MegV

  • Local Expert 2,780 points
  • Reviews 12
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
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Reviews

5/5 rating details
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Words Defy"

The first time I accidentally happened onto Page Road, I thought I had been magically transported about 3 hours East to the mountains of East Tennessee, so suddenly quiet was the area and so remote the feel. The fact that I was less than two miles off of Belle Meade Blvd seemed impossible to me, as did the size of the houses. I have no idea who lives here. I mean literally - NO IDEA. Right now for the low, low, low price of $9.039 MILLION you can buy one, move in, find out and tell me. The description says it has 20,168 sq feet and I'm telling you that I've seen it and believe it, and that the only thing more massive is the gardens that surround it and all of those that share this most prestigious of addresses. Whoever they are. Okay so not all of the homes here are huge, but no one notices the ones that are set on the part of the road before "the bend" curves around to Chickering. But in fairness, even the plain white house with the picket fence on the "normal" part of the road lists for almost $1m, though it looks like something you would find in Mayberry. I have mentioned other places that I would choose to live in Nashville were I to ever win the lottery, but I need to qualify that now by saying that it would depend on how large the jackpot as for my money, there is simply no place better than here. It feels entirely isolated and yet is 3 miles from Green Hills. Most people do not even know it exists and as such will likely not be happy about this post. But if you're ever out for a drive, simply follow Belle Meade blvd south until it turns into another road and passes through the park. And when you come out on the other side, prepare for your mouth to drop.
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Bucolic Intown Locale"

Estes Road, and especially between Harding Place and Hobbs, is again one of the prettiest streets in Nashville. Not in the way that Belle Meade blvd oozes wealth, however, and more in the way of well-kept, beautiful homes, large mature yards and diverse architecture. The road itself is quite hilly, giving it the feel of being somewhere else entirely. It is only minutes to the shops of Green Hills and perhaps only 15 to downtown itself. This street is the home of the renowned Harpeth Hall school for girls, but the local public grammar - Julia Green School - is so highly respected that most locals send their kids there until it's time for middle school, at which point they largely break off to attend one of the nearby private schools. Homes in this area are wildly variant in range, with older/not renovated ones going for $400, and newer or completely re-done ones going for around $2M. The streets that shoot off of Estes likewise carry huge variances with one leading directly into the mega homes of Belle Meade, and the other to smaller, yet beautiful family homes nearer to Green Hills.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Beautiful and Convenient, if you can afford it"

Woodmont Blvd between Estes and Hillsboro is another frequently traveled road that must simply wish it could be left alone. With the cheapest house listed there now at $1.1M, there are likely better places to spend your cash. However, the road itself is picture perfect, with large mature lawns and huge, old trees. Likewise the draw of having the conveniences of Green Hills right on your doorstep must be almost too much to bear. The schools nearby are good, with Hillsboro High being less than a mile, and MBA, Harpeth Hall and Ensworth all within two in either direction. Homes here range from old and traditional to new builds on sites of tear-downs. The traffic can be heavy, though, with people using the street as a shortcut between Green Hills and Belle Meade/West End, and thus I would still - no matter how tempted, give pause before buying right on the streetfront itself. Behind Woodmont you have quieter areas with still large and prestigious homes, and it may be worth exploring those as an alternative to moving out of town or giving up the conveniences that living in this locale would provide.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Another Perfect Street in the Heart of Town"

For me Woodlawn would fit easily into the photo summary of any town in America, with it's generous lawns, large homes, large old trees and quite sort of feel. But it isn't any town and in fact, it's a city. Woodlawn is located just off of West End in Nashville and yet if you're fortunate enough to be able to afford to live there, one can imagine that from your backyard it must feel as though you are in the countryside rather than only two miles from a large university and bustling city. Houses here are rarely on sale, though there is also a very nice condo development that does occasionally see some changing of hands. As I write this there is not a single home for sale on the road, with the nearest one available listed at $1.33M. There is little turnover because this is old money world, where no one was mortgaged up to the eyeballs during the crash. Schools nearby are good, though people who live here patronize only Ensworth, MBA or Harpeth Hall. St. Thomas Hospital is less than a mile, as is its adjacent medical center. And Harris Teeter, Publix and Kroger are likewise less than a mile, making this the perfect in-town locale, albeit with privacy and prestige thrown in for good measure. And $2M.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Good Nature, Good Schools, Great Town"

Around here Hendersonville is perhaps better known as the home of the late, great Johnny Cash whose family home sat on the banks of the lake at the end of a long private drive. Now with an entire road named for him in the town, it is difficult to think of it without also remembering the legacy of the man who put this place on the map. But on the map it is, now known as the fastest growing community in all of Tennessee. With 26 miles of lake front property, great public schools, and excellent sense of community and other music stars making their homes there, it is not difficult to see what it would be a popular choice. Hendersonville is located in Sumner county, but is only 20 miles North of the International Airport at Nashville and 18 miles North of downtown, but the landscape, pace of life and air you breathe could easily lead you to believe that you are an entire world away. Aside from the great public schools there is also the well-respected Pope John Paul II, which interacts in both sports and academics with local Nashville schools. The median income is higher than the state average here, as is the average education level, making it an affluent small town on the shores of a beautiful lake only miles away from a great Southern City. What more could you want?
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Quiet and Leafy for a Main Thoroughfare"

Granny White Pike in Nashville, TN runs all the way from Brentwood through Forest Hills down to Belmont and yet nowhere along the way does it let down its pristine Southern facade. Houses old and new line the leafy, windy road that runs parallel to I65 and to Hillsboro, with some newer neighborhoods having almost let the area down by including unattractive behemoth houses, though even those will soon be overshadowed by the natural beauty of this area. The historic and famous Traveller's Rest is nearby as is the Governor's Mansion and many other homes dating back more than a hundred years. Though the neighborhoods lining either side are diverse ie some old and some new, they seem to co-mingle well and one will always see residents standing in their driveways having a chat or out taking walks together. In terms of being in a quiet and beautiful area outside of Nashville proper, and yet having direct access to the shops and restaurants of Green Hills at one end, or Brentwood at the other, not to mention the absolute natural beauty of the old oak trees and original stone walls, I can think of no place better to spend my money when the lottery finally goes my way.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Funky and Fun"

Berry Hill in Nashville seems to be the place that anyone with any taste wants to meet these days. I mean actual taste ie good food, great coffee and even better ambiance. When I first moved here, I only remember there being Baja Burrito (AWESOME), but perhaps there were more shops and restaurants and I was simply blinded by my lust for the best burrito on earth. Now there is a growing confluence of establishments springing up in renovated old houses including Sam & Zoes cafe (coffee) and Calypso Cafe. There are also vintage shops and a truly eclectic gift shop to give you somewhere to walk off whatever it is that you choose to eat. Homes nearby vary in price, age and demographic depending on which direction you travel, with areas to the East of here being older and less affluent, and those to the West backing up to the expensive Forest Hills, thus meaning there is something for every budge and anyone who may want to live in this up and coming area. In addition to the cool shops in the older houses, there is across the street a massive Guitar Center as well as Vanderbilt University Hospital's out of town medical center. A massive operation that is like the McDonald's of medical care, almost every specialty is now catered to from the complex.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"A Balanced University Neighborhood"

I suppose we are fortunate in Nashville that we have more than a university. A top 20 in the entire world university, at that. Not that we're bragging, because honestly, to locals, it's been a part of the city for so long that we tend to take it for granted and have therefore not, perhaps, paid much attention to its trajectory as it has climbed the rankings ladder. The campus itself is large and takes up almost every inch of land between West End and 21st, all the way from I440 almost down to I40, and encompasses the massive medical center (2 hospitals) and research facilities as well. Peabody College/Vandy Law is actually on the other side of 21st, in its own small campus. But if you live near Vandy it isn't really a given that you will feel as though you are trapped on or near a typical campus. The area competes with being near music row, as well as backing up to historic neighborhoods to its East. So mixed in with the students are professors and doctors (and LOTS of doctors doing their residencies) are transplants who like the vibe of Hillsboro Village or the hustle and bustle of West End on the other side. There are apartment buildings near, but they are not cheap, though this is not a problem for the families of many of the affluent Vandy kids. There are also older houses rented out to students, and those that have been sub-divided into rooms for rent. And then still other streets of solid single dwelling homes lived in by the afore-mentioned professionals who like this part of town. Private school for kids would be close by at either the University School of Nashville, MBA or St. Cecilia's, with Middle School being on West End and High School on Hillsboro. Unless, of course, you are fortunate enough to get your child into Hume Fogg magnet school which is ranked as one of the very finest public academic schools in the entire country.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Lakefront Living"

Old Hickory, much like Mt. Juliet, is one of those rare places where everyone cares about the community in which they live and wants to keep it as it has always been: a nice, good, safe, clean place to raise a family. Located North/Northeast of Hermitage, Old Hickory is sprawled along the South Eastern corner of Old Hickory Lake. Here you can find homes to suit almost any need or budget, with an older original house going for $150K, a 2005 built/4 br/3200 sq feet house on the market for $299K and a lake front mansion for just under $1M, along with other lake front houses ranging from $550K up to $2M. This area, though well north of the city, is still located in Davidson County and governed as such by the metro Nashville system. This means the schools are metro Davidson schools which is, generally speaking, not a good thing, but here in Old Hickory they have managed to impose their overall standards on the schools as well and thus the options here are more than suitable. Many people who have lake homes here have their main residence elsewhere, though there are plenty who live in the actual village year round. The opportunities for outdoor activities run for more than 7 months of the year due to the warm Southern climate.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Good Value for Money"

Farther East of Hermitage and south of Lebanon Pike you will find the area known as Mt. Juliet. Here you get what other areas promise in a small town with its own government and quiet way of life nearby a major city and in fact not far from Nashville's international airport. Located in Western Wilson county, Mt. Juliet is synonymous with good quality housing, good schools and good community, all made better by the location between Old Hickory Lake and Percy Priest Lake and the cornucopia of outdoor activities available on each. Homes here - nice homes - start around $249K and can go much higher, but right now for $289K you can buy 5 bedrooms in 3350 sq feet of a house built in 2005. Not bad at all, and especially not given that it is difficult to find anything wrong with this area. The only drawback would be if you work in downtown or West Nashville and have to fight I40 going in and out with everyone else. But if you work out on Lebanon Pike or down I24 you may very well experience little traffic or even the benefits of a reverse commute. There truly are not that many places as well balanced as Mt. Juliet, with down to earth residents, good public schools and two private choices to boot.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Rural - But Not"

Fairview may be rated as average, but not because there is anything wrong with it, except of course the total lack of restaurants, shops, medical facilities or nightlife. It's average because somewhere between the nice, average single family dwellings and the gazillion dollar homes hidden down lanes you will find here you get to, well, average. Fairview to me is one of the strangest places around, with a difficult to discern town center and no real sign of anything that resembles a cohesive town at all. There is a new school and fire station, and I know they have at least one policeman because he stops me often. But other than that, it seems to be more of a gathering place - one that holds the post office, FedEx pick up and drop off point, pharmacy and absolute necessities - for the residents who do live near the "town," and for those who live farther out near the Natchez Trace, down their long driveways and so far back in the woods that they could film a remake of deliverance from their porches. I make fun of it when I pass through, but in truth I am envious. Invariably as I pass by the little wooden building that says "Post/FedEx," there will be an old pickup parked next to a new Maserati or Porsche. Like many areas around here, you never really know who lives where and in a way, that is the charm of a place like Fairview.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Welcome to Stepford"

I realize that I have already written about other neighborhoods in Brentwood, but technically those are one exit south of what people consider to be the heart and soul of Brentwood, although they are all inside the city boundaries. But Brentwood proper is, to me, one of the scariest places on earth. Everything is artificial, including the people. No one is nice because they're afraid you have something they don't. If they follow you to your car, it isn't to rob you. It's to make sure that yours isn't nicer than theirs. Appearances are everything and so rather than deal with one another, well-off couples simply build houses so large that they never have to see one another. But instead of putting them down private drives or well off of main roads, they plop them as close to the main roads as possible, for all to see. The local school systems are some of the best in the country, without a doubt. Both Brentwood and Ravenswood high are consistently ranked in the best high schools in the entire US, so do not bother paying to send your child to Brentwood Academy or Franklin Road Academy, neither of which is known for academic excellence. Everything is here and it's difficult to conceive for what, exactly, one would need to go into Nashville. But it's likewise hard to see why anyone with any depth would move here.
JacqueR
JacqueR Your review might be an accurate description of the Nashville suburb I grew up in and if so, that's a shame but not very surprising since it is in the wealthiest county in TN but more than ever it's almost completely made from new unestablished money. It is very obvious when talking to friends still in the area or friends from college who aren't originally from TN and those who are weren't born and raised (here so there's a good example of the new money comment ) that THE zip code most desirable and prestigious in Williamson Co is Franklin. They have this idea that it's always been wealthier and more desirable city in the county not the artists interpretation painting that apparently was paid to create this visual of grandeur but in reality is a fib. I would tell Franklin that Brentwood is in fact what put Williamson County in the #1 position of TN's wealthiest counties. Certainly not Franklin. Undoubtedly people moved on out into the spacious empty land that Franklin once was but if you aren't an entertainer with a large farm, you are about the same as those residents in Brentwood. There is no doubt that the appearance of being weathy is not something either area has a trade mark on the visual for this Nashville suburb. Memphis has theirs Knoxille has Farragut which i can't help but be amused at the entire community as well as many Knoxville residents who have such a large ego and mentality that is far greater of a lie than either Brentwood or Franklin's perception of themselves and keeping score on who's got what. I've gone into very nice homes in Farragut that had little to no furniture. I've gone into those homes that were filled beautifully with large salaries built from long careers and residents who are as down to earth and unassuming as you'll meet. The city that I find being TN's best kept secret with such even amount of wealth levels is Chattanooga. You never get the over inflated egos that are suffocating in the weathy area of any town, but the lovely area made out young professionals doing well in their career thus bringing Nashville a new and friendly gathering of just hard working people who did enjoy the perks of honestly earned money and rewarded the entire county in the long run as it did the neighhoods of genuinely good families living in them.
Apr 10, 2016
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Literally Something For Everyone"

It is difficult to review the Antioch section of Nashville because it is such a large and truly diverse area. When you say "Antioch" different people here will immediately think of different things. Some will think of the area just south of the zoo where Antioch begins, a much older part of inner-city that is pretty steadily being bought up and refurbished by singles with good income or couples who want to redo and then flip. This particular area is very culturally diverse, with a large population of African Americans, ethnic Kurds, Lebanese, and Mexican. At the risk of making a sweeping generalization, some of the best ethnic food can be found in the local restaurants here, making it a draw for people who have moved here from more diverse cities and find other parts of town too plain. Further East of this area, but still in Antioch, are the neighborhoods that back up to Percy Priest Lake, a popular outdoor destination for boating, swimming an other water sports. This area has everything from low rent apartments to new build condos to upmarket neighborhoods. But the one truism of this entire area is the good public school system and sense of pride in it. There is nothing you cannot find here if you simply look long enough, so give it a try, if only for a good meal.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Just.....Average"

Looking at the boxes I ticked when doing this review, I realized that I had, with 100% honesty, chosen "average" in most every single category. And that, I suppose, is the best way to summarize this boring Nashville suburb on I24. Smyrna was once known for being the home of the Saturn plant before it closed, along with a few other foreign and local owned companies who located there due to tax incentives. But to me it's like living in a giant strip mall with no personality to remind you of where you are, instead covered by chain restaurants, chain stores and chain motels. Being located in Rutherford county, it is not technically a part of Greater Nashville and therefore has its own local government which has recently been accused of various levels of petty corruption. The cost of living here is average as is everything else - including the populace. There are nicer homesteads around here, of course, as there is beautiful farmland all around. But the people in those homes actually schlep over to Franklin via 840 for their needs rather than coming here, themselves tacitly acknowledging that there really is nothing special. If you work here I suppose it's understanding that you would also live here. But if you work anywhere north, be aware of the traffic as I24 in the mornings is the parking lot to the anteroom of purgatory.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Historic Area Near Lakes"

West/Northwest of Nashville just above Lebanon Pike you will find historic Hermitage, TN. Technically its own town - much like Brentwood - but considered by most to be just another outpost of Nashville. Hermitage, as you may or may not know, is named after the historic home which stands there. The Hermitage was the home of President Andrew Jackson, considered by Tennesseans to have been the finest president, of course. The home has been open as a museum since 1889 and more than 15 million tourists have crossed its threshold in that time. The area now is known for affordable, quite living out of the hustle and bustle of Nashville itself. Many office areas have grown out of Nashville in this direction up nearby Lebanon Pike making it an ideal place to live for many of the worker who hold positions in companies housed there. A nice, new house in Hermitage can run anywhere from $125-$150K for a 2 br on a small or zero lot, to $700 for one standing in 7 acres or more, but for the most part prices here are more reasonable and currently there are virtually new houses of 2500 square feet for around $225K - $250K. Summit Medical center is nearby, offering state of the art healthcare, as are various restaurants and outdoor amusement areas such as a water park and paintball range. All in all, for the prices available and the quality of life, not a bad place to choose.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"North Nashville - Don't Do It"

Again this morning the headline on our local news was "man's body found in street in North Nashville." Sadly this has become an almost daily occurrence as gang violence has taken hold and any positive influences have moved on. Just north of the Cumberland River that divides downtown Nashville you will find a place that could not be farther removed from the tree lined blvds of Belle Meade or even, for that matter, more different from the organized, close-knit and trendy Germantown historic community that is in practice only blocks away. Outsiders do not venture to this part of town and I came across it only by accident right after moving back here, en route to East Nashville to visit a friend. Had I not lived in far scarier parts of the world, I may have panicked as locals stared at me like an alien from another planet. Are house prices here cheap? Of course they are because no one dare tread on this particular swathe of turf. The police and local government have set out all sorts of new initiatives to rid the area of crime, to eliminate gangs and to rehabilitate the members, but reading the news and seeing the place, one has to believe that this is a long-term commitment rather than a medium term goal or plan. Having said that, the area is within sight of LP field, the Titans' home stadium, and with Nashville growing at the rate it is, it could be that changes are discernible within as little as 5 years. We can only hope as the area is rich in history and could no doubt add to what is already a city steeped in tradition.
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"The Governor's Club"

In almost any social circle in greater Nashville and in almost any workplace, if someone is describing another person's lifestyle or status and they say "And he/she lives in the Governor's Club," nothing more need be said. Either the person they are describing is exceptionally well off, or hugely in debt, as there is no other way to gain entre into what is considered to be if not one of the most prestigious neighborhoods around, then certainly one of the most flash. Herein live NFL players, music executives, local entrepreneurs and until recently, Carrie Underwood. From Concord Road passersby can easily gaze upon the opulence and grandiose houses that are so huge they seem to be staging a battle to overtake one another. In this, the front part of the club, it is difficult to find a house for under $2M, but travel back a bit to where some of what they call the "normal" houses are and you may find one being sold by someone in financial duress for just under the $1M mark, but such opportunities are rare, and prices here often and easily approach upwards of $4 to $5 million. There is, of course, the award winning Arnold Palmer golf course and the stunning club house to play on should you not wish to exit your gleaming gates for the duration of the weekend. But there is also something seriously voyeuristic about the entire thing, at least to me. There is no attempt to hide the environs from the main road and it thusly seems as those who reside within are letting out a desperate cry of "Look at me - I have WAY more money than you!" This sense is even more so increased by knowledge that for these prices you could easily be hidden behind your own gate, down a gravel drive and on your own 10+ acres. With horses. Or a tennis court. Or a pool. Or all of the above. So if you need to show off, this is the place for you. Otherwise, look elsewhere as herein everything is about keeping up appearances.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"1950s Neighborhood Close to Town"

The Crieve Hall area of Greater Nashville was named after the large mansion that once stood in the area, itself named after an area in Ireland that to the original owner resembled this part of middle Tennessee. The area is defined as that East of I65, West of Ellington Agriculture and Seven Mile Creek and Blackman Road on the North, but to outsiders is largely and generally thought of as the area between I65 and Nolensville Pike and Harding Place and Hill Road. Though not entirely unsafe, calling it average or safe would be perhaps a stretch, as the part of the area nearer to Nolensville Pike is often the scene of violent crimes. Granted the neighborhoods are farther off of Harding and Nolensville, but if the trend continues it cannot be long before at least petty crime encroaches upon what are currently more peaceful areas. Homes here are almost exclusively 1950s or 1960s ranch style and range in price from the $140s to - at the most - $214 and though not modern or flash, are often set on generous sized lots with mature trees. The public schools are average and possibly border on being better than that, though with so many nationally recognized public schools in the area they would in any event pale in comparison. The worst part of living here would have to be the traffic which around Harding Place is a nightmare, and yet not as bad as the quality of the driving which for whatever reason seems to be dreadful as hardly a day goes by the an accident with injuries is not reported at Harding and Nolensville. For the money, there are better places to start your search for a home.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Brenthaven - Great Neighborhood & Excellent Schools"

Just off of exit 71 on I65 South you will find Brenthaven, a large development inside the Brentwood city limits. With homes ranging from the $360s (older) to the $800s (newer) it truly has something for families of diverse budget and size, and bordered by one of the best YMCAs in the country as well as nationally ranked Brentwood High School, it is difficult to find fault with this area of the Greater Nashville area. Walking trails abound in this area and outdoor pursuits are popular. Frequently on the weekends you will find soccer, football or ultimate frisbee games being played in the pubic playing fields near the Y and the amazing public library. The only drawbacks here may also be the benefits, that being its close proximity to I65, as the morning commute north on this corridor is busy and frequently plagued by both congestion and crashes. There are no grocery stores immediately nearby, thus necessitating going down an exit further to the shops at Cool Springs, or North one exit to those available on nearby Old Hickory, but those are short commutes and the wide-ranging availability of retailers and services in both areas make it easy to cover all household needs with one trip.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Cool Springs"

Cool Springs Blvd is the main thoroughfare through what is essentially a mall-centric commercial area just off of I65/Franklin Exit in Williamson County. The mall itself is busy and is comprised of mid to upmarket shops, with surrounding retail establishments including Whole Foods, Target, TJ Maxx and others, and restaurants such as J. Alexanders, Wolfgang Puck Express, local eateries and probably a dozen others. In Cool Springs itself there are high-end apartment complexes on the West Side of I65, and on the East Side gated communities boasting both zero lot-line and larger houses with small yards. The preconceived notion of Cool Springs is that living there would be a pain because of the traffic that dominates the mall area, and that it may likewise be noisy and comprised of cheap or unattractive housing. Not so. With Sony Music and Nissan both housing large offices nearby, there is quite the population of well-paid transplants in the area and it seems that those that are either single, childless or frequent travelers prefer the convenience of having all the shopping and eating out they can stand within arms reach of both their home and their office. I personally once bypassed looking at this area, turning my nose up at it as somewhere that would not have the type of housing I desired, but have in hindsight found that to not at all be the case.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Hickory Hills"

Another part of town that time forgot, Hickory Hills neighborhood is East of I24 South of Nashville and was many years ago an outgrowth from the Hickory Hollow mall and surrounding environs. Almost halfway between I24 and the popular Percy Priest lake, the area has, however, in recent years experienced a good amount of new building that has brought something of a resurgence to the area. Houses less than 5 years old with square footage of 2000 or more are regularly available for less than $170,000, and in recent weeks there have been many reports in the local media claiming that the long-defunct Hickory Hollow mall is being targeted for re-development, thus raising hopes that this area's resale value - or at least property values - may soon likewise make a turn for the better. Not in the most desirable part of town - or terribly near town - it is understandable why families on a budget who want more space for their dollars would choose to at least make their first purchase here. However, one thing everyone should explore or experience before making a move here, and especially if they plan on working in Nashville, is the morning commute North on I24. In almost a year of working several miles South of the exit to Hickory Hills, I never saw the Northbound traffic anything other than at an almost complete standstill as I zoomed past headed South.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Not What it Used to Be"

Twenty years ago the Mall at Bellevue was "the next big thing," as was the surrounding neighborhood. Now known better as "Exit 196" off of I-40, the mall is entirely empty and the area itself struggles to find a positive identity. There are nicer parts of what some consider "Bellevue," but those areas are in fact nearer to Harpeth or Fairview. Given that this area is only a few miles West of Belle Meade, one can understand the optimism that initially greeted this area when it was first developed, but perhaps because of the lack of office space, medical facilities or good schools that so define other parts of greater Nashville/Davidson, its decline was as rapid as its ascent. There are still nice houses and neighborhoods to be found, but resale value is sketchy, at best, as demand tends to now be closer to town or in more well thought-of areas such as Brentwood. There is one private high school - Ensworth - which also has the distinction of being the most expensive in all of greater Nashville, albeit with varying academic results. If you are moving somewhere to stay and do not mind driving your child across town to a good school - then this may be fine for you. Otherwise, look elsewhere.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Best Condos ANYWHERE - Shame about the Foreclosure"

Jamison Station, across from the multi-purpose building known as "The Factory" on Liberty Pike in Franklin, was itself built as a multi-use building, with the intention of attracting high end retailers or offices for the lower floors, and upmarket residents for the condos on the upper floors, as well as for the large, luxurious townhomes located behind the main building. Unfortunately the developers ran out of money even before the housing crisis, which meant that by the time they needed to borrow, they stood no chance of finance or re-finance. As such, many of the projects, including sculpted, communal gardens and a pool, were never finished. Likewise some of the condos were themselves never completed. However, the ones that were are STUNNING. Solid wood floors, Travertine counter tops, Viking appliances (beautiful, state of the art, no expense spared gourmet kitchens), personal elevators, personal roof-top decks - you name it and it's there. But because parts of the project were never finished and the building not fully occupied, it has a hollow, un-lived-in feel about it that can be a bit unsettling. But all of that may soon be solved as the bank has recently foreclosed on the project and is auctioning off all remaining units and houses. As such there is hope that affluent first-time buyers will be drawn to it or that investors will buy and then manage them as high-end rental properties. Whatever the case, it's the one place I would move today if given the chance. It's close to downtown Franklin - literally seconds - secure and absolutely beautiful.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Historic Franklin"

When I say Franklin, I am speaking specifically of Historic Franklin, encompassing the areas around the square and the immediate streets that run West/SouthWest of it. Like most people, I go back and forth between wanting to live in town and wanting to live out in the country - or at least somewhere with a small town feel. In Franklin, you sort of get the best of both worlds. Downtown Franklin is a gem and is protected as an historically preserved town, with several buildings being individually listed on the historic registry. There is city hall, the courthouse and the obligatory church - all things one would find in or around a small town square. But there is also a large Starbucks with outdoor seating; the Mellow Mushroom for fab pizza; Ben & Jerry's at one end and a locally made, favorite frozen yogurt at the other; as well as two fine dining restaurants and an assortment of delis, cafes and one of a kind shops not to be found elsewhere. The houses immediately adjacent to historic Franklin are beautiful, ranging from Victorian and Georgian, cottages to Southern mansions. Main Street West, as it runs away from the town center, is lined with renovated old homes, as are some of the other streets closer to the square such as 7th, 8th, 9th and Fair. Similarly, South of the town's roundabout you will find more of the same on 3rd Streets and Margin Street. Yet if you tire of the upmarket Mayberry of Middle Tennessee, you can always drive just a couple of miles East to Cool Springs/Franklin where you can indulge your every mall/chain restaurant whim, and do the major grocery shopping while there. All in all, I decided not to move to Franklin when I came back to Tennessee, but given the community spirit, great private school and yes - even one of the top public high schools in the entire country, it's hard to find something wrong with it for families with kids.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Come to See Music Row - Stay for the Neighborhood"

Historic Edgehill in Nashville is highly diverse in that it comprises the mega power offices of music's elite on Music Row as well as historic homes; two universities; two hospitals; graduate schools and private grammar-thru-high schools. Whereas Hillsboro Village can be as hectic as it is fun, Edgehill has the advantage of being further away from the edge of 21st avenue - on the other side of Vanderbilt - and a bit further North of Belmont University. It is home to professors, doctors, teachers and yes, some students. Despite the commercial and academic diversity of the area, the architecture and houses are actually fairly consistent, varying only between bungalows and cottages, with occasional mock-Victorians thrown in for good measure. House prices here have somehow remained steady, perhaps because of the fact that it is still somewhat nestled between two universities and a largely commercial part of town; and thus the constant influx of students/housing does keep prices from becoming overly-inflated. Still, it is a very friendly, very conveniently located neighborhood for those who live or work in/near Vandy/Belmont or even downtown.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Heart of Forest HIlls"

Immediately south of Green Hills, commercial space and condo lots give way to winding streets and large lots. Forest Hills and Seven Hills are outgrowths from the Hillsboro Road thoroughfare. The rolling slopes in these lush green spaces actually are those "green hills" visible from Green Hills. And perhaps because of the elevated lots, or simply because of the quiet, sought-after, near-town location, the prices are equally high. A new build on Bancroft will set you back anywhere from $1.1M to $4.4M based on currently listed prices, but like many other parts of Nashville that were once dominated by ranch style and split level hones, look beyond these newly established streets and gated communities and you will find opportunities in the low $400s for renovation or complete redevelopment. Indeed it is the older homes that still dominate the area - many of which are like new on the inside after lots of investment - and given the building slow down it could be that this mix will remain for longer than initially thought.

This area - much like Oak HIll - is very family oriented and definitely the type of place most people who envision the picket fence version of the American dream would aspire to live. It is also, like Oak Hill, it's own small town that exists as a part of metro Nashville authority. There is a large sense of community spirit, and many families belong to and gather at the Seven Hills Swim and Racquet Club that it is an integral part of the community.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"A beautiful, quiet, neighborhood where families can live extremely happily."

The beautiful neighborhood of Raintree Forest is located in the generally peaceful area of Brentwood, a populous suburb of Nashville mainly filled with upper-middle class to upper-class neighborhoods. Not only is this neighborhood filled with wonderfully-sculpted, beautiful houses, but it is surrounded by lush greenery, in an area where the amount of trees, green grass, and healthy lawns is nothing short of ridiculously abundant. It is one of the nicest neighborhoods in which you could ever see yourself raising a family; in fact, if you imagined your dream suburban neighborhood with your American-dream-like family, you'd probably be imagining this neighborhood without even knowing it. At night time, all you can hear are crickets chirping and the occasional rabbit running through your backyard. On a sunny day, you can go and sit out by either of the two neighborhood pools, go for a swim, or just have a relaxing drive through the neighborhood.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Quiet, trendy street in a convenient location."

12th Avenue South is a quiet, trendy street in midtown Nashville, located conveniently around music shops, coffee houses, restaurants, and even more. Not only is 12th Avenue South in a convenient location, but it also rather peaceful and a place where it's easy just to relax. It's easy to walk to the Nashville fairgrounds from 12th avenue south, and parks like Sevier park, Rose park, and Reservoir park are all within reasonable walking distance, and are all great locations to go on a sunny day, whether you're walking your dog or just going to socialize with friends and family. 12th Avenue South is also not in a particularly busy area, even though it is rather close to midtown Nashville and more populous neighborhoods. Although Belmont university's campus is located on 12th Avenue South, one should not expect loud parties every night or anything that would cause discomfort in living. Belmont's beautiful campus only adds to the overall peace and good-natured living environment of 12th Avenue South. So, while it is not necessarily a place to raise a family or have a vacation home, it is quite the trendy place to just relax and have a quiet life.
Recommended for
  • Singles
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Great Place to Live. For Insomniacs."

Downtown Nashville as a place to live is not really what it should be given that it has a) fabulous nightlife b) the Ryman c) The Frist d) a riverfront and e) did I mention a fabulous night life. Maybe that's the problem. The old converted warehouse lofts in this part of town are simply awesome, with exposed metal and brickwork, and one with its own roof-garden/pool, but the simple fact is that this is, at the end of the day, a club district. People from Nashville - and more so from other places - come here to eat, drink, hear music and perhaps even attend a football game. This makes their awareness of a resident's need to sleep of minimal concern at best. It's true that some of the louder clubs are farther up Broadway, but there are still plenty of places for nighttime entertainment quite literally under your nose. There is a wish in Nashville - or perhaps a marketing ploy - to make downtown a hip place to hang out and to live, but if it is a movement at all, it is a slow one. Downtown Nashville actually has loads to offer, so it's sad to think that the movement may never truly take off. But many believe that once the real estate market picks up and The Gulch (premier midtown/downtown development) fills up, the enthusiasm for living here will spill over into the rest of older, and in this case historic, downtown. For now unless you're a club promoter, music promoter, club goer or someone who simply prefers not to sleep, I'd look elsewhere.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Woodland-in-Waverly Historic District"

Almost on the opposite side of the campuses of Vanderbilt and Belmont from Hilsboro Village is Woodland-in-Waverly historic district. Much like the Germantown district of Nashville, this area is designated as an historic preservation neighborhood and as such all original structures must be renovated as closely to possible as their original form, and new structures must get planning permission to build, thus ensuring that they are in keeping with the historic facades of neighboring buildings. Unlike Germantown, though, there is quite a bit of new building going on, and though the prices for the older/original houses has stayed largely static ($200K or less can buy you a renovated 2/3 bed), the new homes in the area are pricey, and though larger, are still considerably more even on a per square foot basis. Yes, you get the quick access to Green Hills for shopping or to the restaurants near Vandy for eating out, but it is still not necessarily the best value for money in metro Davidson county. In addition, the nearest high school is in Green Hills and though on a map it does not seem far, in traffic and in reality it is quite a trek. Lastly, for the amounts they are asking for newer builds and given the proximity to the universities, there is no guarantee that these homes will hold their values. In some cities the universities are in leafy burbs that make for ideal living. Not so in Nashville where the sprawling Vanderbilt University and Medical Center bump into Belmont University, and all right in the heart of town. Perfect for professors, doctors (Vandy) or others associated with the university as there is a nice sense of community, this is not a place for a random transplant to Nashville who wants to be able to walk to their meal and see their child off to a nearby school.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Germantown - Nashville's First Neighborhood"

There are so many parts of Nashville that can be described as "up and coming," or "the next big thing" that it seems trite to apply either of those terms to what is Nashville's oldest neighborhood. Germantown, however, gets a gold star not only for its age, but also for the fact that it is perhaps the best kept of all the older neighborhoods, both in terms of restoration carried out and new structures being built. An 18 block area ordered by Rosa Parks Blvd, Hume Street, Jefferson Street and Third Avenue North, it is the sort of place that one would recognize as being special even if they simply ran across it by mistake. Of course a lot of that aesthetic distinction is down to the strict zoning and building ordinances in place to protect what is now an historic zoning district, having been designated an historically registered neighborhood in 2008. In this case the push to get the distinction is a sign of the strength of the local community, which is close-knit, and also protective of both the integrity of the neighborhood and of one another. Though Germantown is not located near any of Nashville's private schools, it is likely that many of the artsy or progressive types who live here would opt to go down that path in any event, and nor would they need to with the Hume Fog Academic Magnet School or the Martin Luther King Magnet School not too far away, although these operate purely on a lottery system, thus requiring planning and not just a little patience. Property prices have dropped like everywhere else in the country, and one can now buy a piece of history from $220K to $275K depending on the size of the home and extent of the renovations, though there are also newer homes recently built that have likewise dropped in price.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Something for (almost) Everyone"

It's difficult to squarely define Hillwood as being entirely affordable, given the great disparity in prices between the older homes that line the Western edge of the neighborhood and the newer ones that have been built closer to Hillwood Country Club. However, given that for around $300K you can buy a house that is in proximity to one listing currently for $4.59Million, and know that with that comes a secure neighborhood, a clean and safe environment, and the possibility of seeing your property's value increase, it does at the very least start to seem like a good deal. Hillwood is bordered by Harding Pike, Charlotte Avenue and Davidson Drive and has in recent years become the solution for homebuilders with means who wanted to be in Belle Meade, but knew that failing a miracle, no piece of land would ever come available. Just across the street from Belle Meade proper is Hillwood, with it's nice, clean streets, whopping huge homes, modest & perfectly nice family homes and state of the art country club. Like everything else in this area, the access to good schools - both public and private - is excellent as is access to health care, groceries and pretty much every other convenience required in modern day life. The only downside I can see to this area is the same that could potentially someday prove an upside, that being that there is still construction and there is always the chance that one day your neighbor in the more modest part of this enclave will sell their house and allow it to be knocked down to build a whopper.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Quiet & Neighborly Luxury"

The first time I had to visit a home in the Cedarmont Estates section of the Cedarmont Neighborhood, it was dark and the roads were winding and aside from feeling incredibly lost, I also felt certain that a spaceship could descend, kidnap me and make its escape without being seen by even one person. To me it seemed like the most random and remote possible place to build a neighborhood, but on a return trip - this time in the light of day - it began to make perfect sense. And it began to seem like a perfect place to live. The lots here are large, generally anything from 2 acres to 3.5, and the houses are proportionately likewise, starting around 4500 square feet and going up to 6000. It is common for homes to have pools or some other form of recreational outdoor acoutrement, but it is unique in that there are few fences, with the residents here feeling no need to shut one another out, given the size of their lots and the overall "this is a place for families" vibe. All of the houses are built with the finest ie stone floors, granite counters and the works, but unlike other parts of greater Nashville where places of this size on a similar piece of land and with similar fittings would easily cost upwards of $1M, here it will run you anywhere from $499K to $650K, depending on several obvious variants, such as size, lot and aforementioned add-ons like pools. The vibe here is incredibly friendly, with most people buying and staying long-term and with neighbors who wander in and out of each others' homes as if they were their own. The only drawback is that it is probably a bit remote for those who have to make a daily commute into Nashville for work, and is therefore better suited to those who work in Cool Springs, Franklin or Brentwood.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Great Place for a Fixer-Upper"

Sylvan park is an old, long-established neighborhood in West Nashville, not far from I440, and almost equal distance to Charlotte Pike, White's Bridge Road and West End Avenue. Parts of Sylvan park had, in years prior, fallen into disrepair and seen better times, but as Nashville has grown and property prices have sky-rocketed, this has become a place for young couples or singles to buy an older home and make it their own, carrying out extensive renovations often selling them for admirable profits. Much like East Nashville was only a few years back, Sylvan park is establishing its own neighborhood vibe and even has its own community website and village real estate company, both of which work actively to encourage communication and camaraderie between and amongst the locals. Houses run the gambit with the majority having been built in the 1920s-1950s, with others having been added in the late '90s and early '00s. The older houses are mostly all cottages and again vary between having never had any work (and thus starting at around $150K) to those that have had extensive renovations including new kitchens and luxury bathrooms (and start at $289K), whereas the newer ones generally start at the $300K mark, though in honesty lack the appeal of the older homes which all maintain their original and charming facades. Mostly coveted for its good entry price point levels and proximity to downtown Nashville, one can reason that in coming years it will be a part of town that is increasingly sought after and with steadily rising prices.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Everything is Here - Including the Traffic"

Green Hills is best known, perhaps, as the retail hub of West Nashville, being the home to the Green Hills Mall, The Hill Center and various other off-shoots and outlets. Located less than two miles from I440, the mall itself is the only in Tennessee with a Louis Vuitton, Tiffany, Wolford, being mostly aimed at the high-end consumer, and likewise the surrounding properties, though not always prohibitive, are similarly upmarket. In Green Hills proper ie in the area immediately around the mall, are an abundance of condos both old and new, with two new developments specifically setting the benchmark for luxury, albeit in close quarters as space in this area is at a premium. As you move out from the mall in a westward direction, you have the actual neighborhood of Green Hills with it's, well, hilly roads and winding streets. A much varied neighborhood, it has both the old and the new, the mid six-figures and the high sevens alike, and is very much the epitome of an in-town, middle to upper middle class enclave of professionals of all manner. The public schools here are excellent, with many locals sending their kids to the much loved Julia Green elementary in preference to parting with private school dollars any sooner than they must. And if private education does not appeal, the local Hillsboro High School is the only one in the area offering the IB (International Baccalaureate) and itself has a robust parent support system and student community. Green Hills is, for many, the only place they would choose to live, but as Nashville has grown, and with it this area, the traffic not only to and from, but through the area itself has become something of a pain. Therefore the more frequented streets, such as Estes or Hobbs, are not for walking or playing, though there are far many other streets - some of them cul-de-sacs - for families with kids. Though in general, for commuters, there is little to suggest that the traffic will ease any time soon. There is without question a great variety of houses and all with distinct personality. But for the price tag, one may need to weigh the convenience of being in the middle of it all with the reality of the privacy and quiet that could be bought by moving only a couple of miles south.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Out of Town Close to Town"

Berry's Chapel is a long and winding road that runs between Hillsboro and Franklin Roads in Williamson County. Having taken it the first time as a means to avoid traffic caused by an accident on Hillsboro, what greeted me was - especially given the beauty of that particular day - a breath of fresh air. Literally. Though the first neighborhood on the corner of Berry's Chapel and Hillsboro boasts enormous mansions of 7 figure costs, the road then rises into the hills and gives way to farms, farmhouses and a few very discreetly gated drives that make one wonder exactly whom is hiding behind them. At the very top of the hill rests yet another gated community with what one assumes must be some of the very best views over Franklin and the greater Nashville Area. In the Spring and Fall it is not uncommon to see hot air balloons resting over this exact spot, and one can only envy what sights they can behold from such a vantage. It is almost impossible to believe, as the road climbs and the houses grow less frequent, that you are in an area only perhaps two or three miles removed from all of the very finest in modern conveniences. The shops of Cool Springs are less than 3 miles, and the historic downtown Franklin district is less than 5, both offering unique experiences for every day or specialty shopping and dining. In addition, the public school catchment for this area falls into one of the premier public school districts in the entire country, though there are also an abundance of good private schools only moments away. If you need to be near town, but refuse to give up the peace and solitude of a countryside existence, this would be a good place to start your search.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Okay For a First Move Into Town"

As far as modern mixed use developments go, this one isn't bad. Not bad at all. Conceived as a ready-made village and comprised of a condominium building, townhouses, free-standing homes as well as retail shops, good food choices and on-site gym, it's a great place to live for those who come home after a long day and do not want to have to go far for food or the gym, but is not ideal for those who loathe a long commute. Located on Nolensville Pike in between Old Hickory and Concord Road, the out of the way location does provide for a self-contained environment, free from too much noise or traffic, but with access into Nashville itself coming only via I65 or I24, the northbound morning commute is a killer, and the afternoon commute home not much better. It would be far better suited for those who work in Brentwood or Cool Springs, though, as they would be able to enjoy a reverse commute as well as a vast array of shopping in dining on the trips to and from. The quality of the buildings is surprisingly good, with the kitchens in the condos being disproportionately large for the overall square footage, making them heaven for singles or couples who love to cook. Some condos have large or even over-sized balconies, with others enjoying direct outdoor access and patios. The townhomes and houses are further off the main road and most all are fronted with old-style town squares with plenty of green space for walking the dog or playing soccer. To that extent it is a good place for young couples with children as there is absolutely tons of outdoor space for walking and playing. Like many other ares, once the housing market rebounds and builders are once again building, this area is likely to sprout up even more amenities, though even now there are grocery stores within five minutes in either direction.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"For Ecclectic Urbanites Only"

How could you NOT want to live in a neighborhood with restaurants as diverse as "I Dream of Weenie" and the award winning "Margot?" With bars called Mad Donna's and The Crow Bar? The heart and soul of the resurgent East Nashville, Woodland Ave and surrounding streets are the perfect place for those who want to enjoy their life both in terms of comfort of homes & neighborly surroundings as well as, perhaps above all, superb food and beverage indulgences. Eclectic is truly the first word that comes to mind when describing the thriving fusion scene of East Nashville, where one neighbor is as likely to be a corporate lawyer as the next is to be a performance artist. There is a very tight-knit sense of community here, with many residents having a preferred daily watering hole and a locally-based group of friends. Bordering areas not yet re-developed, that neighborly factor is a comfort when it comes to looking out for one another, as is the case in most urban neighborhoods across the country. An added piece to creating peace of mind is the fact that on any given day - and especially on weekends - you cannot go ten feet without seeing neighbors out walking, whether to a nearby restaurant or a friend's house. It is a highly sociable and interactive place where everyone quickly gets to know everyone else. Houses date back to the 30s 40s and 50s, some completely redone, others only partially, but almost all within walking distance to Marche, Margot and multiple other destinations that make mouths water.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"The Gulch"

Calling an area of town that one wishes to market as THE hippest place to live, replete with 7 figure price tags and 3* restaurants, I'm not entirely sure that choosing the name "The Gulch" was the greatest marketing ploy in history. But somehow it worked, and it is now - in Nashville - synonymous with uber-chic apartment and condo buildings, extreme fine dining and funky retail and exercise alternatives. Anchored by the building humbly known as "The Icon," The Gulch suffered in the property crisis perhaps a bit more than other sectors of the real estate market given its ambitious target demographic and aggressive building phase. Still, however, the properties are largely occupied and rarely for rent, proving that most still are either affluent enough to have bought and lived in them, or bought them for investment and have the stability to not need to rent them out just yet, instead waiting for an upturn in the market. This area is definitely for single or young couples and not a place for kids, as there is little in the way of down-home outdoor space or nearby schools or anything else remotely child-appealing. For adults, however, it is the perfect playground allowing for dinners at the Watermark, drinks at the Wine Loft, and a guaranteed short walk home. In years to come - economy allowing - this will undoubtedly be a bustling area of town and perhaps home to a new wave of trendy boutiques and even more eateries. For now, it is still the perfect place for hipsters in town for work or for nightlife alone.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Perfect for Academics and Transplants from Larger Cities"

When we first moved back from Europe, my son's first instinct was for us to live in Hillsboro Village. After all, with the way 21st Avenue cuts through it, lined with hip, small restaurants, an upmarket grocery store and other cool shops, it reminded him of the high street in many of the villages we had lived in abroad. The neighborhood itself, now having spread out to touch on the campuses of both Vanderbilt and Belmont Universities, is dominated by something of a campus feel, though one gets the sense that it's as much the professors as the students who enjoy its town within a town, funky-homey vibe. On 21st itself, one will find mixed use buildings as well as older apartment buildings and houses converted to multiple dwellings. Similarly on off-shoot streets such as Linden, one will also find mixed use housing, though this area is - like many others - being bought up and renovated at a consistent pace, now making it likely to have a high-end renovation right next door to a house shared by students. But that's, quite frankly, the charm of the place. It's for people who enjoy life - and maybe most of all enjoy being able to walk to Fido or the Pancake Pantry for breakfast or the Belcourt for a film. The only downside of Hillsboro/21st itself is the traffic, which could challenge the patience of a saint. But once off the main thoroughfare and onto the side-streets, it's life as usual in a near-urban, neighborhood setting that is quickly becoming the first place many transplants house-hunt.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"In the Market for an In-town Estate?"

The first time I went for a run in this part of Nashville, I took a turn behind the Ensworth School in order to get off of a busier road and hopefully find some peace and quiet. What I found instead was a freakishly quiet street of near mansion sized houses, each set in more than three acres of land, smack in the heart of Nashville. With a cul-de-sac at one end a very discreet opening at the other, this street would be near the pinnacle of perfection for someone who wanted to feel as though they were on a country estate, but actually less than two football fields away from a grocery store and every other conceivable modern convenience. Houses on this street rarely go up for sale, and as such when they do they are highly sought-after and quickly snapped up, despite never listing for anything below $1M. As the name suggests, the private Ensworth grammar and middle school bordering the street shares both its name and its prestige, being one of the most sought after and exclusive in Nashville. Currently undergoing a massive building project, one can imagine the school might be causing at least a slight momentary annoyance, but given that anyone living on the street likely went there or has children or grand-children attending there, they are unlikely to cause a fuss. Out of every street in Nashville, I find less fault with this one than with any other - as far as my own personal preferences go - as it offers the ultimate in quiet and serenity, privacy and discretion only steps away from the heart of town.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Pricey Peace, Harmony & Convenience"

Richland Avenue, similar to it's neighbor - Whitland Avenue just across West End - is an historic neighborhood of homes built mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, but largely all restored to state of the art comfort. Richland also enjoys the feel of a peaceful small town neighborhood, but right in the heart of West End. Unlike Whitland which winds in a parallel fashion to West End, Richland is a straight, double-sided street, split by a grassy, side-walked median and all covered with hundred year old trees. However, as it backs up to the more up and coming streets of Central and Princeton, Richland tends to a attract a younger affluent crowd who, perhaps having grown out of their bohemian tastes, still prefers to be nearer a reminder of from whence they have come. Also a neighbor of Temple Sherith Israel, Richland is convenient for walking to Temple. A shorter and more contained street, Richland enjoys a rich and deep sense of community to go along with its similar sense of history. Also nearby is a public elementary school, with the public middle school being right across the street, as is a children's center and Presbyterian church. And all of this again with direct, nearby access to the restaurants and medical centers of West End.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Quiet, Yet Convenient; Exclusive, Yet Down to Earth"

Every year, the residents of the Whitland Avenue Historic District open their doors to the public for the annual home tour, and in doing so provide an ongoing example of how traditional neighborhood spirit still thrive in parts of Nashville. Literally just off of West-End Avenue exists a shady, tree-lined blvd of sidewalks, large yards and historic homes that - if one were not aware of how they had arrived at this destination - could easily be a street in a small historic town in any part of the U.S., so quiet is the atmosphere and so homey the surroundings. Unlike many other neighborhoods bordering Belle Meade or West End, however, Whitland is a down to earth mixture of both picket-fence, middle-class American homes and renovated historic homes that easily push seven figures, but all of which co-exist and co-mingle to create place that feels like home in the truest sense. Neighbors are friendly and on the morning school run you will frequently see moms and dads standing and talking to one another and helping out with taking turns dropping the kids at school. It is difficult to find a place so replete with the comforts of an old, established and yet incredibly well looked after neighborhood (it is on the historic registry, after all!) so close to the amenities of West End, such as the restaurants around Vanderbilt, or the medical center at St. Thomas.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Perfect Place For First Time Buyer DINKS"

Kenner Avenue in Nashville is one of the very few streets in this much sought after location between Belle Meade and Green Hills that still possesses small, modest cottages, hundred-year old oaks and a heavily controlled speed limit for what they call a "peaceful street environment." But if you're interested in this type of place, you may want to hurry as Kenner is quickly undergoing what many parts of Nashville have already experienced. Of the perhaps forty homes that line this avenue, over half are almost unrecognizable as their original form, having been upgraded and uplifted with the best and latest, indoors and out. Of the half that are still in their original form, at least 20% have been bought and are in the process of serious renovation. There are, however, several still as is and no doubt soon to be on offer. Kenner is thick with speed bumps in order to keep drivers under 25mph, and because of the extra pedestrian lane painted on either side of the street, you will often find runners, dog-walkers and moms with their kids enjoying the outdoors. At one end of Kenner is Harding Pike with every imaginable convenience, including one of Nashville's best hospitals and pediatric groups, as well as Publix and Harris Teeter grocery stores. At the other end it's like being in another world, with a small, well-kept neighborhood park with small walking path, playground and tennis court. This is a neighborhood for home buyers of high-middle income means to get their start on the property ladder.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"West End - (West of I440) The Reason I Wanted to Grow Up and Get a Job"

When I was younger and we would venture out of Belle Meade and down to either Vanderbilt or to the Ryman for a concert, we would take the most direct route, in our case that being West End. I would stare up at the windows of the incredibly chic apartments and condos and try to imagine what the inside of the expansive spaces must look like inside. West End in Nashville is home to some of the most beautiful and unique - albeit extremely high-end - apartment buildings anywhere and gives one the impression that they are somewhere other than in the home of country music. Being on the West side of the 440 Loop, yet just a couple of miles from Vandy, West End enjoys the leafy surroundings offered by bordering the Historic Whitland District and Belle Meade, yet is only a stone's throw away from the dining that surrounds Vandy as well as the shopping and socializing available in Green Hills. The apartments on offer range from uber modern to completely traditional, with a few that were born traditional and recently converted to Scandic modern thrown in for good measure. Most all of the buildings boast the most up to date electronic security and some even offer on-site concierge service. A recently built Harris Teeter grocery store has been a godsend to choosy residents who otherwise had to fight the traffic over to the Whole Foods in Green Hills in order to get their quality food and produce. The main downside is that West End is a major five lane thoroughfare, though it somehow seems more intimate at times. Being less than two football fields away from St. Thomas hospital, medical care is never far away. West End Middle School is exactly where it says, but for private education there is Montgomery Bell Academy for Boys or St. Cecilia's school for girls.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"Bucolic Life Few Can Afford"

Saying that you live in 37205 is to Nashville what saying you live in 90210 is to Los Angeles. One of the most expensive zip codes in the entire country, with similarly high average household income, house-hunting here is not for the faint of heart or wallet. Home to former Vice President Al Gore and various others with wealth of equal age, Belle Meade Blvd is the centerpiece and is easily the most picturesque part of greater Nashville. Originally an outgrowth of the historic Belle Meade mansion, the surrounding houses have now equaled, surpassed and in some cases dwarfed the historic cornerstone of this bucolic setting. Freestanding single dwelling homes here will never list for less than $750,000 and can easily go as high as $7M, but for that money what you buy yourself is peaceful surroundings and peace of mind. Belle Meade, though in the center of Nashville, boasts its own city council, police force and fire station with each home being wired into the latter two. But if you’re thinking of having a stroll through the enclave before you decide to buy, you had better think again. In recent years younger residents have pushed to have sidewalks added to the leafy blvds that wind over and around the naturally flowing creeks, but the move has met major resistance from established residents and has multiple times suffered defeat. As for education, in spite of the pricey abodes and availability of prestigious private schools – such as Reese Witherspoon’s alma mater of Harpeth Hall – the local public grammar is the choice of many before deciding to part with upwards of $20,000 per year for one of the nearby private schools on offer.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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