housing prices are reasonable, making this a reasonably good place to live without the sky high price.
As much as activism can be good, it has come at a price: there is little retail or food service in Kingman Park, in spite of its proximity to a major stadium and multiple parks. Yet there is a nice place to walk along the river bank. Walkability, it seems, only goes so far. Residents have to leave the area to purchase most things they might need or want.
Pros
  • strong civic organizations
Cons
  • nowhere to shop
  • lack of public transportation
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A History of Social Justice"

Kenilworth is a very poor neighborhood, and has a lot of public housing. Normally I would consider that to be mostly or completely bad, but not this time. Why? Because there is a magnet school in Kenilworth, and because the residents are more empowered than most in this area. In fact, there was an attempt back in the eighties to have residents own their own condos within the public housing units. There was a lot of organization, but politicians being who they are it didn’t work. Nonetheless, these residents are not the type to be resigned to their situation: they are trying to better themselves. They get their high school diplomas and work hard; in a rare combination of factors there isn’t much crime. This makes the private housing options worth purchasing and living in, and you could safely raise a family in this area. Real estate is nonetheless reasonably priced. An added bonus is the aquatic gardens run by the National Park Service. Because of the influx of tourists during the summer there are a few more services than in many neighborhoods east of the Anacostia. Nonetheless, residents will have to drive into Maryland to purchase many of their needs.
Pros
  • empowered residents
  • beautiful surroundings
Cons
  • public housing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"blast from the past"

Kalorama Heights is a unique neighborhood bordering Embassy Row, the Naval Observatory, and Adams Morgan. Full of stately urban mansions and posh condominiums, it is home to the powerful and also serves as an overflow for Embassy Row: because there are so many lovely mansions and not enough space in Embassy Row, many countries have set up their missions in Kalorama Heights. In fact, the Ambassador from France lives here. Others with influence do as well: over the years five US Presidents have lived here, and Senator Feinstein, one of the most influential legislators at the moment, has her home in Kalorama Heights.
Although the neighborhood is close to Adams Morgan and Dupont Circle, Kalorama Heights doesn’t have much in the way of restaurants or retail. But this doesn’t bother the residents: they like it that way, and anyway Adams Morgan is within walking distance. Real estate here is expensive, and has little turnover in general, so anyone who can find and afford it is indeed quite fortunate. There are plenty of trees and loads of vintage charm in Kalorama Heights, which is unlikely to change since the area is on the National Historic Register. Public schools in the area aren’t too bad.
Pros
  • part of history
  • very desirable location
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"urban blight!"

For a long time Ivy City has been one of the most dangerous and poorest neighborhoods, arguably one of the worst north of the Anacostia. Situated near the Arboretum and abutting Gallaudet University, the national school for the Deaf, it is full of blight and crime. Apparently, it was hit especially hard during the Crack cocaine boom in the 1980’s and never recovered. It was so bad that not even Gallaudet students really liked to live there. However, this seems to be changing: because land in DC has become so expensive, many middle class people are moving into the area. They have taken advantage of cheap mortgages and are rapidly revitalizing the area.
Ivy City nonetheless has much low income housing remaining, as developers see the advantage of preserving some. Because it is so close to Gallaudet, there are businesses which cater to students. Be aware however that because the students are deaf, you will have to be careful as they can’t hear you coming. Having students in the area will probably keep property values down a bit. Anyhow, if buying run down properties and revitalizing them is your cup of tea, it might be worth looking at Ivy City. Just don’t expect it to be particularly safe at this time, or to send your kids to the DC schools.
Pros
  • on the rise
  • recent improvements
Cons
  • students
  • still much left to do
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"students and services"

Howard University is one of the best Black colleges in the country. Young people from around the country come here to learn in an environment that inspires young blacks to succeed, to be the future of their race and leaders in the world at large. Around the campus there is predictably a bunch of housing, both on and off campus, that mainly houses Howard students. One of the nice things about this school is that it is good at motivating students to better themselves. However, you might point out that they are still students, and still do the crazy things you would expect of students, like stay out late and throw a party now and then. In the past, the area around the university has had a sketchy reputation because of drugs and theft, but this problem seems to be getting better. Right now, there are gentrifiers hoping to purchase a bargain home in a part of the city with plenty of public transport coverage. Thus, your success here depends on where you buy or live.
Naturally, during the summer this neighborhood is somewhat quieter, because most students go back to their homes. All year though you can count on plenty of inexpensive places to eat and hang out. Perhaps this is the biggest plus of living here.
Pros
  • plenty of services
  • intellectual stimulation
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"pretty little enclave"

Historic Anacostia is a community rich in history: it was one of the original communities for freed blacks, and one that during the Great Depression served as the site of a major protest from veterans, who wanted their entitlements. It is urban, yet scenic at the same time, and since it sits on the Anacostia River, many homes have a stunning view of downtown DC with the dome of the Capitol and the Washington Monument. The river throws off a really refreshing breeze in the summer, and the area is higher than much of the city.
Anacostia High is one of the better public schools on this side of the river, and it is famous for serving as one of the battlegrounds of desegregation during the fifties. Its demographics have changed a couple times, and at present it is where many black professionals are moving in. Comprised mainly of single-family homes, the neighborhood has plenty of trees and historic brick sidewalks. It is also a place where you can find some really nice sidewalk cafes and other fine amenities. Not to say that these are highbrow, but they are pleasant. Generally, this area is middle class and enjoys a respectably low crime rate.
Pros
  • scenic
  • some commerce
  • access to grants and imporvements
Cons
  • close to the highway
  • limitations due to historic nature
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"on the rise"

Hillsdale is a poorer community with bigger dreams. Most of the adults work in blue collar jobs, and quite a few of them are retirees. However, it has a very strong sense of both community and history. Rather than think of its past and despair, Hillsdale dreams of embracing the future with a bow to history at the same time. There is a town center planned, and a farmer’s market. The local community center is extremely active and very vocal about anything it doesn’t like.
Hillsdale used to be a suburb and agricultural district. Residents once grazed dairy cattle and made cheese. For this reason, Hillsdale wants to start a farmer’s market and become a destination in the area east of the Anacostia river.
Consistent with a formerly agricultural area, much of the housing is larger houses on decent sized plots. There are also vacant plots of land there, which sadly do attract the wrong kind of people. Hillsdale is thinking big by wanting more development and retail in their area, and this is happily somewhat successful. By the standards of this part of the city, Hillsdale is quite nice with plenty of grass and trees. Education is also a focus, with several new charter schools. Bottom line: Hillsdale is a neighborhood on the rise.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • forward thinking
Cons
  • poverty
  • close to interstate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"great little community"

Hillcrest is one of the safest and most empowered neighborhoods east of the river. In fact, it is home to the current mayor of DC, a stunning feat for this part of the city in general. Those who like to live in the suburbs, and who are not concerned about driving to obtain necessities or spend a night out on the town would enjoy Hillcrest. The neighborhood has a really strong sense of community: during the warmer months, residents will block off the streets and have a block party. Consistent with this sort of neighborliness, there is a really strong civic association.
Crime is no issue here, and surrounding communities aren’t too bad by Anacostia standards either. Perhaps the biggest drawback of this area is that public transportation isn’t really good when it comes to connecting Hillcrest to the rest of the city. However, if you are willing to drive, or go into Maryland to board the Metro, this isn’t so bad. You will definitely need to own a car though. Housing costs are reasonable: most homes are detached or row homes, with a few condos and garden style apartments. All are a good value for DC, and the houses sit on well manicured lawns. Great place to find community.
Pros
  • beautiful and green
  • fresh air
Cons
  • public schools
  • distance from downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"community as it should be"

Hill East is a great residential neighborhood adjacent to Capitol Hill and the Anacostia. It is primarily residential, but just far enough from downtown that there is space for plenty of services such as full sized supermarkets. For this reason, it is walkable and sufficiently close to everything that you won’t feel too far out in the suburbs. Residents love to use the adjacent Congressional cemetery as a place to walk the dog, and children love to play in the yards. Many young families with children have moved here, and housing costs are reasonable by DC standards.
While there are some bars and restaurants in Hill East, there aren’t nearly as many as you find in Capitol Hill. However, you can quickly get to that part of town if you want; it is longish walking distance, or take the Metro one stop. Parking is easy to come by. Crime is a bit higher, but still manageable and most residents still feel safe there.
Perhaps the biggest advantage of Hill East (also called Barney Circle) is the strong sense of community. It is the sort of place where residents know each other by name, and help one another with yard work. If you are out of town, you could count on your neighbors to keep an eye on the house. There is also a civic association that advocates for local concerns.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • lovely, tree lined streets
Cons
  • poor public schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"A place for family"

Hawthorne is one of the neighborhoods up against Chevy Chase and the Maryland border. Its residents are wealthy, well educated professionals, and many have kids. You can see the children out after school, having fun before they have to go and do their homework. The mothers jaunt around town in luxury automobiles, toting their designer handbags. Unlike neighboring Chevy Chase, Hawthorne is quiet. There are of course some basic necessities available in the neighborhood, but going into Chevy Chase is necessary for more extensive shopping. Not that anyone minds: Chevy Chase is a place to see and be seen, especially if you have plenty of toys to show off.
Unlike Chevy Chase, Hawthorne has lots of space for walking out in nature: it abuts Rock Creek Park, where plenty of residents can be found walking their dogs. Unlike Georgetown, there is no university nearby to increase traffic, or to cause tensions over the growth of a large local industry. But don’t be fooled: residents of Hawthorne have a lot of power, and a lot of influence. Lobbyists, politicians and the managers of important private firms all share this space. And criminals? They don’t have a chance here, because everyone knows everyone else. Almost like a small town.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"poor mans paradise"

Greenway residents are desperately poor, with a hugely high unemployment rate, Many of them have been in prison, and an overall air of hopelessness pervades the entire neighborhood. Housing is rundown, consisting of row houses and public housing complexes—with a few private apartments mixed in there somewhere. In a city where the schools are overall very poor, the neighborhood schools are some of the worst. With this being the case, it is no wonder that nobody cares enough about themselves to graduate high school, and instead chooses to live without a high school diploma. Other examples of urban blight exist as well: it has one of the highest rate of single parenthood in the entire country, and a very low marriage rate.
The few homes that aren’t public housing are ironically worse than public housing. Residents complain about mold, outrageously high prices for what you get, and a general refusal to fix anything. Hoodlums loiter on every corner, and drug deals are everywhere. Drive-by shootings, gang activity, and addiction characterize this neighborhood.
Surprisingly, a very small number of people with good jobs do live here, primarily because they are under paid. These individuals might make for an investment opportunity: if someone were to purchase some units, renovate them, and offer them for reasonable rent, they might be able to make some money. However, I wouldn’t recommend anyone purchasing a unit just to live in.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"ugh."

Typical of most of Anacostia, Grant Park is a very poor, mostly residential neighborhood. Sitting right on the Maryland border, it is served by the Capitol Heights metro station. There are very few services, and the crime rate is sky high. In fact, there is plenty of crime and a load of drugs, since Grant Park went through the crack era in the 80’s and 90’s. Schools are very poor, and quite a few residents not only live below the poverty line, but depend to some extent on public assistance. This is not a place where you want to be hanging out after dark, unless of course you are looking for trouble. If you live here, expect to drive out to Prince George’s County, MD to do your grocery shopping and get other tasks accomplished.
Perhaps the only thing of note which goes on in Grant Park is a bit of local controversy: the neighborhood is home to a very run down nursing home. It is the kind of place you take your loved one to be neglected until he or she dies. In fact, the local health department placed them under investigation for excessively poor treatment of patients. Naturally, a lot of those goons probably live in the area. So much for caring for your neighbors. With industry like this, you can’t expect much better of the neighborhood at large.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"home of the famous"

Georgetown is arguably Washington’s most famous area. Having been a town since before colonial times, Georgetown has some of the oldest homes in the District. It is also home to a famous bakery, Georgetown Cupcake, star of the hit show “DC Cupcake.” Georgetown University has its home here, but besides campus housing few students can afford to live here: that’s because Georgetown housing is among the most expensive in the city. In any event, Georgetown is full of many ritzy shops and decadent eateries. People are on the streets late into the night, and have a lot of fun here. In fact, many of the most famous residents of the city live here, including John Kerry (senator) and former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
Georgetown has some of the best public schools in the city. So much so that residents of other areas try to get their kids sent there under school choice initiatives. Ironically, most Georgetown residents send their children to private schools, as they almost invariably can afford it. Residents play host to some of the most exclusive parties in the city. If you want to impress someone in Washington, all you have to do is invite them to some residence in Georgetown for a party.
Pros
  • elegance incarnate
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"educational mecca"

George Washington University neighborhood is all about students bettering themselves, and residents fighting it every inch of the way. Trouble is, anytime there are college students, you are going to have drunken parties and other ridiculous situations. And so it goes: many neighborhood houses are rented to GWU students, who in turn carry on at all hours of the day and night. Natually, the neighbors don’t like this. The primary result of this situation is a constant tug of war between the residents and the university, and there is considerable tension as a result.
On a different note: you could do a lot worse than live in this area, primarily because in spite of the drunks on weekends there is a fairly low crime rate. If you have kids, there are plenty of young ladies to hire as babysitters, and loads of potential tutors to help your teenager with the math homework.
There is plenty of public transportation in this area, and abundant office buildings. If you don’t mind the noise from GWU students, then this is a reasonable bargain here in the District. Keep in mind: the educational level here is very high, because not only do students live here but the profs as well.
Pros
  • student influence energy
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"dont even think about it"

Near the Arboretum to the north lies Gateway. Like many other areas of the city next to the Arboretum, Gateway has a very high crime rate. Not only are there property crimes, but homicides also take place on a regular basis. If you go to local hotels, you will find that they are primarily the staging area for drugs and prostitution. In fact, there is a drug dealer on almost every corner after dark, and the pimps are violent offenders who import their guns from surrounding states. Gateway is not somewhere that you want to be out after dark, for any reason. Not even if you are just getting home from work. Forget about going out for dinner if you can’t return home before dark. If you do, then you are running a risk of getting mugged or murdered.
Housing reflects the quality of the residents: run down and crummy. Urban blight is everywhere, and the police can’t even keep on top of everything that goes on out there. Only the truly desperate would rent or buy a home in this area. If you insist on trying it anyway, you definitely need to buy a very large dog with a ferocious bark, put in a burglar alarm and have the police department on speed dial.
Pros
  • Arboretum is pretty
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"revitalization success...for now"

In contrast to many of the neighborhoods in Southeast, Garfield Heights is relatively safe and has new housing stock. It is hard however to figure out why such improvements are successful in Garfield Heights instead of some other areas: surrounding neighborhoods are the typical Anacostia urban decay and crime traps. Real estate development has helped, for sure, but bad reputations take a really long time to improve. In comparison to surrounding areas, there is a bit more in the way of services. Nonetheless, residents still have to drive out into Prince George’s County in order to purchase many things that are needed. The nearest Metro station is quite a ways out, and requires people to cross some unsavory parts of town to get there.
Any public school in Anacostia as a whole is a poor excuse for an education. All too many young people drop out and succumb to the cycle of violence and drugs. I don’t see any evidence that Garfield Heights has an active neighborhood association, and this is a huge red flag. Those neighborhoods whose gentrification efforts have stuck over time all have this feature. It could be that Garfield Heights will develop such a group however. Otherwise, the problems of the surrounding areas might spill over back into Garfield Heights.
Pros
  • quality housing
  • recent improvements
Cons
  • schools
  • surrounding neighborhoods
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Chevy Chase, cheap"

Friendship Heights could be called Chevy Chase on the cheap. Close to shopping, restaurants and services, there is something for everyone. Many office buildings and apartments are mixed in with nice houses, and most of them sell or rent for a reasonable price. If you both live and work in the neighborhood, you could walk or bike to work without much problem. You might say Friendship Heights is the height of DC living, while preserving a sense of friendship. It also has a fairly strong sense of community, and the crime rate is very low.
Most of the people who live in Friendship Heights are middle class, in contrast to their neighbors in Chevy Chase. There is a major Metro station there, for those who live either closer to downtown DC or out in Montgomery County, MD. Naturally, many residents of surrounding communities come here for a relaxing evening in one of the restaurants, or to buy groceries.
Because there is a lot of traffic, you won’t see children playing after school. Instead, they will have to go somewhere else. On the other hand, the parents can and do pay for special activities like after school sports, so this isn’t much of a problem. Anyway, you will see families out walking the sidewalks and it is safe to do that.
Pros
  • relatively affordable
  • everything you need is nearby
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Georgetown suburb"

People who live in Foxhall Village enjoy their peace and quiet. That is why, faced with Georgetown University expansions, the residents have united in protest. The sense of community is strong, with one of the most active civic associations in the city. Housing is very expensive, and isolation carefully guarded. So, there are no shops or restaurants, or anything else for that matter. Like Foxhall Crescent, the residents of Foxhall Village do enjoy the amenities of Georgetown: so long as Georgetown stays in Georgetown. The presence of Georgetown University students in the neighborhood is strongly disliked: never mind that the degree of their presence will always be limited by the expense of housing. Many can get a better deal elsewhere.
Like neighboring Georgetown and Foxhall Crescent, the local children have the luxury of the best DC schools have to offer. Naturally, many parents prefer to send their children to the neighborhood private schools (there are several) because they can afford it, but still public school is a reasonable option here. It means that you can spend more of your income on housing should you choose to do so. Do keep in mind: there is very little parking, and even less public transportation in the neighborhood, and for these you may have to go to Georgetown. But, if you want a quiet getaway then arguably the inconvenience is worth it.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • plenty of space
Cons
  • tensions with Georgetown University
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Green and gorgeous"

Foxhall Crescent can be described as Georgetown North: beautiful, green and quiet. And expensive: homes there exceed a million dollars. The entire neighborhood has a park like atmosphere, and indeed there are two parks in the middle of the neighborhood. Since Foxhall Crescent is up against the Potomac River, many homes have a view of the Virginia coastline: this is quite beautiful. If you didn’t know better, you would swear you were far out in the country. Naturally this does come with a price: there are few amenities like restaurants and stores inside the neighborhood itself, so you will probably want a car.
On the other hand, Foxhall Crescent is close to Georgetown, with its many shops, restaurants and neighborhood hangouts. You can be there within minutes, and enjoy a relaxing dinner, or a drink after work. The neighborhood is zoned to send children to the same public schools as Georgetown. If you are going to send your kids to DC schools, this is the place to do it: unlike many other parts of the city, these kids enjoy high graduation rates and often do get into college. Residents will often have garden parties and cookouts during the warmer months, and kids can build snow men when winter storms come. It is quiet and peaceful to live here.
Pros
  • good schools
  • quiet seclusion
Cons
  • must drive to shop
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"inexpensive and fairly safe"

Fort Totten is one of the few Metro stations without much use. Apparently, most people just pass through there to change trains, if necessary. One reason for this, it seems, is that there is a problem with people getting mugged going into and out of the station. Perhaps this has to do with there being so much empty space in the area, as Fort Totten is in need of redevelopment. Relative to Anacostia, the crime rate is low, but that does not mean Totten is completely safe. Not many people stay out at night, there is little or no night life, and in general there are no real forces to keep the problems at bay. Fort Totten is mix-race and reasonably priced, and the government is trying to improve the area.
At the heart of this improvement is an effort on the part of developers and the city to build on those vacant lots, and to tear down the old buildings in favor of something newer. Resulting from this, there are now shopping centers and high rise apartments. Yet improvement comes slowly. In the mean time, if you are looking for housing in a place that is neither excessively dangerous nor expensive, Fort Totten is one place to look.
Pros
  • recreational oppertunities
Cons
  • poor housing choices
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"tiny hideaway"

Fort Stanton is a tiny area of Anacostia, with not much going on. It used to be a fort during the Civil War, and now has a Smithsonian franchise on Black history. Other than that, the area is unremarkable. There is no real commercial space at all, besides a few fast food joints and the occasional gas station or 7-11.
Fort Stanton too went through the fifties and sixties with a lot of problems: all the whites left, and then the riots tore much of the neighborhood apart in 1968. Many public housing projects were built, and a number of people live there who are hooked on drugs. Youth, facing a very poor education system, frequently drop out before getting their high school diploma. Very few job opportunities are in this area, so you will have to have a car or depend on the busses for everything you need. Also, there is no neighborhood school.
On a more positive note, the population density is rather low, with plenty of single-family homes and yards. If you can stomach the risk of raising your children there, they will at least have some space. More likely though, people who buy houses here intend to rent them out for investment income. Few local residents could afford to actually own their home.
Pros
  • green space
Cons
  • crime
  • no services
  • poor housing choices
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"almost no crime"

Fort McNair is a military community and base right next to Buzzard Point. It has been there since the 18th century, being the first fort to protect DC from potential invaders. The only form of housing there is military housing, both for single officers and those accompanied by their families. Because of the diversity of programs at McNair, there are also military officers from allied states there as well. Walking the streets, you may hear more languages than just English being spoken: although the official language will be English at all times, nonetheless others may be spoken at home. Like other military posts, amenities include a post office, commissary, military exchange (shop for military personnel), a clinic, and many offices. Because it is an academic center, Fort McNair also has a library and many classrooms.
If you live there for military reasons, Fort McNair has no crime besides the occasional petty theft, and anything bad that happens will be dealt with by military justice. Of course, if you have kids then you might find a great place to play catch, and plenty of babysitting. Prepare to have your children bussed off base to go to school, as there isn’t one on base.
Pros
  • excellent oppertunities
Cons
  • only for army personel
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"neighborhood on the rise"

Fort Lincoln is an interesting mixture of people and occupations. Many residents are current and former government employees and other professionals. The percentage of married couples with children is much higher here than in other parts of the city. Few people are poor, even though there is a fairly significant variation of income. Residents enjoy walking in the parks, and playing with their children after they return from school. Interestingly, there is a patchwork of services, with the public services being terrible while private amenities are well cared for. In the past, residents were discouraged because the neighborhood was declining, no longer as safe as it had once been.
Concerns about crime however have been more reflective of what was once an old trend, with more property crimes than in the past. Lately, this has been less of a concern because a couple years ago the chief of District police moved into one of the nice homes. While the past had seen residents ignored by politicians, having the police chief live among you is a powerful force for improvement. In addition, a nice new shopping center opened recently. With this shopping center, residents no longer have to face a lengthy drive for every need. Housing is still reasonable, but one wonders how much longer that will last.
Pros
  • home to police chief
  • nice, inexpensive housing
Cons
  • poor public maintenance
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Lock your doors"

Fort Davis Park is close to Barry Farm and some other less-than-ideal neighborhoods, but feels a world away. Rather than the quiet desperation seen in many other neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River, or the poverty seen throughout much of wards 7 and 8, Fort Davis Park plays host to upwardly mobile residents. A throwback to the days of segregation, most residents are black. However, most are professionals of some sort, or occupy management positions. The issues with drugs and violence which plague all too many in DC don’t exist in Fort Davis Park. Rather, it is a safe place to raise children. With a mixture of housing options, all of them affordable, there are plenty of families. In addition, parents ensure their kids get a proper education.
For those who enjoy their recreation, there are many options: a huge park and the standard DC recreation center. While the former sees plenty of residents walking their dogs during twilight hours, the other is a great place for people to hang out and play basketball after school. Of course, there are other programs as well for those who do not want to play basketball. Lastly, there is a significant sense of community, essential to beating the sad statistics in many other neighborhoods in the areas east of the Anacostia river.
Pros
  • cheap housing
Cons
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"worlds away..."

Fort Davis Park is close to Barry Farm and some other less-than-ideal neighborhoods, but feels a world away. Rather than the quiet desperation seen in many other neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River, or the poverty seen throughout much of wards 7 and 8, Fort Davis Park plays host to upwardly mobile residents. A throwback to the days of segregation, most residents are black. However, most are professionals of some sort, or occupy management positions. The issues with drugs and violence which plague all too many in DC don’t exist in Fort Davis Park. Rather, it is a safe place to raise children. With a mixture of housing options, all of them affordable, there are plenty of families. In addition, parents ensure their kids get a proper education.
For those who enjoy their recreation, there are many options: a huge park and the standard DC recreation center. While the former sees plenty of residents walking their dogs during twilight hours, the other is a great place for people to hang out and play basketball after school. Of course, there are other programs as well for those who do not want to play basketball. Lastly, there is a significant sense of community, essential to beating the sad statistics in many other neighborhoods in the areas east of the Anacostia river.
Pros
  • nice and green
  • strong community
Cons
  • must drive to shop
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Family friendly"

Forest Hills is a beautiful neighborhood, which boasts of plenty of grass, trees, and multi-million dollar homes. It has a primarily suburban feel, with a few scattered shopping areas and even a law school. Backed up to Chevy Chase, DC, Forest Hills has all the exclusivity without the horrendous traffic. Instead, the streets are relatively quiet as would be expected of the suburbs. Of course, we are still talking about DC with traffic generally being some of the worst in the country, but still Forest Hills manages to keep fairly quiet. This is because it doesn’t have as extensive of services as surrounding areas. On the other hand, with the Law school in its borders things will never be silent as a mouse either. Forest Hills has easy access to the Metro, for those who have jobs downtown. Naturally this is the case for a majority of citizens, as there aren’t very many offices in Forest Hills. Likewise, th3e schools are good in comparison to much of DC, so if you send your children there then they will at least learn to read and write. After school there are plenty of activities available, so roam the streets of Forest Hills and you will see busy moms taking their children from one place to another. Totally worth it for those who can afford the real estate prices.
Pros
  • family friendly
  • international elegance
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"No foggy brains..."

Foggy Bottom is a very interesting part of town, with a mixture of swank single-family homes and apartment/condo buildings. It is also home to the State Department and George Washington University. Although one might think that this would make it a great place for students to live, it isn’t because of the cost of real estate: a large condo costs millions. Unlike Georgetown or Chevy Chase however residents of Foggy Bottom do not have as many trees or as much grass. And especially different from Georgetown, the traffic is atrocious. Those streets have to absorb traffic from Dupont Circle, commuters going to office buildings, and many other sources.
These drawbacks however are balanced by the shopping, the dining, and the night life. Foggy Bottom is an area where something is always going on, and if this is someone’s style, then it is a great place to be. However, if you want something quieter and can afford this area, I would choose AU Park, Columbia Heights or even Adams Morgan. Keep in mind also that many famous people live in the area, including foreign dignitaries. Combine that with the many federal office buildings, and there is a considerable amount of security. Crime rate is very low.
Pros
  • always something going on
  • culture
Cons
  • very expensive
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"could be worse"

Fairlawn is part of wards 7 and 8, the poorest ones in the District. However, unlike some other neighborhoods, there isn’t such a sense of despair or resignation. Rather, Fairlawn residents desire something better. Some long term residents offer a bit of stability, but unfortunately there is a lot of public housing. Fairlawn is one of those neighborhoods which changed during the “white flight” era, and went through the crack epidemic in the 80’s. In spite of this, the neighborhood is recovering, and has begun to attract development and better residents. Recent improvements in public transportation are helping to break the isolation.
Schools are mediocre at best, like the vast majority of DC public schools. But, somehow the kids graduate. This is a hopeful sign. Generally speaking, there are plenty of stores, and the streets have plenty of places to go. However, residents do not like to walk the streets with their families, as the liquor and porno shops are all too common. Instead, they take the bus, taxis or private cars to get most places.
If you do not have much money to spend on housing, you can certainly do worse than Fairlawn. However, I would have to recommend your buying/renting the nicest residence you can, preferably with some form of controlled access.
Pros
  • desire for change
  • long-time residents
Cons
  • politicians don't give a darn
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"signs of hope"

Fairfax Village is one of the more hopeful areas in Ward 7, one of the poorest wards in the city. However, these neighbors have average incomes, and many more than usual have a high school diploma. As a result, they are generally upwardly mobile professional types. Too bad that they live in a forgotten area of the District. If the residents have their way, however, Fairfax Village will soon have more services, and they are already having some success. There is a nice shopping center, and the Metro recently added some bus routes.
Fairfax Village residents have a strong sense of community, and are working hard to reduce the crime rate. This will be difficult because surrounding neighborhoods have huge crime problems and are poor. On the other hand, community is the key to any sort of improvement. In any event, housing is quite affordable, so residents are able to live more comfortably than other middle class people in the District. Shopping can be accessed just across the border into Maryland. Schools aren’t that good, but the parents manage to educate their children in spite of it all. Hopefully, the residents of Fairfax Village will be able to have a positive influence on the area at large.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • public transaportation
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
Just now

"shadow of a bygone era"

Embassy Row has a storied past: at the turn of the last century, it was primarily an enclave where the rich and famous in Washington society had their homes. Even today, the streets are full of stately mansions and lined with trees. Truly walking the sidewalks is a throwback to the past, when ladies in diamonds and fur coats gathered at friend’s houses for cocktails and talk, and where households tended to have a maid. It was here that children would be tutored after coming home from the exclusive preparatory schools, before learning fine arts and crafts.
Generally however, this is a bygone era both in DC generally, and on Embassy Row in particular. Now, many of the homes on Embassy row have been converted into the diplomatic missions of foreign nations. Many of those houses are just the right size for this purpose, while others have been built on vacant lots in the area. Due to the formerly residential nature of the neighborhood, there are no restaurants or stores. Then again, with all the dignitaries around there, it isn’t such a good idea to let those open anyhow. Never fear though: Dupont Circle, with all of its fast-paced action, is just steps away.
Pros
  • international elegance
  • Beautiful
Cons
  • almost impossible to move to
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"plenty of trees"

Edgewood is a middle class, African-American neighborhood around Catholic University. In spite of its location, there aren’t many students: largely because there are no apartments in Edgewood. Nonetheless, it has kept the tree lined character it inherited from its roots as the estate of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase. The homes are large and stately, with plenty of green grass and trees. Summertime finds the children playing in the yards, and cookouts on the Fourth of July. Like many middle-class DC neighborhoods, there are some private and charter schools in the area, providing an alternative to the terrible public schools. Many residents are fairly well educated, which in DC means a minimum of a high school diploma—or better yet, a Bachelor’s. Several of the schools boast of their better school quality reports.
The local community association, like many in middle-class DC, is always planning neighborhood get-togethers. Likewise, city services are extensive: as the old saying says, the squeaky wheel gets the oil. Sadly, the crime rate is somewhat higher than other neighborhoods in the immediate area. Although residents are fighting this, it is hard to know at this point how their efforts are going to work out.
Pros
  • reasonable housing costs
  • schools
  • community spirit
Cons
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"trees and historic homes"

Eckington is a tight-knit, active and middle class community near the Capitol. Full of stately Victorian homes, Eckington has a lot of beautiful green spaces. Their community association is very active, and local politicians make sure they have whatever is needed. Although there are large homes and yards, Eckington is unique because it contains an old rail yard from the B&O Railroad. This dates from the days when electricity was new, and the District wasn’t as built up. It is also one reason why Eckington has a secluded, exclusive air: getting in and out of the area by car is somewhat difficult. Fortunately however, there is a Metro stop nearby, and many residents take advantage of this every morning.
Naturally, the railroad has its drawbacks: primarily, the noise from trains can be unpleasant. Nonetheless, the community doesn’t let this bother them too much, and the tracks provide a barrier to separate them from the less savory parts of town.
Housing values are on the rise, and so are apartment rents. Unlike many neighborhoods, Eckington seems to be able to have both coexist without losing any of its semi-suburban character. There is some shopping in a small commercial district, and everything else can be easily accessed with a short Metro ride to the commercial district by the Capitol. Schools in the area are better than some other parts of the city.
Pros
  • beautiful and green
  • community spirit
Cons
  • a little isolated
  • train yard
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"middle-class oasis"

Eastland Gardens is a rare jewel in the area around the Arboretum. It is one of DC’s newer neighborhoods, and it is quite small. Unlike many neighborhoods in that part of the city, it is quite safe and has middle class residents. The housing stock is mainly single family homes, and these are fairly large with well-manicured lawns. In fact, consistent with the surroundings of a large national garden, Eastland Gardens has a strong neighborhood association that promotes gardening. They also have a lot of community gatherings in the summer, and engage in community activism.
Whenever there are crime sprees, or if the residents need something, they lobby City Hall for whatever they need. And unlike complaints from some less-active communities, the gripes of Eastland Gardens residents are heard loud and clear. In fact, the mayor has been known to go over there and address concerns himself. During the last Presidential election, there was a major community event to turn out the vote.
Even though housing is well kept and beautiful, it is reasonably priced. Many other neighborhoods in that part of the city have comparable housing values, but the homes aren’t as well kept. For this reason, housing in Eastland Gardens is readily available—assuming you can get it. In this neighborhood, people tend to stay for generations.
Pros
  • interest in education
  • community spirit
Cons
  • housing availability
  • surrounding areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Ray of Hope"

Dupont Park is a relatively affluent area of Southeast DC. In addition to the poorer citizens, the area has middle class residents and even some who are fairly well-off. Apparently, this has been the case for several generations: it is a good neighborhood from back in the days of segregation in DC, when Ward 7 was almost exclusively Black. Although much of the rest of Southeastern DC is a ghetto, Dupont Park has managed to hold its own. In fact, the neighborhood is slowly improving even more to the extent that some professionals live there.
Most houses are well kept, with trees and nice lawns. Quite a few homes rival their counterparts in tony sections of Northwest, and date from about the same period. Anyhow, this is a safe place to come home to after work, and there are even some major stores close by. Doctors offices—including an abortion clinic—and pharmacies call the area home. Perhaps the only major complaint among residents is that there are few sit-down restaurants, partially because the population density is low, and partially because there is very little public transportation going through the area. This neighborhood derives its name from Fort Dupont Park, a large greenway nearby. It is an historic park, and there are plenty of recreational activities there. Not a bad place to live.
Pros
  • beautiful park
  • large homes
  • relatively affluent
Cons
  • surrounding neighborhoods
  • little public transportation
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"ritzy hangout"

Dupont Circle is an area rich in District history. Full of trees, gardens and urban parks, Dupont Circle boasts everything from embassies to mansions and small apartments. Walking its streets, you will encounter foreign dignitaries, gays and lesbians, young professionals and families. In other words, Dupont Circle is highly diverse. Besides the various residences, Dupont Circle has a wide variety of bars, restaurants and ritzy shops. You might see a gay couple walking their dog in early evening, or people coming in and out of the Iraqi Embassy during business hours. At rush hour, people pour out of their apartments and rush to the local Metro station at the heart of the neighborhood. On their way home, they might pick up a few groceries in the corner market. Saturday will likely see people playing Frisbee in the parks, or playing with pets at the dog run.
Because of the expense of housing, there are relatively few families: apartments are often cramped. If you are lucky enough to have a mansion, be sure that it costs millions of dollars. Chances are that the children go to private school, although the public schools in this neighborhood are better than most in the city. Biggest drawbacks of the area are traffic and the cost of living.
Pros
  • Great restaurants and bars
  • Pretty people run rampant here
  • wide variety of places to live
Cons
  • high cost of living
  • Bad, bad traffic
  • Everything is crowded, all the time.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Right in the middle of everything"

Downtown DC is like many others, but with two differences: there are loads of government buildings, and there are no sky scrapers. This is because no building in the District is allowed to be taller than the US Capitol building. With the government owning so much of downtown DC real estate, and with other real estate demanding high prices for commercial applications, there are relatively few apartments. No single family homes or duplexes exist in downtown—except perhaps that most famous one of all, the White House. In this area, you will find all kinds of interesting things: hotels, bars, restaurants and swank shops.
During the summer, there will be tourists everywhere. For those lucky enough to find an apartment or condo, the neighborhood has much to offer. There are many Metro stations, and bus routes are abundant. Whatever you might want to eat is readily available, from Asian food to steak. At night, you might take in a show, or enjoy a concert. Many times, there are people on the street until quite late. Also, traffic is terrible: many streets are blocked off since terrorism became a concern in the DC area. At rush hour, the congestion nears gridlock for a couple of hours. However, if this does not bother you, or if you can get to work without driving, then you might enjoy living here.
Pros
  • always something to do
  • dining
  • shopping
Cons
  • heavier traffic, since it's at the city's center
  • never a quiet moment
  • no real distinguishing factor from the rest of DC, besides being close to monuments
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
Just now

"struggling to revitalize"

Douglass is a low income to middle class, almost exclusively African- American neighborhood. Historically it has mainly consisted of public housing complexes, but recently it has also included some single family homes as well. Vacant lots have been developed, and older structures torn down to make room for more modern amenities. Recent redevelopment has turned some neighborhood lots into shopping areas as well. Most of these new stores are not trendy, but nonetheless they serve the purpose of allowing Douglass residents to purchase more everyday items without going far from home. Perhaps more importantly, more services in the neighborhood does mean more minimum wage jobs, the sort which most Douglass neighbors are qualified for. Unfortunately, crime is still a major blight in the area. Thefts and burglaries are common, and often this reflects desperation on the part of locals looking for drugs. Residents complain of young people who smoke marijuana on the sidewalk, and neighbors who make noise at all hours. Then again, perhaps it is a good thing that they are complaining: such complaints express a desire for change. We can only hope that these desires lead to some genuine improvements. With the recent redevelopment, this is highly likely.
Pros
  • growing and rebuilding
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"suburban hodgepodge"

Deanwood is one of those places where young people starting out can make their dreams come true. There is a great deal of economic diversity and fixer up homes, which can be reinvented according to their dreams. Think extreme makeover home edition, and you will get the idea. Of course, this might make your home another one of the popular community gathering spots should you decide to host a backyard barbecue. Then again, having other, more run down houses around yours will keep the home value down in the intermediate term. As for other factors, Deanwood is convenient to the shopping in Maryland, and there is plenty of public transportation as well. Because of the traffic in the District, consider this a major advantage. Without it, or if you don’t have a good public transportation route to work, be prepared to spend a lot of time in traffic every morning. Deanwood, sadly, is surrounded by many crime-ridden neighborhoods, something to keep in mind if you plan to return home well after dark on a regular basis. Keep in mind that many people who have the same means as those buying homes in Deanwood also consider living in the suburbs. Anyhow, the chance to get a house and yard for cheap is worth checking out.
Pros
  • nice, inexpensive housing
Cons
  • the homes are not very large
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"family enclave"

Crestwood is the kind of place you would want to raise your children. Plenty of trees line the streets, and the children can be found playing after school. Of course, those after school hours are somewhat shortened for many children since they have to leave the neighborhood and go to private school. Otherwise they would be stuck with the poor DC system. Citizens of all races live and work together in peace, a relative rarity in well-heeled parts of DC because of the legacies of segregation and white-flight. Here you will also find current and former mayors along with other movers and shakers of Washington society. Naturally the city is careful to keep such dignitaries happy, so the pests are kept under control, the streets cleaned, and the sidewalks maintained. An added bonus is that, because the mayor lives here, there is a decent police presence providing security. That works well to keep the crime down. The citizens of Crestwood are always organizing fun activities, which serve the purpose of community bonding. Crime is comparable to that of the suburbs, making Crestwood safe for all residents. If only the real estate prices were comparable, instead of being so high..
Pros
  • family atmosphere
  • location
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Lifestyles of the rich and famous..."

OK not quite. Connecticut Avenue neighborhood is near the White House and other tourist areas of the District. It is expensive, but not quite as bad as some places like Georgetown. One thing which probably keeps the price down is the noise and crazy tourists in the summer. Personally, that would be enough to keep ME from buying a house there, as it is for anyone who likes things quiet. Anyway, there are plenty of places to eat and hang out, including some gay bars. Connecticut Avenue is a great place to visit even if you would prefer not to deal with the noise all the time. You will probably see lawmakers and lobbyists on a near daily basis, and whenever something happens in the government you'd have a front row seat. For those who enjoy politics, this is an added plus. In addition, the proximity to the White House means more police presence as well as Secret Service. Needless to say, not much happens on the crime-side. One drawback though is that because the area establishments cater so heavily to tourists and lobbyists, they do tend to be expensive. If you're willing to deal with that, you will enjoy the area.
Pros
  • quality housing
  • front-row seat to politics
  • sleek apartments
  • chic bars and restaurants
Cons
  • noise
  • traffic
  • expensive
  • no parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"could be worse."

Congress Heights is a cheap place to live, but be forewarned you will have to cross a lot of crime-ridden areas to get there. Recent revitalization efforts have improved the area somewhat, and there is a viable commercial center. In addition, the Metro station breaks up the isolation that plagues most of that area of DC. As a result, a few professionals are starting to buy homes there, in an attempt to escape the high prices of many other neighborhoods. I would consider this a hopeful sign, as professionals tend to demand better services, and dont tolerate much crime. Then again, having people with TOO much money could attract more problems with burglary. Hopefully that will not happen. Most such situations in DC have worked out well.

Still not a good place for children, as plenty of vacant space and drug dealing go on daily. Schools are some of the worst in the city, that includes paint peeling off the walls and abundant graffiti. No wonder that a large percentage of the teenagers drop out. Nonetheless, if you MUST live in this part of the District, then this would have to be tohe choice of neighborhood. At least you won't take your life into your own hands quite as much.
Pros
  • progress
  • desire for better things
  • economic diversity
Cons
  • still much left to do
  • schools
  • violent crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"diverse and trendy"

Columbia Heights is very diverse, with a broad mixture of income and race. You can find anything from rather expensive houses to housing projects, and they all seem to get along just fine. In addition, there is a very nice commercial center with everything you might need readily available. This keeps property values higher. After all, who doesn't want convenience and safety? The drawback of course is increased noise, but for most residents, it is a worthwhile price to pay.
Columbia Heights has its own Metro station, and is very walkable. Evenings will find the younger set sitting in coffee shops and restaurants after work, or buying groceries on their way home. In a city where racial tensions still dominate the scene, here there is very little of that. On the other hand, the schools aren't very good, and many residents of Columbia Heights cannot afford private school. No matter what you choose for school though, your children will have the opportunity to enjoy a nice place to hang out with friends. Because of the recent revitalization efforts, many of the shops, restaurants and other establishments are rather trendy. It is therefore easy to see why younger adults love this neighborhood so much.
Pros
  • Affordable apartments
  • growing and rebuilding
  • plenty of shopping close by
  • easy commute
Cons
  • a little dull compared to its neighbors
  • still up and coming
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Power brokers paradise"

Colonial Village is a tree-lined suburb inside the city limits, full of fine victorian homes and modest modern dwellings as well. Here, children play in the evenings after school, and the grandmothers help watch over the younger set. During the summer there will be garden parties with hamburgers on the grill. People love to walk their dogs, when they aren't playing in the fenced in back yard. A family atmosphere pervades this neighborhood, which is one of the District’s more exclusive.

Don't let the unassuming appearances fool you though: many of the residents are people with a large amount of influence and plenty of money. They just prefer not to live in pretentious Georgetown or aristocratic Chevy Chase. Those addresses invite tourists and the curious, not to mention shoppers. Many of them would also rather not be so close to the inner city of DC, or they might live in Georgetown. Rather, living farther away is a welcome bonus, affording them more breathing room and suburban feel, while at the same time giving that prestigious DC address. Whatever they need can either be purchased in the neighborhood or with a short drive to shopping centers just over the state line into Maryland.
Pros
  • family friendly
  • well maintianed
  • quiet enclave
Cons
  • distance from downtown
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Stylish hangout"

Cleveland Park is a mecca of shopping, restaurants and anything else you might need. It is host to the largest shopping center in DC, and is not touristy. There are plenty of trees along the roads, and plenty of space to walk your pet after work. Taking a nice jog in the morning is a popular retreat. You could easily pick up some groceries on the way home from work, and if you are too tired to go out, there are plenty of dining options. Cleveland Park is home to a lot of racial and ethnic diversity, which gives it a nice flavor quite rare in Washington. A nice mixture of single family homes and trendy apartments/condos, Cleveland Park caters to your every need. In addition, there is a very low crime rate, making the streets a safe place to be long after dark. With a Metro stop nearby, getting to work is quite convenient.
Only drawback I can see about the place is that the cost of living is quite high: quarter of a million dollars plus for a small condo. The prices may be prohibitive for a larger family on a modest income. On the other hand, if this is a place you can afford, it is really nice.
Pros
  • architecture
  • neighborliness
  • family friendly
  • self-sufficient
  • gorgeous houses
Cons
  • quiet
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Community with character"

Chinatown has undergone many reinventions over the years. Until about 20 years ago it was mainly residential, with Chinese restaurants and other attractions. It was the landing place for Asian immigrants with business in the Nation’s capitol. Chinese restaurants did and still do dominate the area, and are the best in the city. But now the place is full of sports stadiums and more mundane fare. Some of the old architecture does remain, and much of it is now on the Historic Register. The historic part of the neighborhood is walkable, but due to the stadiums the traffic is terrible. Try getting in or out of there just before or after a game! Crime is fairly low, although anytime there is a stadium there will be pickpockets. Likewise, parking is a nightmare. Many residents speak languages other than English, and if you aren’t Asian as a resident you will stand out. There are many ties to the Chinatowns in other US cities. Some area bars and restaurants are open late to cater to the game crowd. If you need to get somewhere though, even during games there is a Metro station. Decent choice for singles.
Pros
  • culture
  • shops and restaurants
  • Office space and apartments
  • Public Transportation
  • Verizon Center
  • low crime rate
Cons
  • noise
  • traffic
  • Homeless people
  • Lack of green space
  • Lack of any space
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Trendy and elegant"

Chevy Chase is one of the most famous areas of DC, up there with Georgetown and Capitol Hill. It is also one of the most expensive. Tree-lined streets and quaint homes are everywhere, mixed in with wonderful shops and everything you might need. Neighbors know one another, and keep each other safe. If you have the means to afford Chevy Chase, you might also be able to join the famous Chevy Chase club, and go there on the weekends to enjoy a cocktail. This is a very expensive and stylish "city club" where many of the movers and shakers of Washington society hang out when they don't have business on the Hill. Think ladies with heavy fur coats and lots of diamonds, gold jewelry and you get the idea. Most of the Washington social register meets here. Less exclusive but also wonderful are the many fine restaurants and clubs. Expensive, chauffered cars are everywhere. Weekends and during the summer local residents might hold a barbecue in their back yards and invite all their friends over. Most of the children go to private schools, but after hours they have a safe place to come home to. For those who can afford to live here, it is a delightful place. Of course, the rest of us can always visit.
Pros
  • exclusive
  • convenince
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"hopeful signs"

Like most of this part of the city, Central NE is very low income and riddled with crime. Unlike its less fortunate peers however, the area has a strong sense of community. Almost like another March on Washington, the residents have had enough. Enough of the violence, poverty and urban blight. Enough of the poor schools and uncaring administration. Enough, that they'll do something about it. So, they'll support their local charter school and participate in many community activities. with high school diplomas in hand, the next generation will grow up and be able to get better jobs, escaping the cycle of drugs and violence.

For now, the neighborhood has many of the standard neighborhood amenities: inexpensive restaurants and corner stores, where residents can pick up the basics of life on the way home from work. Weekends, residents can either relax locally, or leave the neighborhood for more interesting parts of the city. There are no large industries or offices, so Central NE is fairly quiet. Residents may play their radios at night, but rush hour is fairly subdued. Because of the demographics housing is cheap, but with the neighborhood improving, it is a decent choice if you are starting out and don't have much money.
Pros
  • desire for change
  • educational opportunities
Cons
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Green and pleasant"

Cathedral Heights is a great place to live and work. well educated and diverse, the residents work in a variety of jobs and include students in nearby universities. Because of the cost of housing, those who might cause trouble cannot afford to live here, and nothing worse than the occasional theft happens in this neighborhood. Besides the huge cathedral, the area boasts an abundance of shops and restaurants. Many residents also live close to work and may even walk there. Once in the neighborhood, you can buy nearly everything you need, and walk to the store or a bar after work.

Since the area is nice and safe, it is a great place to raise your children. There is plenty of green space in which they can play. Area students also provide plenty of baby sitting help, and can be hired to mow the grass or shovel the snow. During the summer, their reduced numbers makes up for the increase of tourism. Also courtesy of the students, there are many reasonably priced places to eat; a huge advantage in a city as expensive as Washington. Singles would also enjoy the neighborhood, as there are plenty of others to hang out with.
Pros
  • comfortable homes
  • community spirit
  • stability
Cons
  • cathedral events
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"gritty but safe"

Somehow the residents of Carver have managed to not let the blight and crime take over their little section of the city. One way that Carver citizens have done this is through constant vigilance and community togetherness. Nearly everywhere around it (and the arboretum) have serious crime problems. But, everyone seems to have a collective will to have their children grow up in a safe place. Perhaps this is the biggest advantage that Carver has, and it is a cause for much hope. Because of their location close to the Arboretum there are sufficient services to support this tiny community. Housing is reasonably priced, but rather old. Given the very limited means of residents, there are few with the ability to renovate residences, so houses are rather sad looking. For once however, this problem cannot be attributed to vandalism or other destructive behavior on the part of local youth. George Washington Carver, the one after whom the neighborhood was named, would be proud of this. If only the residents would develop something of his inventive spirit. Sadly, the neighborhood hasn't gone from holding its own to thriving. Hopefully that will happen soon.
Pros
  • strong community bonds
  • stable
Cons
  • surrounded by crime ridden areas
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"plenty of diversity"

Cardozo Shaw is quite diverse, and depending on your point of view that can be a good or bad thing. Because it is backed up to Howard University there are plenty of students, and due to bordering neighborhoods it isn't particularly safe. African immigrants have moved in recently, and apparently so have the homosexuals. If you enjoy gay bars or ethnic cuisine, Cardozo Shaw is a worthwhile place to be. One result of the immigrant presence is that there are fewer people who speak good english, and plenty of children for the local school. Naturally, the high percentage of gays reduces this percentage of children somewhat. Another good thing is that African immigrants and gays aren't known for gang culture or violence, which should help. Houses and apartments are well kept, and there is plenty of diversity. Children love to play in the neighborhood after school, and they can do so safely. There are also plenty of stores and small restaurants in the neighborhood, so getting the things you need locally is not too much of a challenge. Like most places in DC however, there is a drive required to purchase less basic items. If you like diversity and don't mind a slightly higher crime rate, this is a decent neighborhood to look into.
Pros
  • family friendly
  • Ethiopian food
  • Every single type of bar/restaurant on one street
Cons
  • high crime rate
  • Can be loud and hectic
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"not so close to the Capitol"

Capitol View is a neighborhood near Benning and other deteriorated areas close to the Maryland border. However, it is itself a safe neighborhood, full of good, hardworking people. Whether or not they are educated, Capitol View residents do fairly well for themselves, earning a middle class living. Primarily African-American, there is a strong sense of community. Good neighbors make for safety and upward progress. Better still, this neighborhood doesn't have the struggle with drugs and crime suffered by many other affordable enclaves of the District. Highly educated professionals are a rarity here, primarily because Capitol View is far from professional jobs. But, the neighbors are polite and take care of the neighborhood. Blight isn’t a problem, and residents feel safe at night.

Just as its name suggests, you can see the Capitol from many sections of the neighborhood, and yet the residents are far from the halls of power. If you want to live here, I would definitely recommend having a car, as you may have to go into Maryland to obtain much that isn't a basic necessity. In any event, this is one neighborhood where you can get a lot of living space for a reasonable price.
Pros
  • pretty view
  • comfortable homes
Cons
  • few amenities
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
Just now

"beneath the halls of power"

capitol Hill lies in the shadow of, and even includes some of, the major government buildings which shape our nation. Specifically, the US Capitol building, the Supreme Court and the Library of Congress, with their accompanying offices, frame its borders. Live here, and the Mall is your backyard. Every morning as you wake up, there will be trees, and grass, and in season, flowers. the dome of the Capitol building will tower over your home, and everything you need is close by. If you are so fortunate as to work for the lawmakers, a quick walk will get you to work and there will be no need to fight the infamous DC traffic by car. work a bit farther away, and the superior public transportation system will suit your every need. After all, why would the city government risk annoying the very people who have the authority to change DC law?

One drawback: besides the high cost of living, during the summer this area is overrun with tourists. If you like to be left alone by the masses, this might not be the best choice for you. Then again, having the Secret Service and Capitol Police everywhere just might make the inconvenience worth it.
Pros
  • lovely, tree lined streets
Cons
  • tourists overrun the place in summer
  • crowded
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"needs revitalization"

Buzzard Point is primarily industrial and low income housing. The Navy has a smallish facility there, and some factories exist as well. Sadly some of these will be closing down in the next few years, making the problem of neighborhood blight even worse. If you live in Buzzard Point, you will need access to a car in order to leave the neighborhood because there is almost no public transportation. And to make matters worse, few local amenities exist among the vacant lots. On the other hand, if you work in the blue collar and service industries then that job just might be close by. Professionals, if they even wanted to live here, would have a significant commute. Of course, if you can't walk home after that late shift, you may not care that it is only two blocks.

Although many things are closing down, Buzzard Point is currently a target for urban revitalization. Seeing the profit potential in building on cheap land in a down economy, some developers have plans for some expensive new homes. Whether or not they can actually sell these for as much as they might want to given the Point's tough reputation remains to be seen.
Pros
  • blue collar jobs in the area
  • near Nationals Stadium
Cons
  • unpleasant surroundings
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"weak community and nothing to do"

Not the most dangerous neighborhood in the District, but all too close. Some violent crime exists, but other neighborhoods are where the lives are lost. Although there is no housing project in the area (only single family homes) to lock the rough neighbors in, Burrville has been unable to attract higher class residents. Many houses are run down because residents don’t have enough money to keep them up properly. Instead, the houses sell for a song and the streets are full of fast food joints and convenience stores. You can smell the grease walking by on the sidewalk. Plenty of homeless call the sidewalks home, and some loitering also takes place. On the bright side, many homes do have yards--if you dare use them. Chances are, after the children come home from school their parents won’t allow them to play outside without close supervision. The local lack of community contributes to much of the crime, including drug dealing and violence. Good neighbors, and quality babysitters, are hard to come by. For those who cannot afford better, Burrville is an OK place to live. Otherwise, it isn't the most liveable place around. Just be sure to hold tightly onto your handbag.
Pros
  • parking
  • front lawns
  • cheap housing
Cons
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Just now

"Lesser known treasure"

Burleith is the cheaper, but still quite tony, neighbor of Georgetown. It is to the north of the University, and shares many facilities with Georgetown. Unlike most countries who have their post on Embassy Row, the French chose to put theirs here. Burleith is almost exclusively residential, but still convenient to most services. Mass Transit serves the area abundantly. there is a good neighborhood association, and everyone knows everybody. If you live in Burleith long enough, people will know you by name. As a result, outsiders with less than honorable intent are watched. when the residents need help from the city for anything, they tend to get it quickly. In addition, the area children go to some of the best public schools in the District--if they don't attend private school instead.

Burleith is fairly expensive, but not as outrageous as Georgetown: houses run about a million bucks. Out of reach for many, but in reach for quite a few more than the famous neighbors. As a result, public servants like senators and cabinet members can and do live there. Overall a great place to live if you can afford it.
Pros
  • community spirit
  • security
Cons
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"awesome place at a reasonable price"

Brookland is one of the areas around Catholic University, and contains a monastery and several Catholic sites. Because of the monastery and relatively few apartments, Brookland is quiet in spite of its location next to a university. Listening to the church bells is a bonus for the spiritually inclined, although Sunday morning does bring a bit more traffic. Brookland also has the distinction of being extremely safe. Green space abounds, and overall this neighborhood is extremely family friendly. If you like to live in a small town, but need to live close to your work, this is a worthwhile choice.

Adding to its quiet nature is the lack of night life. Unlike most neighborhoods close to universities, there aren't really any nightclubs. However, if the family restaurant is your preference then there are plenty of those. Predictably, those wanting to spend a night out on the town will mix with plenty of students having a good time after class. Groceries are easy to buy, but a shopping center would require some travel. Because there is plenty of public transport, this is no problem. There are some tourists because of the Catholic sites, but not enough to ruin the charm of this lovely neighborhood.
Pros
  • public transportation to MoCo and Downtown on the red line, bus lines run late
  • beautiful surroundings
Cons
  • subject to student housing issues
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"bargain for families"

Brightwood Park is close to several parks and recreation facilities. Multinational in character, the rents and house prices are reasonable. Living there, you will be surrounded by the sights and smells of the diverse backgrounds of your neighbors. Just imagine witnessing all kinds of diverse, but strong, communities in action at once. In addition to the many nationalities, Brightwood Park is an enclave of gay and lesbian citizens. Overall, it is an inexpensive place to live, but not poor at all. Rather, the lower middle class and the young professionals call Brightwood Park home.

The major con of the neighborhood is transportation. There is no metro stop close by, and few bus routes go through the area. However, if you own a car this won't be a huge problem; just jump into the busy DC traffic and enjoy. With the park next door, there is plenty of space for the kids to play, and longtime residents make good babysitters if needed.
Because you will be close to Catholic University, do expect some neighborhood students, sometimes with young families. On the other hand, students do mean plenty of inexpensive places to eat and buy basic necessities close by. Just be prepared to travel for more extensive shopping needs.
Pros
  • plenty of shopping
  • pleasant, neighborly feel
  • diversity
Cons
  • no metro stop
  • subject to student housing issues
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"undiscovered beauty"

Brightwood is right next to Walter Reed Medical Center and Rock Creek Park. The former has some job opportunities for now, though it will be closing in a couple years. There is a lot of speculation on what will happen once it is closed; some push for redevelopment. Given the overall value of land in DC, I would consider this to be the most likely outcome. This is also true because Brightwook is an undiscovered jewel in the city, where real estate is a bargain mainly because demand is low. Houses have beautiful front lawns, and turnover is very low. Most houses have been occupied by the same owner for decades, and have been proudly maintained. Even the apartment buildings are relatively small and well kept.

Brightwood is however mainly a bedroom community: besides the random fast food restaurant or the corner convenience store, you will have to drive for everything you need. but even this has its advantages: with few people passing through, there is little noise and less crime. For an inexpensive area of DC, this is exceptional. You can come home and relax, knowing you are away from it all. If you want a quiet place to raise a family, Brightwood is a good choice.
Pros
  • quiet
  • neighborly
  • reasonable cost of living
Cons
  • Walter Reed is closing soon
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"moderately priced and close to work"

Brentwood is an area mostly controlled by the government. Like much of DC, there are government buildings everywhere you turn, and a major rail yard lies within its borders as well. Housing is scarce, but moderately priced with houses running about 300K. Such a price is quite affordable for blue collar workers and government employees who may work there. The area is close to Gallaudet University which, because its students are Deaf and unaware of the loudness of their radios, can make the neighborhood a bit noisier at night. For this reason it is also necessary to ensure that one keeps an eye out for pedestrians who cannot hear your car coming. Naturally the rail yard doesn't help either. With that said, the neighborhood is safe relative to most other areas surrounding the Arboretum and Gallaudet University. Having the additional law enforcement presence due to the government facilities really helps in this area. People who like to walk their dogs after work may not find Brentwood to be an ideal location due to all the traffic. Of course, I cannot recommend the public schools in this area, so if you have the money it might be better to send your children to private schools.
Pros
  • Career opportunities
  • police presence
Cons
  • Industrial business
  • noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"walkable and lovely"

Bloomingdale is a lovely neighborhood with abundant recreation opportunities. It is located between Howard University and Trinity College, but this doesn't seem to make it unsafe. The reason: there is a long history of resident activism and togetherness which can overcome even the worst negative pressures. Washington Hospital is just outside the neighborhood border, so residents needing medical care have no problem obtaining it. Bloomingdale is also a neighborhood in DC where the different racial groups live side by side and get along with one another very well. Historically, the area has been one of the staging grounds of the civil rights movement, and it is currently home to Chita Rivera, Broadway star and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Freedom. One might say that Bloomingdale practices what it preaches when it comes to racial equality, and in preventing the marginalization by race through extreme poverty and crime. Because Bloomingdale is increasingly trendy, there are many fashionable shops and amenities along its streets. However, it has not yet become so expensive as to be unaffordable to the average citizen. If you are looking for a nice safe neighborhood to start out in, yet don’t have a large amount of money for an expensive residence, I'd give Bloomingdale careful consideration.
Pros
  • reasonable price
  • community spirit
  • local culture
  • shops and restaurants
Cons
  • students
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"public or private"

Knox hill is primarily a public housing complex. Like all such properties, it is loud, crime-ridden and poor with few opportunities. In the area there are some amenities, but not nearly as much as one might want. All too many local residents drop out of high school, and their income potential is tragically limited. Especially in DC, such places are full of single-parent households. Also, the city has a rat problem, and this is especially acute in nearly all public housing. I definitely wouldn’t recommend living there, though if you are poor enough to be eligible there probably isn’t much choice.
Yet there is hope: Buena Vista, next door is one of the few pockets of relative sanity in the area. Some young professionals live there while saving money to live somewhere else. Sadly, if you have children Buena Vista is still not the best choice. with so many bad neighborhoods around, I would be worried about their safety. worse, the DC schools in this part of town are terrible.
Although the topography of the area is nice, with hills which can help you get a good workout if walked, there are no neighborhood parks. If you have a pet, it will not be able to enjoy a nice stroll in the grass.
Pros
  • neighborhood cooperation
  • desire to improve conditions
  • Buena Vista
Cons
  • public housing
  • crowded
  • Knox Hill
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Broke and Blighted"

Barry Farm has a horrible problem: it is called unemployment and an annual average income barely above the cost of rent. Perhaps the poorest neighborhood in the District, there is crime and drugs everywhere. when you get home at night, you have to lock your doors. Otherwise, you risk falling victim to one of a plethora of burglaries which take place every month. And not just your stereo is in danger: Berry Farm being the "projects," there are plenty of rapes and murders there as well.

Worse still, there are few amenities in the neighborhood: nothing larger than the occasional store, and many residents have to leave just to buy adequate supplies for the week. There is very little green space. Overall, this neighborhood is full of gangs and despair. The schools are terrible, and not very many residents have high school diplomas. Like many poorer neighborhoods in DC, there are some government buildings but this doesn't help the economy of the area too much, because there aren't many places to eat and the residents are usually underqualified for jobs in the building. I hear this is supposed to change soon, but with the housing crisis in low income neighborhoods, I don't see much reason to be optimistic.
Pros
  • affordable housing
Cons
  • poverty
  • lack of education
  • high crime rate
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Rough but rising"

This area has had a very rough reputation for a long time. However, like other neighborhoods in DC, the quality of residents is rising steadily. Housing values and rents are going up, and crime is in decline. This does however lead to considerable tension between the new residents (who are trying to improve the area), and the older ones who are unsure of newcomers. There is now a variety of class and income where once there was only poverty. Some homes are in good repair and sell for a nice price, while others have the classic look of a property in distress. Nice cars and old clunkers are parked next to each other on the streets, creating an interesting hodge podge of scenery. Sadly however, there are plenty of houses for sale under less than ideal circumstances. Neighborhood schools are poor, and there are no middle or high schools in the area. If you can afford it, you'll want to send your child to a private school for the time being. Overall though, a good place to move into if you need a neighborhood to get started in: as the neighborhood continues to improve, you may find either that your house value will appreciate such that you can move to a nicer place, or the neighborhood will become the nicer place. For now, it is an island of relative calm in the middle of lower quality neighborhoods.
Pros
  • improving conditions
  • housing
Cons
  • surrounding neighborhoods
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"urban blight!"

Many of the houses are in disrepair, and the apartments? Well, if you don't mind section 8 and housing projects, you'll be fine. Benning is one of the cheapest and most dangerous neighborhoods in the city. And of course, with cheap you also get loads of noise and hanging out on street corners. This area isn't really safe even in the daytime, and at night, then forget about it. There are plenty of abandoned and foreclosed houses, and the purchase prices are below 200K--barely the cost of their materials. As if this is not bad enough, the entire ward is known for being a ghetto. Even the local politicians admit this and seem to have no desire to do anything about it. So, Benning remains a place full of dirt, grime, and rats. Police presence is minimal because nobody seems to care about the residents of Benning.

Probably the saddest thing of all about Benning is that the residents can barely afford to live there. They are just trying to survive without any education and few job opportunities. Truly the neighborhood is one of the most hopeless places to live. Vagrants, crime and drugs are on every corner. Not where you want to live
Pros
  • transportation
Cons
  • high crime rate
  • poor quality housing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport