SusanM

  • Local Expert 14,620 points
  • Reviews 27
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A real jewel"

Mount Washington, a small, residential neighborhood in Baltimore, is popular for its affordable housing and high end local shops and restaurants. Residents also find it convenient to most parts of Baltimore via Interstate 83, the Central Light Rail and three different bus lines.
While there is both a public elementary and high school, most of the students who live in Mount Washington attended either private or parochial schools, or one Baltimore’s popular magnet schools. Many of the neighborhood girls go on to highly placed Bryn Mawr. Lacrosse is by far the most popular sport in the area. Most school children play on either a school or neighborhood team at some point in their lives. Some even go on to belong to the historic Mount Washington Lacrosse Club, which was once the home of nation Lacrosse Hall of Famer Doug Turnbull.
As a community, Mount Washington have produced more than its fair share of famous Americans. For instance, astrophysicist Charles Bennett grew up here, as well as the heart surgeon Duke Cameeron. Katie Hoff, an Olympic Swimmer, also got her start in the community’s pool.
Overall, Mount Washington is a real jewel in Baltimore, and would make a great place to raise children or even to retire.
Pros
  • Affordable
Cons
  • mixed quality
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Where the Past is Still Present"

Of all the neighborhoods in Baltimore, Franklintown is perhaps the most unique. It well-earned its place on the National Register of Historic Places, with roots going back more than a century and a half. Beginning as a village known as Franklin Mill, constructed by William H. Freeman in 1832, the neighborhood is built around an oval street plan radiating from the central wooden park. It was designed to be a suburban retreat for the growing middle class, and the area still retains its rural characteristics. Historic Franklintown still features several original buildings, including the Franklintown Mill, the Homestead, the Franklin Inn, the original schoolhouse, and the historic Saint Anne’s Cemetery. The neighborhood features numerous examples of mid- to late-19th century homes.
As a national historic district, potential residents need to keep in mind that their ability to make changes to their homes is going to be strictly regulated by regulations governing historic properties. This neighborhood would definitely be best for either a young professional couple with plenty of disposable income and a taste for history, or retirees who want to own a piece of history and want to invest some of their retirement nest egg in something a little more exciting than a 401k.
Pros
  • Great historical district
Cons
  • Not for everyone
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Lovely and Lovable"

If you are known by the company you keep, than Oaklee is in good shape. Indeed, its two closest neighbors, Violetville nad Irvington are among Baltimore’s most sought after communities. And little Oaklee is not far behind. Located on the southwestern edge of the city, Oaklee has many nice homes and several lovely parks, as well as access to good schools and neighborhood amenities.
Oaklee is also easily accessible to most any part of Baltimore via the well-known city bus system. There are several stops in the neighborhood that connect residents with a variety of ways to spend their time. For instance, anyone attending classes at the University of Maryland’s Baltimore Campus could take the bus straight to class. On the other, someone wanting to play hooky could just a easily go on to the upscale White Marsh Mall.
Overall, Oaklee would be a very nice place to raise a family. Not only is it affordable, but much of the neighborhood still has the same feel that it has and for decades. I certainly would not mind living there myself, and would recommend it to my family and friends without hesitation.
Pros
  • green space
Cons
  • not much glamor
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"A Great Place to Live"

Ashburton is a wealthy, predominantly African American neighborhood in northwest Baltimore. Characterized by a few large Victorian mansions interspersed among row houses, it has played home to some of the city’s most prominent citizens. For instance, one time mayor Kurt Schmoke has called Ashburton home, as has Maryland State Senators Catherine Pugh and Lisa Gladden. Even the current mayor, Stephanie Blake, lived there as a child, along with prominent Baltimore lawyer Dwight Pettit.
In addition to single family homes, Ashburton also sports a large scale apartment complex that appeals to the less affluent members of the community.
One of the things that accounts for Ashburton’s success, according to its residents, is the fact that the neighbors know each other well and look out for their own and other children. They also work hard to keep the community looking good, and are especially interested in making the area more environmentally friendly.
While Ashburton is not far from the hustle and bustle of downtown, it none the less quiet and suburban like in atmosphere. This makes it especially attractive to those who are looking for a quiet retreat that is still within easy access of all the city has to offer.
Pros
  • cozy, comfy housing
Cons
  • kind of pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Squared Away"

Wyndhurst is a square shaped middle class community of more than 300 homes, four schools, two churches and several stores and restaurants. It is popular among its residents for its extensive green spaces and nice, affordable housing. Recent years have seen an influx of buyers interested in the community because of its suburban feel within easy traveling distance of the many amenities offered by downtown Baltimore.
While most of the streets were laid out and named around the turn of the last century, the typical Wyndhurst home dates back to the first decades of the 1900s. For instance, the housing boom of the 20s saw series of simple two story cottages spring up around the area, while what is now the Roland Park Public School was built in 1910. The Catholic Cathedral Mary Our Queen and the Friends School were built later.
Another piece of history that Wyndhurst has successfully modernized is the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad. The area where its tracks once ran has been converted to a well maintained path popular among bikers and joggers. Of course, by the time the weather is too warm for jogging, the Roland Park pool is open and people can more comfortably exercise there.
Pros
  • green space
Cons
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Pick This"

The Orchards is a lovely, upper middle income neighborhood in North Baltimore. For from the crime and violence that plagues so much of the rest of the city, its well built homes located on large, well-manicured lots typically sell for almost twice the average price of other Baltimore houses. It is particularly popular with young professional families looking for a safe, quiet place to raise their families.
The centerpiece of the community is the Elkridge Hunt Club. Established in 1878 to cater to the needs of the upper crust of Baltimore society, the club once consisted of acres and acres of rolling, wooded area dedicated to fox hunting. Today, where once bugles rang out and men and women in stylish riding habits “rode to the hounds,” residents of The Orchards and the surrounding communities meets for golf on the 18 hole course.
While most of The Orchards’ residents own their own cars, there is still some bus service in the area. Two different bus routes run from the edge of the community to other parts of the city. However, there are no local schools in the neighborhood, though there are two excellent public elementary schools nearby.
Pros
  • excellence
Cons
  • no local schools
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"A Small Light in a Dark Place"

Don’t look to Brooklyn for a quiet, residential neighborhood. Located at the south end of Baltimore’s Harbor Tunnel, this neighborhood consists primarily of industrial factories built to be near the harbor’s shipping center. So, while there are a few federal government buildings in the neighborhood, you are more likely to see men loading rail cars or oil tankers than carrying brief cases. Likewise, this is not a place you want to live if you enjoy pushing your baby in a stroller down tree lined streets each evening.

Not surprisingly, what little housing there is pretty shoddy and tends to attract low income residents who cannot afford anything better. As is usually the case, this type of desperation and poverty has bred a pattern of crime and violence that make residents very wary of being out on the streets at night. Though there has been talk of trying to improve the area, gang violence has made it difficult to attract investors.

One of the few bright spots in the areas is the Masonville Cove Environmental Education Center begun in 2008 to provide a place for Brooklyn residents to visit and enjoy the waterfront they live so near. It features bikes paths, classrooms and a restore riverside habitat that will enable both young and old alike to learn more about their natural environment.
Pros
  • new waterfront development
Cons
  • everything else
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Not Doing Well"

Armistead Gardens is a small neighborhood originally built in Northeast Baltimore for those workers coming into the city for jobs in the World War II munitions factories. Unfortunately, most of the original houses were not well maintained and soon collapsed for lack of care. In an attempt to preserve the remaining architecture, the Armistead Homes Corporation purchased man of the remaining properties in 1956. Today, many of the residents are second and third generation citizens of the neighborhood.
Part of the neighborhood’s charm rests in its four historic churches that serve both the spiritual and social needs of the area. Most of the neighborhood’s children attend the Armistead Gardens Elementary and Middle School through 8th grade.
The main problem facing the neighborhood right now is that its population is aging and many of the units are not being purchased by new residents. This, along with a higher than average unemployment rate, has given the community a feeling of being run down and decaying. On the other hand, because over a third of the homes are currently empty, this could be an excellent place for a young couple looking for a bargain in housing. However, there would be a real danger that any property purchased could lose rather than gain value.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • crime and poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Like Living in a Dream"

Arcadia is one of the loveliest and most charming neighborhoods in Baltimore. Most of the cozy, bungalow style homes in the area were built in the mid-1920s. There are more than 450 single family homes along the tree lined streets. These cozy, typically wood, homes are set off by vintage style lampposts that seem just waiting for children to play under at twilight. Likewise, roomy front porches make great meeting places for neighbors hoping to wile away a few minutes visiting.
In fact, many of the adults visiting on these porches were once the children playing under the lampposts. In addition to growing up in the little neighborhood, they have stayed in the area, attracted by the close proximity of good schools, quaint shops and small restaurants. They also enjoy the green spaces that enhance the neighborhood’s quality of life, including several parks and playgrounds. For those wanting a little more adult entertainment, this primarily family neighborhood does sport a few quiet pub style taverns where adults can enjoy a drink or two after work. However, these are hardly nightspots and also attract families stopping in for a quick meal at the end of a long day at work and school.
Pros
  • family oriented blocks
Cons
  • very few
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Another slice of old suburbia"

Dorchester, a predominantly African-American community in northwestern Baltimore, is another example of a neighborhood in that area of the city that has managed to maintain its former character as a suburb of Baltimore in an earlier time. Built in the 1900s, its tree-lined streets feature homes that remain fine examples of the residences typical of the area. All the homes of that era feature large backyards and plenty of privacy, providing the feel of suburban living with the convenience of the city. Bus Route 91 provides service to Dorchester Downtown, enabling residents to reach the heart of the city easily. One can also work in the area, as the neighborhood offers a vibrant retail and office area. With a crime rate below that of the city as a whole, Dorchester is still a safe, quiet neighborhood that should idea for young families with children, young professionals, even retirees. Young and hip college students on a tight budget may want to steer clear, however, as they may not find the area very affordable. There is a cohesiveness in the neighborhood among its residents which is why Dorchester is, even after 100 years, still one of the most desirable addresses in Baltimore.
Pros
  • Peaceful tree-lined streets
Cons
  • May be too high for those starting out
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Close knit and active"

One of the defining characteristics of Woodbourne Heights, a community in northern Baltimore, is the high degree of civic involvement among many of its residents. The area sports not one, not two, but three associations—the Woodbourne Heights Community, the Woodbourne-McCabe Neighborhood, and and Beauregard Neighborhood Associations. Each has worked hard over the years to keep the area as a nice place to live. For the most part, they have succeeded in keeping this predominately African-American middle-class neighborhood of homeowners and renters as a desirable area for Baltimore residents to call home. With Chinquapin Park nearby and a close proximity to Morgan State University, young families, students and professionals might want to take a look at this neighborhood. City Garden plots that can be rented on a yearly basis by city residents are located on Woodbourne Avenue, making the area particularly inviting for residents who want to give their green thumbs a workout. The Belvedere Square Shopping Centers feature boutique retail shops and a European-style fresh food market that appeals to an upscale clientel. For this reason, young stylish couples should also give Woodbourne Heights a look if they are looking for a neighborhood that combines close proximity to the city and, an upscale urban vibe, and elements of green living.
Pros
  • The great shopping
Cons
  • Most shopping too upscale
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Return to Nature"

Yale Heights is a neighborhood that has seen a lot of attention in the past few years, primarily because of the efforts to restore the green scape of the area. Located in southwest Baltimore, most of the neighborhood was constructed in 1955 and are two-bedroom brick townhouses. There is a lot of civic pride in the area, centered on the very active Yale Heights Community Improvement Corporation. The Corporation meets monthly and spearheads efforts to maintain the friendly and close-knit sense of community that has marked the neighborhood from the beginning.
Perhaps no other area of Baltimore has labored to bring some of the natural environment back into the city. Maiden Choice Run flows through the neighborhood, and in 2008 was selected for a $1.4 million restoration project to improve the water quality of streams and rivers flowing into the Chesapeake. The project included planting hundreds of trees and thousands of native plants along the stream near Beechfield Elementary School. The inviting natural environment and the parkland along Yale Avenue make the neighborhood ideal for young families with children. This upper-middle class, predominately African-American neighborhood is also in close proximity to Mt. St. Joseph High School, a parochial school in the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore.
Pros
  • parks, schools
Cons
  • in transition
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Country Lovers
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Nice, Very Nice"

One neighbor was asked about her life in Oakenshawe. This is what she said, “My neighbors and the tree-lined streets. Why did I choose to live here? Location, location, location. Plus the beautiful, well-built rowhouses.”
Indeed, Oakenshawe does have all the charm of a historic neighborhood without the crime and violence that have invaded so many other parts of Baltimore. Built during the decades surrounding the turn of the previous century, Oakenshawe has the kind of large, old trees and quiet, narrow streets that newer neighborhoods dream of.
However, there is a lot more to do in this community than just sleep and eat. For instance, you can take a leisurely stroll from your home to a local restaurant for dinner, followed by a little shopping at a local boutique. Or, if you don’t drive but still want to get to another part of town, there is always the regular public transportation system. It will take you other parts of the city, and return you safely home later in the evening. The streets here are so safe that you need not be afraid to return home, even if it is later than your originally planned.
Pros
  • everthing is so close by
Cons
  • everything is so close by
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Maybe for a Start"

Mt. Winans is not necessarily a great place to live, for several reasons. First, it is largely industrial and commercial, with not a lot of residential housing available. And, unfortunately, what there is is not very well maintained or cared for. While this was once a respectable, middle class neighborhood that attracted blue collar workers and their families, much of the Victorian Era buildings were lost in the Baltimore Fire of 1903.
Also, because it tends to attract a rather poor population, there is a significant amount of crime that is also part of the local landscape. That is not to say that many of the people who live here do not want something better for their lives. It’s just that they often don’t have the resources necessary to alter their surroundings.
On the other hand, if you want to live, work and shop within in few blocks, Mt. Winans might be just the ticket. It could be especially attractive to a student or someone who has just left home the first time. You could live here cheaply, even without the expense of a car, and save you money for something better. However, I don’t think anyone would want to make this neighborhood their long term home.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • poor housing choices
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"TV Hill and So Much More"

Woodberry is a small, middle income neighborhood in north Baltimore. Most of its structures were built in the 1920 and were designed primarily as single family homes, row houses and duplexes. There are also several large apartment complex that tend to cater to a lower to middle income clientele. It is an area, with a long and respected past.
Led by the Concerned Citizens of Woodberry, residents of this community have been diligent in their fight against pollution, littering and crime. They work hard to maintain their own homes and to encourage their neighbors to do so. They also keep an eye on the popular walking path, Greenspring Trails, which lure many residents off their couches during the warmer months of year.
Woodberry is also the home of “TV Hill,” a higher than average location that is the home of four Baltimore television stations.
About ¾ of Woodberry’s population is white, with most of the rest of the residents being African American. It has a much lower than national average unemployment rate and provides nice, inexpensive housing for those with a limited income. So, if you are looking for a safe, quiet, inexpensive home, check out Woodberry. They might have just what you’re looking for.
Pros
  • neighborhood association
Cons
  • TV stations
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Take me out to the ballgame...in 1910"

Located in the north-central area of Baltimore, the neighborhood of Harwood is east of Charles Village and south of Waverly. Known as Oxford in the 1870s, the area became known for the brick and frame construction in the area near 25th and Barclay streets. The neighborhood's place in the history of the city is centered around it's role as the site of several successive baseball fields, beginning with the first Oriole Park at the intersection of 25th and Greenmount Avenue and continuing with the second Oriole Park along 30th Street until it burned in 1944.
Today, this charming and close-knit area preserves a particular era's of Baltimore's history. It is a predominately African-American upper-middle class area with rents and housing values near the median for the city as a whole. Because of it's close proximity to the main campus of Johns Hopkins University, students might find it a good low-cost choice for off campus living. Professionals with a connection to the University should also look in this area. It's crime rate is no greater, certainly, than most other neighborhoods in this part of Baltimore. One of the drawbacks is a lack of park space close to the neighborhood. Families with children should look elsewhere in the city.
Pros
  • Close proximity to Johns Hopkins
Cons
  • Lack of greenspace
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Nice Place to Live"

Wyman Hill is a pleasant, economically diverse community in Baltimore. Depending on their needs and budgets, families can choose between a wide variety of housing options. For those on a fixed income or just getting started in this, there are some nice high rise apartment buildings. Or, if you’re afraid of heights, there are also some very affordable garden apartments built close to the ground. On the other hand, is you are a couple with kids are looking forward to starting a family, there are also some very affordable single family homes in Wyman Park, many of them with shady lawns and plenty of bedrooms.
Most of the commercial and residential structures in Wyman Hill were built in the mid 20th century and reflect that style of architecture, though a few do date back to the 1920s. Among more recent buildings is the Keswick Nursing Home, built to house those at the end of their lives, and the Roland Park Country School, designed especially for those just learning how to live and work well with others. Finally, there are several new building associated with Johns Hopkins University, which continues to expand its campus into Wyman Park.
Pros
  • solid, middle class neighborhood
Cons
  • not great architecture
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Great Then, Fabulous Now"

Union Square is one of those great communities that people imagine themselves living in when they leave Kansas for the “Big City.” Built around the historic park by the same name, its elegant three story row houses date back to the Victorian Era and continue to attract upper middle income families to their elegant, Italianate features. But what many new residents don’t know is that famous American author H. L. Mencken already beat them to it and lived in Union Square his entire life.
While Mencken’s highbrow vibe still attracts many artists and galleries ot the neighborhood, there’s plenty for the less artistic types to do, too. For instance, one can easily stroll over to Camden Yard or Raven’s Stadium to see a ball game, or down to the Inner Harbor for a great meal or some fun shopping. You can even play a round of golf or take the MARC train into Washington DC for some sightseeing.
Of course, if you’re looking for something to do with the kids, you’ll find plenty going on in Union Square. Depending on the season, you might be able to see an outdoor movie, hunt some Easter Eggs or carve a Jack O Lantern. There are also two great public schools, the Southwest Baltimore Charter School and Stuart Hill Academy.
Pros
  • cool, funky vibe
  • lots to do
Cons
  • somewhat crowded in places
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Holy Ground?"

Seton Hill has the distinction of being the only neighborhood in Baltimore named for a local saint. Mother Elizabeth Anne Seton, founder of one of the country’s first schools for girls, lived and worked in this neighborhood for years before moving to the mountains surrounding Frederick, Maryland. It is characterized by a healthy mix of historic, residential and commercial buildings.
The showpiece of Seton Hill is its beautiful, historic Saint Mary’s Park which attracts people on an almost daily basis to walk along its brick paths under the shade of its centuries old trees. Unfortunately, many of the historic homes surrounding the park have fallen into disrepair and give the area felling of being run down and dangerous.
Residents worked hard to have Seton Hill placed on the National Register of Historic Places around the same time Mother Seton was canonized. However, there has not been as much interest in improving the long stretches of row houses, many of which are among the city’s oldest, as some think there should be. So, if anyone is looking for a place with a lot of potential just waiting to be tapped, Seton Hill might be for you. And who knows: you might even merit some help from a higher power.
Pros
  • elegant, historical homes
Cons
  • disrepair
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Hope for the Future"

Located in southern Baltimore, Westport is yet another example of once prosperous, middle class neighborhoods that fell victim to the triple threat of urban sprawl, racial tension and economic woes. When it was built during the 1920s housing boom, immigrants and blue collar workers were lined up to buy the new and modernly equipped row houses. However, by the time the children raised in Westport had reach adulthood, they were anxious to move away from the crowded urban setting in favor of the big lots and trees offered in the suburbs.
With so many people selling their homes, values dropped and some homes stood empty, waiting for someone who wanted to move closer to the city rather than away from it. Then the racial tensions of the 1960s drove out most of the rest of the residents and left the once happy neighborhood in desperate straits.
However, things are looking up. Westport has been tapped to receive a large influx of money from the federal government as part of a major armed services reorganization. There are plans underway for high end apartment buildings and new waterfront businesses. So, if you’re willing to take and chance and looking for somewhere to invest, Westport might just be a good location for your new home.
Pros
  • influx of new captiol
Cons
  • current difficulties
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"fun and Funky"

Most commonly known as “Pigtown,” Washington Park is one of the most interesting and culturally diverse neighborhoods in Baltimore. The first thing you’ll notice as your drive through this quaint neighborhood is that it is constantly growing, with new high end town homes being built beside existing structures that are decades old.
You’ll also see vibrant, electric groups of people on the streets, many of whom were originally attracted to the area by the annual fun and funky Pigtown Festival. This includes everyone from young families to street performers to local craftmen and artists. At the same time, you’ll likely notice professionals making their way home from work and blue collar laborers on their way to a shift in one of the local factories.
Another thing that distinguishes Pigtown is its affordable, quality housing, much of which is perfect for young couples starting out. On the edge of the Camden Yards Transportation Center, Pigtown is convenient to Philadelphia and Washington DC via MARC train, downtown Baltimore by bus and the surrounding suburbs by I-95.
But then again, why would anyone want to leave the area unless they had too. It is veritable smorgasbord of shopping, restaurants and entertainment designed to cater to most any kind of taste.
Pros
  • diversity
Cons
  • unflattering nickname
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Diveristy is the Byword"

Built to house returning solders following the Civil War, Washington Hill soon attracted families from all over the country, and indeed all over the world as more and more people poured into the coastal city looking to make their fortunes.
Today Washington Hill can best be described as “economically and culturally diverse.” On the one hand, two large scale housing projects dominate its landscape, attracting much of the poverty and crime that often accompany such structures. On the other hand, there are also several apartment and condominium complexes that cater to some of the wealthier citizen of Baltimore. In between there are some remaining historic homes that are in various states of repair. This variety of housing attracts a variety of people from differing cultural and racial backgrounds, including everyone from long term African American residents to newly arrived Hispanic immigrants. Though the area has a higher than national average unemployment rate, it is still is not nearly as bad as some other parts of town.
There are several schools in Washington Hills, including the well-respected Baltimore Curriculum Project Charter School. There is also City Springs Park, which is attached to a formerly failing but recently improving public elementary school by the same name.
Pros
  • cultural diversity
Cons
  • uneven value
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Hard Work Pays Off"

Waltherson stand in mute testimony of what can be accomplished in a neighborhood when residents band together to defend their homes and businesses against encroaching trouble. Like many communities in the 1980s Baltmiore, Waltherson was once a dying area, plagued by ever increasing crime, falling property values and unsafe streets. However, all that changed in 1990, the residents got together to form the Gardenville Nieghborhood Association (named Gardenville after Waltherson’s popular local nickname).
With more than 200 members currently, the GNA has done an amazing job improving life in Waltherson. One of their first actions was to organize a citizen watch group to combat crime. Simply by keeping an eye out on what was going on and calling the police to report suspicious activity, they have seen a marked decline in the number of thefts and violent crime over the last two decades. They neighborhood association has also hosted numerous clean up and neighborhood beautification projects. Through their efforts, homes that were once in disrepair are not well cared for, and streets once strewn with littler now host children playing.
Today Waltherson is a pleasant, stable neighborhood knows for its good neighbors, well maintained playing field where Little Leaguers frolic and the Rosedale Park, where joggers run in the morning and children play in the afternoon after school.
Pros
  • commited community spirit
Cons
  • uncertain future
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Not Here"

Walbrook is a predominantly African American neighborhood in western Baltimore. Like so many other communities within the city limits, it suffers from a perfect storm of poverty, racial tension and violence.
In many ways, the racial tension of the late 1960s was what began Walbrook’s descent into the pit. Prior to that time it was a lower middle income neighborhood that catered to working class singles and families. However, the riots that rocked much of the country following the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. destroyed most of the community’s businesses and extensively damaged homes. Fears of further trouble drove residents out of the area and into the newly integrating Baltimore suburbs.
There is little left in Walbrook today accept a few small businesses, most of which have bars over their windows and doors, as well as some homes that have been similarly outfitted. Many of the buildings in the community have been abandoned and stand boarded up year after year until they finally collapse.
The one thing recommending Walbrook is its excellent bus service. In fact, its is the central hub of the Maryland Transit Administration and thus connects with many bus services around the area.
Not Here
Pros
  • excellent public transportation
Cons
  • crime and poverty
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Not a Possibility"

Primarily an industrial center, Wagner’s Point is one place the no one wants to live anymore. While 50 years it was a pleasant water front neighborhood with a predominately African-American population, the pollution given off by the large industrial complexes is thought to have killed many of its lifelong residents. During the late 20th century, resident concerns over their high incidence of cancer combined with the city’s desire for harbor front industrial expansion to spell the destruction of every home in the community.
While many opposed the city’s offers to buy them out, all those who lived in Wagner’s Point eventually came to see the hand writing on the wall. Most left before the wrecking balls raised their formerly tidy row homes, clearing the land for new factories and waterfront industry. Others simply stood and mourned what has once been a nice place to live.
The bottom line is that there is no place to live in Wagner’s Point anymore. And that’s a good thing, because you probably wouldn’t want to anyway. It’s not even a very interesting ghost town, according to Ghosttowns.com, since pretty much all of the original structures have been torn down and replaced with modern activity.
Pros
  • historical interest
Cons
  • everything else
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"a Hidden Gem"

From rambling, 19th century farmhouses to tidy 20th century row homes, Violteville has most any type of single family home you might be looking for. Perhaps more than any other neighborhood in Baltimore, it has maintained much of the same community spirit and look that it had in the 1950s. It is not surprising, then, that Violtetville was voted the “Best Neighborhood in Baltimore” in 2005 and years later still referred to as a “hidden gem.”
Much of the credit for the community’s continued success goes to its determined and committed community association. Founded during the suburban heyday of the late 1950s, they have worked tirelessly to see to it that all is good in Violetville is maintined and any negative influences are held at bay. They began by establishing Violetville Park, devoted then and now to maintaining the neighborhood’s Little League teams and promoting their competitions. When the weather is too cold for baseball, the association turns its attention to the annual outdoor Christmas lights completion which makes Violetville one of the loveliest neighborhoods in Baltimore throughout the holiday season.
In sum, if I were a young family looking for a place to live in Baltimore, I would focus my search on Violetville. It seems to have everything you could want, and little that you wouldn’t like to have for both you and your children.
Pros
  • great all around neighborhood
Cons
  • might not be afforable for everyone
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Simply the Best"

Upper Fells Point got its start as the home of immigrants coming to Baltimore to work on the docks and in local factories. By the turn of the last century, it was a regular melting pot of immigrants from all over Europe. Today its comfortable row houses and charming streets continue to attract immigrants, but this time from South America. As a result, it often bears the affectionate nickname “Spanish Town.”
Whereas the original residents might have been attracted to its peaceful streets that were still within walking distance of their jobs, today’s young professional residents love Upper Fells Point for its nearby urban opportunities, including nightclubs and good restaurants. They love to take a water taxi across the harbor to all the excitement of the Inner Harbor.
On the other hand, those who have lived here a while and are getting up in years appreciate its proximity to top notch medical care at the world famous Johns Hopkins Hospital.
The Baltimore City Paper summarized Fell’s Point attraction in 2006 this way, “It's got a hardscrabble exterior, a booming Latino community, a dash of the old-school Baltimore that's being edged out in most of the city's up-and-coming environments.” That is the same year in which they named it Baltimore’s Best Neighborhood.
Pros
  • almost perfect
Cons
  • kind of pricey
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Youll Love to Learn It"

While the main campus of the University of Maryland is located about 30 miles away in College Park, Maryland, the Baltimore campus is quite large and popular in its own right. Known as the University of Maryland at Baltimore, or UMB for short, the neighborhood surrounding the campus is obviously dominated by a student population. As a result, most of the living spaces consist of newer but inexpensive housing designed to appeal to students looking for an affordable place to live near campus.
There are several advantages to living near a college campus. First, there are always a wide variety of social and cultural events going on, most of which are free. Also, because of the compact nature of the housing and campus buildings, you can easily get along without a car. This is made even easier by the extensive public transportation system that carries residents from several places in the area to most any other part of the city.
Crime on any college campus is always a little higher than in the suburbs. However, it typically takes the form of alcohol related mischief and petty theft rather than violent or drug related offences. The UMB does offer officer escorts for lone walker who are going to their vehicles after dark, so there is a higher than average protection against becoming a victim.
Pros
  • plenty to do
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Hunt No Further"

The Orchards is a lovely, upper middle income neighborhood in North Baltimore. For from the crime and violence that plagues so much of the rest of the city, its well built homes located on large, well-manicured lots typically sell for almost twice the average price of other Baltimore houses. It is particularly popular with young professional families looking for a safe, quiet place to raise their families.
The centerpiece of the community is the Elkridge Hunt Club. Established in 1878 to cater to the needs of the upper crust of Baltimore society, the club once consisted of acres and acres of rolling, wooded area dedicated to fox hunting. Today, where once bugles rang out and men and women in stylish riding habits “rode to the hounds,” residents of The Orchards and the surrounding communities meets for golf on the 18 hole course.
While most of The Orchards’ residents own their own cars, there is still some bus service in the area. Two different bus routes run from the edge of the community to other parts of the city. However, there are no local schools in the neighborhood, though there are two excellent public elementary schools nearby.
Pros
  • lovely, tree lined streets
Cons
  • no local shools or shops
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Dying to Live Here"

Taylor Heights is an unusual community, in that most of its residents are dead. The sprawling Parkwood Cemetary dominates the community landscape, and limits the number of homes available in the area.
Instead, most of the property in Taylor Heights is devoted to commercial endeavors. There are a couple of chain restaurants, as well as a few family owned eateries. Because Baltimore is a seaport town, these places tend to focus on seafood offerings. There are also several bars and nightclub that tend to attract a somewhat rowdy clientele, especially on the weekends.
There are not a lot of chain stores in Taylor Heights. Instead, most of the stores are privately owned specialty shops that cater to those who do not have transportation to shop at the more competitive stores in the suburbs. There are also several hair salons and a small day spa.
The few homes that are available in the community tend to be of poor quality and occupied by people of questionable intents. In other words, because the neighborhood is primarily commercial, those who choose to live there are often interested in less than entirely legal commercial activities. For these reasons, and others, I would not recommend this neighborhood to anyone.
Pros
  • nice, peaceful cemetary
Cons
  • crime and violence
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Not a Good Place to Live"

Stonewood-Pentwood-Winston, a small neighborhood with a big name, is located on the outskirts of Morgan State University in Baltimore. Like most communities near college campuses, it has had some trouble balancing the needs and wants of the nearby student population with those of the residents. For one thing, neighbors have had to institute a parking permit system to make sure that they are able to park in front of their own houses.
Unfortunately, this largely African-American community has fallen on some financially hard times. There are way too many abandoned homes in the community, as well as the types of crime and violence that that sort of problem attracts. At this time, almost half the homes in this once nice community are standing empty.
On the other hand, Stonewood-Pentwood-Winston can be a cheap place to live for more serious students who do not wish to become too entangled in campus life. This includes low income upperclassmen and older students who may be married and have families of their own. However, no one would come here looking for a permanent home to raise a family, or as a place to retire. There are just too much poverty and crime right now for me to recommend it to anyone, other than desperate students.
Pros
  • cheap housing
Cons
  • crime and violence
Recommended for
  • Students
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"You Dont Want to Live Here"

Located in West Baltimore, Sandtown-Winchester is a large neighborhood known to its residents simply as Sandtown. Unfortunately, it is also one of the city’s most dangerous places to live. In fact, children in the community are more likely to have heard of the Bloods and the Crips, notorious gangs, than they have of Washington and Lincoln.
Perhaps the saddest thing about this community is that it spent its first century as an enclave of middle income African American culture. So now, where once Cab Calloway and Billie Holliday played jazz, their neighborhood descendants get high and dodge bullets. Along the streets where Thurgood Marshall once practiced his opening arguments, former drug lord “Little Melvin” later got the youth of the community hooked on his criminal drugs nad violent activities.
In short, there is nothing at all to recommend this community. It is too dangerous for anyone, even students. If you are poor but still want a safe, decent place to live, look elsewhere. You do have other options, and anything is better than living here. Even those who live that now are desperate to get out and would not try to draw in anyone they care about.
Pros
  • some public transportation
Cons
  • everything else
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Such a Shame"

Rosemont is a sad example of the history of so many of Baltimore’s historic communities. First, it began as a middle class neighborhood made up of hard working blue collar workers and professionals during the latter half of the 19th century. It remained a growing, vibrant area for about a century before succumbing to a number of factors that combined to create a “perfect storm” of social and economic disaster.
First, there was the flight to the suburbs, during which many of the communities more stable families left the neighborhood for larger homes in areas farther from the center of town. Next, those who remained suffered economic setbacks as the American economy tanked following World War II. Many who had mortgages were unable to make the payments and faced foreclosure. Because the neighborhood was by this time in such a decline, there were not enough people interested in purchasing homes to keep them full. This led to boarded up homes which made the area look even worse.
Finally, the racial riots that spread through Baltimore after the death of Martin Luther King proved to be the final nail in the community’s coffin. Today, the neighborhood is a center of crime and despair where drug dealers and pimps ply their trades.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • crime and violence
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"What a Nice Place to Live"

One of the first planned communities in America, Roland Park was a suburban neighborhood from its inception during the turn of the previous century. Once can still see the remnants of it upper income original owners when you look at the elegant architecture and tree lined streets.
Not just a good place to live, Roland Park is also a great place to learn. Its local public elementary and middle school has won statewide recognition for its academic excellence. There are also numerous private schools in the community, including the Friends School of Baltimore and the Cathedral School, as well as private academies for girls (Bryn Mawr) and boys (the Boy’s Latin School). Residents can continue their higher education at St. Mary’s Seminary and University.
Once they graduate, or if they want to earn some extra cash during high school, students can often find work at the Roland Park Shopping Center, listed in the Guinness World Records as the first shopping center ever created. They can also find work at one of several other malls in the neighborhood.
Finally, the neighborhood is that proud home of the Baltimore Country Club, one of the city’s long established centers of society and culture.
Pros
  • ultimate in suburban living
Cons
  • not a lot of excitment
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Take Me Out To a Ball Game"

Ridgely’s Delight is a small residential neighborhood in Baltimore. Located within walking distance of the Inner Harbor, it is popular among those who are looking for a more affordable neighborhood that is still near the glitz and glamor of the touristy Inner Harbor.
Ridgely’s Delight’s main claim to fame is the Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum. The men and women who come from all over the country to visit this shrine to America’s most famous baseball star have led to the development of a baseball theme subculture in the immediate area. There is everything from a sports themed bookstore to the Camden Pub, where patrons can enjoy a light meal and beer while watching various games played out on TV.
Residents have benefited from this influx of tourist dollars in several ways. For instance, a local MARC train station brings tourists in, but it also give residents an easy way to get to jobs as far away as Washington DC. There are also many opportunities for those who own their own homes to rent out parking spaces to baseball fans coming ot see games at the nearby Camden Yards, or other events at the M & T Bank Stadium.
Pros
  • baseball, baseball, baseball
Cons
  • not a lot of great housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Some Many Homes to Choose From"

Once the home of American author Gerturde Stein, Reservoir Hill is a charming Victorian neighborhood located on the edge of Baltimore’s famous Druid Hill Park. No matter what size home you are looking for, you are likely to find it here. There are everything from rambling Victorian mansions to row houses to apartments carved out of older homes. Many of these older structures were built by 19ths century immigrants from Eastern Europe. The commitment of many of these immigrants to their Jewish faith can be seen in the elegant architectures of the still in use Beth Am synagogue, originally built in 1922.
The jewel of Reservoir Hill is the Mount Royal sub neighborhood. Here you will find homes that have been extremely well maintained through the years. Not surprisingly, they also fetch the highest prices in the neighborhood, and are hard to buy because those who originally purchased them tend to hold on to them for life.
The other great beauty in Reservoir Hill is Upper Eutaw. Also a historic district, it boasts a number of the larger mansions in the neighborhood, as well as several apartment complexes that date back to the turn of the previous century. Unfortunately, some of these apartments will need to work to bring them up to the standards of the rest of the community.
Pros
  • variety of home
Cons
  • uneven housing quality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Main Street America"

Located in northern Baltimore, Remington is the type of community that most people imagine when they picture middle class America. While its earliest origins date back to those of the republic, it did not began to grow in a significant way until the late Victorian Era, when improved transportation attracted people from the downtown area to the suburbs.
There is also a wide variety of business opportunities in the community, including small, family run shops and restaurants, fun and funky markets, and even some small scale industry.
There is also a wide variety of business opportunities in the community, including small, family run shops and restaurants, fun and funky markets, and even some small scale industry.
Today, Remingtons early 20th century row houses remain some of the best cared for and popular in Baltimore. They have attracted a culturally diverse population that truly represents the best of the American melting pot experience. The few houses that have fallen into disrepair or disuse are even now being renovated as part of Baltimore’s Healthy Neighborhood Initiative.
Most of the residents of Remington are married couples with children. Whether their kids attend one of the public charter schools or private schools, they tend to be very involved in their children’s education. This has allowed Remington schools to gain a reputation in the area for excellence and progressive educational practices.
Pros
  • something for everyone
  • schools
Cons
  • not much glamor
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Main Street America"

Located in northern Baltimore, Remington is the type of community that most people imagine when they picture middle class America. While its earliest origins date back to those of the republic, it did not began to grow in a significant way until the late Victorian Era, when improved transportation attracted people from the downtown area to the suburbs.
Today, Remingtons early 20th century row houses remain some of the best cared for and popular in Baltimore. They have attracted a culturally diverse population that truly represents the best of the American melting pot experience. The few houses that have fallen into disrepair or disuse are even now being renovated as part of Baltimore’s Healthy Neighborhood Initiative.
Most of the residents of Remington are married couples with children. Whether their kids attend one of the public charter schools or private schools, they tend to be very involved in their children’s education. This has allowed Remington schools to gain a reputation in the area for excellence and progressive educational practices.
Pros
  • something for everyone
  • schools
Cons
  • not much glamor
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Dont Forget Your Parking Permit"

Ramblewood is a small, predominantly middle income African American neighborhood in northeastern Baltimore. It is popular among residents for its affordable housing, good schools and friendly neighbors. The Ramblewood Community Association works very hard to keep that community a nice place to live, and to address concerns of area citizens about such matters as school districting, trash pick up and lawn maintenance.
One of the issues that the RCA has to deal with a while back was that of parking. Most of the single family homes are privately owned and occupied year around. Because these houses tend ot be close together, and because most families today have at least two cars, residents tended to park on the street in front of their homes. This was not a problem until students at nearby Morgan state University also started parking on Ramblewood Streets. This often led to the following scenario: a resident would leave for work early in the morning and then return home in the evening to find that he had no place near his home to part because students have taken up all the on street parking.
The RCA solved this problem by issuing parking permits to residents, and then obtaining permission to have any parked car not bearing a permit towed from neighborhood streets. The students soon got the message.
Pros
  • solid, middle class neighborhood
Cons
  • Parking
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Rose"

Radnor-Winston might romantically be described as a rose among thorns. Located in Baltimore’s often troubled North district, it has maintained its historical integrity in spite of the racial unrest, poverty and industry shutdowns that have nearly destroyed more than one of its sister communities.
Perhaps Radnor-Winston’s success is to do some sort of supernatural protection. After all, it is located just behind the famous Catholic enclaves Loyola University and Notre Dame’s Baltimore campus. While the prayers no doubt help, it is probably more likely that the students looking for nearby housing are not as likely as non-Catholics to be involved in drugs and violence.
Another possible reason for its success is the charm and value of Radnor-Winston’s 220 single family homes. Consisting of everything from cottages to bungalows to row houses, they continue to attract a culturally diverse citizenship that are mostly of middle and upper middle incomes. These good folks tend to work hard, many at one of the local colleges mentioned above. Plenty are also active in the Radnor-Winston Improvement Association, a group of citizens committed to maintaining the community’s pleasant surroundings and stable property values. They meet regularly to make suggestions for community improvement, and to keep citizens abreast of social and political issues that are relevant to their lives.
Pros
  • cultural diversity
  • nice, affordable housing
Cons
  • near high crime areas
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Not a Good Idea"

Pen Lucy is a small, mainly African American neighborhood in North Baltimore. It has a bad reputation in the area for its poverty and high crime rate. In fact, it is often accused of harboring drug dealers and other violent criminals who prey on the surrounding areas.
The primary cause of Pen Lucy’s poverty is that well over half of its homes are headed by single parent families, usually single moms, who do not make enough money to support themselves and their children. Many of these women became pregnant as teenagers and were never able to finish high school. They live in Pen Lucy because of its low cost housing. In fact, almost two thirds of the neighborhood’s residents do not own the homes they live in. Instead, they are dependent on government support rental properties and apartment complexes.
The Pen Lucy Neighborhood Association, Inc. is working hard to improve the lives for these mothers and their children. However, they have an uphill battle against numerous problems, including boarded up, falling down houses that attract every kind of criminal. They dream of a day when these homes can be repaired or even simply torn down and replaced by safe parks for the community’s nearly 1,000 children.
Pros
  • neighborhood association
Cons
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Students
playfair
playfair A good idea is often a matter of timing. This is roughly a year after your post, and a combination of factors have improved Pen Lucy. While various nonprofits, including Habitat, PLAN, and PLNA have made their mark, the most important influence on my street is that people are basically conservative. Yards are kept, and there are many "old school" men and women who are neat, quiet neighbors raising polite children. These habits have chased some of the drug dealers elsewhere. I have always gone when and where I please, alone and often on foot. When my realtor brought me to my current home four years ago, no one commented on our races. Rather, neighors greeted us. My realtor noted that porch furniture was not bolted down (as it is in some parts of town) and said, "Well, I won't have any nightmares selling you this house." And honestly, I have found neighbors helpful when I needed help. Four locals dug my car out of a drift during Snowmaggedon. People speak to each other on the street. I purchased a vacant lot in the neighborhood and even the somewhat fearsome looking young men made conversation with me while I maintained the lot with a scythe, which fascinated some of them. While whacking away at my weeds, I could hear churchbells and sparrows - you'd think it was Montmartre. When I moved here from Seattle, I was unaware of Pen Lucy's reputation. Three thousand miles away, an entire city like Baltimore can be dismissed as a ghetto. I came because I was priced out of Seattle's housing market, even though I had been a homeowner in an outlying area. In Baltimore, I am able to own an old rowhouse and investment properties which are decently maintained. A legal secretary in DC, I can afford to travel and return to college without financial aid. There are activist, intellectual and spiritual communities within Pen Lucy and nearby because of the neighborhood configuration some locals characterize as "Smalltimore". But I admit that the negative characterizations of Pen Lucy have their element of truth and I am glad I did not try to raise my (grown) children here and would not choose to do so just yet. I was a singe mother and needed to raise my boys in an environment where my family would be respected which, it seems from your post, would not have been likely here. Having said that, I have enjoyed living here and can promote it as an affordable retirement destination. But you do have to deal with an imperfect place. If you are an adventurer or activist, you can seriously love it. If you need to assert a "higher" class, it will not appeal to you as much as neighbohoods like nearby Charles Village. But I am truly thankful for my nice neighbors and the opportunities I have had to experience some of Baltimore's best attributes. As they say, "Location, Location, Location".
2yrs+
Add a comment...
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Trying Really hard to Improve"

Built just after the Civil War, Patterson Park is yet another of the many historic neighborhoods surrounding Baltimore’s downtown area that have been nearly destroyed by racial tensions, declining blue collar jobs and a poor economy. What makes it special is that, unlike so many of other neighborhoods, the past decade have seen it rise again like a Phoenix out of the ashes of poverty and violence.
Patterson Park’s fight back began in 1986, when the Patterson Park Neighborhood Association organized neighbors to take responsibility for their surroundings and improve what they had. Among its many other project, the PPNA has raised money to finance home improvements that are making Patterson Park’s old styles houses more modern and energy efficient. They have also gated many alleys that were once homes for drug deals and turned them into quiet, park like space where people can relax and garden.
The other player in Patterson Park’s renaissance is the Patterson Park Community Development Corporation, which oversaw renovations on more than 300 collapsing row houses before succumbing to the current economic crisis. This has led to an amazing drop in crime and a tremendous rise in home values. These improvements continue, even though the PPCDC is no longer in operation.
Pros
  • people are trying to help
Cons
  • decaying houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Could Be a Nice Place for the Right Family"

Parklane is a small, almost exclusively African American neighborhood in North Baltimore. While the population tends to be lower middle income, it does have many of the features that one would expect to find in a more affluent area. For instance, it has two significant green spaces, Edgecombe Park and Pal Mall Playground. While some families are concerned about the dangers of drugs and violence in these public areas, they are typically pretty safe during daylight hours. For indoor recreation, the James D. Gross Recreation Center offers a gym, meetings rooms, a computer lab and some workout equipment.
Most children in the neighborhood attend the Edgecombe Circle Elementary School, a small public school with a low teacher to student ratio, through the 5th grade. In addition to offering education, this school provides both free breakfasts and lunches to most of its students, as well as afterschool care.
Parkland also has a good bus service, with several routes running through the area. Residents can take these buses to visit historic Fort McHenry, or to connect with a Baltimore Metro train, as well as to work and higher education, social events or dinner and a movie.
Pros
  • parks, schools
Cons
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Nice, Solid Neighborhood"

Overlea is a solidly middle class neighborhood in Baltimore. Located on three square miles of land, it boasts more than 12,000 residents, making it one of the area’s more crowded neighborhoods.
Most of the more than 3,000 families in Overlea live in one of several middle income style apartment or condominium buildings. However, they are more likely to be DINKS (double income no kids) than families with children. This is because, while Overlea has little crime or problems with violence, it also does not have many single family homes with large lots, such as families with children a likely to look for.
That is not to say that there are no kids in Overlea. In fact, there are more than 2000 kids in the area. However, most are younger, first children of families still working for the dream home or the children of one income or single parent homes. Those in high school attend Overlea High, a large high school with extensive extracurricular activities.
There is very little poverty in Overlea, which also makes it popular with retirees. Nearly one quarter of its population is over 55. Typically, these are people who have lived there for years and chosen to remain, rather than choosing it as a place to retire to.
Pros
  • little crime
Cons
  • not great housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"In a Word: WOW!"

Located near the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Otterbein is a small community with a big pocketbook. In fact, it has the proud distinction of being one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Baltimore. Though its charming old row houses are located close together and have only what used to be called handkerchief sized lawns, they regularly fetch high real estate prices from those wanting to live within walking distance of the history and glamor that makes up the Inner Harbor.
A typical home in Otterbein is an antebellum, row house. Depending on which part of the neighborhood it is in, it may be a large mansion, a Victorian Era home that has been turned into one or two high end apartments or a small, two or three story row house. What is particularly interesting is the Otterbein was, even from its earliest times, pretty culturally eclectic. While standing on a singly street corner on any given day, you might see a grand lady drive by in a carriage, hear an newly immigrated Irishman trying to learn English or wave to a black freedman newly arrived from the south. This is still the situation today. Though most of Otterbein’s residents are wealthy, they come from all sorts of religious, cultural and racial backgrounds.
Pros
  • very desirable location
  • beautiful homes
Cons
  • cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Coasting Downhill"

Oliver is a predominantly African American neighborhood on the east side of Baltimore. Once a solidly middle class neighborhood on the edge of Greenmount Cemetary, it has, in recent decades, joined the much too long list of Baltimore communities that are dominated by crime and poverty.
The problems began during the racial riots on the late 1960s when Oliver was the home of Baltimore’s infamous Black Panther Party. Rioters, vandals and looters damaged or destroyed many of the local homes and businesses. Frightened by this violence and instability, those residents who could left the area for better, safer parts of town. Those who remained behind had little choice but to watch their once happy community fall victim to drug dealers and pimps. Today it is in such a state of decay that HBO used it for exterior shots for the widely acclaimed TV show, The Wire.
Though one in four homes are abandoned and boarded up, there are a few signs of life yet. The Oliver Economic Development Corporation is working hard to attract new businesses and investors ot the area. They are responsible for the community’s only culture center, the Great Blacks in Wax Museum. At the same time, the Oliver Community Association is encouraging residents to apply for grants and other government programs designed to fix up and maintain their homes.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • poverty and violence
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"The Heart of Charm City"

Without a doubt, the Inner Harbor neighborhood of Baltimore is by far the best area of the city. It is the real heartbeat of the city, with annual city-wide events taking place with the Inner Harbor as it's backdrop. These include the recent Grand Prix of Baltimore and the Virgin Music Festival. Also in the area are the city's major tourist attractions, such as the National Aquarium at Baltimore, Camden Yards (home of the Baltimore Orioles), M&T Bank Stadiym (home of the Baltimore Ravens), and the Baltimore Maritime Museum featuring the USS Constellation. Also in the neighborhood are numerous office complexes, hotels, retail shops, restaurants, bars, nightclubs, and other establishments meant to attract both residents and tourists.

While the Inner Harbor is known primarily as a shopping and entertainment destination, it is also a place to consider if one wants to live in the heart of Baltimore. The area has luxury condominiums with prices high above the city median housing price, and there are plans over the next several years to increase the amount of residential space through mixed-use development. Because of the location in the heart of the city, Inner Harbor would not be a good choice for families. Young single professionals and couples would find the area ideal .
Pros
  • Everything is right there
Cons
  • Not family friendly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Suburban life in the city"

Lauraville is another example of an area begun as a suburb of Baltimore in the late 19th century and gradually incorporated into the city limits. It has managed to maintain it's suburban charm while being gradually converted into an urban area. The neighborhood, named after the daughter of a local property owner, is bounded on the south by Herring Run Park and on the west by Mount Pleasant Park. The close proximity of the parkland contributes to Lauraville having a quiet and “green” atmosphere.
Most of the houses date from the 1870s-1920s, the area being mostly developed by the time Lauraville was annexed into the city in 1918. The houses were built by a variety of developers over the years and show different styles and facades. Most houses are detached single-family fame or cedar shingle structures along streets lined with shade trees coveted by the residents of the area.
Neighborhood residents describe the area as safe and quiet, engaging in outdoor activities such as biking, walking and running that take advantage of the nearby parks and the tree-lined streets. An upper-middle class area with a median income almost twice that of Baltimore as a whole, with nearby Morgan State University adding to the professional character to the neighborhood, the area is ideal for professionals, families, singles—anyone looking for a bit of suburban living in the city.
Pros
  • Safe and quiet
Cons
  • Can't think of any
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"An old place for a new century"

A neighborhood in south Baltimore, the Lakeland neighborhood is on some of the oldest land in Baltimore City. Settled by 1675, the area was purchased by Charles Carroll of Carrollton and consolidated into his Georgia Plantation in 1732; in 1733, portions were deeded to the Baltimore Iron Works Company. From this time through the 19th century, a small community of brick homes sprang up, first named Minersville and later named Lakeland.
Today, Lakeland still has much of the charm it earned through the 19th and 20th century. It is one of the few truly integrated neighborhoods, almost evenly divided between whites and African-Americans. With median income above that of the city as a whole, Lakeland is one of the more prosperous areas of Baltimore. Housing is more expensive than in much of Baltimore, with housing prices and rents being above the city-wide medians. While attractive because of its relatively low crime and good schools, for those on a budget (especially singles and young families) may want to look at other areas of Baltimore first. The neighborhood is convenient to the main highways of MD-295, I-695 and I-95. It is also on Baltimore's main bus routes, so getting into downtown is not difficult. For those who want to commute to jobs outside the city area, the MARC line is nearby.
Pros
  • Low crime
Cons
  • Housing costs higher than city median
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Simply lovely"

If you want to live in a neighborhood that combines urban convenience, suburban environment, and historical appeal, then the Lake Evesham neighborhood is no doubt the best place for you. This entire neighborhood, located in North Baltimore, has been designated as a Historic District, and for good reason. The area preserves a variety of residential architecture showing its development between 1870 and 1940. It exemplifies through it's variety of home types and architectural styles Baltimore's grown from the late 19th century through the World War II era. The neighborhood includes Victorian-era facades, bungalows and homes from the 1920s and 30s, and immediate post-war housing styles at the beginning of the baby boom years. While the neighborhood represents the efforts of several developers, the neighborhood has its own sense of time in space through its architecture, its old streetscapes, setbacks, and landscaping.

Lake Evesham is preominately white, upper class professionals. Housing values are high above Baltimore's median value, making the area very attractive to professionals and families. Because of high housing costs, it may not be best for singles or young families starting out.

Because of its designation as a Historic District, anyone with the idea of making changes to their home should keep in mind the many rules and regulations governing historic properties. But if you want to own a piece of history, then look at Lake Evesham first.
Pros
  • Beautiful, historic homes
Cons
  • House prices may be too high for young couples
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Stay Away!"

Unless you are a heroin pusher or junkie looking to score your next fix, you should avoid Kresson at all costs. Located in Southeast Baltimore, Kresson is primary an industrial neighborhood with a small residential section of about 400 low-income people who would not live there if they could leave. This is not a place one would want to be in during the day, much less at night. You're more likely to see a prostitute on the streets than a postman. One of the more dangerous areas of Baltimore, there were two shootings and a stabbing at the same streetcorner in the neighborhood over a two-day period in September 2011. Without a doubt, crime and drugs are a continual problem in this neighborhood, and will be for some time to come.

It is impossible to recommend this neighborhood to anyone. There is no redevelopment taking place, and none planned in the near future. In contrast to an area such as Joseph Lee, there has been no attempt to clean up the area and replace the run-down buildings with new, more inviting housing options. Even if there were, it would take a major effort to rid the area of the crime and drug problems and the social problems that go with them. There are so many nicer neighborhoods in Baltimore one can choose, there is really no reason anyone should choose Kresson. Don't even think about giving this neighborhood any consideration if you're looking to move into the city.
Pros
  • None
Cons
  • HIgh-crime and drugs
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"One of the best neighborhoods in the city!"

If you're looking for a place to live in Baltimore, you should start by looking here. Joseph Lee is the residential part of the Bayview neighborhood. It is often called the "A-B-C" neighborhood because all of the north-south streets are laid out in alphabetical order. The neighborhood features numerous examples of traditional Baltimore row houses. The oldest houses in the neighborhood, in the western part, were constructed in the 1920s, with the houses in the eastern part build in the 1950s, The neighborhood features streets line with azalea bushes. The neighborhood is predominately white middle-class professionals, many of whom work at the nearby biomedical research facility at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center that houses the National Institutes on Aging and Drug Abuse.

There have been several development projects in the last decade that have gone a long way to increasing the attractiveness of the neighborhood. These include "Archer Square," an open-air shopping center developed at the former Archer Fence complex; and a Streetscape project along Eastern Avenue. In all, Joseph Lee is one of the more desireable neighborhoods in Baltimore.
Pros
  • Shopping, houses, and work all in one area
Cons
  • Can't think of any
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Going backwards to move forward"

Jonestown is an area of Baltimore that demonstrates what can happen when a city fails to preserve its historical areas. The neighborhood is in a section of Southeast Baltimore originally laid out in 1732. It is bounded by Little Italy, Oldtown, Washington Hall, and Downtown Baltimore and is only a few blocks away from the Inner Harbor. Featuring a mixture of industrial, commercial, and residential buildings, Jonestown has shifted form being an Eastern European and Jewish neighborhood in the 19th century to a predominately African-American community by the mid 20th century. In a misplaced attempt at urban renewal, the original row houses and townhomes in the area were torn down and replaced by public housing projects. By the early 21st century, however, these run-down projects were themselves being torn down and replaced by modern rowhouses resembling suburban townhomes. As one of the oldest areas of Baltimore, Jonestown features 8 City Landmarks, including the Flag House.

Over time, the area continues to show signs of renewal, particularly because of its close proximity to Inner Harbor. While currently a lower-income African-American community, the area should attract those with higher incomes as housing opportunities improve. Those who want to try a revitalizing neighborhood close to shopping, nightlife, and work may want to try this area.
Pros
  • A neighborhood in transition
Cons
  • Still transitioning
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not a bad place to live"

A neighborhood in southeast Baltimore, Irvington is located between Yale Heights to the west and Gwynn Falls to the east. With most of its homes built before 1950, it is one of the older neighborhoods in Baltimore with houses going back at least a century. The neighborhood has two significant landmarks--the Irvington Theater and St. Joseph Monastery. Irvington Theater opened in 1925, its marquee sign being a prominent community landmark. Remodeled as a cinema in 1967, by 1971 it became an unwelcome feature to the neighborhood as it had transitioned to screening adult films. It closed in 1971, only to be reopened in September of that year as a church. St. Joseph's Monastery, build in 1886, houses the Passionist Order and is one of Baltimore's most striking architectural features. Thanks to the presence of the monastery, the area is served by several parochial schools of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, including Mount St. Joseph College, a Catholic High School for Boys.

An upper middle-class, predominately African-American community, Irvington should be attractive to professionals looking for convenience to the business districts and young families looking for reasonable housing prices in an area that still has some attractive green spaces.
Pros
  • Convenience to downtown
Cons
  • Close proximity to Interstates
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"No, Not That One"

Named for George Washington’s elegant home, Mount Vernon is best known for the first Washington Monument, built in Baltimore decades before the better known DC version. It has excellent public transportation and numerous cultural centers, including the Lyric Opera House and the Peabody Conservatory. It also offers excellent educational opportunities to its citizens, with both the University of Baltimore and Johns Hopkins University being located within its borders. These institutions have attracted an eclectic mix of restaurants and night clubs to the neighborhood and have led several owners of older homes to turn their residences into charming Bed and Breakfast that are popular with tourists.
Mount Vernon isn’t just for tourists, though. There are numerous elegant homes built around the Washington Monument during the decades following its construction, as well as apartment buildings and row houses. The elegant Belvedere Hotel, originally constructed in 1903, has since been converted to high end condominiums. Many of these homes boast large, well-cared for lawns, or are near one of the neighborhood’s many carefully manicured parks.
Overall, Mount Vernon is the perfect middle class urban neighborhood, with homes, museums, restaurants, shops and park all nearby. It continues to attract up and coming professionals and their families.
Pros
  • history
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Not a the Best Place to Live"

Located in west Baltimore, Mosher is a large community that has seen better days. While primarily African American, it was once a largely European enclaves, as can still be seen by much of its architecture. For instance, the imposing brick building that was once the Hebrew Orphan Asylum still dominates that landscape. In fact, this building represents that changes that have taken place in the neighborhood over the past 150 years. IT was built in 1876 by Jewish immigrants who wanted to provide for the needy children in the community. Then, in the 1950 it became a Lutheran Hospital, as a more gentile population took over the community. Today, it is the home of Coppin State University, a traditionally black college, and caters to the almost entirely low-income African American population that lives in the area.
Unfortunately, not all the houses and buildings in Mosher have made the transformation as easily. There are many once proud homes that are run down or have been damaged by racial unrest. There are also far too many boarded up and unsafe buildings in the area that play home to drug dealers and prostitutes. While it would be nice to see Mosher restored to its former glory, there is little in the works right now to indicate that will happen.
Pros
  • one great building
Cons
  • boarded up homes
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"More at Morrell"

Where once cotton and tobacco grew, later trolley tracks ran and today Morrell Park is some of the nicest, most affordable housing in Baltimore. Known for its row house and well maintained single family homes, the neighborhood is popular with those wanting to live in Baltimore while working in Washington DC.
Morrell Park is a friendly neighborhood with local restaurants and businesses, many of which have been owned by the same families for years. In fact, Bessie’s Cleaners has been family owned and operated for more than 50 years. There are also several good schools nearby, though only one public elementary/middle school in the actual neighborhood. The three local churches are well established and popular with residents, is the local recreation center.
The residents association continues to work hard to keep Morrell a pleasant place to live. They support the local youth athletics programs and help maintain the neighborhood playground. They are also always working to improve facilities and recreational opportunities of the area’s residents. There is some talk right now of a new recreational center that may even include an indoor swimming pool. This will likely be very popular during the many cold months of the year when families are looking for a place to go to blow off a little steam and recover from cabin fever.
Pros
  • safe, secure environment
Cons
  • strict homeowners association
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Life is Great at Morgan State"

It will surprise no one to learn that the neighborhood surrounding Morgan State University is primarily populated by students enrolled there. While there are also a few professors and members of the campus support staff who make their homes in the neighborhood, most of the people you’ll see walking along its busy streets are likely to be more concerned with their next test than in planning for retirement, or how their kids are doing in school
There are two types of on campus residences for students. The first consists of four residential halls that are set aside for upperclassmen and honors students. The other type are high rise apartment complexes. The first of these two building catered to a predominantly female population and is popular among serious students who wish to avoid romantic distractions. The other building, named for Thurgood Marshall, is co-ed and caters mostly to the upperclassmen and married or cohabiting students.
For upperclassmen wishing to live near but not on campus, there are two more apartment complexes nearby. Most freshmen and sophomores live further away from campus and commute in each day, or live in private residences near the area.
Pros
  • student influence energy
Cons
  • lots of student life
Recommended for
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Love to Learn"

Famous for its cultural diversity, Mondawmin is a melting pot of professionals just getting their start in the corporate world and retirees who have left their working years behind. It is also rumored to have been named by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow for Mondawmin, a legendary Native American corn god. Though most of the single family homes are row houses, even its architecture screams diversity, with tree lined streets backing up to urban apartment complexes. In fact, a few years ago it was chosen by those who know as one of Baltimore’s six best neighborhoods.
For shopping, residents have a wide variety of choices. For chain stores, they can visit the local Mondawmin Mall, while those looking for something more unique can check out the ever changing urban shopping center. There are also plenty of free standing family owned businesses and restaurants, as well as several churches and other houses of worship.
Educationally speaking, a child can go from kindergarten through a Bachelor’s degree without ever studying outside the community. In fact, there are more than 12 different types of public and private schools in the area. But if they do choose to leave, they can easily catch a Baltimore Metro train to anywhere else in the city.
Pros
  • great educational oppertunities
Cons
  • mixed quality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"A Great Past, A Promising Future"

Located in northeast Baltimore, the Mid-Govans of today is a predominantly African American, historic neighborhood that was once on the way to York, Pennsylvania. As such, it boasts many historic sites. For instance, there are three historic homes that date back ot the Victorian Era in the neighborhood. There are also two charming green spaces, DeWees Park and Chinquapin Park. There are additional spaces for sporting events at the DeWees PAL Center. Finally, the Homeland Shopping Center, as well as the Belvedere Square shops provides a wide variety of stores, restaurants and local retail spaces for residents in the area.
Because it is such a solid, middle income neighborhood, Mid-Govans still attracts families with its affordable rental housing and lower than average crime rate. It is also well known for its nearby educational opportunities. In addition to four public elementary and one middle school, Mid-Govans is also the home of the primarily female Notre Dame Baltimore campus and the famous Catholic college, Loyola. While these schools might be out of the economic reach of many students in the neighborhood, generous scholarships coupled with the ability to live and work at home can improve local children’s shots at excellent high education.
Pros
  • solid, middle class neighborhood
Cons
  • not a lot of nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 1/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Yep, This is a Hotbed, Too"

Not unlike its international namesake, Middle East has been a source of tremendous controversy for years. The problems in this East Baltimore neighborhood began when the race riots of the late 1960s damaged many of the homes and businesses beyond repair. This was quickly followed by a suburban flight by many residents who were looking for a safer, more stable place to live. Next came drugs, crime and the associated gang violence. In fact, the area is so bad that it was the site of HBO’s The Wire and provided many seedy location shots for Homicide: Life on the Street.
Now, much of the controversy surrounds city efforts to improve the area. City leaders want to tear down much of the area, and replace it with a biotech park that will house industries and retail establishments, as well as various types of residential areas and apartment complexes. The problem is that, in order to make the park a reality, the city will need to move out many of the long term residents who believe that they should be well rewarded for the lifelong commitment to the neighborhood. They are arguing with politicians about what constitutes “well rewarded.”
In the meanwhile, the community waits, hoping that now that things have gotten so much worse, they will soon get better.
Pros
  • rumors of future improvements
Cons
  • gang violence
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"It is all a question of where."

Also referred to as Forest Park, Howard Park is not so much a distinct neighborhood as it is a region consisting of smaller neighborhoods in Northwest Baltimore. Included in this “super-neighborhood” are Ashburton, Callaway-Garrison, Central Forest Park, Dolfield, Dorchester, East Arlington, Forest Park, Grove Park, Hanlon Longwood, Howard Park, Garwyn Oaks, Purnell, West Arlington, West Forest Park, and Windsor Hills. An economically diverse area historically the center of Baltimore's Jewish Community, the area experienced “white flight” during the 1960s and became a predominantly African American area. Within Howard Park, however, there is a variety of social and economic conditions; some areas have experienced a great deal of urban decay, while others are prosperous upper-middle class neighborhoods.
In addition to being a residential area, Howard Park offers a variety of recreational opportunities. It is home to Hillsdale, Hanlon, and Powder Mill Parks in addition to the Forest Park Golf Course. It is in close proximitiy to the Baltimore Zoo and Druid Hills Park. Other than these, however, the area does not offer much in the way of retail shopping or other economic opportunities. Because of the varied conditions in the smaller neighborhoods that make up Howard Park, anyone considering moving to the area should look at conditions on specific streets and blocks.
Pros
  • Close to nice parkland
Cons
  • Wide range of living conditions
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A bohemians paradise"

The Hollins Market neighborhood gets its name from the centerpiece of the area, the oldest existing public market building in Baltimore. It is part of the Union Square-Hollins Market Historic District. The building is the center of the neighborhood, and the geographical heart of Sowebo, a term for South West Baltimore. The community around the Market experienced decades of urban decay but in recent years, the area has experienced gentrification. The homes on it's main thoroughfares (West Lombard Street, Hollins Street, West Baltimore Street, and South Carey Streets) reflect the Italianate architecture of the Market itself, which continues to provide a focus for the community. Every Memorial Day weekend it hots the Sowebohemian Arts Festival. Hollins Market is open Tuesday through Thursday 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. It is closed on Sundays and Mondays.
The Hollins Market area would be an ideal for young singles or couples interested in the arts and music scene in Baltimore, and with the continuing revitalization the area is sure to continue to attract the kind of establishments hip 20 and 30-somethings are looking for. Young families with children may want to find a quieter, less active neighborhood.
Pros
  • A rich culture
Cons
  • Gentrification in progress
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Sci-Fi fans might like it"

The history of the Highlandtown neighborhood is reflective of many areas of Baltimore. Established in 1866 as “Snake Hill,” a village outside of Baltimore, the village was renamed Highland Town in 1870 and made part of Baltimore city in 1919. It is one of Baltimore's trditional Blue-Collar neighborhoods and, for that reason, it was designated as part of the Patterson Park/Highlandtown Historic District in the National Register of Historic Places.
Highlandtown was traditionally one the Baltimore's main commercial and industrial hubs. As with other cities across the country, the neighborhood suffered a period of decline beginning in the 1970s as the manufacturing sector declined and department stores were replaced by suburban shopping malls. Beginning in the later 1990s and early 2000s, however, efforts to revitalize the area were undertaken. Chief among these was the designation of the portionof Eastern Avenue running through the neighborhood as a “Main Street District,” part of the National Main Street Program.
Along with economic revitalization Highlandtown is experiencing an ethnic change with a growing Latino propulation joining the traditional blue-collar Polish, Italian, Irish, and Greek residents. A middle-class area, the neighborhood does have several small businesses and is also the headquarters of the Baltimore Science Fiction Society.
Pros
  • Historical district
Cons
  • Retail still undergoing revitalization
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Great Place to Live and Learn"

Built primarily during the mid-twentieth century, Medfield is a residential neighborhood located in northern Baltimore. Many of the first residents were middle income families attracted to the area by its larger than average yards and well-built single family homes. However, the majority of the neighborhood consists of row houses with wide front porches where neighbors could sit and visit in the early evening.
While many neighborhoods in America’s urban areas suffered during the white flight to the suburbs during the 1950s, Medfield has remained much as it was when it was built. In fact, the turn of the recent century brought about quite a spate of improvements to both the homes and the infrastructure around the area. These efforts continue today, and attract more and more families to the area. For singles or couples just getting their start in independent housing, there are several apartment complexes.
In addition to the quality of the homes and properties in the area, people are also attracted to Medfield by the high quality schools. Both the elementary school and two nearby high schools are considered among the best in the state. Families also enjoy the several well cared for parks and green spaces where they can gather to play ball, have picnics or just relax with neighbors.
Pros
  • excellent schools
Cons
  • few free standing homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Where the beehive is still king"

What can one say about Hampden? What can be said about this neighborhood in northwest Baltimore plays host to the annual “Hon Festival”, where attendees sport enormous beehive hairdoos and compete in a contest to find the best “Bawlmerese,” a variation of Baltimore's unique accent? Or about the world-famous annual holiday ritual, “Miracle on 34th Street,” where houses lining either side of 34th Street decorate their homes in thousands of lights and decorations? Or about the neighborhood being featured in the 1999 John Water's film Pecker? Unique, odd, and idiosyncratic are three words that come to mind. But if one gets past the unique character of the neighborhood, one finds in Hampden a charming part of Baltimore's past, present, and future.
Architecturally, the neighborhood continues to reflect the areas roots as a factory area, with small row houses originally built for workers and larger detached homes for managers. More modern homes and apartments were built during the mid-20th century around the edges of the neighborhood. Because the neighborhood is bounded by other build-up areas, further development of Hampden is unlikely without affecting the current aesthetic of the community. For those looking for old Baltimore, Hampden will provide a home for years to come.
Pros
  • Center of traditional Baltimore culture
Cons
  • May be to hip for some
Recommended for
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Where the beehive is still king"

What can one say about Hampden? What can be said about this neighborhood in northwest Baltimore plays host to the annual “Hon Festival”, where attendees sport enormous beehive hairdoos and compete in a contest to find the best “Bawlmerese,” a variation of Baltimore's unique accent? Or about the world-famous annual holiday ritual, “Miracle on 34th Street,” where houses lining either side of 34th Street decorate their homes in thousands of lights and decorations? Or about the neighborhood being featured in the 1999 John Water's film Pecker? Unique, odd, and idiosyncratic are three words that come to mind. But if one gets past the unique character of the neighborhood, one finds in Hampden a charming part of Baltimore's past, present, and future.
Architecturally, the neighborhood continues to reflect the areas roots as a factory area, with small row houses originally built for workers and larger detached homes for managers. More modern homes and apartments were built during the mid-20th century around the edges of the neighborhood. Because the neighborhood is bounded by other build-up areas, further development of Hampden is unlikely without affecting the current aesthetic of the community. For those looking for old Baltimore, Hampden will provide a home for years to come.
Pros
  • fun and funky
Cons
  • you may need more hair ot fit in
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Heritage and convenience"

Of all the neighborhoods in Baltimore, Guilford is perhaps the most unique. It has a rich historical and architectural heritage that earned it a designation as a National Register Historic District. Planned by the Olmsted firm and developed by the Roland Park Company in the early 1900's, Guilford has stunningly beautiful architecture, community parks, streets lined with mature trees, the world-famous Sherwood Gardens, and a prime location that is a short commute to downtown Baltimore. Anyone with an address in this neighborhood would truly have one of distinction.
Guilford contains about 800 single-family homes ranging in size from cozy cottages to stately mansions. The neighborhood provides families with a quality of life and a unique environment rarely found in an urban setting such as Baltimore's . Guilford is minutes from the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus, Loyola College, the College of Notre Dame, an array of excellent neighborhood restaurants, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the City's finest public and private schools.
The Guilford Association oversees and enforces the Deed and Agreement. The covenants of the Deed and Agreement assure that the integrity of the community is maintained and that the original design standards are followed. For this reason, Guilford may not be a neighborhood of choice for those looking to make substantial design changes or home improvements.
Pros
  • Historical district
Cons
  • Regulations make property changes difficult
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Only time will tell"

It would not been an exageration to call Greenspring a neighborhood in transition. Located in the North District of Baltimore, the area is located between the neighborhoods of Woodberry and Central Park Heights. It is bounded by West Cold Spring Lane (north), Greenspring Avenue (east), and Springhill Avenue (south). A predominantly lower-middles-class African-American neighborhood, recently Greenspring has shown something of a revitalization. The centerpeice of the new Greenspring neighborhood is the Quarry Lake at Greenspring development. Quarry Lake features luxurious condominiums and single-family homes in a unique lakeside community. Quarry Lake is a mixed use community, in that in addition to the residences there is a variety of retail and office space. The Shops at Quarry Lake is the town center of the community, featuring a range of small retail and restaurants, including a Walgreens and a Starbucks. The area also has a lot of greenspace, with native trees and wildlife, clean air and spring-fed streams. Quarry Lake is designed to attract a much different type of resident than has been typical for Greenspring in the past. Only time will tell if Quarry Lake changes the character of the surrounding neighborhood, or if it becomes a luxury gated enclave in a not-so-desireable area of Baltimore.
Pros
  • The new Quarry Lake Development
Cons
  • Development too new to make an impact
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Country Lovers
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Habitat for Hope"

Located in southeast Baltimore, McEldery Park came to the area’s attention during the fall of 2010 when former president Jimmy Carter led an army of Habitat for Humanity volunteers in a massive, week long work project that made repairs on more than 20 formerly boarded up row houses in the neighborhood. In spite of Carter’s efforts, the area remains one of the worst places to live in Baltimore. Like so many other communities, it fell victim to a combination of working class flight to the suburbs and a large influx of Section 8 housing tenants.
Still, there are a few rays of hope. For instance, residents have been working together to tear down buildings that are beyond repair and replace them with things like community gardens and playgrounds. One of the most popular of these spaces is the Amazing Port Street Sacred Commons, a prayer garden that feeds both the body and soul by providing green space for meditation and growing food that is in turn donated to the neighborhood’s needier residents.
More good news: there are several public schools within walking distance of many houses, as well as a public library and a well-used public transportation system.
Pros
  • peopleare trying to help
Cons
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"No, Beaver Cannot Come Out and Play"

Mayfield is a small, upper middle class community located in northeastern Baltimore. Governed for the most part by the local homeowner’s association, it features many affordable single family homes, as well as some waterfront properties located on Lake Montebello. Most of the homes were built in the late Victorian Era and 1sts half of the 20th century and feature larger than average lots and well grown trees, as well as manicured lawns and well maintained garages. Many of these are located behind classic white picket fences or more expensive stone enclosures. There also some pretty affordable rental properties in the area, usually in the form of duplexes owned by small time real estate investors.
Mayfield is one of several Baltimore neighborhoods that grew up with the city, and provided homes for families who wanted to live further away from downtown than had otherwise been possible. In many ways, these communities owe their existence to the ever improving modes of transportation that began with trolleys and grew to fruition with the automobile.
The school children in the area typically attend either the public elementary school or St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School. They also enjoy playing in either of the two large parks that border the community, and many families attend one of the five local churches.
Pros
  • beutiful homes and views
Cons
  • strict homeowners association
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Not just Greeks anymore"

Once known simply as The Hill, this area along a stretch of Eastern Avenue has been home to Baltimore's thriving Greek-American community since the 1930s. Thanks to a sucessful petition effort by its residents, the Baltimore City Council changed the area's name to Greektown in the mid-1980s. It is bounded by Lombard Street, O'Donnell Street, South Haven, and I-895.
Greektown is notable for it's combination of residential and business space, enlivened by a rich and diverse cultural heritage that is managing to maintain it's traditional base in Greek-American culture while incorporating both European and non-European influences. Greektown consists of single family town houses, many restaurants, authentic Greek coffee houses and bakeries as well as many other types of small businesses. It is a diverse community of largely blue-collar people of numerous ethnic derivations. While still mostly Greek and other European descendants, other ethnic groups are represented by growing subcommunities of Indians, Asians, African-Americans, Hispanics and a growing GLBT community that enjoys the rich heritage and low crime rate.
Greektown still acknowledges it's Greek-American roots annually by hosting the Baltimore Greek Festival and Parade, attracting people from across the city to sample Greek food, music, and dance.
Pros
  • Rich ethnic heritage
  • Diverse, diverse, diverse
Cons
  • May be too urban for some
Recommended for
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Urban living with a suburban feel"

For a city neighborhood with a friendly, suburban feel, you cannot do better than Glen Oaks. Located in the North District of Baltimore, the neighborhood is bounded by the city line to the north and is surrounded by the neighborhoods of Chingquapin Park-Belevedere, Lake Walker, Cameron Village, Idlewood, Ramblewood and Woodbourne Heights. Unlike neighborhoods in older areas closer to the city center, Glen Oaks is dominated by single-family homes with large yards. Most of the neighborhood homes were build in 1948 by Elba Construction Company.
The look and feel, as well as it's distance from the city center, has let Glen Oaks to attract upper middle class African Americans who like the proximity to the city and the convenience of being on a mass transit route. The area is well-served by MTA Bus Route 36 , running along The Alameda connecting the neighborhood with downtown, as well as Route 44 providing cross-town service along Belvedere Avenue. For young couples just starting out and wanting someplace convenient to work, shopping, and nightlife, or yourng families wanting the look and feel of suburban life without the high cost of housing, the Glen Oaks neighborhood would make a good beginning for most people.
Pros
  • Served by two transit lines
Cons
  • Few newer houses
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A great Place to Visit, and to Live"

Located on a peninsula in the Patapsco River, Locust Point has been a long time ethnic community attracting immigrants from Ireland, Poland and Italy. As more and more second and third generation sons and daughter achieve their version of the American dream, Locust Point is experiencing something of a renaissance of building and housing renovation. This, along with its close proximity to the water, has made it one of Baltimore’s more sought after communities and has allowed housing values to remain pretty solid, even in the current economic climate.
Best known locally as the home of the famous Fort McHenry, where Francis Scott Key penned The Star Spangled Banner, Locust point attracts thousands of tourists each year who come to visit the fully restored and well maintained historic site. The revenue generated by tourism has a allowed the community to restore two of its waterside parks, Tide Point and Silo Point.
In addition to Fort McHenry, Locust Point is also popular for its small, family owned restaurants and pubs, not to mention its cruise terminal and the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Children in the area typically attend the local public elementary and middle schools, though they are used out of the neighborhood for high school.
Pros
  • so much to do
Cons
  • still growing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"True to Its Motto"

In contrast to the Gay Street neighborhood, Glen is one of the newer neighborhoods in Baltimore. Development began in the early 1920s and 1930s, the with remaining development in the 1940s and 1950s. One of the largest communities in the Northern Park Heights area of Baltimore, the neighborhood has a charming mixture of housing types. These include Tudor, French Norman, brick ranch-style single family homes as well as garden apartments, condominiums, and townhouses. These along with its canopy of beautiful trees along its quiet streets make it a beautiful place to live.
One of the most unique features of the neighborhood is the long-term coexistence in one community of African-Americans and Orthodox Jews. This has resulted in a striking degree of cultural diversity. The Glen Neighborhood Improvement Association has been responsible for sponsoring numerous cultural and athletic activities as well as improving relations among neighbors and between the neighborhood and Baltimore's political institutions. These include the International Diversity Music Celebration, Winterfest, neighborhood plant exchanges, and flag football games pitting a neighborhood team against a team from the Baltimore Police Department.
All told, Glen is an attractive, active neighborhood that more than lives up to its neighborhood motto: “Glen is a Great Place to Live.”
Pros
  • Active neighborhood association
  • Charming variety of housing
Cons
  • A good distance from central downtown
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"No Sea Monsters Here"

Loch Raven is a large residential neighborhood in northeastern Baltimore that caters primarily to middle and lower income African American families. Unlike many less prosperous parts of the city, Loch Raven has no boarded up houses or abandoned homes. However, most of the residents do not own their own homes. Instead, they rent from older owners who have left the area, or from corporations that purchased foreclosed properties as investments.
Loch Raven has a small though significant claim to fame. The members of the popular band, Animal Collective, grew up in Loch Raven and the surrounding area. The even did a tribute to their early lives as a local garage band in their song named, appropriately, “Loch Raven.”
In general, Loch Raven could be a good location for a young single or couple getting their first start in the housing market. While prices are depressed right now, they are likely to increase over the next decade, as the American economy recovers and interest rates fall. On the other hand, there is some crime, such as what one might associate with a lower middle class neighborhood. For the reason, it might not be entirely appropriate for families with young children or retirees.
Pros
  • affordable housing
Cons
  • some crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Maybe at one time, but not now."

Named for colonial Baltimore surveyor Nicholas Gay, the Gay Street neighborhood is one of the few historic communities in northeast Baltimore that was unscathed by the 1904 Great Baltimore Fire. Thus, the original character of the neighborhood remained until the early 1970s. AT that time, Gay Street was cut in half by the urban development of east Baltimore. Today, the old Gay Street area is dominated by the Oldtown Mall, a retail strip that was converted from a working street to a pedestrian mall. In spite of the development, there are still a few housing units in the area that follow the original, angular path Gay Street cut through the neighborhood. North of Monument Street is a pedestrian path, following the old route of Gay Street along the Cain athletic Field.
Gay Street is a predominately African-American, lower-middle-class neighborhood. Dominated by mult-family housing complexes, the Gay Street neighborhood does not contain much in the way of retail stores or family entertainment. It may not be the best choice for young couples or families looking to establish a residence in the city. Perhaps one of the other neighborhoods in Baltimore that is undergoing something of a renaissance would be a better choice.
Pros
  • Reflects old Baltimore
Cons
  • Not much new
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A Little More Than Just Little Italy"

Located near Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, Little Italy is, not surprisingly, the home of multiple generations of Italian immigrant. In fact, most relatives are so committed to this cozy and traditional neighborhood that it is very hard to purchase a home in the area. Perhaps it’s because of the resident’s similar ethnicity, or because so many have long term commitments to each other, there is very little crime in this community.
Another thing that makes Little Italy so attractive is its convenient proximity to public transportation. The Baltimore Subway is nearby and will take anyone to any part of the city.
The subway also brings people in from other parts of the city for Little Italy’s annual summer film festival, where they show movies outdoors for all the community to see.
Little Italy lifetime citizens have much to be proud of. Their neighborhood has contributed numerous professional people who have made Baltimore and other places better. In fact, Democratic leader Nanci Pelosi grew up here, as well as Al Giardello, the fictional detective on TV’s Homicide: Life on the Street. Finally, popular American novelist Nora Roberts set one of her most famous books, Blue Smoke, in Little Italy.
Pros
  • strong tradition
Cons
  • difficult to get into
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"We All Have to Start Somewhere"

Located in northwestern Baltimore, Garwyn Oaks is a primarily African American community made up of over 300 wood frame detached and row houses built at the turn of the last century. Most of the population is lower middle income blue collar workers, professionals and retirees who have lived in the community for years.
While there are not a lot of public transportation options available in the area, there is one bus stop the runs to downtown Baltimore. However, most of the families own some sort of motorized transportation and drive to and from work.
While there are no schools within the literal boundaries of the neighborhood, most of the neighborhood children attend one of the local public schools located nearby. Because of most residents limited incomes, there are only a few who attend private or parochial schools. After school and work, some families enjoy playing at William McGill Park, a pleasant green space popular among residents.
While Garwyn Oaks is not likely to attract wealthy investors looking for homes to “flip,” it can be appealing to lower income families looking for a fresh and affordable start. In fact, the Garwyn Oaks Northwest Housing Resource Center was established especially to help such families find new homes and new lives.
Pros
  • solid, middle class neighborhood
Cons
  • little public transportation
  • poor schools
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Take a Chance on Me?"

Once a primarily Jewish community, Forest Park is now an economically diverse but primarily African American community. When driving through the area you are just as likely likely to pass by houses that are abandoned and boarded up as you are to see well maintained upper middle class homes with manicured lawns and expensive cars in the driveways. Fortunaly, you will also notice the community’s extensive green spaces, including three parks and golf course. If you’re very quiet on a still night you might even hear an exotic bird screech from inside the nearby Baltimore Zoo.
In general, certain parts of Forest Hill would make excellent homes for young families with children who are looking for a place to settle down permanently. Certainly golfers will love it because of the nearby course.
However, for those who are will to take a chance, purchasing a property of the edge of the higher end art of the community could prove to be a good investment, since some of the gentrification that is taking place could move in your direction. Just remember that you are taking a risk, and that there is a certain amount of crime and violence associated with lower income areas.
Pros
  • low cost housing
Cons
  • could be a good investment
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Live and Work in the Same Neighborhood"

As its name indicates, Federal Hill is another of Baltimore’s more charming historic neighborhoods. Located near the business district in the southern part of the city, it is known for its panoramic views of the Inner Harbor and expansive green spaces.
Residents and investors have worked hard to maintain an atmosphere of historic elegance with a slightly urban feel. The Cross Street Market is a central meeting space for residents looking to pick up some groceries or enjoy a meal with friends. It is especially busy during the several weekend street festivals the community hosts each year, as well as the popular Shakespeare on the Hill events that attract hundreds of attendees each summer.
In addition to excellent cultural opportunities, Federal Hill is also the home of quite a few historic churches, public and private schools and local branch of the Enoch Pratt Free library.
While Federal Hill is located at a hub of interstates and railway stations, most residents do much of the marketing and socializing within the neighborhood confines. In fact, many either do not own cars at all or drive them only on weekends when leaving the area to visit friends.
Overall, Federal Hill is the ideal spot for anyone wanting to live and work in a fresh, cityscape type of setting.
Pros
  • excellent oppertunities
Cons
  • very urban
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Ever Lovely Evergreen"

The first thing that most people notice when they drive through Evergreen is that, unlike most Baltimore neighborhoods, there are few if any row houses. Instead, most of the homes, built around the turn of the previous century, were single family, freestanding homes that were designed to cater to the needs of Baltimore’s burgeoning middle class community. During the early decades of the 20ths century, you’d regularly see husbands leaving early in the morning for blue collar and service type work while their wives hung out laundry or chatted with neighbors. At that time two different railroad stations, now gone, allowed men to work in just aobur any part of the city in which they could find jobs.
Evergreen still caters to middle class adults today, although there are fewer children in the homes than there once was. In fact, almost half of the residents are single and most work in managerial or other types of professions.
There are a few neighborhood businesses, most of them small restaurants.
Overall, Evergreen is probably one of the nicest neighborhoods in Baltimore, and continues to attract more and more up and coming professionals each year.
Pros
  • homes and shops
Cons
  • cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Sad Past, Sad Present"

Edmondson is not so much a neighborhood itself as a collection of several communities in western Baltimore. These include West Mulberry, Allendale, Rognel Heights, Edmondson Village and Uplands. Depending on which specific part of the area you live in, you can expect to find middle to lower income housing. Because of its size, Edmundson is home to not one but two public high schools.

Unfortunately, a turning point in Edmondson’s history occurred during the early 1960s as desegregation laws changed much of the community’s landscape. During this time, unscrupulous realtor would play on fears among whites that blacks buying houses in their neighborhoods would hurt property values. They encouraged long time home owners to sell their property to them for under market value. They in turn would then resell the homes for a profit to those who understood that there was no real threat.
It is a tragic coincidence that many of the realtor threats were reinforced in Edmondson when it became the site of some of the worst riot in America following the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King. By 1970, white flight and the damage done by the looters had taken their toll.
What was once a vibrant, solidly middle class neighborhood became a lower income community that was just barely hanging on. Edmundson continues its fight for recovery to this day.
Pros
  • local schools
Cons
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Return to Eden"

The Druid Hill Park neighborhood takes its name from the center piece of its community, one of the oldest continually maintained public parks in the United States. Built on the eve of the Civil War around an already existing mansion, “Drudle Park,” as the locals call it, features whimsical architecture and some of the best sledding hills in the area. Joggers love to take their morning runs through the northern end of the park, which features some of the oldest trees in the state. It rivals New York’s famous central park in both its size and age, not to mention its careful maintenance. The City of Baltimore is constantly looking for ways to improve that park, including installing state of the art exercise equipment, draining man-made lakes to provide more natural space, and making sure the paths are well maintained.
Unfortunately, there are very few places for people to live in Druid Park, since most of the land is devoted to green space. However, those wishing to take advantage of its many amenities can find reasonable housing in any of several surrounding neighborhoods that share boundaries with the area. They include Reservoir Hill, Parkview, Liberty Square, Hampden, Park Circle, Woodbrook, and Woodbury.
Pros
  • green space
Cons
  • little housing
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Things Will Be Great When We Go Downtown"

Like most downtown areas of large cities, Downtown Baltimore is primarily commercial. While more than 100,000 people work in its offices, restaurants and shops, most of them tend to live in other parts of the city. However, that situation appears to be changing as more and more residents are taking advantage of high rise apartment complexes to allow them to live near where they work and thus eliminate the need for to own a car or drive a long commute.

Much of the skyline of Downtown Baltimore is shut out by both newer skyscrapers and older tall buildings built in the early 20th century. This is not a place for someone who love sunlight and wide open spaces. However, if you are attracted to excitement and an urban pulse, this is where you want to be. If you are fortunate enough to live in on one of the upper floors of the new condominium complexes, you can have you morning coffee while overlooking the expansive city skyline, then walk to work for the day, stepping out to run to one of the nearby bistros for lunch. You can finish up your day with an elegant dinner at one of the popular restaurants along the Inner Harbor and leisurely stroll down by the water. And you can do all this without ever traveling more than a few blocks from home
Pros
  • variety of options
Cons
  • not sunny
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Struggling"

Cylburn is a predominantly African-American neighborhood located in northern Baltimore. Most of the residents are middle class, single parent families who work hard each day to provide for their children. The local elementary school has a low student teacher ratio of one teacher for every 15 students. However, there is still a good bit of poverty in the area, with almost all the children in the school qualifying for the free lunch program.

One of the things that make Cylburn popular is its excellent access to public transportation. In addition to extensive bus service, there are several metro stations that can take residents to any part of the city for work or recreation. One nearby location is Fort McHenry. In addition to offering real insight into American history, the area is also a hug green space where families can relax and play.

Generally speaking, residents of Cylburn are slightly better off than the average Baltimore resident. Because of the community’s ethnicity, there is a unique flavor of African American heritage and tradition. Local shops and restaurants tend to cater to the needs and preferences of the neighborhood so it is an excellent location for those looking to be completely immersed in this type of American culture.
Pros
  • public transaportation
Cons
  • poverty
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Coming and Going"

Fallstaff is a uniquely diverse community. Once known as an Orthodox Jewish enclave, it’s now also home to many African American and Hispanic immigrants. Located in northwestern Baltimore, it caters primarily to middle income families looking for a safe, secure place to raise their children. Most of the children in the area attend the local public elementary and high schools.
Some of the community still retains its historic charm, featuring brick row houses and wooden bungalows. However, there are also a wide variety of homes available in the neighborhood, including duplexes, apartments and condominiums. It is considered by most people to be a quiet, low crime district. However, the community was rocked by a triple child murder in 2004. This led to something of a wide spread panic until it was determined that they had been killed by two adult relatives.
One thing that recommends Fallstaff too many residents is its excellent access to public transportation. Baltimore City buses regularly run through the area, connecting people with employment opportunities downtown, as well as the light rail system that can take them into further reaches of the area. Those who own cars will find that the many side streets, while somewhat confusing, can allow one ot quickly get in, out and across the area for work and recreation.
Pros
  • public transaportation
Cons
  • not well maintained
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Has Seen Better Days"

In many ways Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello captures the essence of what it means to live in Baltimore. On the one hand, it features elegant, stately brick row houses built in the later part of the 19th century. On the other, many of them are boarded up and stand as sad testimony of a community that has fallen on seriously hard times. While residents work hard to try to rebuild and restore their homes and make their street safer, they are still fighting something of a losing battle against crime and gang violence.

Most of Coldstream’s residents are African-American families with school aged children. The retired residents who are still in the neighborhood are often raising their grandchildren. Many families are dependent on government programs for food stamps, energy supplements and home improvement items. They also take advantage of locally sponsored programs for youth, including everything from dance classes to computer instruction.

Given its current circumstances, I would not recommend Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello to anyone with children or to the elderly. However, it could be a great opportunity for a young single person or couple who want to be part of a war against poverty and desperation.
Pros
  • pretty architecture
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Life in the Garden"

Clifton Park is a bit of community within a community in northeast Baltimore. Located within the boundaries of Belair-Edison, Clifton Park is popular among golfers for its 18 hole green and the annual Clifton Park Golf Tournament. Perhaps the most distinctive feature of the community is the 19th century Italian style villa that houses the golf club’s pro shop.

Another unusual feature of the community is the Valve House, an octagonal building originally used to house a 19th century water pump house that originally provided water for the entire community.
Clifton Park was very fortunate during the riots that destroyed much of Baltimore and Washington DC in 1968. While they suffered the inconvenience of having the national guard camping out in their beautiful park, they also benefited from the protection of the soldiers’ constant presence.
Clifton Park boasts Baltimore’s largest high school, Lake Clifton Eastern High, which is actually two smaller schools put together.
One of the most attractive features of Clifton Park is its 6 acre Real Food Farm that provides small plots of arable land for local residents to grow fresh vegetables during the summer. This program, similar to the allotment programs popular in Europe, allows those who might not otherwise be able to afford fresh foods access to healthy and tasty alternatives to canned goods.
Pros
  • community garden
Cons
  • lots of work left to do
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not a Bowl of Cheeries"

Cherry Hill, popular with many because of its small town feel, is located in southern Baltimore near the Patapsco River. One the country’s earliest segregated planned communities, it was built after World War II for retuning African American soldiers and their families. Unfortunately, the neighborhood has not always lived up to the hopes and dreams those veterans brought home with them. For one thing, much of the original architecture was somewhat shoddy and difficult to maintain. Overtime, the homes in the community have become more and more run down.
Also, the civil unrest of the 1960s took its toll, leaving many older residents afraid to o out at night. Young, successful adult children tended to move out of the area once the segregation was outlawed and they were allowed to move into formerly restricted neighborhoods. Many of those who remained have watched this once prosperous neighborhood continue decline. Today residents are concerned about rising crime and gang violence, as well as an increasing sense of hopelessness brought on by the poor economy.
While I would not recommend Cherry Hill to young family looking for a permanent home, it could be very attractive to a student or single person looking for an inexpensive place to get his start.
Pros
  • community spirit
Cons
  • shoddy housing
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Great for Families"

Cedarcroft is a delightful, upscale neighborhood in one of Baltimore’s most sought after historic areas. While most of the homes were originally built during the 1920s, they have been well maintained thanks to the vigilant efforts of the neighborhood’s governing board. By maintaining high standards of both construction and exterior design, the community has seen housing prices rise steadily over the decades to a high of the half-million mark in the past few years.

Another major asset is the neighborhood’s strong sense of community. Residents gather several times each year for holiday celebrations and pot luck picnics. Most of the homes are owned by wealthy professional families who work in Baltimore or Washington D.C. There are no public schools in the area so most families send their children to private and parochial schools, such as the local Cedarcroft School, housed in the historic Church of the Nativity.

What strikes a person driving through this neighborhood is how well maintained the homes are and how much they look like they must have when originally built. The main difference is that the trees that were then seedlings have now grown into overarching tunnels that provide cools shade in the summer and sturdy wind breaks in the winter, creating an almost cavernous feel along the narrow streets.
Pros
  • historic homes
  • good school
Cons
  • higher prices
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Beautiful Location"

While most people living in Maryland are familiar with Baltimore’s famous Inner Harbor, fewer know about its outer harbor, the home of the Canton neighborhood. Built around the O’Donnell Square Park, Canton is best known for commercial district, which features several coffee shops, bars and restaurants, along with a small art gallery and several other businesses. In addition to O’Donnell Square, Canton is also has a lovely waterfront park and several marinas and boat launches.
Looking at cozy, modern Canton with its quaint homes and friendly shops, one would not suspect that it is built on land once worked by slaves. Following the Civil War, the plantation was broken up into a number of lots that were purchased and use for both housing and business ventures. By the beginning of World War I, Canton was a small melting pot of immigrants from all over Europe.
Recent gentrification efforts have restore Canton to much of its former glory. Families and young professionals often move here because of its small town feel of the two to three story row houses and the wide, shady streets. Others are attracted to the modern apartment complexes that have been built in renovated factories. Most enjoy having the pleasures of a Main Street America within just a few miles of the employment opportunities available in downtown Baltimore.
Pros
  • shops and restaurants
  • historic homes
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Yes, You Do Have a Prayer of Living here"

Located on the north side of Baltimore, Cameron Village is a quiet neighborhood with a noisy history. For instance, in 1960 it became the center of a national controversy when Madelyn Murray O’Hair filed a lawsuit against the local junior high school that resulted in prayer being prohibited in all public schools in America, giving rise to a boon in parochial and later home schools.
The school that was the center of this controversy was closed by the public school system in 2010 and reopened as a magnet school the following year. It now attracts some of the best and brightest students in the area to its challenging technological program.
Most residents of this community are middle income, African American families more interested in paying bills than in politics. Many take one of several Baltimore city buses back and forth to work each day. Ironically, some also send their children to local parochial schools that sprang up to fill the faith based hole left by Mrs. O’Hair’s lawsuit.
Overall, Cameron Village is a pleasant place to live and raise a family. The low cost of the local housing makes it an excellent place for anyone just getting started on their own.
Pros
  • solid, middle class neighborhood
Cons
  • controversial history
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Doctors and Artists and Butchers, Oh My"

Located in southeastern Baltimore, Butcher’s Hill was originally built to house the large number of European immigrants who moved into Baltimore in the decades before the Civil War. Many of these men were butchers and needed open spaces to ply their trade and market their wares to local housewives and cooks. In addition to gentiles, Butcher’s Hill also attracted several Jewish butchers who were able to supply their customers with kosher beef and chicken.

During most of the 19th and early 20th centuries, the butchering trade was economically sound and many of the residents of Butchers Hill built large, elegant row house homes on the backs of beef and bacon. Today, however, those residents of these town homes are more likely to be employed at Johns Hopkins Hospital than in their own homes. Still, the area also holds an unusual attraction to artists and other bohemian types. As more and more of the homes are added to the National Register of Historic Places, it has become easier for residents to obtain loans and grants to restore many of these homes to their former splendor.

If you want to learn more about the area, I recommend your check out Laura Lippman’s mystery novel, Butcher’s Hill, that is set in this community.
Pros
  • historic homes
  • interesting architecture
Cons
  • uneven housing quality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Histoic Elegance"

Though within walking distance of the popular and somewhat glitzy tourist destination, the Inner Harbor, Bolton Hill is a small, quiet tribute to Baltimore’s past. Many of the homes that line its shady streets were built around the time of the Civil War and have been lovingly restored to much of their former glory. While you might be picturing large, antebellum mansions, remember that even then Baltimore was an urban area. While there are definitely some large mansions, there are also plenty of townhouses. Tall and slim, these homes often reach three or four stories tall.

Part of Bolton Hill’s charm lies in its large green spaces, including several historic parks with their elegant water features and ornate fountains still maintained. These are but larger versions of the private, wall in gardens attached to many of the older homes.

While most of the row houses and mansions in Bolton Hill remain intact, many have been divided into several small apartments that are popular with single professionals and students for the University of Maryland’s Baltimore campus.

However, not all homes in this small community are old. There are several modern style townhouse complexes scatter throughout the area. This diversity of housing has, in turn, attracted a diverse population of people from many different walks of life, races and religions.
Pros
  • cultural diversity
  • beautiful homes
Cons
  • older homes
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Not as Warm as California, But Nearly as Nice"

Beverly Hills is yet another of Baltimore’s more charming historic neighborhoods. Featuring over 800 suburban style homes, it looks like the kind of place that Wally and Beaver ought to come running through. While much of the architecture technically pre-dates the 1950s, there are still plenty of foursquare frame houses and masonry bungalows. These more modest dwellings are set among the grander Tudor and Colonial Revival homes.

In addition to single family homes, there are enough commercial spaces to provide ample shopping and dining opportunities for the residents. There are also two churches, a large cemetery and a beautiful green space known as Herring Run Park. However, there are not any apartment complexes or other types of multi-family dwellings accept for a few larger homes that have been converted into several small apartments.

Because Beverly Hills is part of the National Register of Historic Places, much continues to be done to preserve its property values. This, along with the nice sized lots and large back yards make it a lovely place to retire to or raise a family. Just remember that the same regulations that maintain property values can also restrict what are and are not allowed to do to your home.
Pros
  • lovely homes
Cons
  • limitations due to historic nature
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
KathyF
KathyF dear susan M hello ma name is kathy im new in maryland and try to find a safe and warm neighborhood for living for me and my 4 years sun and my husband.whats your recomendation.thank you
2yrs+
Add a comment...
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Unwaveringly Beautiful"

Waverly is a charming, middle class neighborhood in a historic section of Baltimore. With easy access to downtown, the two sub-divisions that make up Waverly are popular with both young families and established professionals. In fact, the area is so popular that it was immortalized by Baltimore poet, Lizette Reese, in Waverly: A Victorian Village. In her book about the area she told a charming story of the community during the end of the Victorian Era. Copies of this book are available for sale in local bookstores and in the well-appointed Waverly library.

In addition to multiple row houses and homes, the Victorian Era also saw the construction in Waverly of the nation’s first trolley.

In addition to single family homes, Waverly is also the home of Memorial Place, a housing complex for senior citizens. Built on what was once the site of Memorial Stadium, Memorial Place features comfortable and affordable housing for middle income senior adults.

Obviously Waverly is a diverse community that would appeal to almost any type of resident. However, the one caveat I would mention is that buyers should take care if they are purchasing one of the older homes in hopes of renovating it. Several of the Victorian Era structures have been singled out by the Center for History and Architectural Preservation, who governs what changes can be made to both their interiors and exteriors.
Pros
  • fabulous homes
Cons
  • limitations due to historic nature
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"History on Parade"

Located in both Baltimore City and Baltimore County, Bellona-Gittings is an elegant tribute to Baltimore’s historic past. Architecture lovers can stroll down its streets during the spring and early fall and bask in the beauty of every style home from Federal Revival to 1950s Ranch. These homes tell a story of Baltimore during the 100 years following the Civil War, as better and better transportation allowed citizens to move further from the center of town.

The first wave of this move toward suburbanization began when street cars were built in the city during the Civil War. It continued through the advent of the first automobiles and reached its height of design and comfortable living during the post-war baby boom of the 1950s.

Today the neighborhood carries the well-respected designation of Bellona-Gittings Historic District. While its architectural interest keeps home prices steady, this is not a neighborhood for those wanting to do a lot of renovating. Many and convoluted rules govern what can and cannot be done to the homes within the district. So, if you love and respect the past, this could be the place for you. If you are more inclined to “do your own thing,” look elsewhere.
Pros
  • historic homes
Cons
  • renovation limits
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Simply Charming"

Belair-Edison, located in Northeast Baltimore, features street after street of brick row homes that tend to attract middle and lower income families looking for decent, inexpensive places to raise their children. Originally named Georgetown for three prominent citizens who all shared the same first name, the community only became known as Belair-Edison after it was annexed into the city in 1918. In fact the neighborhood owes much of its existence to one of these men, George Brehm. Right after the Civil War, he bought a brewery in the area and put many returning soldiers to work making beer. Years later, during the Roaring 20s, his grandson expanded the company setting off a building boom in the neighborhood that saw it more than triple in size.
Many of the new homes were designed by well-known builder Frank Novak and are characterized by two story porches that gave families a cool place to sit during Baltimore’s sweltering summers. Though most of these homes are now air conditioned, the double porches still provide a shady spot for sitting and socializing during many months of the year. They also attract neo-traditionalists looking for classically style, cozy homes in which to raise their children.
Pros
  • nice, inexpensive housing
Cons
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Neither a Beach nor a Field"

Located in southwest Baltimore, Beechfield is easily reached by one of several Baltimore bus routes. However, residents are typically more interested in getting out of the area than in getting in. This is because there is very little in the way of restaurants or other entertainment in this primarily lower middle class neighborhood.
Unfortunately, many in the neighborhood left or threatened to move when Maryland chose Beechfield as the site for the Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents. This psychiatric hospital, run by the state for the care of the most incorrigible of Maryland’s children, intimidates many residents who take something of a “not in my neighborhood” attitude. While the National Cemetary, located of Frederick Avenue, tends to attract quiet, subdued families visiting fallen warriors, the hospital is considered to be a source of conflict that attracts families who have a history of mental illness and drug problems.
To be fair many residents remain unfazed by the hospital. And, realistically, it is way too well monitored and controlled to ever cause any significant danger to those living nearby. Still, old stigmas die hard and can seriously affect property values. Therefore, I would not recommend Beechfield for those looking for a long term real estate investment.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • poverty
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 2/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Barely Hanging On"

Barclay is on of way too many neighborhoods in this country that were built for beauty but have now fallen on hard times. As you drive down the streets, you can’t help but feel a certain sense of tragedy when you see row after row of once elegant three story brownstone homes built during the late 1800s that have now fallen into disuse and disrepair. Streets that once hosted young families building a new future in the city are now known as hotbeds of gang violence and crime.

However, things may be improving. For one thing, the number of murders has dropped by over 50 percent since 2007. Residents are hoping that this trend will continue as the Housing Department develops more and more middle income style housing in the area and issues grants to encourage small businesses to move into the area. The first step of this project began in 2009 when two historic were converted to middle income style apartments.

Overall, Barclay might be a good neighborhood for someone used to an urban lifestyle and looking to invest in a property that will probably increase in value over the next decade. However, I would not recommend it for families with children or elderly people.
Pros
  • inexpenisive
Cons
  • crime
  • decaying environment
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Hanging On"

Located in southeastern Baltimore, Baltimore Highlands is a small neighborhood conveniently located to four bus routes that can take its residents to just about anywhere the city. This is important because the one source of employment in the immediate area, Esskay Meats, close its factory in 1993. This caused the neighborhood to take a bit of an economic hit, although most of the residents who had worked in the plant were able to find employment elsewhere.

While the now empty Esskay Factory still dominates the neighborhood’s landscape, it is actually overshadowed by other, more attractive areas. For instance, the Hebrew Friendship Cemetery consists of acres and acres of peaceful, gently rolling green space. While not exactly suitable for family picnics and soccer games, it none the less provides a sense of tranquility amidst this otherwise hectic part of the city.

While less attractive and peaceful than the cemetery, the Chesapeake Uniform Rental Company provides employment for those residents looking for a workplace within walking distance of their homes. It operates a commercial laundry facility that specializes in cleaning the uniforms they rent. While improvements have certainly been made in how the plant processes items, there are still some concerns about the effect of the chemicals and techniques sued on the environment.
Pros
  • employment oppertunities
Cons
  • declining area
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Building on History"

Abell, a residential part of the Charles Village region of Baltimore, consists primarily of good size row houses built during the early part of the 20th century. These homes feature large windows that allow lots of natural light. Named for a former owner of the Baltimore Sun, Abell also features a number of single family dwellings that were built toward the end of the Victorian Era.
In addition to residential structures, Abell also features a number of light industrial facilities and small businesses that provide both jobs and goods andno services for members of the community. Many of these originally grew up around the first Oriole Park, which burned in during World War II, and have since been replaced by a local school and warehouse buildings.
Another major landmark in the area is the Huntington Baptist Church. Originally built in 1836 to meet the needs of convalescent soldiers stationed at Fort McHenry, it was replaced by the modern day facility in 1922. Today, the church is a prominent part of the local African American community and a leader in the fight against local crime. Many of the residents of Abell are involved in the church and active in both its worship and its community outreach projects.
Pros
  • strong tradition
Cons
  • few free standing home
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Above the Best"

Upper Chevy Chase is another DC neighborhood along the boarder with Maryland and, like the neighborhood of Takoma, has a Maryland sister city just across the line. But don't get the two mixed up; each has it's own character. Unlike many of the District's neighborhoods in the Northwest quadrant, Upper Chevy Chase has a distinct urban feel. Connecticut Avenue, the area's main thoroughfare, is home to apartments, a community center, and a host of locally-owned businesses. Unlike in other areas, these businesses—some of which (like Magruder's Supermarket) are more than 100 years old—have yet to be displaced by large chain stores and suburban strip malls. What revitalization has occurred in the neighborhood has been designed to preserve the architectural and cultural heritage of the neighborhood. The prime example of this is the Avalon Theater, originally opened in 1923 as a silent film house, and how home (after a 2003 renovation) to a non-profit theater. Upper Chevy Chase offers residents the benefits of urban living with the quiet of the suburbs. If you want life in the city without living in the city, you might want to check out Upper Chevy Chase. I think you'll be happy you did.
Pros
  • always something to do
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Tale of Two Neighborhoods"

If you live in the District and have never heard of Woodland-Normanstone Terrace, don't feel bad. As one of the Northwest's smaller neighborhoods, it is often thought to be part of one of the larger surrounding neighborhoods of Woodly Park, Massachusetts Heights, or Observatory Circle. Tucked into a corner of Rock Creek Park, it is a quiet community of single-family homes. Since there are no commercial businesses, residents have to travel outside the area for shopping and employment. Because of the small size, the area is not likely so see any. Fortunately, the area is well served by the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Metro station on the Red Line. The area is a rather wealthy neighborhood by District standard, with median home prices in the $700,000 to $800,000 range. As with most nice neighborhoods in the district, potential residents need to be aware of the high prices of property. If you want to live here, you will need to purchase a home; unlike many of the nicer areas of DC, there is little in the way of rental property. But if you can afford it, the quiet Woodland-Normanstone Terrace area is a good place to be: close to the city, but miles away from city problems.
Pros
  • quiet, tree lined streets
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Jewel In the Crown"

The West End neighborhood is one of the true gems of the District. Located in Northwest, the neighborhood is bounded by K Street, Rock Creek Park, and New Hampshire Avenue. It is home to the Ritz-Carlton, Park Hyatt and Fairmont hotels, several luxury condominiums, and some of the finest restaurants in the city. In addition, the embassies of Qatar and Spain make their homes there. The West End has the distinction of being one of the earliest beneficiaries of community redevelopment in the District, begun in 1972. It has gone from being an area in decline to being one of the most desireable addresses in the Nation's Capital. George Washington University and the George Washington Medical Center are on the edge of the neighborhood. The area is close to Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, and downtown. Residents have easy access to the city's cultural and arts centers, being minutes from the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Residents enjoy high-end luxury living without having to sacrifice close proximity to the commerical and business opportunities in the city. If one can afford the luxury rents, then West End should be near the top of anyone's list.
Pros
  • plenty to do
Cons
  • noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Scenic, In More Ways Than One"

Woodley Park is a lovely neighborhood in one of the nicest, most settled part of the District of Columbia, the northwest quadrant. It shares border with the National Zoo on one side and Rock Creek Park on another. It is also easy to get to on the DC Metro’s Red Line.

Characterized by wide streets and spacious lots, some parts of Woodly Park still retain their original, early 20th century homes. These areas feature rows and rows of single family homes that have retained their value across the decades because of careful care and maintenance. They rest peacefully under old trees that have grown tall and strong around generations of residnets. These homes are obvious favorites among young families looking for a place to raise children.

On the other hand, most of the single or newly married residents who are moving in today gravitate toward the tall, high-end apartment buildings. Even though District regulations prohibit them from being taller than eight stories, from the top of these buildings you can see Rock Creek Park in one direction and the National Cathedral to the other. In many people’s mind these amazing views more than make up for not having a lawn.
Pros
  • beutiful homes and views
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Simply Gorgeous!"

Wesley Heights is a small, affluent neighborhood just south of American University in Washington, DC. Its spacious lots feature new large, custom built homes and older brick or stone homes from the 1920s and 30s. These can all be reached by following winding roads up and down shallow hills, occasionally crossing a shallow stream.

While the first homes in Wesley Heights sold for from $7,500 to $9,000, current houses in the neighborhood sell for more than ten times that. But then, as now, residents were paying for more than just a nice place to live. For instance, there was the property’s original estate, which the developer converted to an elegant clubhouse. Here they could attend everything from dances to July 4th fireworks.

In addition to the clubhouse, Wesley Heights is now also graced by the 183 acre Glover Archbold Park full of quiet paths running through a dark shady forest, as well as several small restaurants and high end shops.

If this lifestyle sounds like something you’d enjoy, but the price for a single family home is too high, you can always look at one of the townhouses or condominiums located on New Mexico Avenue. These are still available for as low as $350K.
Pros
  • fabulous homes
Cons
  • high cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"You've Got to See This"

The Washington Mall may be the most famous place in the United States. Home of every important building from the Capital to most of the Smithsonian Museums to the Washington Monument, the Mall, as it is known locally, has seen both the best and worst moments our nation has experienced. It is no wonder that this location draws millions of visitors from all over the world each year.

As a neighborhood, it is much more suited to these millions of tourists than to someone looking for a permanent residence. However, there are a few very high end apartment complexes available within the neighborhood. They are popular among young professionals looking for a location that will allow them to walk to work each day. If you can afford to live in one of these, you cannot be the location or the view. Just imagine waking up in the morning with the sun rising over the Lincoln Memorial.

There is one drawback to this location, however. Don’t be surprised if you are soon inundated with calls from friends and relatives saying, “Hi, we’re coming up to DC for a visit. Could we possible stay with you for a few days, or maybe a week, or two?”
Pros
  • historic views
  • location
Cons
  • traffic
  • noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Don't Even Think About It"

Washington Highlands is one of the largest and poorest neighborhoods in the District of Columbia. Almost every home in the area is occupied by a family living at or below the poverty level. As a result, there are few privately owned homes. Instead, most residents rent apartments in government subsidized housing projects. The most notorious of these housing projects is the large, Highland Dwellings complex. While the DC Housing Authority has promised $11 million dollars in stimulus funding to renovating the dilapidated building, there is a very good chance that a significant amount of that money will never make it into the building.

Another complex, the Wheeler Creek community, was built in 1997 as part of a federal grant. About a third of its units are set aside for senior adults, while about half are available to purchase by anyone. The rest are to one extent or another subsidized by government funding.

The one jewel in this very beat up crown is Walter Washington Estates, a gated community with middle class residents. Developers are hoping to add other, nicer homes, to draw in higher income residents.

While not exactly a jewel, I would like to give some credit to the greater Southeast Community Hospital that is located in the neighborhood and tries desperately to stay ahead of the every increasing medical needs of this population.

In order to do this, though, they are going to half to end the high number of violent crimes that have made Washington Highlands infamous. They are also going to have to improve the poorly managed local recreation facility.
Pros
  • rumors of future improvements
Cons
  • poor housing choices
  • crime
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Learners and Earners From Around the World"

Van Ness is a quiet community located in northwest DC. Like many of its equally charming neighbors, its shares a border with the ever popular Rock Creek Park. Van Ness is also close the University of the District of Columbia’s campus by the same name, and has its own Metro station.

In addition UDC, Van Ness is also the home of Howard University’s Law School and the Levine School of Music. The Edmond Burke School and the Hillwood Museum round out the neighborhood’s educational and cultural icons.

The site of Fort Kearny during the Civil War, Van Ness once housed the National Bureau of Standards. In fact, at one time many families move into the area so that one or both parents could work at the Bureau.

Today, Van Ness has something of an international feel to it. That’s because the community is host to the embassies of the Czech Republic, Hungary and the Netherlands.

In addition to extensive student housing, Van Ness has a number of spacious single family homes that are popular among professors and other professional families in the neighborhood. You can meet some of these people of Saturday afternoons when they run or take their kids to play at Soapstone Valley Park.
Pros
  • international elegance
Cons
  • student influenced noise
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Learn Here"

University Heights takes its names from The Catholic University of America, which is located right next door in the northeastern part of Washington D.C. While one might expect an increased amount of noise and mischief from a neighborhood next to a college campus, you should also be aware that University Heights has a Franciscan Monastery on another of its border. These two institutions seem to balance each other out and make the community pretty peaceful.

The two main sources of entertainment for those not interested in study or prayer are the Fort Bunker Hill Park and the Turkey Thicket Park and Recreation Center. While both parks have the typically running paths and playground equipment you’d expect, Turkey Thicket has more. For instance, the recreation center has a large gym, a nice weight room and several meeting spaces that offer classes. These spaces are also used from time to time for public and community club meetings.

The one major problem with University Heights is the traffic. While most local students bike to campus, there are still enough commuters to snarl traffic, especially around the time when classes are changing. Also, the Franciscan Monastery is a favorite stop for tourists, many of who come to see its recreation of the Holy Land. They, along with groups of parochial school kids, can easily increase the congestion in the area, especially during the school year.
Pros
  • educational opportunities
Cons
  • traffic
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 5/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Should Be Called Truxton Triangle"

Shaped much like a triangle, Truxton Circle is a small neighborhood in Northwest DC. Although “Truxton Triangle” would sound great, the area is called Truxton Circle after the long gone traffic circle it originally grew up around. After causing more than its fair share of accidents, the traffic circle was removed just after World War II.

Still a primarily African American community, Truxton Circle features some lovely houses and schools from the turn of the 20th century. For instance, Duke Ellington graduated from Truxton’s Armstrong Manual Training School, while the Dunbar High School was America’s first public high school of African Americans.

Today Truxton is made more attractive by her lovely green spaces. Though a small neighborhood, she has several parks that attract local children and families. You can see and hear them playing on the playground or just running in the fields on warm summer evenings.

Although Truxton is proud of her strong history, she is not resting on her laurels. Residents struggle every day to keep crime out of their community. While they are not always successful, they believe that they will ultimately triumph against the modern evils of drugs and theft.
Pros
  • friendly atmosphere
Cons
  • some crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
4/5
Just now

"Drawing and Painting and Sculpting, Oh My!"

Trinidad is one of Washington’s more artsy neighborhoods. Much of its existence is centered on the growing and expanding Atlas Performing Arts Center. And, every August the whole area turns out for Trinidad Day, a festival that celebrates the past, present and future of this ever evolving community.

Most of the local residents on the south side of Trinidad live in one of many 1920s style row houses that can be found lining the quieter parts of the area. Those to the north have slightly newer homes that were built as part of the World War II housing boom.

Trinidad has two public elementary/junior high schools: the Wheatly and Browne Education Campus. These schools feed into the Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School. Trinidad is also home to Gallaudet University, America’s most prominent school for the hearing impaired.

Perhaps Trinidad’s most prominent natural feature is the United States National Arboretum, located just to the east of the center of the neighborhood. This beautiful garden features both land and aquatic flowers that bloom most months of the year.

Trinidad is easily reached by the Washington metro system that has a station near Galaudet University, and by a number of city bus routes.
Pros
  • artistic atmosphere
Cons
  • uneven housing quality
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5
Just now

"Just Left of Center"

The Takoma neighborhood in northern DC shares a common history with the adjacent city of Takoma Park, Maryland. Both areas are best known for their extremely left-leaning politics (the city of Takoma Park declared itself a nuclear free zone in the early 1980s). The politics of the community have shaped it's development in the last 50 years. In the 1960s area residents lobbied successfully against the construction of a freeway that would have bicected the DC neighborhood from it's Maryland sister. Instead, they advocated construction of a Metro Station on the site of the old B&O railroad station which had served as the center of the community. The station was built, but the area surrounding the station had become neglected and run-down—primarily because the freeway had not been built. The area on both sides of the DC-Maryland line is now a historic district. The neighborhood of Takoma, DC, consists of single family homes, many more than 100 years old; the area between Takoma, DC and Takoma Park is undergoing redevelopment, with the construction of several new apartment buildings, bars, and restaurants. The closing of nearby Walter Reed Army Hospital, however, may have a depressing affect on retail in the area. Both Takomas may have to adapt to a changed economic environment in the next several years.
Pros
  • strong civic organizations
Cons
  • serious politics
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Nice, Near Neighbors"

Stronghold is a tiny, charming neighborhood near North Capital Street in Washington. One of the things that makes is so charming it the neighbor’s friendliness and commitment to each other and their home.
Behind the doors of the 1920s Federal style row houses live some of the most caring neighbors in the DC area. And one of the greatest things is that the neighborliness cuts across racial and financial lines. While most of the older neighbors who have lived there for decades are African American, they freely welcome the newcomers, many of whom are white.
Longtime resident Sam Belton once observed, "Everyone looks out for one another here…. I did telephone work for 30 years; if someone has a telephone problem, I'll help. Other people do things like carpentry or plumbing, and they'll help out. It's like family."
It has not always been easy to maintain this neighborhood’s safety. When drugs started threatening their way of life in the late 1980s, neighbors took action. They organized community watches and made sure that those who came on their streets for nefarious purposes were quickly driven away. They remain vigilant against crime today an, even though they still have problems, they have avoided many of the issues that have nearly conquered other areas.
Pros
  • neighbors
Cons
  • crime
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5