SuzyQ

  • Local Expert 1,832 points
  • Reviews 55
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
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Reviews

3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Stuyvesant Walk Meanders through the Stuyvesant Town Projects"

Stuyvesant Walk is the main walkway that meanders through the massive Stuyvesant Town apartment complex. It's a pleasant and safe walk and the only way to reach some of the buildings that are on the interior of the this huge community. The walkway has a lot of trees and bushes, so even if you are surrounded by high rise buildings, the greenery makes you feel like you are in a little private park. Stuyvesant Town is a city within a city, and it is almost always 100 percent occupied because of the rent control status on most of the apartments. If you can find an apartment here, you are very lucky. They are nicely appointed (even though they are older) and very affordable. This is a good place to live for moderate-income New Yorkers.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Charles Lane is at the Edge of the Village and Close to the Greenway"

Charles Lane is a short street that is mixed use, meaning there are some warehouse and storage facilities as well as apartments and condos. This makes the apartments less expensive than living closer in to the Village area. However, the rents are not cheap here, even if they are a few blocks away from the more "hip" area of the Village. This street does not have a lot of traffic, which is unique for New York City, but that's because it can't be used as a short cut. The people living here look out for one another, which is nice. You are about a 10-15 minute walk to the subway and there are bus lines that can take you uptown or downtown. You can find shopping and eateries on Washington Street and Christoper Street. All in all, this is a a decent street that has a lot of possibilities.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"The Center of Stuyvesant Town"

Stuyvesant Town is one of New York City's massive apartment projects in lower Manhattan that has thousands of residents living in one of the many high-rise apartment buildings. Another one of the few remaining rent-controlled complexes, finding an available apartment in one of the buildings will be difficult, since once people move in, they rarely move out, and find ways to pass the apartment lease on to their family members. The apartments here are relatively spacious and clean and the rents are extremely affordable for New York City. Stuyvesant Circle is the street that is smack dab in the middle of this complex, and you can usually find lots of people walking around the circle or the other paths, since it is good exercise. Close to schools and medical facilities, Stuyvesant Town apartments is a great place for families. Shopping and some restaurants are on the adjacent avenues, but you will most likely need to go further uptown for serious shopping.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"The Road that Goes through the Projects"

Peter Cooper Road goes through Peter Cooper Village, which is one of New York City's few remaining rent-controlled apartment projects. Peter Cooper Village has about twenty high-rise apartment buildings in its massive complex, which houses mainly middle-class families. There is a very low turnover in this complex because of the rent control status, and so trying to find an apartment is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. If you do find one, grab it and never let go! Shopping is available on adjacent 1st Avenue and there are excellent medical facilities within just a few blocks. Although this is a safe and moderately priced place to live, you will need to go out of the neighborhood for night life and entertainment. However, the rents are affordable -- if you can find an available apartment!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Great Location for Someone Who Likes the Village"

Cornelia Street is a great location for anyone who loves the action of the Village. Getting around the city is easy, with the subway right at your corner, and there are restaurants galore from which to choose. Although the apartments on Cornelia Street are pricey, they are also well-maintained and quite lovely. The neighborhood is safe and friendly and there is always foot traffic on the street, even late at night. Many people living here either work at or go to school at New York University, which is an easy 10 minute walk. This is a great location for anyone who enjoys being in the middle of a very active environment.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Friendly and Fun with a lot of Thing to To"

Jones Street is a hidden treasure in the West Village area of Manhattan. Just a block away from the subway station, Jones Street has a nice complement of small apartment buildings, lofts and casual eateries. There are always people walking around and the atmosphere is friendly and welcoming. Living here would put you in the central part of the Village, close to some of the best shopping in the city. It is also walking distance to New York University and Washington Square Park. This is a very desirable place to live, but be prepared to shell out more than average for an apartment.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Mixed Use Street is Affordable but Missing Many Amenities"

Pike Street starts down by the East River and the FDR Drive, where it is called Pike Slip, and continues westward. It is adjacent to the Manhattan Bridge, which carries constant traffic to and from Brooklyn, so it is extremely noisy. There are high rise apartments lining much of Pike Street, with some small, older tenement buildings. This part of Manhattan is not the nicest, but it is affordable because of the apartment projects that have some of the more reasonable rents in the city. There are some small stores and a major drugstore chain that are within walking distance, but you will need to to to midtown to find real retail therapy. There are some good little mom-and-pop ethnic restaurants in the area, but you'll want to go to Little Italy or Chinatown for better meals.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Give Carlisle Street a Few Years and it will Come Back to Life"

Ever since the World Center tragedy of September 11, the surrounding neighborhood has been undergoing extensive changes and renovations. Carlisle Street is one of the streets that has been getting a facelift, and there is still work in progress. Just a short walk from the former site of the World Trade Center, Carlisle Street still holds memories of that tragic day. Many of the residents who lived in the apartments on this street have moved, but that has allowed owners and landlords to make improvements that will make them desirable to new residents. This is not the prettiest street in the financial district, but in another year or two, the construction equipment will be gone and a Carlisle Street address will once again be chic to have. For now, it is a convenient place to live, but doesn’t offer many local amenities.
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"You'll Pay for the Convenience of Living Here"

Although this east-west street is in the midst of New York’s financial district. It is surprisingly wide for this narrow part of Manhattan. It sports a number of retail establishments as well as small corporate offices. The upper floors of many of the businesses are condominiums or apartments, with some areas that have been turned into lofts. Thames Street is convenient to the Battery Park area as well as the Wall Street financial district, so there are opportunities for both work and play. Be prepared to spend a lot of money if you’re buying or renting. You are paying for prime real estate.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"A Charming Street with its own Private Park"

Living on Rector Street comes with its own private park. This street, which branches off from South End Avenue in lower Manhattan is extremely well maintained and surrounds a beautiful little park that is perfect for parents with young kids or anyone who wants to spend some time with grass and trees. Rector Place is also walking distance from the Esplanade that offers great views of the river. The apartments and condos facing the park are expensive, but you pay for the convenience of living near the world's greatest financial district.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 06, 2010

"Convenient to the Financial Center and Battery Park City"

This is a nicely maintained street that is in the heart of the downtown Manhattan financial district, not far from the World Trade Center site and convenient to Battery Park City and the walkway that overlooks the Hudson River. With a mix of businesses and high-priced condos and apartments on this short street, it affords luxury and convenience, especially if you work in financial district. The one negative is the noise of the highway in the background.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Nice Neighborhood but Lots of Airport Noise"

White Drive has lots of really nice, upscale affordable homes, but the downside is that it is too close to the airport for my liking. They are in the flight path for McCarren and the planes come zooming over the homes too often, which makes it very difficult to enjoy a quiet conversation. The houses here are upper middle class-type stucco ranch homes and parts of the neighborhood have large cement privacy walls built up so it masks the back and side yards from traffic noises. Unfortunately, it does not do anything for the sound of the planes flying overhead. However, if you can get past the planes (maybe they just grow on you or you become immune to the noise), you can get a lot of house for your money on White Drive and the rest of the neighborhood, especially now, with real estate being so depressed. The neighbors are friendly and if you work the airport, you could be there in less than 10 minutes. If it weren't so noisy, it would be a pretty perfect place to live.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Average Neighborhood that is Affordable and Convenient to Airport and UNLV"

If you are looking for a clean, affordable street that is convenient to the airport, the University of Nevada-Las Vegas or the Strip, then consider Hialeah Drive. The small, modest ranch homes are clean but they are very small, mostly with two bedrooms and one bathroom (except those that have been remodeled). It is a working class neighborhood and has a healthy dose of both white and blue collar workers that work various shifts at the local hotels and casinos, so you see people coming and going all the time. The folks are friendly and will wave at you (even if they don't know you) and they take pride in their street. It is clean and well maintained, although there are a few homes which need some repair work. There are also a few homes that seem to have more than two or three vehicles taking up the short driveways or the street, but they are few and far between. Kids play on the street here, so be careful if you are driving around. It's close to shopping and schools. Overall, a very average, middle class neighborhood that works well for anyone who works hard and enjoys good family values.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Like to Golf? You'll Love it Here"

The tourists who don't come to Las Vegas for gaming, come for golf and then never leave. That's what it seems, because the city has so many beautiful golf courses with stately and opulent homes right on the links. Canyon View Drive is just one of many scenic and impressive streets surrounding the Canyon Gate Country Club and Golf Course, located on the western side of the city in the shadows of the foothills. This is a permanent neighborhood that feels like a resort. Most of the residents are middle-aged or older and seem to be retired or have a very flexible lifestyle, in that they spend their days golfing instead of going to the office. There are very few children, and those that are here appear to be grandchildren that are visiting. So I don't get the impression that children are particularly welcome. The streets are clean, the homes are immaculate. Many of them have the same architectural feel, although there are one or two that stand out from the rest as being much fancier. It was a great neighborhood to visit and I think it would be a good place to live if you didn't have to worry about young children. You need a car to access services, but that is not a problem for most people living in this city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
5/5
Sep 04, 2009

"YES! Live here if you can afford it"

If you have an opportunity to live in Las Vegas and can afford a home on Captain's Place or anywhere in this neighborhood, go for it. This is one of the best places to live in Las Vegas because homes here are right on or near West Sahara Lake, which has opportunities for water activities, right in the middle of the dry desert. Even in recessionary times, the average home price is about $850,000 and can exceed $2 million, so it is an exclusive community with many amenities available to the residents, including a robust community association that plans social activities and events. I attended a party here, and although I only knew one other person, you could tell that the people living here are well-heeled with a lot of social standing. It is very insulated from the rest of Las Vegas, and it is quite beautiful. Almost everyone has a private gardener, except for those resident living in condos, where the yard maintenance is included. If you're ever in Las Vegas, take a drive through this neighborhood and you can "ooh and aaah."
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Cute Neighborhood, Near Park and Elementary School"

Las Vegas is such an "adult" town that if I were going to settle there, I would look for a modest neighborhood near an elementary school. Franklin Avenue and the surrounding streets fits the bill. This is a very nice, very comfortable middle class area, where you have a lot of family activity. I like the area of Franklin Avenue where it intersects S. Maryland Parkway, since there is a lovely little park sitting in the middle of of the Parkway where you can enjoy the green space. This street also has an elementary school (Park Elementary School) so there is easy access for the kids. There are a lot of kids in this neighborhood. They all seem to be polite and well behaved, so I got the impression parents instill family values here, even if this is Las Vegas. Overall, this is a fine street to live and play. You're close to most areas of the city, but would need transportation to get to major shopping areas.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
1/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Avoid this Street as a Cut-Through"

On the surface, this street looks like it could be a popular cut-through from the Las Vegas Hilton and Convention Center areas to Las Vegas Boulevard (the "Strip"). And it is. However, I would caution anyone (especially women) about using it as a short cut getting from Paradise Road to Las Vegas Boulevard. For some reason, a lot of vagrants and homeless people seem to enjoy making this street their home, and they are none too sanitary. The street smells like urine and you will be approached by very seedy looking people looking for money. Although you're surrounded by hotels and casinos, it is a longer walk than what it appears on the surface. You you do pass by parking lots and a few vacant buildings along the way (at least they were vacant when I was last there.) It just makes me uncomfortable and I do not feel it is safe.
5/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Nice Cul de Sac Street"

I have friends living on the cul-de-sac side of Canosa Avenue, which is the short side of the street (it is dissected by commercial establishments.) This side of Canosa curves around and turns into S. 14th Street. However, Canosa continues on the other side of S. Maryland Parkway and pretty much has the same type of middle class neighborhood homes. It's a very friendly area. Most of the people living on this street are employed by one of the hotels or casinos. They make good livings, but are not living beyond their means. A lot of the homes on Canosa Avenue have swimming pools and they are all typically ranch style homes. Despite the desert conditions, there are a surprising number of trees and shrubbery in the yards. It is walking distance to a school, shopping, restaurants and most anything else you need, so it really is a perfect little Las Vegas oasis. It's just really HOT in the summer!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Sep 04, 2009

"Nice, residential street with good access to services"

Griffith Avenue starts and stops, so it's not one continuous thoroughfare, but almost all sections of this street are populated with modest, single family homes that are fairly well maintained. There is good access to services, since you are close to S. Maryland Parkway, which has a lot of restaurants, food stores, a laundromat, dry cleaners, a drug store, etc. It is also not that far from either the downtown casino area or the "Strip," so if you worked in either part of Las Vegas, there would be easy access to get to your job. This is a typical middle class neighborhood that is filled with families and some senior citizens. It would be easy to make this street your home and feel very comfortable there.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
Sep 03, 2009

"Upscale Homes for Well-to-Do Golfers"

Golfers will enjoy living on Castle Pines Avenue, which is part of a larger development of single family homes, duplexes and condos that are built adjacent to and right on the Spanish Trail Country Club and Golf Course. Just minutes away from the famous "Strip," this exclusive community has expensive homes which have been well designed into a private community that seems to be populated mostly with active and well-to-do retirees who enjoy spending their time on the greens, even in the hottest weather. Many, but not all, of the homes in this part of the community have swimming pools, which is a nice addition to the homes, since it's pretty hot and dry during the summer months. The only odd thing is that I rarely saw anyone using the pools. There don't seem to be any children living in this neighborhood, so be forewarned if you are looking here for a home. There are no restrictions against children, but those living here seem to be singles, couples or retirees. This is a great place to live and feel like you're on vacation!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
5/5
Sep 03, 2009

"Resort Type Living in the Middle of a Golf Course"

I spent several weeks in Las Vegas wile on assignment, and I was able to stay with friend who had one of the units on Round Hills Circle. This development is fairly new and is adjacent to the Spanish Trail Golf Course. If you spent all of your time in this very private, very secluded community, you would never know it is just a short distance to the famed "Strip" with all the casinos, hotels and restaurants. Round Hills Circle is quite upscale. It has a mix of retirees, people who come to Vegas for a getaway, and a lot of middle-age to older folks who enjoy golfing and living in a golf community. This is a very casual neighborhood, even though the condo-type units are expensive to own and rent. Many of the homes back up to the golf course, which is beautifully maintained. This is a peaceful little desert getaway location that is close to the action, but definitely far enough away to escape the crowds. It's a great neighborhood, but it is just very hot in the summer.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
4/5
Aug 31, 2009

"Beekman Street NW is a Neighborhood Within a Neighborhood"

Beekman Street NW is a little neighborhood within the neighborhood of Adams Morgan in Washington, DC. This is a well-planned development of multi-family apartment homes, which all look similar in design and style and most of them have been built with two or three-car garages which will suit the residents, but those with multiple cars will have to find on-street parking. Fortunately, residents in this community need parking permits to leave their cars on the street overnight, so if you officially live on Beekman Street NW or on one of the surrounding streets, you have nothing to worry about. This is a quiet street that is sheltered from some of the more raucous activities of the Adams Morgan club scene, which is within walking distance or a few blocks. Living here provides lots of opportunities for clubbing and enjoying the variety of independent eateries. Getting to other parts of D.C. is easy, as buses are available to take you to metro stations. Beekman Street NW is a great street to live on. The apartments here are pricey but sometimes the extra cost is worth the convenience of being among nice people who take pride in their street. That's what appears to be the case n Beekman Street NW.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5
Aug 31, 2009

"Quaint, Beautiful and Close to the Georgetown Action"

Dumbarton Street NW is a street that is quite beautiful, as most of the residences on this street are older, brick homes, many which date back to the turn of the century. Some of them are quite large and have been remodeled to contain multiple apartments; others are multi-story one-family townhouses. Many of them have built in garages, which is definitely desirable in this part of Washington, D.C., where parking is highly restricted in some of the neighborhoods, including Georgetown, where Dumbarton Street is located. People who live on Dumbarton Street are either retired or have very well-paying jobs, since rents in this area are extremely high and sale prices of homes are beyond the means of the average home buyer. You can find politicians, executive chefs, physicians, lobbyists and other highly paid officials living here. It is a quiet, but friendly street. There are parking restrictions, so unless you have a neighborhood sticker, outside cars are towed if they exceed the time limits posted on signs. This is because parking in the Georgetown area is nearly impossible, and residents don't like their spots taken up by tourists. This is a great place to live if you can afford it, since you are minutes away from the excitement and hustle and bustle of Georgetown and all it has to offer. Enjoy Dumbarton Street NW!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
Aug 31, 2009

"A Stone's Throw Away from American University"

Springdale Street NW is a short, private and well-maintained street just a stone's throw from American University and most of the residents on this street are tenured professors or staff members working at the University. Because it is so close to the school and most of those living on this street have a close affiliation with American University, the residents are a tight group and everyone looks after everyone else. One of the nice things about living on Springdale Street NW is the sense of community everyone has. Since everyone pretty much knows everyone else, there is an unofficial neighborhood watch in place 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so strangers beware. You are being watched! This street is close to a recreation facility just a block or so away, plus all of the amenities afforded to those who live and work near American University. You need to walk a short distance to find casual or more upscale restaurants, but there are quite a few University affiliated eateries around the campus. This is a quiet street most of the time. The students tend to stay in their own areas. This is a nice family street, well established and with a good reputation.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5
Aug 31, 2009

"Woodley Road NW is a Great Location to Work, Play and Eat"

Woodley Road NW is a great location and if you have the opportunity to find an affordable apartment or condo to rent in this area, then grab it before someone else does. This is one of the prime areas in the city to live, work and play. Old, but not that old, established but not stuffy, this road starts (on one end) at the city's beautiful Rock Creek Park and runs past large and small apartment buildings, hotels and the magnificent Washington National Cathedral, which is at the edge of Georgetown. Woodley Road NW is close to the Washington National Zoo and its famous panda bears, the Washington Metro, numerous eclectic and ethnic eateries, popular night spots and is within walking distance or a short cab ride to Georgetown University, American University, George Washington University, the Kennedy Center and the downtown mall attractions. Visitors to Washington, D.C. often stay at one of the major hotel chains in this area, since it is safe, relatively quiet and more upscale than the suburban motels. Living here is a very cosmopolitan experience. People are cordial, but everyone is involved with their own interests and activities, so don't expect to get palsy-walsy with folks right off the bat. This is a great location for someone who is coming to D.C. for a first job or to go to school.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Aug 31, 2009

"15th Street NW Goes Past D.C. Sights"

Imagine driving down 15th Street NW in Washington, D.C. and seeing the majestic Washington Monument on one side of the street and the gigantic Department of Commerce building on the other side. Drive a little farther and you will come up on the Treasury Department, the Ellipse and the famed Willard Intercontinental Hotel. This is the end of 15th Street NW that travels through the government and tourist section of town, until it turns into mid-rise and high-rise apartment homes toward the northern end of the street.

This is a great place to live if you work in the District of Columbia, as 15th Street NW is one of the most convenient locations around. The street gets its share of traffic, but it is also clean, lively, friendly and very tolerant of newcomers (which is good). There are restaurants and boutique shops on 15th Street NW, but it is never far from a night spot or eatery. Getting around the city from this location is easy and convenient. The only downside of living here is that it is fairly close to the White House and Executive Office Building, and streets can get congested (and may be closed) during special events. Otherwise, this is pretty much in the heart of everything in D.C.
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1/5
Aug 31, 2009

"New York Avenue NE is a Run-down Gateway to the City"

One of the major ways that visitors drive into Washington, D.C. is through New York Avenue, NE, which is also U.S. Route 50 and U.S. Route 1 concurrently. For as long as I can remember, this has been a ramshackle and run-down gateway to our nation's capital, which is a shame. Once you get past the Maryland-District of Columbia border, you come up on the National Arboretum, which should be a nice place to visit, but the neighborhood is a bit run down and can be dangerous after dark. The road traverses through a heavily industrialized area, with warehouses, many of them abandoned, dotting the sides of the road and there is a rather seedy area right around the intersection of Bladensburg Road, where a lot of alleged drug dealers and prostitutes hang out. Beware if you are driving in this area, as there is a lot of violent episodes happening in this vicinity. Unfortunately, this is what newcomers and visitors see as they enter Washington, D.C. through New York Avenue, NE. Once New York Avenue gets to the area around Mount Vernon Square in the downtown area, the ambiance improves. Frankly, I don't recommend this street for anyone to live on, since whatever housing is available is run down and mostly likely rodent-infested.
4/5
Aug 31, 2009

"Reservoir Road Begins at Georgetown Reservoir and Continues Past the University Complex"

Reservoir Road NW starts at Canal Road, close to the Chesapeake and Ohio National Historic Park and continues all the way until it runs into Wisconsin Avenue in the Georgetown area of the city. It is a major access road for cars traveling to the downtown area that don't want to get stuck on the more direct, yet more congested streets, although once you reach the Georgetown University complex (which consists of the university and its affiliated hospital) you can get into some major traffic jams. Reservoir Road does run past the small, Georgetown Reservoir at its beginning, before passing through some residential neighborhoods and then entering the hospital area, which can get VERY congested. Georgetown University is directly behind the hospital, so you also have a lot of student traffic. Right beyond the hospital, you'll find some housing, which is primarily rented by those who work or go to school here, but as soon as you leave this area, you are hitting Wisconsin Avenue, which is the northern part of the trendy Georgetown area. This is a great place to be if you want good restaurants and night life. Living close to Wisconsin Avenue can be loud, annoying and filled with hassles, especially on the weekends, since this is where everyone comes to party, but it is a good neighborhood because of the influence of the university and the hospital.
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5/5
Aug 31, 2009

"Beautiful Homes in an Upscale Neighborhood"

Woodland Drive NW is a beautiful street that runs from Garfield Street NW and meanders around to Rock Creek Park Drive Park, and the adjoining natural parkland. The street is centrally located in the upscale and expensive part of Northwest Washington, home to politicians, high-ranking government officials and ambassadors and their embassy staffs. The street is filled with multi-million dollar homes, many of which sport multi-car garages, high stone privacy walls, circular driveways and hidden swimming pools in the back. This is not a typical working class neighborhood and not one that you would expect to find in Washington, D.C., which typically emits a gritty-type feel once you get out of the downtown tourist area. Woodland Drive is a very desirable place to live, if you can afford it. It is close, but not right on top of, Georgetown, which offers every type of night life and restaurant you could imagine. It is also close to the U.S. Naval Obervatory and the home of the Vice President of the United States. The closest Metro stop is Woodley Park, which is a longish walk, but on a nice day it can be refreshing, with lots to see along the way, although if you live on this street, I don't think you would be using the Metro -- you would probably be driving a Mercedes or have someone driving it for you. Overall, this is a great place to live if you have a job in the District.
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3/5
Aug 30, 2009

"A Street Interrupted in the Nation's Capital"

Riggs Place NW is a street that is interrupted in the Nation's Capital. Like many of Washington, D.C.'s streets, Riggs Place NW starts and stops, so you need to know where you're going if you are planning to meet someone or visit someone on Riggs Place NW. However, no matter what part of Riggs Street you are on, it really is a charming area, since it is in a very desirable part of town, not far from DuPont Circle and the Adams Morgan areas, which are popular with tourists and trendy Washingtonians, not only for their selection of eclectic eateries and night spots, but also for the stylish apartments and condos and good shopping. Riggs Street is primarily residential, with small, multi-unit buildings or larger homes that have been renovated into small apartments. Everything is accessible to residents living on Riggs Street within a few blocks, although one thing missing seems to be a large supermarket. There are plenty of small food stores, but you have to travel a little ways to find a large store for grocery shopping. This is a good place to live if you work in the city.
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2/5
Aug 30, 2009

"Hidden Residential Street in the Capital City"

Kingman Street NW is a short street not far from Logan Circle Park in the middle of Washington, D.C. It is just about a block long, running between P Street NW and Q Street NW. It is mostly populated with small apartment buildings that are not the best maintained, but it is in a pretty central neighborhood, so people living here put up with shabby looking exteriors in return for the ability to get around the city easily. There are some trees on the block and believe it or not, you are able to find a parking spot fairly easily. Because the street is small and not very well known, people looking for parking often pass it by. Although there are no shops or restaurants on this street, you can find most services on 14th Street, which is a main thoroughfare. I think the best thing about this street is its proximity to Logan Circle Park.
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4/5
Apr 14, 2009

"Fond Memories of a Bygone Era and Hope for the Future"

My family roots are in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. My grandparents lived and died there and my dad was born and raised there. I spent many, many good times in my grandmother's apartment, looking out over the fire escape to the streets below. And I loved to visit the neighborhood shops and restaurants and come away with a "bargain." Sadly, quite a bit of what "was" the Lower East Side is gone, having been replaced with much needed renovation and some out-of-place new construction. Still, if you know where to look, the old, original Lower East Side still exists. Formerly a neighborhood filled with immigrants and the center of Jewish culture in New York, you can still stroll down Orchard Street, Hester Street, Essex, Grand, Delancy and Houston Streets and find what made the Lower East Side the "go to" place for New York bargains, especially on Sunday mornings, when the original Lower East Side business people come out to sell their wares in the little shops. One of my favorite places for a "nosh" is Yonah Schimmel's on E. Houston Street. They sell knishes of all varieties and have been there since FOREVER (actually, since 1910) in the SAME LOCATION. It looks like a dive, but their knishes are melt-in-your mouth goodness. Also on E. Houston Street is another culinary landmark - Katz's Delicatessen, which has been serving humongous sandwiches since 1888. But aside from gastronomical delights, the Lower East Side is a good place to live if you have to live in Manhattan, even though it has become pricey and populated by young professionals who enjoy the new night life that has invaded the area.

I don't mean to sound bitter, but I just hate to see the Lower East Side lose its personality and morph into another upscale, vanilla neighborhood without any character. Thankfully there are enough remnants of the past to keep the Lower East Side authentic to its roots. If I had to live in Manhattan, here is where I'd choose to live (if I could afford it). There are still lots of tenement houses in the area that are walk-ups (meaning you have to walk up the stairs to the 4th, 5th or 6th floors -- no elevators) and you pay dearly for that privilege. But the Lower East Side has come up in the world from where it was. It's cleaner, sleeker, more modern and definitely more accessible. I am very positive about the neighborhood. I just hope that progress doesn't ruin the historical significance of this neighborhood that is dear to my heart.
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4/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Caton Avenue is a Typical Brooklyn Street"

When I think of Caton Avenue, I think of what Brooklyn, New York is to most people who "think" about what Brooklyn is like, but who have never lived or visited there (if that makes sense). It is a very busy street with lots of hustle and bustle, lots of traffic, lots of noise, a lot of activity all of the time, horns blowing, sirens squealing. Never a dull moment. Parts of Caton Avenue have nice homes and other parts of Caton Avenue have large apartment buildings. In the summertime, you see a lot of people sitting out in front of their buildings in lawn chairs, because most of the buildings are not air conditioned and its cooler in the street. This is the street where you have kids playing ball while they're trying to keep out of the way of traffic ... and this is the street where the ice cream truck comes down playing those obnoxious tunes. Living here is very cosmopolitan - anything goes. Tolerance is practiced as there is a lot of diversity along Caton Avenue. Part of Caton Avenue passes along "the Parade Grounds" which is on one side of Prospect Park. So there really is a bit of everything here, including lots of small shops and restaurants. This is Brooklyn!
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4/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Warm and friendly and underrated"

Friel Place is a little street that is hidden in a little pocketed neighborhood that is a bit off the beaten Brooklyn track. A very working class neighborhood, the people here are friendly, outgoing and want to let you know about their latest grandkid's achievements. It's an ethnic mix .. it used to be heavily Italian, but now it is more diverse. The homes are mostly one-family attached, with a few free-standing homes in the mix. Location wise, it is close to the Prospect Expressway, which leads you to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel for direct access to Manhattan. On a good day, you can zip into downtown New York in less than 15 minutes. Shopping and services are within a couple blocks. There's no night life to speak of here. This is a solid family neighborhood. People tend to look after each other here, and that's a nice feature.
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5/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Great Memories on Slocum Place"

I spent a lot of time on Slocum Place when I was going to college. My best friend lived on this charming street, which is only two blocks long. It is made up of older, single family homes and there are actually trees on the street. In fact, some of the homes are large enough to include little gardens in the back or on the side. Slocum Place is one of those hidden treasures, since it is carefully hidden, but still very accessible from the major Coney Island Avenue thoroughfare. Although Coney Island Avenue is filled with a variety of commercial businesses, it still is a fast way to get from one end of Brooklyn to another, so living on Slocum Place is ideal. Parking is good and you are close to the subway stop on Cortelyou Road. This is a very private neighborhood, middle class and clean. People who live here have been in the neighborhood for years, so it is not as transient as other places. Prices remain stable and the people living here are middle aged to older. It is still as nice a place as it was years ago, as I visit my friend's family whenever I'm in town.
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4/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Avenue H Dumps into Brooklyn College"

I actually lived right around here and went to school here, so I know this area well. Avenue H is another street that is split in two -- this time, Brooklyn College is in the middle. One side of Avenue H is filled with small apartment buildings and private homes. On the other side ... the side which I am more familiar with, it is almost exclusively one family and duplex homes. It is a very middle class to upper class neighborhood that is well kept. A lot of faculty and staff live here because it is close to the college, but neighbors should be aware that parking can be difficult since students will fill up the streets with their cars. This is the biggest annoyance. The area is well situated and close to public transportation -- there are two subway lines which are convenient to Avenue H, one on each side of the Brooklyn College campus. And the intersecting avenues have all the commercial services that people should need. This is a lovely area to live and work and is really in the middle of Brooklyn.
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4/5
Mar 31, 2009

"The Heart of Bed-Stuy"

Rochester Avenue is a busy street that is in the heart of Bedford Stuyvesant. Populated with mostly mid-rise apartments and tenements, this is not a very affluent neighborhood and it has been riddled with crime over the years. This is a working class neighborhood with solid citizens who are banding together to keep their community clean and free of drugs. Those who live here have a lot of small bodegas and corner grocery stores, small eateries, laundromats, storefront churches and the like. There are several medical centers close by, so there is excellent health care. Transportation options are also good. You will always find people on the street on Rochester Avenue. It really is a very friendly neighborhood filled with good people trying to make an honest living.
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5/5
Mar 31, 2009

"In the Heart of Brooklyn Heights"

Pierrepont Street is in the heart of Brooklyn Heights, one of the most upscale of all neighborhoods and an address that most people would die for. Only about four blocks long, Pierrepont Street runs perpendicular to the East River. Mostly older brownstone homes and mid-size apartments, Pierrepont Street gets into more of a business environment as you travel toward Cadman Plaza and the Court Street/Borough Hall subway station. Living in this area is ideal for singles and couples and retired folks, since it is a stone's throw away from Manhattan and closes to subway transportation. As a trendy neighborhood, you don't have to go far to find restaurants and services. Most of them are locally owned. You won't find many chains here. Pierrepont Street is close enough to the Brooklyn Heights promenade, which is a favorite place to walk and gaze over the lower Manhattan skyline. This is a good neighborhood, although it is very expensive. It takes a long time to find a vacancy.
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5/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Beautiful Street Bordering the Park"

Prospect Park Southwest is a beautiful street that runs adjacent to Prospect Park, the largest park in the borough of Brooklyn. At one time, this was not a very desirable area, but there has been a lot of revitalization in this part of Brooklyn and now it is an extremely upscale address to possess. It is not a very long street. It runs between Park Circle and Bartel Pritchard Square, and consists mostly of small to medium apartment houses with some smaller individual or multi-family homes. There are at least three formal entrances to the park off Prospect Park Southwest and several other ways to enter. Living alongside the park is lovely and serene and residents and tourists alike can take advantage of the walking trails, the lake, the zoo and various other amenities. There are few, if any commercial establishments on this street, so you will need to walk or drive to adjacent streets to find shops and/or restaurants. However, this entire side of the park is a little more subdued than the Flatbush Avenue side, which has more activity. Public transportation is good -- there is a bus that runs on the street. And residents are not far from Methodist Hospital, which is less than a mile away.
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3/5
Mar 31, 2009

"A Little bit of Everything Close to Everything"

Lott Place is a tiny street (i.e. short street) that runs between Flatbush Avenue and E. 40th Street. There is a little bit of everything on this street, including single family homes, apartment buildings and commercial businesses, such as a laundromat and a shoe repair shop. Because it dumps into Flatbush Avenue, it ends up being quite busy, as large trucks and vehicles use it as a cut through to save time from going around to wider streets. This can be an annoyance to anyone living on Lott Place. There's a supermarket on the corner, which is convenient and you can catch a bus nearby. It is not a very pretty street and it is quite hectic. Parking is OK, even with the apartment building.
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3/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Bergen Avenue - the Edge of Brooklyn"

Bergen Drive is part of the Bergen Beach area of Brooklyn, but it's not really a beach as much as it is a marshland. Years ago there was nothing there, but now there are multi-family homes that face the trees and vegetation that hide the marshy, murky waters of Paedergat Basin. This is a very middle class neighborhood with cluster housing (low apartments). As many Brooklyn streets, Bergen Avenue is split up, so if you're going to that area, remember to ask what part of the Avenue you are traveling to, since it isn't very convenient to get from one part to another. In terms of restaurants, shops, or night life -- there really isn't in this area. You have to get out of the neighborhood to find commercial establishments. Public transportation is not that good, either. However, it is quiet and relatively crime free.
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3/5
Mar 31, 2009

"East 3rd Street is Diversified"

East 3rd Street is another street that runs a long way through Brooklyn and changes personalities many times. Depending on where you are on East 3rd Street, you could find yourself in a single family or duplex home, or you could find yourself in a dentist's office or you could find yourself in a dry cleaning shop or Chinese restaurant. On one end, East 3rd Streets starts at Vanderbilt Avenue, but it gets cut off by intersecting streets at 18th Avenue and picks up again after Foster Avenue. It is intersected again at Bay Parkway and then picks up again until it ends at Avenue Y. Most of East 3rd Street is residential in nature, with mostly smaller homes and small to medium size apartment buildings. There is a mix of people living on this long street, and since it meanders through several different neighborhoods, you are going to find a different mix depending on where you are. However, living on this street is a good location since it is convenient to public transportation, shopping, small, independent eateries and limited night life. It's an all-around decent street to live on, very middle class.
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1/5
Mar 31, 2009

"McDonald Avenue is a really Ugly!"

Apologies to anyone living on McDonald Avenue within sight and sound of the elevated subway, but this major part of McDonald Avenue is downright ugly and nasty. It is one of the longest streets in Brooklyn, running from the Greenwood Cemetery area all the say toward the Coney Island area, ending at the intersection of Avenue X, 86th Street and Shell Road. The reason most of McDonald Avenue is so ugly is because the elevated subway has a line that travels McDonald Avenue and all of the apartments and businesses on this noisy street face the subway and its constant rumblings. So if you happen to have an apartment on McDonald Avenue, your front windows will see and hear the trains whooshing past at all hours of the day and night. For this reason, it is not a very desirable place to live and the rents are fairly low. If you need a place to stay on the cheap, this is the street to look at. Most apartments are on the second floor, above stores and businesses. There are a lot of little mom-and-pop stores on McDonald Avenue, restaurants, ethnic eateries, and one-of-a-kind places. It's interesting to see, but nothing worth a special trip. Sorry! Frankly, I don't recommend ths area for anyone .... but I'm checking singles because I have to.
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4/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Parkside Avenue Borders Prospect Park"

Parkside Avenue begins at Park Circle (a bona fide traffic circle) at the edge of Prospect Park, and travels eastward until it ends at the Kings County Hospital Center. Parkside Avenue runs the gamut from being a lovely, peaceful promenade adjacent to the largest park in the borough of Brooklyn to a bustling commuter subway stop with little shops and neighborhood eateries and then to a more residential area with a mix of private, single dwellings and small apartment buildings. The neighborhood is mixed. Once the home to more well-to-do Brooklynites who enjoyed living near the park, it has had its share of crime. However, underneath it all, Parkside Avenue still has what it takes to be a lovely address.
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2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Mar 31, 2009

"Avenue K is Just Another Residential Area"

Avenue K runs for quite some distance and I lived in the Midwood area, between the major thoroughfares of Flatbush Avenue and Bedford Avenue. It is a fairly wide avenue with mostly single family homes, two and four-family duplexes and some smaller apartment buildings. It is unremarkable in terms of shopping or nightlife, so in that respect, it was a good place for families to raise kids. Much of Avenue K is not on any major subway line, so most residents would have to walk a significant distance to the train. Bus service is accessible. If you have a car, you would be able to find places to park, since the neighborhood is mostly residential. The best thing that I can say about this neighborhood was that for me, I could walk about 15 minutes to the subway line and get into Manhattan in about 55 minutes. It was a longish-walk but good exercise!
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3/5
Mar 31, 2009

"A Plain Street in a Residential Neighborhood"

Avenue F is a relatively plain street that starts at Ocean Parkway and runs to Dahill Road. It isn't very long and it is populated mainly with private homes, both single-family and duplex, especially right off Ocean Parkway. There are some small multi-family apartment units. Because of its proximity to Ocean Parkway, residents of this area have quick and easy access to a major route going into Manhattan, plus it is walking distance to one of the Brooklyn's many subway stops. (Remember that "walking distance" is relative!) As you travel down Avenue F toward McDonald Avenue, where the elevated train runs through, you'll find a small park and a few small businesses, as well as a couple of boarded-up and abandoned storefronts. (Living in the shadow of an above-ground subway is not the most pleasant experience.) This is a middle-class neighborhood composed mostly of families with kids. It is isolated from a lot of the hustle-bustle of the rest of Brooklyn, so it still has a lot of appeal.
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Mar 27, 2009

"There's No Place Like Brooklyn"

I was born and raised in Brooklyn and lived there most of my life (in various neighborhoods), but ended up living in Midwood before I moved. I still go back to visit frequently and I have to say that there is no place like Brooklyn any where else in the world.

Midwood is a very pleasant, family-oriented, middle class neighborhood. It has its share of lower-income tenements but at the other end of the spectrum, it has some of the loveliest, older single-family and duplex homes in the borough of Brooklyn. When I think of Midwood, I think of Midwood High School and the adjacent Brooklyn College (my alma mater). Brooklyn College is part of the City University of New York system and a fine academic institution with outstanding faculty.

Although Midwood is not one of the city's "hot spots" in terms of night life and/or entertainment, it has some of the best little restaurants, delicatessens and eateries around. Because the area has a large Jewish population, you don't have to go far to find a good Jewish deli that serves knishes or pastrami on rye (two things I dearly miss since moving out of state). When I go back, I stock up on Brooklyn knishes and bring them back home!

One of the best things about the Midwood neighborhood is that it really is central to everything in New York (or as central as you can be without being right in the middle of things). You can get to Manhattan in about 45 minutes by public transportation. There bus lines are convenient and travel to places where you'd want to go (Coney Island, Bensonhurst, "Downtown" Brooklyn). You can still have a car in Midwood and find a place to park, even though you may need to walk a block or two.

Shopping is good, with a mix of chain stores and little independent stores. Medical care is adequate. The overall quality of life is good, as Midwood is still small enough to have people caring about their neighbors, but large enough that you can remain invisible, if you want to.

Although it has changed quite a bit since I've actually lived in Midwood, it still retains much of its charm and intrigue. The people who live there and own their own homes still take pride in the way their property looks, so that is an indicator to me about the strength of the neighborhood and the commitment to keep it safe for generations to come.
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JCG
JCG Mmmmm. I forgot about the knishes! Thanks for reminding me!
Apr 10, 2009
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Feb 27, 2009

"Carytown: A Town within a Town"

Carytown is a small, eclectic neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia. It is approximately one mile long and three or four blocks wide (although many neighboring streets would like to claim they are part of Carytown). Definitely one of Richmond's oldest and most famous "neighborhoods," Carytown is known for its unique shops, restaurants and services... sort of the "Greenwich Village" or Richmond. Although there are a few chain stores in Carytown (i.e. McDonald's, Subway, etc.) the character of the neighborhood has been maintained throughout the years by close neighborhood pride and cooperation. About five years ago, two major shopping malls opened in the Richmond area (Short Pump and Stoney Point) which cut into the profits of many of the smaller retailers. A few of them decided to relocate their shops to one of the two new malls. However, those stores were taken over by new retailers and the area is as vibrant as ever. One of the new additions to Carytown is Penzey's Spices. A national retailer that sells mainly through mail order, this is one of two Virginia locations and they have done an excellent job of bringing people to Carytown because of their excellent reputation. A local jewelry store just had a major expansion, despite the economy. Bottom line: Carytown is prosperous and growing.

No matter what your food preferences, you can find many different types of cuisine in Carytown. French, Italian, Middle-Eastern, American, Burgers and more are available at both small and larger eateries. Most of the restaurants in this small area make the list of "best eats" in Richmond year after year.

Although Carytown is known for its shops and restaurants, living in Carytown is like living in a small town. There are apartments over many of the stores on Cary Street and small homes or multi-family units on the side streets or parallel avenues. Rents are high in this area, since Carytown butts up to the neighborhood where Virginia Commonwealth University resides. However, it really is a small town environment, where neighbors know and help each other.

You don't have to go far to find a food market or drug store, either. At the end of Carytown is a large mainstream grocery store (Ukrops) and Ellwood Thompson's Natural Market, which caters to the folks who enjoy organic and health food. There are also pharmacies dotting the edges of Carytown, as well as banks and other commercial necessities.

Access to downtown Richmond is easy, as Cary Street runs right down into the heart of the city. The downtown expressway borders Carytown on its western side.

The one negative about Carytown is its lack of parking. You have to be lucky to find a spot on Cary Street. There are a couple of small lots and garages, but most visitors will have to find a spot on adjacent streets and walk to their destination. However, everything is relative, since you rarely have to walk more than two blocks.

Carytown is a trendy neighborhood that is great for singles and young couples. Retirees and families with kids would probably be happier in other areas of Richmond.
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4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Feb 25, 2009

"Quiet Neighborhood Nestled Among Tall Trees"

Bretton Woods is a neighborhood in Glen Allen, Virginia, which is only minutes from the bustling capital city of Richmond, Virginia. This small and intimate community consists of single family homes on small lots that are approximately 1/4 or 1/5 of an acre. Managed by a community association, homeowners in this neighborhood are pretty much able to do anything with their property, since covenants only regulate what type of fence can be erected!

The best thing about Bretton Woods is the wide streets and lack of traffic, which makes it a perfect neighborhood for walking or biking. The streets are also very flat so it is easy to stroll, walk, jog or run without any effort.

There is a small shopping center about 1/4 mile from the entrance to the neighborhood that has a grocery store, three restaurants, two beauty salons, a shipping store, card shop and a few other retailers. A professional office park also has medical and insurance offices, so there are plenty of nearby services.

The neighbors are friendly, but for the most part, people keep to themselves. Everyone takes good care of their yards and it is a pleasure to be part of a neighborhood where people take pride in their property.

This is a beautiful little neighborhood that is quiet, clean and very American!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Feb 20, 2009

"You are ELITE if you live at East Lawn!"

The East Lawn is part of the original landscape of the University of Virginia. At one end of the Lawn area is the Rotunda, the impressive round building designed by Thomas Jefferson himself, as the centerpiece of the academic environment at UVA. Along the sides of the garden area are the East Lawn and the West Lawn, which included rooms (or barracks) for the academic community to live. Historically, professors and students both lived in these Lawn rooms, which are rather stark by comparison to modern housing. However, students selected to live in the Lawn rooms are definitely considered elite, since there is an extensive screening process to become one of the lucky recipients. Although the actual rooms may be stark and without many amenities, the surrounding landscaping is impeccably neat, clean and beautiful. Those chosen to live on the Lawn are fortunate, indeed. There is an annual Christmas lighting during the holidays, which brightens up the whole Lawn area and brings the faculty and student residents together. During the rest of the year, the flowers, shrubs and trees provide a beautiful and peacful backdrop to all the residents. This is a very nice place to live if you're a UVA student.
Recommended for
  • Singles
5/5
Feb 20, 2009

"Elegant Retirement Community"

Pantops Mountain Road is the home of Westminster Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, an extremely elegant and upscale continuing care retirement community. Overlooking the town of Charlottesville, this pristine and well-manicured development offers senior citizens a comprehensive lifelong care program, complete with 24-hour staffing and security and a full complement of activities. Pantops Mountain Road is beautiful. Anyone living on this road or the surrounding streets will feel a sense of peace and comfort as they gaze from their mountaintop retreat over the town below. Since Charlottesville is often referred to as one of the "Best Places to Retire," Pantops Mountain Road is probably the best place in Charlottesville to live out the retirement years. Having a loved one living at the Westminster Canterbury community is extremely comforting, since you know they are in a wonderful location, enjoying the fresh air, scenery and activities.
Recommended for
  • Retirees
5/5
Feb 20, 2009

"More Downtown Mall Activities"

West Main Street is the end of the Historic Downtown Pedestrian Mall, close to where the road opens up again to vehicular traffic. At this end of the Pedestrian Mall, you’ll find the Regal Cinema 6 Theatre well as one of the free Trolley stops that are strategically located throughout the mall area and other parts of downtown. Charlottesville’s Ice Park is also located at this end of West Main Street, where you can stop in for year-round public ice skating sessions. (Don’t worry if you don’t know how to skate – they have lessons available.) If you go a little farther down West Main Street, past the Pedestrian Mall, you’ll find the Amtrak and Greyhound bus stations. Of course, there are lots of little restaurants and shops on West Main Street as well.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
Feb 20, 2009

"East Main Street - Start of Historic Downtown Mall Area"

610 East Main Street should be the start of anyone’s walking tour of the Historic Downtown Pedestrian Mall area in Charlottesville. The location of the area’s Visitor’s Center, stop here first to pick up maps, brochures, restaurant recommendations and information about validated parking. If you need overnight accommodations, they’ll be able to help you with that, too. Currently under extensive renovation, this celebrated street is the home to some of the trendiest shops and eateries in the area. Visitors can meander up and down the cobblestoned streets and dart in and out of the numerous boutiques. During the warmer months, you can sip a glass of wine or snack on a salad or sandwich at one of the many outdoor cafés.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Feb 20, 2009

"Home of one of our Great Presidents"

Thomas Jefferson Parkway (also known as Route 53) is a winding and hilly country road that branches off from Monticello Avenue, which starts in the central part of Charlottesville. It meanders up to the home of our nation's third President, Thomas Jefferson and his beloved Monticello. One of the premier tourist attractions in the area, Monticello is an architectural masterpiece that demonstrates the inventiveness and ingenuity of Jefferson’s mind. Thomas Jefferson Parkway is a beautiful, well-maintained road and when you finally arrive at your destination (Monticello), you can imagine what it must have been like 200 years ago, before all of the development in the area. Jefferson, who was also the founder of the University of Virginia, was able to look out from his mountaintop retreat and see the University in the distance. If you travel up Thomas Jefferson Parkway to visit Monticello, don’t forget to leave time to tour the gardens and plantation. The natural beauty of the area remains untouched on this road, as it is the sole access to Monticello from Charlottesville.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Dec 11, 2008

"A Cultural Icon on Eastern Parkway"

Starting at the great Grand Army Plaza and running all the way through Brooklyn to the Queens border, Eastern Parkway is a wide, busy boulevard that is a prime location for strolling or bike-riding. Filled with elegant brownstones as well as chic and trendy apartment buildings, Eastern Parkway is home to the renowned Brooklyn Museum, which boasts one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of Egyptian art and masterpieces. The Museum also has numerous special exhibits, classes, gallery talks and special events, plus an on-site café and marvelous gift shop. Also on Eastern Parkway is an entrance to the beautiful Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. No visit to Brooklyn is complete without a stop at these two tourist must-sees.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids