Langleyman

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Reviews

2/5
May 17, 2009

"Broad Channel, a small island community"

Broad Channel is located in Queens, New York. It is an interesting neighborhood, built upon landfill, but has a rich present, and is home to families and more established people. The island is connected by bridges to other parts of Queens.

Though it eventually became somewhat of a summer escape for city dwellers through development of summer homes and retreats. Today, it is a mainly residential neighborhood with a strong community. In many ways, this neighborhood is disjointed from the city function as a small town, with its own churches, an elementary school, a library, and fire department. The neighborhood also has several community centers and organizations including the Broad Channel Athletic Club with various sports teams and leagues and the Broad Channel Historical Society charged with the task of community engagement in the history of its hallowed streets. The neighborhood also has a park named for the neighborhood with a wonderful array of offerings and activities for residents of the neighborhood. Another park in the neighborhood is Gene Gray Park with beautiful trees and sites.

Transportation: The A & S subway lines stop at the Broad Channel station.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
May 17, 2009

"Cooperative owned, Irish Riviera in Queens."

Breezy Point is a co-operative neighborhood in Queens, New York, bordered by Rockaway Inlet / Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. This elite neighborhood is scenic and beautiful and a wonderful place to live. This predominantly Irish neighborhood is developed around the co-operative system of development under the Breezy Point Cooperative in which the residents own half of the land and own their homes. This sense of ownership adds to the community feeling of the neighborhood, but also an exclusivity, which can be offsetting to an outsider. The average listing price for homes for sale in Breezy Point is around $600,000.The neighborhood is mainly residential and filled with family fare, not to mention a good variety of offerings. The Breezy Point Shopping Center is the center of commerce, with several small shops and stores. The neighborhood also has other small restaurants and shops, but is primarily residential. Breezy Point is home to several beaches with fantastic wildlife and coastal views. A perfect place to spend an afternoon, Breezy Point has a fantastic amount of outdoor and entertainment offerings.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
May 17, 2009

"Nice, upmarket neighborhood"

Belle Harbor is one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Queens, New York. Bordered by Beach 128th and Beach 142nd Street. This neighborhood, developed by Fredrick Lancaster, has beautiful homes and a sophisticated atmosphere making it one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Queens.

Most of its residents are upper middle class, a large proportion being Jewish, and the real estate in the neighborhood is beautiful, with some home selling for more than $1.5 million. The property with beach access is more expensive, but there are several condos and apartments which sell for more reasonable prices. This family oriented neighborhood is filled with schools, public, private, and religious, and good parks. Sadly, the neighborhood was brought to national attention in 2001, when American Airlines Flight 587 crashed into its streets. A memorial to the victims of the accident has been constructed at Beach 116th Street in Rockaway Park.

This neighborhood is home to a predominantly Irish and Jewish middle and upper middle class population. There are several schools in the neighborhood making it a perfect family enclave.

Transportation (per Wikipedia): Transportation in the neighborhood is convenient with passenger cars via the Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge providing access to Brooklyn and the Cross Bay Veterans Memorial Bridge which services other parts of Queens. The A subway train also stops in Belle Harbor, available at the Rockaway Park–Beach 116th Street station.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
May 17, 2009

"Bayside, one of the nicer, more expensive neighborhoods in Queens"

Bayside is one of the better neighborhoods in Queens, New York. With a diverse population and nice housing offerings, this neighborhood is a wonderful place for people of all walks of life and a wonderful oasis from the concrete which punctuates the landscape. A great place to live and retire.

This neighborhood, today middle class, is one of the most popular and elite neighborhoods in the city due to its prime waterfront location. Today, the neighborhood is mainly inhabited by middle class residents, but is still, nonetheless, one of Queen’s most notable neighborhoods. Sites of interest include Lawrence Cemetery, All Saints Episcopal Church, and the Straitiron-Storm Cigar Factory.

The neighborhood is filled with good schools, libraries, and parks, making it a wonderful place for families with children to reside. There are also six parks in the neighborhood, making this one of the most green neighborhoods in the city.

Housing costs in the neighborhood range according to real estate options, which are mainly single family homes and multiple family apartment buildings. Bayside is considered one of the most expensive places to live in the city, with four bedroom homes selling for more than $2 million, on average. These spacious estates which once brought New York City’s elite to this borough still maintain their charm, making this one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in Queens.

Transportation in the neighborhood is convenient with Bayside's major highways include the Long Island Expressway, Clearview Expressway, and the Cross Island Parkway. Bayside is also connected to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and Long Island by the Long Island Rail Road's Port Washington Branch at the Bayside station.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
May 17, 2009

"Good middle-class neighborhood in Queens"

Border: Atlantic Avenue, the western border is the county line with Brooklyn (mostly Drew Street ), the southern border is South Conduit Avenue, with the eastern of border is 108th Street .

Ozone Park is one of the most popular neighborhoods in Queens, filled with a distinctive history, is home to wonderful people, including several celebrities, and is a great example of true New York City living experience. Ozone Park is now home to a varied population of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, Italian-Americans African-Americans, South Asians, South American, and Latin American people. Ozone Park is a mainly residential area, without much to offer in terms of entertainment. Real Estate prices vary from section to section, as the socio-economic status varies greatly. Two bedroom homes can sell for as little as $300,000, a steal in New York City. Some homes in the neighborhood are quite large, and many are rented out by several tenants. Community is an important part of life in Ozone Park and it is very much a family neighborhood. Ozone Park has nine public schools and lots of parks, making it a convenient place for people with children to live. Ozone Park is an accessible neighborhood; nearby John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport, as well as access to public buses and the subway make Ozone Park a desirable location for people looking for something more low-key that’s a hop, skip, or a ride away from the more bustling sections of town. Ozone Park, though simple, is a unique neighborhood in Queens and a wonderful place to live.

Transportation: Q7, Q21, Q41, Q11, Q8, Q24 and the Q53 public buses; the A subway train services Liberty Avenue.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5
Mar 22, 2009

"Arverve, Brooklyn - declining with time."

Arverne, named for its developer, R. Vernam. is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens, New York.

Arverne is bordered by Beach 59th Street to Beach 79th Street, along its main thoroughfare Beach Channel Drive, alternatively known as Rev. Joseph H. May Drive. Arverne, once a beautiful beachfront community, has seen its prominence decline with time, and is today home to mainly middle and working class residents. As time has progressed, more housing has been developed.

Real Estate in the neighborhood ranges from apartments to multiple family housing units, as well as some public housing units. The average listing price for the neighborhood is about $365,000, a steal in comparison with other more expensive sections of Queens and New York City.

Entertainment in Arverne is limited, as most of the more interesting food and entertainment options can be found in the other more populated neighborhoods in Queens. One positive aspect of the neighborhood is its proximity to the East Rockaway Inlet and other bodies of water, making it a prime place for new beachfront property development. In contrast to the monotonous concrete in the city, Arverne has the benefits of being near the water, which in summer months, is an invaluable oasis from the sweltering summer sun.

Transportation in the neighborhood is convenient, as most families have at least one automobile. Public transportation is available, including buses and the Express A train which runs along Far Rockaway Boulevard. This makes Arverne a good place to live for commuters who work in other parts of New York City.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Carnegie Hill - incredible wealth, Upper East Side living"

For Manhattan’s elite, Carnegie Hill is the prime location for beautiful homes, tasteful stores, upscale restaurants, and finer living. An Upper East Side delight, Carnegie Hill is like a page from 1920's New York City.

This 10 block neighborhood using 5th Avenue and Central Park as a cross street, spans from 85th to 95th streets in the wealthiest section of Manhattan. This neighborhood has been home to the most prominent residents of Manhattan, as this neighborhood boasts the best private schools in the city, including the Dalton School, Andrew Carnegie’s mansion, and branches of the Smithsonian Institution.

Given the posh nature of the Upper East Side and namely real estate bordering the illustrious Central Park, the beautiful brownstones which fill the tree-lined streets of each block are amongst the most expensive in the city. Homes in this neighborhood can sell for well over $5,000,000, while decently sized apartments sell for no less than $700,000. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood is expensive as well, with shoe box one room apartments going for $1,800 or more. In Manhattan, much of living and status is defined by location, and the lengths some will go to have an Upper East Side address is sometimes astonishing.

With beautiful homes and wealthy residents, it is no surprise that Carnegie Hill is home to wonderful restaurants and shopping, not to mention perfect access to one of the most beautiful sections of Central Park. Central Park, the largest park in the city and the gift of the Rockefeller’s to the tree-starved people of New York City, is the most popular park in the world, and boasts acres and acres of picturesque scenery. Dining is exquisite with French-Asian Bistros (namely Table D’Houte) and Italian Ristorantes galore.

Transportation in the neighborhood is available, though many in this neighborhood can afford chauffeured private cars. Taxis wait on each corner, but the subway is available on Lexington Avenue and East 96th Street as well as the 4, 5, and 6 trains on East 86th Street and Lexington Avenue.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Hamilton Heights is an ever-changing section of uptown Manhattan living"

Filled with nice homes and a truly Harlem-esque experience, this neighborhood is a common favorite amongst residents and visitors.

Nestled between Washington Heights and Morningside Heights, Hamilton Heights (located 135th and 155th streets). Hamilton Heights has become a popular relocation destination for those seeking cheaper housing costs while still desiring quick access to the many other areas of Manhattan. Hamilton Heights is one of the prettier neighborhoods in the uptown section of the city, with beautiful brownstones and opulent multiple family homes throughout the neighborhood. It’s hilly streets and friendly residents are also a plus, not to mention the diversity. With a mainly African-American professional population, as well as a growing number of Hispanic and Caucasian inhabitants, this neighborhood is extremely vibrant and filled with life.

Beyond being unique, real estate in Hamilton Heights is prime because of the location in reference to other sections of the city, and because of the price. Renting or subletting in this neighborhood can be done at a fairly reasonable price, but owning a coveted brownstone is expensive, with many selling for well over $1,250,000.

Hamilton Heights is filled with things to do and see. With dance companies, the City College of New York’s beautiful campus, and the Hamilton Heights/Sugar Hill historical district, this neighborhood is wonderful place for a stroll on a nice day. Most streets are tree-lined and many have small parks and sitting areas at each corner.

This is a comfortable neighborhood for a vast array of people due to its proximity to the city and its laid-back nature. Entertainment here comes mostly in the form of dining impacted by its Hispanic population. Street vendors serve falafel as well as quesadillas.

Transportation is this neighborhood is made easy with the 1 train stop on 135th and 145th streets. This local train is one of the most used trains in the city and travels the length of Manhattan. Some taxis, private cars, and several buses also service the neighborhood.

Hamilton Heights is as diverse as they come, and a nice place to live in uptown Manhattan.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Washington Heights, home to the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park"

Welcome to the Heights, known to some as “Little Dominican Republic.” This vibrant neighborhood, filled with an extremely diverse population, may seem delapitated to some, but to many, it’s been home for decades.

The first street to visit in “The Heights” is Broadway beginning at 163rd street. Broadway has everything: liquor stores, restaraunts of all varieties, street vendors, cheap clothing outlets, furniture stores, and of course, a McDonalds. This throuroughfare is also where the 1 and A train stop (on 163rd Street, 168th Street, 175th Street, and 181st Street) making this section of Manhattan very easily navigable. Various buses run throughout the neighborhood, as well as some taxis and private cab services, and many families have cars in the neighborhood.

Washington Heights is home to Columbia Medical Center and the school of Public Health, making the neighborhood more diverse in its population. You’re joined on a walk to the coffee shop in the morning with doctors wearing scrubs, mothers with children, and ivy-league graduate students.

The area between 163rd and 170th is filled with a heavy population of Columbia students, bringing about a Starbucks and other downtown amenities. Dorms are located on 170th mixed in with the neighborhood.

As you head further in to Washington Heights, a major shift occurs, namely in language. Signs turn to Spanish and the Dominican population swells, changing the tamber of the neighborhood. This is a great place to try some authentic Dominican food and to buy plantains, as they are sold in virtually every store in this neighborhood.

Washington Heights is also home to the George Washington Bus Terminal, which produces both noise and a variety of people. This neighborhood, once known for an intense drug and crime problem, has improved greatly within the past 2 decades. Today, many families live in the neighborhood’s standard multiple floor apartment buildings including some escaping expensive rent downtown. Rent in Washington Heights can be as low as $2300 for a 3 bedroom apartment in a walk up, or $600 to rent a room. Buying an apartment in the neighborhood depends on the location. Washington Heights’ prime real estate is located on the beautiful Riverside Drive with running trails and beautiful views of the water. Apartments there sell for over $1,000,000.

Lastly, the George Washington Bridge is located in the Heights and at night is a wonderful way to view the uptown area. It’s also the fastest way to New Jersey!

Washington Heights has a flare all its own, with wonderful people, great restaurants, and a truly New York City feel.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Prospect Heights - fantastic place to live, not cheap."

If ever a picture of Brooklyn was instilled in psyche of Americans across the country, Prospect Heights is that picture come to life. Beautiful brownstones on a real live Park Place, tree-lined streets, and sophistication are in each step of this immaculate and upscale neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York.

Prospect Heights is a diverse neighborhood located in the expansive Prospect Park neighborhood. Prospect Park, known for its free live concerts during the summer months, as well as a vast array of artistic performances, ice skating rink, and beautiful scenery. This is the heartbeat of this neighborhood, and of downtown Brooklyn. Prospect Heights is renown for its affluent population of mainly Caucasian and African-American descent. It is one of the few neighborhoods that displays such an equal cross-section of people.

Real Estate in this neighborhood is great, but does not come inexpensively. Condos and Coops sell for at least $400,000, while renting and subletting can be done for $1500 or more.

Entertainment and dining in the neighborhood is fluid, especially on Vanderbilt Avenue. There are several restaurants, shops, and stores in this neighborhood, all reflecting the diversity and affluence of the neighborhood. This street is a frequent haunt of people from all over the city looking for unique eats and unique treats.

Transportation to the neighborhood of Prospect Heights is simple with the B and Q train on Flatbush Avenue as well as several buses connecting this area with other areas of Brooklyn and the rest of the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Park Slope - a great neighborhood in Brooklyn to call home."

Park Slope is one of the most popular and prominent neighborhoods in Brooklyn, New York. With wonderful homes, a vibrant personage, and brilliant views, this is the perfect neighborhood in Brooklyn to call, “home.”

Located in beautiful downtown Brooklyn, Park Slope is the most popular destination for Manhattan ex-patriates and professionals new to the city seeking lower rents and more space. With a history of opulence in design and expansive floor plans, the brownstones in this neighborhood are spectacular. Due to this, real estate in Park Slope is expensive in comparison with other neighborhoods. 2 bedroom apartments typically sell for half a million dollars or more, while renting and subletting is still comparably expensive, beginning at around $1600 a month for one-bedroom units.

Park Slope is home to a diverse population, with an increasing 20 and 30 something group of professionals, artists, and “scene-sters.” This is a very hip neighborhood, and every corner is drenched in nouveau New York City style. One of the main highlights of this neighborhood is the beautiful Prospect Park, known for its free live concerts during the summer months, as well as a vast array of artistic performances, ice skating rink, and beautiful scenery. This is the heartbeat of this neighborhood, and of downtown Brooklyn.

Due to its youthful and bourgeois culture, Park Slope is drenched in entertainment options. Fine dining, bars, clubs, cafes, performance spaces for new artists, and a wide variety of art galleries are prime in this neighborhood. Often featured are Fairway Supermarket, Atlantic Terminal Mall, and the busy avenues of 5th and 7th Avenues.

Transportation in Park Slope is a breeze with the 2, 3, 4, 5, B, D, F, M, N, R, and Q trains servicing the neighborhood, as well as several buses. Park Slope is also near the BQE (Brooklyn-Queens Expressway) making a commute into Manhattan very speedy.

Park Slope is the ideal neighborhood to live in. It’s the best of both worlds— if the two worlds are Brooklyn and Manhattan!

Best Food (featured by New York Magazine):
al di là - 248 Fifth Ave., at Carroll St.
Blue Ribbon - 280 Fifth Ave., between 1st and Garfield Sts.
Café Steinhof - 422 Seventh Ave. at 14th

Nightlife:
The Gate - 321 Fifth Ave. at 3rd Street
Loki Lounge - 304 Fifth Ave. at 2nd St.

Shopping:
babybird - 428 Seventh Ave. between 14th and 15th Sts.
Beacon's Closet - 220 Fifth Ave. near Union St.
Loom - 115 Seventh Ave. near President St.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Fort Greene - Tree lined streets and beautiful architecture"

Fort Greene area is a great neighborhood, due to its beautiful architecture and proximity to transportation. With great proximity to Manhattan and other boroughs of the city, Fort Greeene is a prime place for people of all walks of life and virtually all income brackets.

Real Estate in Fort Greene is amongst the most beautiful as its opulent brownstones line the streets with a distinctive flare. Many of the brownstones have been refurbished and are a coveted nesting spot for flighting Manhattanites as well as those new to the city. The spacious provide privacy while still offerring a uniquely NYC feel. Houses in the Clinton Hill neighborhood generally sell for $350,000 at the least, with some large and extensively renovated homes selling for well over $2 million. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood is extremely possibly, and can be done for as inexpensively as $1,000.

Public transportation is expansive and with subway lines (2, 3, 4, 5, A, B, C, D, F, G, M, N, Q, and R), about 20 bus lines, and the LIRR, Fort Greene is fantastically convenient.

Fort Greene features several attractions. Firstly, dining and entertainment are a must in this neighborhood (mainly on as Lafayette, Fulton, Myrtle, and DeKalb Avenues), as the proximity to Manhattan keeps this section Brooklyn extremely chic and hip. Several eateries as well as cool shops and stores are speckled throughout the neighborhood making this a wonderful place to live or to visit on a night out in Brooklyn.

Other sights include the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. Walking on the Bridge is a must do when visiting New York, as the views from the Bridge of the Manhattan skyline are one of the most popular photographs taken on a visit to the city. Another great place to visit is the Brooklyn Academy of Music and renown director Spike Lee’s Film Studio, 40 Acres and a Mule.

Despite its somewhat touristy nature, Fort Greene is still wonderful place for families, with great schools, both private and public offered throughout the neighborhood, not to mention institutions of higher learning including the prestigious Brooklyn Law School. Fort Greene is a wonderful parallel of the city and a wonderful place to raise a family in a cultured area, while still able to maintain some of the comforts of living in a smaller community. Fort Greene is a comfortable home to many and for good reason.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Mar 15, 2009

"East New York, a low income neighborhood in Brooklyn"

East New York is a historically diverse neighborhood, impacting its restaurants, shops, and the overall vibe of the area. It is one of the most classically Brooklyn areas of the boroughs, with big apartment buildings, people on the street in the summertime, and a reminiscent ambiance to pre-war New York City. Though the neighborhood is somewhat rundown, it is still a hallmark of Brooklyn living.

East New York was originally a mainly Italian and Jewish enclave at the turn of the 20th century, but as time progressed began to see an influx of Spanish and African residents. After the 1970s’, East New York has undergone extensive revitalization. Throughout its history, it was considered a ghetto, home to crime and widespread poverty. Schools in East New York have been ravaged by crime and violence, making this district one of the lowest performing in New York City, though efforts are being made to revitalize the schools in the neighborhood. Today, more stores are being built as well as apartment buildings being refurbished, as the reputation of the neighborhood slowly improves as well as crime rates and progress.

Real Estate in East New York is primarily comprised of single-family row homes, as well as a series of public housing communities. Apartments can be rented for as little as $900 and purchased for as little as $130,000 for 2 bedroom 2 bathroom units.

East New York is filed with rec centers, playgrounds, and park, built to help encourage and engage the youth of the neighborhood. Many of the centers have state-of-the-art equipment, making them popular with kids of all ages. These parks are a great place for families during the summer months. Entertainment and dining in the neighborhood is impacted by its Spanish and African occupants, with several ethnic cuisine restaraunts with cheap prices and wonderful and authentic cuisine. Shopping in the neighborhood is best done at the Gateway Center Shopping Mall.

East New York is a hub for transportation with various subway lines running through the neighborhood as well as the East New York Bus Depot being conveniently located in this neighborhood.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Clinton Hill, a desirable neighborhood in Brooklyn"

Clinton Hill area has always been a desirable neighborhood, due to its beautiful architecture and proximity to transportation. Fort Greene is located minutes away from the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges, making it an easy commute to Manhattan.

Real Estate in Clinton Hill is amongst the most beautiful as its opulent brownstones line the streets with a distinctive flare. Many of the brownstones have been refurbished and are a coveted nesting spot for flighting Manhattanites as well as those new to the city. The spacious provide privacy while still offerring a uniquely NYC feel. Houses in the Clinton Hill neighborhood generally sell for $350,000 at the least, with some large and extensively renovated homes selling for well over $2 million. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood is extremely possibly, and can be done for as inexpensively as $1,000.

Public transportation is expansive and with subway lines (2, 3, 4, 5, A, B, C, D, F, G, M, N, Q, and R), about 20 bus lines, and the LIRR, Clinton Hill is arguably the best connected neighborhood in Brooklyn.

Clinton Hill features several attractions. Firstly, dining and entertainment are a must in this neighborhood, as the proximity to Manhattan keeps this section Brooklyn extremely chic and hip. Several eateries as well as cool shops and stores are speckled throughout the neighborhood making this a wonderful place to live or to visit on a night out in Brooklyn.

Other sights include the beautiful Brooklyn Bridge. Walking on the Bridge is a must do when visiting New York, as the views from the Bridge of the Manhattan skyline are one of the most popular polaroids taken on a visit to the city.

Despite its somewhat touristy nature, Clinton Hill is still wonderful place for families, with great schools, both private and public offered throughout the neighborhood, not to mention institutions of higher learning including the prestigious Brooklyn Law School. Clinton Hill is a wonderful parallel of the city and a wonderful place to raise a family in a cultured area, while still able to maintain some of the comforts of living in a smaller community. Clinton Hill is a comfortable home to many and for good reason.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Mill Basin, a quiet residential neighborhood in Brooklyn"

Mill Basin is a neighborhood within a neighborhood, a section of the Bergen Beach neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Featuring expansive water front homes, as well as a unique history of being the only neighborhood near the bay in Brooklyn that was never a sea-side resort, Mill Basin has now become the crown jewel of Bergen Beach living.

Real Estate in Mill Basin is diverse as many of the homes are private, large, well-landscaped, and uniquely designed. With beautiful waterfront properties as well as an affluent population, Mill Basin is somewhat of an anomaly in gritty Brooklyn. Most homes in the neighborhood sell for no less than $600,000 with some selling for more than $2,000,000. Fortunately, renting and subletting in this neighborhood is significantly less expensive with units renting for sometimes less than $1,000.

Mill Basin, similar to its neighborhoods,, has wonderful schools for children of all ages. Other attractions include proximity to the huge Kings Plaza Mall, New York City’s only true mall, as well as parks, community centers, and of course, the water.

Transportation in Mill Basin, similar to that of Bergen Beach, is done easily by car, with the Belt Parkway running along the Western portion of the neighborhood. The nearest subway station is at the Brooklyn College Station on Flatbush Avenue, northwest of Bergen Beach. There, the 2 and 5 trains run within Brooklyn and the greater New York City area.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Flatlands, a diverse and up and coming neighborhood in Brooklyn"

Flatlands was originally a series of farms settled by Dutch Farmers in the 1600's. Since that time, the area has seen massive development, gentrification, and increasing diversity. Real estate in the area is diverse as well, featuring mainly attached homes with lawns. Home prices range anywhere from $330,000-$600,000 for some 3 and 4 bedroom homes, while renting or subletting an individual unit in the neighborhood is generally around $900-$2,100.

Flatlands is a beautiful neighborhood with a lot of great offerings. The Kings Plaza Shopping center is a major hub for residents and visitors of the neighborhood, as the mall has several stores, restaurants, and even good places to park a boat, with boat slips available on the southwest corner to connected to the beautiful Mill Basin, which can take a small ship straight to sea, after eating junk food in a food court and shopping in Macy’s.

Flatlands, once a predominantly Jewish neighborhood, saw an influx of mainly middle and working class West Indian and Carribean residents who comprise the majority of homeowners in the neighborhoods. This has heavily impacted the offerings of the neighborhood, in terms of public schools vs. Yeshivas, and falafel restaurants vs. Haitian retreats. The cultures seem to mesh well in this scenic neighborhood.

Transportation is done mainly by car and bus in the neighborhood, as the nearest subway stop is for the 2 and 5 local trains on Flatbush Avenue, which is a bit of a walk from Flatlands. Adding to its almost suburban feel, Flatlands is much less like Brooklyn than other sections of the borough. With its wonderful homes, unique people, wonderful schools, and sights, Flatlands is a staple in Brooklyn living.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Canarsie, a mix of residential and industrial"

Near the beautiful Jamaica Bay, Canarsie is a neighborhood of residential and heavy industry, mostly focused on the water surrounding the neighborhood. With an ever-changing population and increasing visibility, the Canarsie area of Brooklyn is a nice place to live and work.

Canarsie is a familiar word in New York City, as it is the final stop on the subway on one of the cities most used trains, the L train. Various buses run throughout the neighborhood, keeping transportation within Brooklyn convenient.

Throughout its development, Canarsie has been home to a variety of people, from Italians and Jews in the past, to today’s heavily Carribean and West Indian population. Recreation in Canarsie is somewhat limited, but the Canarsie Pier is still a wonderful place to visit. Though the neighborhood has been known for its rising crime rate, it has seen a decline in violence over recent years, and several community development and refurbishing project have allowed the neighborhood to revive itself. Another wonderful place to visit throughout the neighborhood are the beautiful parks, as the neighborhood itself is sat on a National Park. There are also several Carribean and West Indian style restaurants and shops throughout the neighborhood.

Canarsie is a family neighborhood and housing ranges from small apartment buildings, to homes, to public housing. Housing in this neighborhood ranges from as much as $550,000 for a decent sized two family home to one bedroom apartment rentals for as little as $1,000. This neighborhood is a wonderful place to live with a great sense of a home-like feel, right in sometimes a too busy Brooklyn.

This is a family-oriented neighborhood, with several public schools for children of all ages. Transportation in the neighborhood is easy, though having a car is common. Buses, the popular Belt Parkway, and the L train located on Glenwood Road and Rockaway Parkway are the best bets.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Bergen Beach, a wonderful inlet in Brooklyn."

Bergen Beach is a small neighborhood once an island near the Canarsie neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. This quaint neighborhood is unique, with nice homes, schools, and a good family atmosphere. Certainly more residential than other neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

Real Estate in Bergen Beach resembles that of a suburb, with free standing homes with yards. Houses are generally priced for $300,000 or more in this neighborhood. Once an amusement park and entertainment-haven, Bergen Beach has emerged as a site for nice and comfortable living, all within the confines of New York City proper.

With the main thoroughfare being Veterans Avenue, Bergen Beach is still filled with some sea-side entertainment. With the nearby Pergedat Basin as well as East Mill Basic, this neighborhood is surround by water.

Transportation to the area is done easily by car, with the Belt Parkway running along the Western portion of the neighborhood. The nearest subway station is at the Brooklyn College Station on Flatbush Avenue, northwest of Bergen Beach. There, the 2 and 5 trains run within Brooklyn and the greater New York City area.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Sheepshead Bay, an up-and-coming neighborhood in Brooklyn"

Sheepshead Bay is a nice neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York bordered by Coney Island. With beautiful views and a more classical New England feel. With prime real estate options, education, connectivity, and culture, Sheepshead Bay is a wonderful place to both live and to visit.

The heart Sheepshead Bay is the bay itself, a beautiful expanse of water filled with fish and boats. Piers, yachts, and private fishing boats are common to the area, and with the real estate boom and revitalization which occured during the late 2000s, Sheepshead Bay began to see an influx of residents, with the addition of several new apartment and condominiums all focused on the serene bay.

Real Estate in the neighborhood is varied, with apartments, brick row houses, and fantastic condominiums. Homes in the neighborhood sell for as much as $500-000-$600-000 while apartments are generally priced between as little $100,000 to $300,000. Renting in this neighborhood is always an option, as well as subletting, which can be done for as little as $800 per month.

Sheepshead Bay is a family neighborhood with several schools available for children of all ages. The nice homes as well as the stand-out educational facilities are a major attraction for people visiting this diverse area. Classically, Sheepshead Bay is populated by middle-class Russians, but over the years, the neighborhood has experienced a diversification, with a growing population of Spanish, Turkish, Chinese, and Middle Eastern residents.

The diversity certainly effects the offerings in the neighborhood in terms of food and entertainment. A majority of fine dining can be found Emmons Avenue, including several sea food restaurants, some selling the sheepshead fish the neighborhood is named for.

Seaport Plaza is a wonderful place to shop and to enjoy the neighborhood, and the Bay is a wonderful place for leisure throughout the year. Recreational fishing, sightseeing, and walks along the beach are most popularly done on Emmons Avenue, which borders the water.

Transportation throughout the neighborhood is made simple by the Brighton Beach bound B & Q trains stopping along the rail line at the Sheepshead Bay stop. Cars are popular in the neighborhood, as well.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"One of the more affluent sections of Brooklyn"

Manhattan Beach, with its beautiful waterfront scenery and laid-back residents, is a wonderful spot in Brooklyn. The ocean is a sight for sore eyes for the typically city dweller, and this piece of beach splendor is only a subway ride away from what some consider to be the most cosmopolitan city in the world. Manhattan Beach has not only historically wonderful place for its residents, but a popular spots from visitors from around the city, the country, and the world.

Real estate in this neighborhood is expensive, mainly due to the beach front appeal and beautiful mansions and homes. Condos sell for no less than $300,000 in this spunky neighborhood, and some of the most spectacular homes sell for well over $1 million. Renting in Manhattan Beach is also an option. Some of the more opulent units featuring amenities such as marble floors and ocean views rent for upwards of $10,000 per month, while the more modest 2 bedroom 1 bath units rent or sublet for $1,900 or more.

Manhattan Beach is not as diverse as other neighborhoods in Brooklyn, as it traditionally home to a heavy Russian Jewish population. It is a family neighborhood, with several wonderful schools throughout the neighborhood, including the Kingsborough Community College and various religious-based private schools.

When visiting Manhattan Beach, one won’t be disappointed. The main promenade is filled with food and shops, and during the summer, with people looking for a little fun in the sun. Transportation to the beach, which is located on Oriental Boulevard at Irwin Street, convenient with the B and Q subway trains stopping at Brighton Beach. Residents of the neighborhood use a mixture of public and private transportation.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Chinatown, one of the most visited neighborhoods in NYC"

If you’ve never been to China, the closest you might get is New York’s Chinatown. The authentic food, Chinese music gracing the streets, and the beautiful culture are wonderfully expressed in the small enclave that has become one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions.

The history of Chinatown is steeped in the pursuit of the American dream. Many immigrant groups upon settling in New York City found discrimination and chose the lower east side to form communities reminiscent of home where they could speak their native language. Chinatown is the most popular of these areas, while similar areas include Little Italy and Spanish Harlem. This phenomenon is still prevalent today, as new immigrants to the city are also choosing certain neighborhood where people of similar backgrounds have chosen to reside.

Chinatown is one of the most visited areas of the city, and one of the most heavily trafficked. Filled with vendors selling faux-designer goods, random performances, and great shopping, this dynamic section of “The Village” is always bustling with activity. With its gritty beauty, Chinatown was the settlement of mainly Cantonese (southern Chinese) immigrants, and their fingerprint still graces the buildings with authentic signs with traditional characters and the sounds of choppy tones used throughout the neighborhood. A wonderful shopping local is the Pearl Market, which has great buys on authentic Asian imports ranging from silk-woven purses to statues of Terracotta soldiers.

This is also a great place to get as close to China as you can in the states, as New York City’s Chinatown is greatly considered to be unrivaled in terms of cuisine. There are hundreds of fantastically authentic— and fantastically cheap— restaurants in the neighborhood with everything from Peking Duck to hot and sour soup!

Best Restaurants:
Oriental Garden - 14 Elizabeth St.
Mandarin Court - 61 Mott St.
All Natural Hot Mini Cakes - Grand St. nr. Bowery

Best Shopping:
Asia Market - 71 1/2 Mulberry St.
Lung Moon Bakery - 83 Mulberry St.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Greenwich Village, the heart of New York"

Greeenwich Village is what some consider to be the heart of New York City. With its upbeat urban tempo, modernistic scene, vibrant nightlife, and unique people, this section of the city is a prided tourist location and the diverse representation of urban culture.

Bohemian Greenwich was originally a settlement of Dutch settlers in outskirts of the fast growing New York City. What was the mid-19th century haven for upper-middle class is now the paradigm of the modern culture of New York City, still the hallmark of avant-garde art, fashion, dining, music, and living.

Greenwich Village spans nearly 30 blocks in the Lower West Side below West 14th Street and west of Broadway in the densely populated isle of Manhattan. When visiting here, the challenge of getting to all this neighborhood has to offer might seem daunting, but everyone’s tastes can be tantalized here, no matter what entertainment they are seeking!

Sightseeing in this neighborhood is a best bet, as the picturesque brownstones and lively inhabitants offer the eye a feast of interest. Some of the most popular places to visit is located in the neighborhood’s heart: Washington Square Park. Surrounded by the ever-sprawling New York University and located at , this world-renown park in a center for live street performances, excellent goods vendors, and beautiful scenery. The famous stone arch is a must-see.

Shopping in the Village is its trademark and a wonderful way to spend a day— and a lot of money — in New York City. Ranging from vintage dives to upscale boutiques, everyone can find something to love in this diverse neighborhood. With luxury eateries for dogs and cats to deluxe bathroom stores, this neighborhood is like nothing else. The thing to remember when shopping in the city is to avoid the chain stores! This is the time to be adventurous, and with several unique stores and shops, you won’t be disappointed.

Living in the Village is a coveted honor, either done through subletting or having a good amount of money. A good amount of money = six or seven figures. Owning a one bedroom, one bathroom apartment will set you back 500,000 at the absolute least, while some units go for $2 million or more. If you still want to live the in the Village and don’t have Donald Trump’s wallet, a good idea would be subletting an apartment, which could range anywhere from $2000- $20,000 per month. Be careful of sketchy deals and shifty people, however, as subletting doesn’t always end up in the best situation. You’ll be in good company in this neighborhood though, because beyond the NYU crowd, several famous people and New York Elite reside in this fantastic neighborhood.

And now it’s time for food. Greenwich Village has a lot to offer in terms of dining, and after a day of trudging about the vibrant neighborhood, you’ll want something to eat! In this great neighborhood, you’ll find cuisine from literally every corner of the world and with top chefs and avant-garde and artistic techniques, this will be a meal to remember. Restaurant quality ranges throughout the neighborhood, as there are plenty of low-end greasy fast food joints as there are upscale $200-a-plate restaurants.

Getting to the Village:
NYC Metro: A, C, E and B, D, F, V to West 4th Street, 1, 9 Christopher Street/Sheriden Square, Houston Street

3 Faves For Shopping:
Strand Bookstore at Broadway and 12th; great books at cheap prices (some books are priced as low as 50 cents!).
Ludivine.172 W. 4th St; French designers, french boutique, right in the heart of the Village
Verve Shoes 338 Bleecker Street; Unique women’s shoe store with a great selection, and great blue couches to rest your heels!

Restaurants in the Village:
Dell’anima at 38 Eighth Ave., nr. Jane St.; avant-garde upscale Italian cuisine
Dessert Truck University Pl. nr. 8th St., Cheap, fast, delicious desert... from a truck
Kingswood 122 W. 10th St., nr. Greenwich Ave.; Great Bar Food
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Gravesend, a quiet, humble neighborhood in Brooklyn"

Gravesend is a nice neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. Gravesend is bordered by Coney Island, Shore Parkway and Coney Island Creek, Stillwell Avenue, and Kings Highway in the southwestern section of Brooklyn.

Gravesend shares a common history with other neighborhoods throughout Brooklyn, as it was originally home to Dutch farmers beginning in the mid 1600s. Over time, Gravesend benefitted from the progress seen in Coney Island and was developed into a resort town, as many in this section in Brooklyn were given their vicinity to the water and to various stretches of beaches. It's heydey was reached during the 19th century via its three horse racetracks, but eventually Gravesend lost the race against Coney Island and became home to an extremely diverse population of people. Mainly of middle class and working class stock, modern Gravesend is not postured as a resort town, but as a humble neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York.

Transportation in Gravesend is easy with the D & M trains servicing the neighborhood as well as several public buses. Most families in many sections of Brooklyn do have access to a car.

Real estate in this neighborhood is somewhat costly, as gentrification and new development have struck virtually every neighborhood of the popular borough of Brooklyn. There are variety of styles of homes in this neighborhood, ranging from free standing homes to coops to condos. Due to this diversity, the prices range from $500,000 to well above $2 million depending on the needs of the buyer. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood are much less expensive, as some one bedroom units go for as little as $600.

Entertainment in Gravesend is somewhat unimpressive, as this family-oriented neighborhood lacks the excitement of other Brooklyn neighborhoods. Due to the diverse population of the neighborhood, restaurants and shops reflect the diverse tastes of the residents here.

Though Gravesend lacks the pizazz of nearby neighborhood, the family atmosphere, convenience, and style of this neighborhood do not go unnoticed by its residents and visitors.

Somethings to Try While in Gravesend:
Bianky Hookah, Bar and Lounge - 2340 Coney Island Ave
Back To Nature - 535 Kings Highway
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Gerritsen Beach - a wonderful shift from the concrete jungle of greater Brooklyn."

Gerritsen Beach is home to a middle-class population mainly of Irish descent. Real Estate in the area is significantly less than on Coney Island and other beaches in Brooklyn, but the offerings here are a bit more unique. Town homes and decadent seaside apartments are the speciality of developers here, ranging in price. The average one bedroom one bathroom until sells for no less than $350,000, while renting and subletting a until can be done for anywhere between $500 and $5,000 depending on the proximity to the water.

Gerritsen Beach, named for its developer, is a family oriented neighborhood, with schools, Catholic churches, and community groups. Many families use the beautiful beach to leisure with family friends, enjoying their proximity to both the offerings of the city and the relaxing ocean right in their backyards. Another popular passtime amongst residents are sports, and with the several sports fields located throughout the neighborhood in addition to the beach-front activities available, fitness buffs could find a Venice, California-like town right in Brooklyn.

Transportation in Gerritsen Beach is limited as the Metro Transit Authority trains do not run to the area, two public buses, the BM4 and B31, service the neighborhood. Travel by automobile in Gerritsen Beach is completely standard

Entertainment in this neighborhood is of course prime at the beach during the summer months, with swimming, volleyball, tanning, and relaxing amongst the top four things to do, but during the off season, the restaurants in Gerritsen Beach which are all ocean and seafood oriented are a wonderful place to dine and leisure. There are also shops and stores lining Gerritsen Avenue and Avenue S worth visiting on a trip to the area, featuring local beach-themed fare.

The diversity of New York City is found in the vast array of its offerings, and the wonderful beaches available off the coast of Brooklyn remind the city residents that they do live on an island. Gerrittsen Beach is a wonderful stretch of that reminder, and is a beautiful place to spend a day— or night— in Brooklyn.

Dining
Beach Bar - 2722 Gerritsen Ave.
Buckley's - 2926 Ave. S
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Coney Island, a famous seaside neighborhood in Brooklyn"

With beautiful views of the water and a culture steeped in a fantastic tradition, ever-changing Coney Island is a wonderful place all year round.

Coney Island, a peninsula near Long Island, is home to a diverse cross-section of residents. Built as a resort for the Manhattan residents of all classes and those who couldn’t afford a Hamptons getaway, Coney Island, namely at the turn of the nineteenth century, was viewed as a wonderful oasis for city dwellers and locals alike. With amusement parks, movie theaters, shopping on the boardwalk, great restaurants, and a family feeling, Coney Island remained a staple in New York City consciousness for decades, considered the prime location for recreation in the city.

As time progressed, safety decreased, and rides began to deteriorate, Coney Island became a less-desirable location for residents of New York and for visitors. The neighborhood’s residential composition remained the same and still today is home to a mainly African-American, Hispanic, and Italian population. Real Estate on the island varies through its four neighborhoods and depending on the unit, as many people live in town homes, beach side towers, or multiple family apartment homes. Owning an apartment would cost no less than $500,000 on Coney Island, though renting and subletting is significantly cheaper with prices as low as $600 per month on some studio units.

Entertainment on Coney Island is still centered around the water front, with rides still open today. The two and half miles stretch of beach which has entertained generations of people between West 37th Street to the beginning of the Manhattan Beach, one will find rides, outdoor entertainment, and family fun. Coney Island is home to several sights, and is fun for all ages.

Coney Island is deeply apart of the traditions important to all city dwellers: the sense of community. Coney Island is a family-oriented neighborhood with several schools, parks, and community organizations based in youth engagement. This neighborhood is a wonderful place to live, but also a wonderful place to visit.

Sightseeing:
New York Aquarium - 602 Surf Ave.
Astroland Amusement Park - 1000 Surf Ave.
Totonno's Pizzeria Napolitano - 1524 Neptune Ave.

Dining:
Cha Cha’s Club Atlantis - 1229 Riegelmann Boardwalk
Ruby's Old Tyme Bar and Grill - 1213 Riegelmann Boardwalk
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Brighton Beach or Little Odessa, named after the local Ukrainian population"

Brighton Beach or Little Odessa as it is called after a city many of its Ukrainian residents originally called home is an ethnically diverse neighborhood on Coney Island located in Brooklyn, New York. Its residents, traditions, and proximity to the limitless ocean bring visitors from near and afar to enjoy its delightful fare.

Brighton Beach was developed as a beach resort in the mid-1800s. This area has always been a prime place to live with the water an amazing contrast to the city life of Manhattan and more populated sections of Brooklyn. Real Estate in Brighton Beach has always been expensive, as owning a home, condominium or apartment costs well over $350,000. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood is fairly inexpensive, similar to other neighborhoods in Brooklyn, ranging anywhere from $600 for a room to $4,000 for an apartment, a price that could be more depending on the vicinity to the beach.

Brighton Beach has always been home to a predominantly Jewish population, post World War II especially. Their culture is ever-presently, and with influx of Russian Jews, and other Central European immigrants, this neighborhood is a monument to their cultures. Other cultures reside in the neighborhood, adding to its wonderful fluidity and the friendly feel.

This is a family oriented neighborhood and a happy escape for Manhattan residents. The beach, as well as the shops and restaurants that surround it, are located mainly on and around 5th Avenue. There, you will find a variety of offerings, including a Russian Bookstore, reflecting the distinctive culture found here.

Brighton Beach is conveniently serviced by the D and M trains, this neighborhood is a great place to live and to visit.

Dining

Primorski Restaurant - 282 Brighton Beach Ave.
Gina's Café- Russian diner at 409 Brighton Beach Ave.
Ocean View Café- delicious and refreshing spins on dessert at 290 Brighton Beach Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Sunset Park - a family friendly neighborhood in Brooklyn"

With wonderful parks, friendly people, and the family-oriented vibe Brooklyn is renown for, Sunset Park is a treasure within the Brooklyn neighborhood and within New York City.

Sunset Park has always been home to a diverse population of people, many of Norwegian, Irish, or Polish descent. A historically middle and working class neighborhood, Sunset Park like many neighborhoods in Brooklyn, saw a period of building and progress during the turn of the nineteenth century. The Great Depression made a major impact on New York City, namely because of the negative effects it had on industry-based communities like Sunset Park. The “white flight phenomenon” and declining businesses left much of the neighborhood abandoned leaving space for a new crop of immigrants from all around the world, their presence forever impacting the landscape of Sunset Park.

Entertainment is rich in this neighborhood. Within Sunset Park there lies a beautiful and scenic Sunset Park, located between 5th and 7th Avenues and 41st and 44th Streets. Here, people can see the beautiful skyline and harbor of Manhattan, a wonderful place to see the sunset over the majestic island that houses over 8 million people from every continent on Earth. The immigration of Chinese residents to Sunset Park has brought in their culture in terms of dining and traditions. The Chinese New Year Celebration or celebrate in February of each year brings people of all ethnicities to Sunset Park to take part in eating moon cakes, watching the famous Lion dance, setting off fireworks (fang bian pao) to frighten off the misfortune-bearing dragons, and celebrating a new Lunar Year.

Due to the diversity of the residents in Sunset Park, food and shopping are equally diverse and unique, with several restaraunts featuring an authentic and worldly cuisine.

Transportation in Sunset Park is convenient as it service not only by the Metro Transit Authority’s D, M, N, and R trains, but is also served by public buses, ferries, and freight trains, not to mention exclusive service from Manhattan’s Chinatown to Sunset Park, which is considered Brooklyn’s Chinatown, similar to the more long distance services provided between New York’s Chinatown and Washington D.C.’s Chinatown, as well as the Chinatown in Philadelphia.

Real Estate in this neighborhood is fairly expensive and the beautiful homes are the reason why.
Owning in this neighborhood would cost no less than $500,000 though renting or subletting can be done for as little as $700 per month.

Sunset Park is filled with a unique and changing culture and is a wonderful place both to live and to visit.

Other things about Sunset Park

Dining:
Georges - 5701 Fifth Ave.
Rotisseria Mexicana Los Pollitos - 5911 Fourth Ave.
The Esquites Man - Fifth Ave. nr. 53rd St.
El Tesoro Ecuatoriano - 4015 Fifth Ave.
Ba Xuyên - 4222 Eighth Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Dyker Heights, a beautiful neighborhood with an Italian-American aura."

Dyker Heights is a beautiful neighborhood in the wonderful borough of Brooklyn, New York. One of the first traditional suburbs of Brooklyn, Dyker Heights today still maintains the handsome detail it did when it was first erected.

Historically, Dyker Heights was created as a suburban enclave of the growing borough of Brooklyn during the 1800s. Strict residency requirements as well as building guidelines, not to mention the very clear vision of the neighborhood architect helped to construct the large and decadent homes which are the hallmark of this affluent neighborhood. Dyker Heights has always been home to an upper middle class population, mainly of Italian descent. In Dyker Heights, the homes are large, as some eight bedroom homes sell for $800,000 or more, which is exponential cheaper in comparison with the 1 bedroom/ 1 bath units throughout the neighborhood that sell for more than $300,000. Subletting and renting are options as well, and as with most neighborhoods in Brooklyn depending on the quality and location of the apartment or home, rent can range anywhere from $1,000-$6,000. The most recognizable of the historic Dyker Heights homes, the Sietta House, is remarkable with fantastic details both in and outside.

The population of the neighborhood relishes in the exclusivity of their suburban palace, as well as their vicinity to the city. Though Dyker Heights is not directly serviced by the New York City subway system, public buses are available and trains are located in nearby neighborhoods and namely the D & M trains on New Utrecht Avenue.

Dyker Heights is a family-oriented neighborhood, home to several parochial schools and churches. With a feeling reminiscent of an upstate New York village, Dyker Heights is a nice oasis from city living. Community groups, clubs, and organizations make Dyker Heights the great neighborhood that it is, focusing on issue other sections of Brooklyn are often forced to neglect. Beyond these social groups, Dyker Heights is also home to a few wonderful parks and recreation areas, namely Dyker Park Golf Course and Dyker Beach Park located on the waterfront.

Shopping and restaurants in Dyker Heights is somewhat limited to upscale fare, with most commercial businesses located on the neighborhood’s main thoroughfare, .

Dyker Heights is a timeless neighborhood, a suburban heaven conveniently located in the sprawling metropolis of New York City.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Bensonhurst - the little Italy of Brooklyn"

Bensonhurst is a popular neighborhood of the borough of Brooklyn, New York. To many, this neighborhood is regarded as the “Little Italy” of Brooklyn, and with that title comes a culture steeped in respect, honor, and family values.

The history of Bensonhurst is closely linked with the larger Brooklyn history, having originally been the farmland of Dutch settlers. The farmland was eventually sold to entrepreneur Arthur W. Benson. Since then, Bensonhurst has had a heavy Italian population, including a heavy Italian-speaking population in residence there today. Due to this, pride is a major part of the Bensonhurst swagger, as neighborhood recognition and honor is an important aspect for many living here.

With time, the neighborhood has seen an influx of Chinese and Russian people to the neighborhood, but this has not done much to thwart the Italian dominance of the neighborhood. Real Estate in Bensonhurst varies in price as the changing shape of the neighborhood is beginning to effect offerings, which are now mainly in multiple family apartment buildings. Homes in the area range in price for $300,000 or more while renting and subletting is typically less than $2500.

This mainly Italian neighborhood is of course the best place outside of Little Italy to get authentic Italian food. 18th Street is the main thoroughfare lined with mom-and-pop stores, cafes, and bistros, perfect for any lunch or dinner. Shopping can be done along 86th Street, though its offerings are a bit outdated.

Beyond its heritage, Bensonhurst is famous for its festival of “The Feast”, also known as the Santa Rosalia Festival during late August and early September. Filled with culture and life, Bensonhurst is home to a very proud people who hold on to the dreams of their ancestors and remember their culture daily through sharing their rich culture with visitors.

Transportation:
The D, M N, & F subway lines at several stations serve the neighborhood of Bensonhurst keeping travel throughout the borough and the larger New York City metropolitan area fast and easy.

Dining:
Villabate Pasticceria & Bakery - 7117 Eighteenth Ave.
Trunzo Bros. - 6802 Eighteenth Ave
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Bath Beach - no longer a beach resort"

Bath Beach is located in the borough of Brooklyn, New York and is bordered by Gravesend Bay, New Utrecht, Dyker Beach Park, and Gravesend, not to mention near to the famous Coney Island.

The history of Bath Beach included an actual beach, but today, that beach has been covered by the Shore Parkway, leaving behind a somewhat harsh appearance. Residents and visitors can still enjoy the nearby beaches however. The neighborhood is comprised of apartment buildings and family owned businesses and is home to a mainly immigrant-based population of Irish, Italian, and Chinese descent.

The commercial street in this neighborhood 86th Street is filled with small boutiques and lower quality stores and some locally owned restaurants. A “good fellas” vibe still remains in the neighborhood, though drowned in changing times and styles, heavily impacted by the new ethnic groups calling Bath Beach home. Bath Avenue at one time used to house several popular restaurants and stores, but with time, has become a less desirable location to spend leisure time. A nice place to spend a day in this neighborhood is the Oceanview Tennis Center at 9000 Bay Parkway, though membership is a requirement.

Transportation can be a bit of a headache, with the slower D and M trains servicing the area. Some consider the best route to be the R train to the 86th Street stop followed by the B64 bus one stop to 86th Street and Bath Avenue.

Real Estate in Bath Beach is not as desirable as in the other waterfront neighborhoods of Brooklyn, with the average price to rent or sublet ranging from$500 to $1,200 and the average cost by buy beginning at $300,000. Mainly available are small apartment buildings and small free-standing homes, as well as condominiums.

Though to some a neighborhood long past its prime, Bath Beach, named for the beautiful Bath, England still has its highlights.

Places to Dine in Bath Beach:
Pino's Italian Restaurant, Pizzeria and Catering
2025 Bath Ave.
Hollywood Tans
1875 86th St.
Tommaso Restaurant
1464 86th St.
Villa Paradiso
1969 Bath Avenue
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Prospect Park South - a neighborhood built using vision and a redefining of city living"

Prospect Park South in Brooklyn is a beautiful upscale neighborhood is beautiful and filled with a diverse population and various other offerings.

Prospect Park South is comprised of large, free-standing homes with lawns and trees. Reminiscent of suburban living, these homes are still located in the urban Brooklyn and its surrounding neighborhoods must envy the space offered in this fantastic neighborhood. Real Estate in this neighborhood is expensive, as most home sell for nearly $1 million or more. Owning an apartment in the area costs on average $275,000, while renting is standard at $4,000 or greater. Subletting is an option, with prices ranging anywhere from $800 for a room to $4,000 for a three-bedroom apartment.

The namesake of the neighborhood, Prospect Park, is a wonderful oasis in Brooklyn. Only a few blocks away from the heart of the Prospect Park South, you’ll come across the park’s expansive lake. Prospect Park is considered to be the Central Park of Brooklyn. Filled with live music, shows, artwork for sale, and concerts, Prospect Park is a constant centre of fun.

Prospect Park South is home to some great restaurants, as the neighborhood is filled with a variety of people. Church Avenue and Caton Avenue is the main place to find food, shopping, and the like in this neighborhood, as well as a more Brooklyn feel. You’ll find a variety of cuisines here, but something they all have in common is that they are cheap. Rent might be high in this neighborhood but food is not.

With glorious homes, beautiful parks, and an suburb within the city limits, Prospect Park South is a premium neighborhood nestled in wonderful Brooklyn.

In Prospect Park South:

Transportation:
This neighborhood is served by the B, Q, and F trains as well as several public buses.

Dining & Entertainment:
La Huasteca Cocina Mexicana - 1217 Church Ave
Golden Krust - 1617 Church Ave
Shenanigans Pub - 802 Caton Ave
Bev's West Indian Cuisine - 1219 Church Ave
Number 1 Chinese Restaurant - 1125 Church Ave
Chin Chin Wu Restaurant - 1615 Church Ave
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Midwood, one of the most popular neighborhoods in the borough of Brooklyn"

Midwood is heavily Jewish neighborhood, filled with temples, synagogues, and Jewish schools, including Brooklyn College. Today, this middle class neighborhood is home to diverse array of ethnicities, adding to the purely Brooklyn atmosphere.

Bordered by Avenue H, Flatbush Avenue, Kings Highway and Coney Island Avenue, including the City College of New York.

Midwood is home to the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) studios, located at E. 13-14th Streets from Avenue M to Locust Ave. Since 1953, many famous television shows as well as classic movies, including the Godfather, were filmed here and on the streets of Midwood, adding to the rich and vibrant history of this great neighborhood.. Shopping in this area is prominent as well as dining, offering food as diverse as its residents.

The picturesque homes in Midwood have been the representation of Brooklyn living in television and in film. Most one or two family homes, and mainly brownstones, Midwood turn of the century architecture symbolizes classic Brooklyn living. In Midwood, a one bedroom/one bathroom apartment goes for as much as $300,000 and larger more luxurious units sell easily for over $1 million.

Entertainment in this neighborhood is uniquely Midwood, steeped in tradition, and fun to observe. Shopping as well as dining in this area is prominent, offering food as diverse as its residents. Pedestrian Rest Areas, used primarily for card-playing and “shooting the breeze,” are available throughout the neighborhood, not to mention the track and field parks located at Midwood High School and Brooklyn College which can be accessed by the public.

In & Around Midwood:

Parks & Rest Areas:
Sgt. Joyce Kilmer Square - Kings Highway and Quentin Road (E. 12th-13th Streets)
Midwood High School - E. 17th St., Ave.'s K-L.

Transportation:
The Midwood neighborhood of Brooklyn is serviced by the B, Q, F, 2, and 5 trains, as well as several public buses.

Dining:
Midwood Suites - 1078 E. 15th St.
Jerusalem II Pizza. - 1312 Ave. J
Di Fara Pizza - 1424 Ave. J
Oh! Nuts- The Kosher Willy-Wonka. 1503 Ave. J

Shopping:
Diva- girl’s clothing with an attitude - 1409 Ave. M
Tuesday's Too- children’s haute-couture - 1904 Ave. M
Esti's - 1888 Coney Island Ave.
Olga's Corset & Specialty Shop - 2753 Nostrand Ave.

Nightlife
Starlite Lounge - 1213 Mcdonald Ave
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Kensington -a beautiful neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York"

Kensington is located with Caton Avenue to the north; the Kensington stables to the northeast, Coney Island Avenue to the east, Foster Avenue to the south, and Dahill Road to the west.. With various offerings, bright people, and proximity to Manhattan as well as the other boroughs of New York City, Kensington is a nice place to live, work, or visit.

The neighborhood is filled with one and two family homes, sidewalks spanning the length to Coney Island, and a culture steeped in Brooklyn living. Classically a Irish-Italian neighborhood, Kensington overtime has greatly diversified, representing virtually every ethnic group living throughout New York City.

Being in Kensington is like taking a step back in time, with Ditmas Avenue serving as a main street in village all its own. Of the sights to see here, the Public Library is a nice place to spend an afternoon. Located on Ditmas Avenue, this library houses several thousand books which are stored in a beautiful space. Another great pastime are the Kensington Stables, adding to the nineteenth century-esque feeling of this great neighborhood. The fluidity with other neighborhoods is a major perk of living in Brooklyn, so finding something new is definite and easy.

In Kensington, housing tend to be a bit cheaper than in the other neighborhoods, though “cheap” in New York City is a relative term. Some one bed/one bath units sell for under $200,000, but higher prices are tacked on to all the larger houses and apartments. A good option in this neighborhood in renting or subletting a space, which can be done by the room or by the apartment for as little as $1,000 per month for a room and $3,000 per month for an apartment.

In and around Kensington:

Transportation:
The village of Kensington is serviced by the F train with several stops throughout the neighborhood and is also serviced by several buses.

Dining:
Café K, where the “K” stands for kosher. 4110 Eighteenth Ave.
2 B Thai - 126 Beverly Road

Shopping
David Shannon Nursery and Florist - 3380 Fort Hamilton Pkwy.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Busy neighborhood, Caribbean locals and establishments"

Flatbush is one of the oldest and most famous neighborhoods of Brooklyn, New York, spanning to include the southernmost part of Prospect Park. Flatbush encompasses 6 neighborhoods. An interesting history and a dynamic present, this neighborhood is filled with great dining, shopping, living, and ambiance. A great place for both visitors and residents, Flatbush fails to disappoint.

As with other sections of Brooklyn, Flatbush has seen a change in its demographic composition since its beginning, with the Dutch Farmers who referred to the area as the “wooden lands.” Today, Flatbush is comprised of a mainly Afro-Carribean populations, with residents hailing from Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and other island nations. Packed with the American Dream, these immigrants brought and have maintained their vibrant culture, as native languages of French and others are still used by many here.

Historically, Flatbush has been a diverse neighborhood. As with the neighborhood of East Flatbush, this originally mainly Jewish and Italian neighborhood saw an increase of West Indian immigrants during the 1980s, as its more affluent residents fled to other more prominent sections of Brooklyn. This working class neighborhood then began to see an increase in crime and drugs as did most neighborhoods in Brooklyn during this era. Due to community organizing, building repair, and focus, Flatbush has since seen a drastic decrease in crime and a renaissance of the affluent culture it once held.

A major perk to the neighborhood commercially is that most businesses are family owned, adding a unique flare to the neighborhoods offerings. Today, as the neighborhood increases diversity both culturally and monetarily, the streets of Flatbush have something to offer anyone either looking to hold onto their culture or looking to adapt.

The Real Estate in Flatbush is amongst Brooklyn’s most expensive, selling for as high as $1.7 million. The price of smaller apartments is significantly, but the neighborhood compensates greatly for the high prices.

Transportation: Flatbush is serviced by the B and Q trains on Avenue H. Public buses B6, B8, B35, B41, B44 and B49 also service the neighborhood.

Dining:
Flatbush Farm - 76 St. Marks Ave.
Peppa's Jerk Chicken Restaurant - 738 Flatbush Ave.
Well Lounge - 329 Flatbush Ave.
Vegetarian Palate - 258 Flatbush Ave.

Shopping
Wealthy Hostage - 1924 Church Ave.
Hooti Couture - 321 Flatbush Ave.
Harriet’s Alter Ego - 293 Flatbush Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"East Flatbush - Thriving with culture"

East Flatbush is an ever-changing neighborhood located south of East New York Avenue between Nostrand Avenue and Kings Highway. With an interesting history, pretty homes, and connectivity with the rest of the New York City, East Flatbush is a desirable location for both residents and visitors.

The history of East Flatbush is closely related with the history of its diverse residents. Originally called ‘Rugby,’ East Flatbush has seen a change in its majority. Having been a predominantly Jewish neighborhood up until the 1960's, East Flatbush was then met by an increasing number of Africans of a Carribean descent, greatly affecting restaurants, shops, and the overall look and feel of the neighborhood. The culture of this neighborhood through music and expression is phenomenal, listing such famous past residents as famed rapper Busta Rhymes, and the Basketball player who walked on air, the one and only Michael Jordan.

In East Flatbush, one of the highlights when visiting or living are the sights located within its streets. The Wyckoff Family Museum is the oldest structure in New York City, a farmhouse built in 1652 which housed the original Wyckoffs and their descendants for over 250 years, until 1901. The home has been preserved wonderfully and is a great spot to see in the city, especially for history buffs and those interested in pre-Revolutionary American life.

Restaurants and dining are also a major aspect of life here, as the Carribean culture is as fresh in East Flatbush as it must be on the shores of Jamaica. Though the neighborhood is overrun with fast food restaurants, this is the home of hole-in-the-wall authentic cuisine. One popular restaurant is the Bajan Café, with an interesting menu and nice patronage, this is a staple in the East Flatbush neighborhood.


In East Flatbush

Transportation:
The neighborhood of East Flatbush is loosely serviced by the 2 and 5 trains on Nostrand Avenue as well as the 3 train on Livonia. Various public buses run throughout this section of Brooklyn, as well.

Real Estate:
Real Estate here sells for as low as $250,000 in some parts of the neighborhood and easily some houses go for more than $1 million dollars.

Sightseeing:
Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket
Grand Army Plaza
Wyckoff Farmhouse Museum- The oldest house in New York City. - 5816 Clarendon Rd.

Dining
Bajan Café - 456 Schenectady Ave
New Combination Restaurant - 568 Utica Ave
Negril West Indian Cafe - 841 Utica Ave
Zip Burger - 300 E. 52nd St.
Allan's Quality Bakery - 1109 Nostrand Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 15, 2009

"Crown Heights -home to an extremely diverse population of Afro-Carribean dissent"

Crown Heights is a nice neighborhood nestled in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, New York. With its diverse population, distinct homes, and tree-lined streets, Crown Heights is an esteemed home to its 150,000 or more residents. Crown Heights is a premier neighborhood in Brooklyn and a wonderful place to reside, visit, or photograph.

Crown Heights is home to an extremely diverse population, mainly of Afro-Carribean dissent. There is also a dynamic Jewish community in this neighborhood. The unique and lively population have heavily impacted the restaurants, shopping, and businesses in the area, not to mention adding an interesting and upbeat atmosphere to the neighborhood. The beautiful, multi-colored brownstones and picturesque environment offer both residents and visitors a classic homage to Brooklyn living.

The history of this neighborhood is steeped in the tradition of community, promise, and traditional New York City urban living. As Brooklyn was originally populated by the pastoral Lenape Native Americans eventually to be sold and restructured by mainly Dutch immigrants, Crown Heights was the sight of vast upward change, through times of struggle. Classically home to upper and middle class residents, Crown Heights, since the mid-nineteenth century, has been viewed as a prosperous neighborhood. Riots as well as a change in demographics in the mid-twentieth century brought an end to the heyday of this beautiful neighborhood, with an increase in low-income housing, crime and poverty, not to mention racial tensions increasing drastically since the 1960's. The result was a dichotomy in offerings for the residents of Crown Heights, with an apparent difference of culture and taste between the classes.

Despite these tumultuous times, Crown Heights is still a wonderful place to live for its residents, its diversity adding to its original flare, as crime is currently on a sharp decline. The Brooklyn Museum and the beautiful Brooklyn Botanical Gardens are located here, not to mention the beautiful Eastern Parkway, all perfect representations of the great culture, talent, and beauty of its residents. Annual celebrations, including the West-Indian American Day Parade, cite the fantastic culture still living and thriving here today.

More about Crown Heights:

Transportation: The MTA 2, 3, 4, 5 subways trains service the Crown Heights neighborhood, as well as the B14, B17, and B46 buses.

Real Estate:
Housing in the Crown Heights areas varies in price, though you’ll find that most one bedroom or two bedroom units are no less than $300,000.

Sightseeing:
Brooklyn Museum - 200 Eastern Pkwy.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden - 900 Washington Ave.


Dining
The Islands is a great getaway if a trip to Jamaica is desired without having to check any bags - 803 Washington Ave.
Abigail Café & Wine Bar: the name says it all - 807 Classon Ave.
Secrets Restaurant & Lounge - 724 Nostrand Ave

Shopping
About Time Boutique - 736A Franklin Ave.
Walter Rossi, Inc., a wonderful handmade furniture store - 1306 Union St.
Brooklyn Botanic Garden Gift Shop - 1000 Washington Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
1/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Brownsville - A tough neighborhood"

Brownsville is one of the older neighborhoods in the bustling borough of Brooklyn, New York. With neighborhood Bedford-Stuyvesant and East Flatbush, Brownsville is a neighborhood with a history steeped in struggle, but with a future filled with wonderful promise.

Brownsville is comprised mainly low income African American and Latino families. The neighborhood has had a tumultuous history, though its future shines bright and the culture here has heavily impacted the offerings in this Brooklyn neighborhood. Brownsville is the sight of eighteen public housing developments. Historically, Brownsville was always prone to crime and destitute living, as when it was populated with a largely Jewish community during the nineteenth and early twentieth century. An influx of crime, drugs, and joblessness plagued the neighborhood throughout the latter part of the twentieth century, impacting its present condition. Poverty is endemic in this neighborhood as well as low educational opportunities and opportunities for the youth of the community.

Despite major issues, community organizers and urban developers have placed an increased focus on redeveloping this dilapidated neighborhood. Despite the crime and poverty rate, real estate in this neighborhood is still optimum in some sections, though the overall reputation of the neighborhood deters “Manhattan flighters” from settling in Brownsville.

Real Estate:
As stated before, real estate in this neighborhood is somewhat restricted as many of the residents live in public housing. The other properties in the neighborhood are nice and spacious however, with homes and apartments selling for an average of $320,000 or more. Rental units could range anywhere from $3,000-$10,000.

Dining:
The restaurants in this neighborhood reflect the culture of their owners and of the residents in the neighborhood. In Brownsville, you’ll find several Latin and Afro-inspired restaurants, as well as a vast amount of seafood restaurants, not to mention your simple fast-food fare. The following are amongst the best reviewed and most frequented:
1 Restaurant -1007 Clarkson Ave
Villa Castillo Restaurant - 1474 Pitkin Ave
Prince Jamaican Restaurant - 1139 Clarkson Ave
Pitkin Seafood -378 Stone Ave
New York Fish and Chips Corporation -444 Rockaway Ave

Shopping
K Trimming is a great place for both clothes and housewares- 1151 E. New York Ave
Happy Days Children's Wear: the name says it all. -50 Belmont Ave.
4/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Brooklyn Heights - the nostalgic ideal of Brooklyn"

With beautiful homes, friendly people, and unique style, Brooklyn Heights is a wonderful neighborhood tucked in the heart of this bustling borough.

It is from Brooklyn Heights that one can gain an appreciation of the Brooklyn Bridge and the beauty of this borough as well as Manhattan via the Brooklyn Heights Promenade. This neighborhood has historically been the sight of the formation of Brooklyn, having been the sight of an American Revolutionary War Battle. Throughout time the neighborhood developed into the home of those desiring to live in the classic Brooklyn.

Brooklyn, in an ideal state to both residents and visitors, is about family, relaxation, and a sense of neighborhood pride. Having been home to the Brooklyn Dodgers, the pride of Brooklyn rests in its Heights, as many Brooklyn traditions, ranging from Independence Day celebrations to summer baseball tournaments, are an intrinsic part of his neighborhood.

Brooklyn Heights is populated by a wide variety of people and has been home to several notable people including W.H. Auden, Walt Whitman, Marilyn Monroe, & Truman Capote. The artistic and free-flowing nature of the neighborhood has not been lost and is a treasured part of the culture of the neighnorhood.

Brooklyn Heights epitomizes the qualities of Brooklyn that those near and far treasured, and throughout the “Heights,” one can find the timeless ambiance of an amazing city.

In The Heights:

Transportation:
The MTA A, C, F, M, R, 2, 3, 4, and 5 trains run throughout this neighborhood, making it one of the easiest neighborhoods to commute to Manhattan and other parts of the city from.

Real Estate:
The classic housing for a resident of Brooklyn Heights are the fantastic brownstones that line its many streets. The prices of those homes and others are sold for no less than $300,000 for a one bedroom one bath unit. You might consider exploring options of renting or subleting which would likely begin at $3,000-$4,000 per individual unit.

Sights:
Beyond the Brooklyn Heights Promenade, you might also visit Walt Whitman Park on Adams Street for a nice afternoon or the Doll Toy Museum on Montague Street. You’ll also find the American Folk Art Museum and the South Street Seaport Museum in this neighborhood.

Shopping:
Shopping in Brooklyn Heights is very similar to Manhattan offering many chain and popular retail stores.

Dining:
The River Cafe -1 Water Street
Bubby's Brooklyn -1 Main Street
Five Front- 5 Front Street
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Fashionable Carroll Gardens"

Carroll Gardens is a classy neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. Once the settlement of Irish and Norwegian immigrants, this now largely Italian neighborhood is the site of gardens, beautiful town homes, and unique shops and restaurants on Smith Street or “Restaurant Row”, not mention having being frequented by “wiseguys” as infamous as Al Capone.

The gentrification movement of the 1960s brought about a period of change for the once mainly working class neighborhood. Today, this section of Brooklyn is amongst the most well-kept. The homages to its upward-moving history are ever-present, namely in the Norwegian Seamans' Church which is now a residential building and the “front” houses, brownstones with gardens in the front. Other great sights include St. Paul's Episcopal Church (199 Carroll Street) and St. Mary's Star of the Sea Church (467 Court Street) where mobster Al Capone was wed.

The scenic Carroll Park is a must-see in this tree-filled neighborhood, not to mention the many stores and restaurants which line Smith Street. Carroll Gardens epitomizes the neighborhood feel of Brooklyn and the unique culture it holds.

Transportation:
The F & G trains run through this neighborhood, keeping it easily accessible and convenient. The city bus also runs fluidly throughout the neighborhood.

Housing:
Real estate ranges from $500,000- $3 million dollars for a unit in or owning on of the row housing, while renting and subletting could range from $3,000-$10,000 depending on personal needs and tastes.

Shopping:
Mongo, 246 Smith St- Chic and eclectic clothing store filled with great finds
Flirt, 252 Smith St.- Great store for young women’s trendy fashion
The Green Onion, 274 Smith St.- Unique children’s clothing store
Soula, 185 Smith St.- Men’s footwear taken to the next level in this unique boutique

Dining & Entertainment:
Marco Polo Ristorante, 345 Court Street- If you like ‘The Sopranos,’ you’ll love this restaurant
P.J. Hanley's, Court Street & 4th Place
F. Monteleone & Cammareri Bros. Bakery, 355 Court St.- This bakery specializes in Italian delicacies, which will tantalize your palet
Smith & Vine, 268 Smith St.- Fantastic wine shop
Brooklyn Artisans Gallery, 221A Court St.- A cooperative art gallery that is a nice place to spend an afternoon
Lucali, 575 Henry St.- Wonderful pizza bistro
South Brooklyn Pizza, 451 Court St.- Best slice in South Brooklyn
Chestnut, 271 Smith St.- Great takes on traditional American fare
The Grocery, 288 Smith St- Great prices and great food
Cubana Café, 272 Smith St.- It’s like eating in Cuba without worrying about Chavez
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Revitalised and trendy, renovated brownstones,great restaurants and happening bars."

Boerum Hill in Brooklyn, New York is a modest and quaint neighborhood. Today, it is home to many middle income families and epitomizes the family-feel and community spirit that is so classically Brooklyn: eclectic, urban, and all-it’s-own.

As with the other neighborhoods of Brooklyn, historical Boerum Hill was a farming community and has through the years seen a shift in commerce, people, and trends. Over time, this neighborhood did acquire an eclectic population bringing about an interesting and dynamic shopping and entertainment scene. The neighborhood is a bit more upscale than others in Brooklyn and is comprised of many commuters as well as more established residents.

The common dwelling of people in Boerum Hill are row houses, the trademark of Brooklyn and coveted real estate for those new and old to New York City. Owning a condominium or a row house is pricey, beginning at an estimated $600,000-700,000. Renting and subletting, which is common if not standard in the city, could range from $3,000-10,000 per month. Escaping the cramped space of Manhattan sometimes has its downfalls, but Boerum Hill is a neighborhood worth escaping Manhattan for.

Sightseeing in Boerum Hill would include a trip to the small but beautiful Carroll Park. A day of walking through the park coupled with a walk on Atlantic Avenue and a nice meal at one of the myriad restaurants is a perfect way to spend a day. This hip and chill neighborhood is a great treat in the heart of Brooklyn.

Transportation:
The MTA F, G, D, M, N, & R trains stop in this neighborhood, keeping it accessible to other parts of Brooklyn as well as Manhattan and the other boroughs.

Dining & Entertainment:
Blue Marble Ice Cream, 420 Atlantic Ave.
Sample, 152 Smith St.- Wonderful Tapas Bar
Mai, 497 Atlantic Ave.- Southeast Asian fare
Cheryl Kleinman Cakes, 448 Atlantic Ave.- Dangerously Delicious Desserts
Three Kings LLC- 125 5th Ave- Funky Nightclub with wonderful Djs
Knitting Factory- 74 Leonard St. - Dance club with great music
The Hook Club,18 Commerce Street- Great Lounge clandestinely tucked away in Boerum Hill
And Then Some,103 Bond St.- Small Menswear Boutique
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Bed-Stuy - beautiful brownstones, the flavor of African American and Caribbean culture"

Named for its original moniker as the Village of Bedford and the annexed adjacent neighborhood of Stuyvesant, Bedford-Stuyvesant, or “Bed-Stuy” as it is commonly referred to, is considered to be the “Harlem of Brooklyn.” Housing a mainly African-American population historically and presently, this urban neighborhood is home to a middle and working class, not to mention being the birthplace of a few notable people in the entertainment community, such as Chris Rock, and innovators in music namely in the realms of hip-hop and rap, including Jay-Z & the late Notorious B.I.G..

The history of this dynamic neighborhood is closely linked with the current “flight” seen in Brooklyn, as people looking for spacious apartments head to the outer boroughs. Prior to the phenomenon that would be seen in the 1930s, development and progress was a hallmark of this historic neighborhood. Following the end of the civil war and the freeing of the slaves, several African-Americans traveled north seeking jobs and a new life. Many headed to New York City, some settling in popular Harlem, and some in the neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant. During that time, many of the inhabitants of the neighborhood worked in Manhattan and commuted back to Brooklyn, creating the composition of working class families. During the 1930s, as people began to desire larger apartments and homes and lower housing costs, many African-Americans moved from Harlem in uptown Manhattan to Bedford-Stuyvesant into the row houses, the neighborhood’s trademark.

As the economy declined, New York City was heavily impacted, as well as the neighborhood of Bed- Stuy. Riots, the infamous NYC Black Out, rampant crime, and unemployment affected the neighborhood to what some thought was an irrevocable degree. Today, however, Bed-Stuy has benefitted from a renaissance of community organization, gentrification spurred by the famous row houses, and crime on a steady decline, this once undesirable neighborhood is slowly being reborn. Various people from all walks of life are now choosing to call the changing Bed-Stuy their home, ranging from students to middle-class families.

Due to the culture of the neighborhood, all aspects of life, be it through entertainment or living, is impacted by the rich heritage and pride of its inhabitants. The music that was born in this neighborhood is the hallmark of the hip-hop and rap communities, not to mention the trends in common jargon and fashion that were born amongst its vibrant youth sweeping the nation. As with all the neighborhoods of NYC, there is a certain pride exhibited by its residents, and that is no different in Bedford-Stuyvesant.

Knowing Bed-Stuy:

Housing:
To gain residence in the illustrious row homes, you’ll need $500,000 or more. As with other sections of Brooklyn, subletting and renting individual units is possible, and will likely range from $2,000-5,000.

Transportation: The MTA J,M,Z,C,S, & G trains run throughout the neighborhood, making it easily accessible.

Restaurants & Entertainment:
Sputnik, 262 Taaffe Pl # 517
Cafe Naico, 705 Myrtle Ave
Le Chateau de Frenche Day Spa & Private Tea Room, 441 Tompkins Ave

Nightlife and Music:
Brown Sugar Club, 433 Marcus Garvey Blvd

Denim Lounge, 1223 Bedford Ave.
Amarachi Lounge 2.0, 325 Franklin Ave.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
Mar 12, 2009

"Williamsburg - much more than the sterotype of young people looking for cheap rent."

Williamsburg is a diverse neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. With the Williamsburg Bridge linking Brooklyn directly to Manhattan, this neighborhood has emerged as a popular location for young people and those fleeing their expensive Manhattan roots, not to mention a heavily historic population, this up and coming neighborhood is one of the most popular attractions in Brooklyn.

The history of Williamsburg is steeped in preserving tradition and the search for the American dream. Similar to the founding of the neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Bushwick, the British East India Trading Company negotiated the settlement of Williamsburg off the shores of New Amsterdam, as New York was originally called. As time progressed, this small neighborhood developed and what was once a farming settlement emerged as one of the most dynamic neighborhoods in Brooklyn, home to several innovators and successful entrepreneurs.

Williamsburg is a “neighborhood within a neighborhood,” as the many disparate ethnic groups and people have individual cultures all their own. Perhaps the most renown of these groups are the Hasidic Jews whom reside in South Williamsburg. Their distinctive look as well as their culture are esteemed with the residents of the city. Here, you’ll be hard to pressed to find a non-kosher restaurant, but in the east, you’ll find a more diverse and older working class of mixed heritage, while in the north resides a heavyily Italian population. Williamsburg is now home to a crop of young people, referred to as “hipsters,” who are mainly young artists, musicians, and professionals who thrive off of the hip offerings in this fun neighborhood.

Living in Williamsburg was once championed for low rents, but with the influx of people leaving the city to commute, rent prices have drastically increased. Depending on the street in the neighborhood you’re interested in living on, condos range from $300,000-$500-000, but subletting in this area is popular and available for more affordable prices.

Entertainment and shopping in Williamsburg is wonderful, as the neighborhood is chalked full of unique vintage book shops, antiques stores, clothing stores, cafes, and restaurants. Sightseeing in this neighborhood should begin with the Williamsburg Bridge and a nice stroll through the neighborhood taking in all the great ambiance it has to offer.

Highlights of Williamsburg:

Dining:
Sea,114 N 6th St
Fette Sau, 354 Metropolitan Ave
Zenkichi Sake & Seasonal Japan,77 N 6th S
Nightlife:
Music Hall of Williamsburg, 66 N 6th St
Soft Spot, 128 Bedford Ave
Marquee Nightclub, 289 10th Ave

Shopping:
Sodafine, 119 Grand Street
Ghostown, 335 Grand Street
Kimberly Shoes, 342 S 4th St
Williamsburg Pooch, 222 Leonard Street

Art Galleries:
The Front Room Gallery, 147 Roebling Street
Cinders,103 Havemeyer St # 2F
City Reliquary Museum, 370 Metropolitan Ave

Transportation:
transportation is simple as this neighborhood can be accessed by the L, J, M, Z, and G trains as well as several cross-town and local buses.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 09, 2009

"Greenpoint, a once working class neighborhood, very affordable place to live."

Greenpoint is located in wonderful Brooklyn, New York. A prominent neighborhood once steeped as a middle-class home of immigrants seeking the American dream, Greenpoint is a great neighborhood, changing daily and with a fingerprint all its own.

Perhaps most recently renown for an oil spill on New Town Creek in the 1980s, Greenpoint was originally mostly populated by Dutch settlers in the 1630's when Brooklyn was negotiated for settlement with a Native American tribe, the Lenape. As time progressed, the settlement morphed from a pastoral community to a highly industrialized section of Brooklyn including a surge of Polish immigrants during the 1800's, the prestige of the community also increased. Greenpoint is one of the most illustrious neighborhoods in Brooklyn, and with its wonderful offerings in dining, entertainment, and housing, it is an impressive place to live or to visit.

Greenpoint is not as diverse as other sections of Brooklyn, as it is home to many Polish and Irish middle and working class families. It is vibrant and pleasant, filled with people and a calm lifestyle. Entertainment, dining, sightseeing, and living are all prime in this historical section of Brooklyn.

Living in Greenpoint is expensive, as its real estate is amongst the most expensive in Brooklyn, as this up and coming section is a popular escape for the Manhattan working elite. The average price on a one bedroom one bathroom unit is as high as 500,000, with condominiums selling for as high as $1.3 million. Subletting in this borough is competitive, and when looking to enter into that sort of arrangement, it’s advisable to sign a contract and preview the unit prior to making any agreements. Subletting an apartment here could range from $3,000-7,000, though individual room rentals are significantly lower.

Dining and entertainment options in Greenpoint are plentiful, as with the gentrification of any neighborhood come the luxuries. With various high quality and unique options for dining, you and your palet will never be bored in this neighborhood. Nightlife in Greenpoint is just as vibrant with various upscale venues with live music and late-night dancing.

Greenpoint is just as entertaining during the day as it is at night. Among the many perks of living in Greenpoint is the history, namely in architecture. Various churches and schools constructed throughout the neighborhoods’ esteemed history are quite remarkable, and would be of interest to anyone with an eye and appreciation for meticulous detail. A wonderful day in Brooklyn is spent taking a walking tour through the many sections of this neighborhood which is filled with parks and outdoor leisure spaces.

Transportation to Greenpoint is convenient and efficient as several trains and buses run throughout the dynamic neighborhood.

Greenpoint in a Flash:

Transportation:
MTA trains G, L, 7, E, V service the entire neighborhood and make commuting to Manhattan quick and easy.
Sightseeing:
McCarren Park- Popular and large, this is a must-see in Greenpoint
Huron and Java Streets: Water Access Points- a wonderful place on the East River to get a panoramic view of the city.
Kent Street- More views of the city as well as a walking tour of the history of Greenpoint

Dining:
Christina's, 853 Manhattan Ave- down home American dining
Lomzynianka, 646 Manhattan Ave- traditional Polish cuisine
Thai Café, 925 Manhattan Ave.- Delicious Thai food in the heart of Old Poland

Nightlife:
Coco 66, 66 Greenpoint Ave.- Average Greenpoint fare: a sports bar with cheap beer
Twisted Bar and Lounge, 37 Driggs Avenue
Matchless, 557 Manhattan Ave. (at Driggs Ave.)- more upscale venue
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5
Mar 09, 2009

"Bushwick, a once rough neighborhood on the improve."

Bushwick is a neighborhood spanning two square miles located in the borough of Brooklyn. This diverse and vibrant neighborhood is home to a wide-variety of ethnicities. The remnants of this once bustling neighborhood are lower-income housing projects and apartment buildings and a clear differentiation between the wealthier and more prominent sections of this borough.

Life in Bushwick has improved for its residents since the turbulent era following the1960s. The resulting community organizing projects brought about the construction of several parks and community centers throughout the neighborhood for youth engagement and community involvement. A popular venue in the summer is the Bushwick Pool & Park (Flushing Avenue & Bushwick Avenue). A nice place to take the family, this park is filled with people and an exciting energy.

Historical sights in Bushwick are few, but one that does stand out is Memorial Gore Park which holds a granite monument for those who perished during World War I. Picturesque and serene, this is a nice spot to relax in the neighborhood.

Dining and Entertainment in Bushwick is unique as with the melting pot of different peoples provides a visitor with a very diverse dining experience, not to mention a slew of fast food restaurants. Nightlife in Bushwick can be somewhat of a mystery to an outsider, as the most popular venues for the young crowd tend to be in Manhattan or other sections of Brooklyn.

A major reason why people choose to live in this section of Brooklyn as opposed to Manhattan is mostly due to accessibility. The L train and M trains run throughout this neighborhood, making travel into Manhattan extremely convenient. The following buses are also available: B13, B26, B38, B52, B54, and B60.

Visiting Bushwick

Sights:
Bushwick Green Park located at Flushing Avenue and Central Avenue.
Hope Gardens Multi Service Center

Restaurants:
Northeast Kingdom,18 Wyckoff Ave- Great place for unique mid-range fare.
El Salvador Restaurant, 1544 Myrtle Ave- Vibrant Latin food restaurant
Three Brothers Restaurant, 616 Livonia Ave- Wonderful Italian cuisine
Life Cafe NINE83, 983 Flushing Ave- Traditional American Fare
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 24, 2009

"Nolita - great bars and shops, great for young and families"

Historically, NoLita was a section of Little Italy, but as time progressed and the neighborhood became smaller, NoLita emerged with a flare and culture all its own. Following the outflow of the Italian population from Little Italy throughout the latter half of the twentieth, Nolita began to lose its cultural flare, with many Italians moving to Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, in search of lower rents, jobs, and still managing, in many cases to create the unity found in Little Italy. Left behind in NoLita was a unique mixture of people, some of Italian descent, but many of the businesses and authentic Italian restaurants were abandoned. During the 1990s until the present-day, many investors, business people, and store owners saw the advantages of the NoLita location, not only in relation to Little Italy, but also to SoHo, NoHo, Greenwich Village, and the Lower East Side as a whole. Development skyrocketed and many apartments were refurbished to suit a more youthful and ethnically diverse population of young professionals and artists. Real estate in NoLita is fabulous with various walk-up buildings in an array of colors. Prices are lower in NoLita than in other sections of the Lower East Side and is a wonderful place for young professions, couples, and families to live. NoLita is a bourgeoning neighborhood with a unique beauty, distinctive from its very close neighbors.

Transportation:6 to Astor Place or Bleeker Street for NoHo; F to 2nd Ave. or J or M to Bowery for NoLita

Dining: (in NoHo very close to NoLita)
BONDST - 6 Bond Street
Il Buco - 47 Bond Street
Realto - 265 Elizabeth Street

Nightlife:
Bleeker Street Bar - 58 Bleeker Street
Fez - 380 Lafayette Street

Shopping:
Resurrection - 217 Mott Street, near Spring Street
Sigerson - 28 Prince Street, near Mott Street
Tutu - 55 Spring Street
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
Uraniumfish
Uraniumfish Pretty good summary of the place. I would also add Cafe Gitane on Mott Street near Prince for fantastic Sunday brunch. The waitresses wear these hippy little green dresses.
Dec 12, 2009
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4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Rego Park - Home to "The King of Queens" TV show."

Rego Park is an exciting neighborhood in Queens, New York, a sprawling borough and pinnacle of Queens living, immortalized in popular culture in such sitcoms as All In The Family and The King of Queens. Rego Park is known for its predominantly Jewish population, though the neighborhood is quite ethnically diverse, with several people of Eastern European descent, as well as a growing Middle Eastern and East Asian population. Historically, Rego Park has been called “home” by many immigrants, coming to New York in search of better opportunities and the American Dream. Real Estate in Rego Park is diverse, with expansive and opulent homes in the section of the neighborhood known as the Crescents, and more affordable units multiple level apartment buildings. Rego Park is a family-oriented neighborhood, filled with schools, mainly public, with a few parochial and Jewish educational institutions. An important draw to Rego Park is it convenience, namely along 63rd Avenue and Queen Boulevard. On these streets, one can find everything from McDonald’s to fabulous locally owned restaurants. Both drags are chalked full of cheap places to eat and shop. Nightlife and Entertainment are somewhat nonexistent, but this humble neighborhood maintains a certain essence that encompasses true New York City life.

Transportation: 63rd Drive subway stop, served by the R, G, V, and E (during off-hours) lines.

Restaurants:
Eddie’s Sweet Shop - 10529 Metropolitan Ave
Taco King - 6405 108th St
Tower Diner - 9895 Queens Blvd
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"A neighborhood of multi-storey co-ops and apartments"

Lindenwood is a section of Howard Beach located in Queens, New York. Lindenwood is a mainly Italian neighborhood and features family fare. Real Estate in Lindenwood is plentiful, with several multiple family apartment buildings and co-operatives. Housing in this neighborhood is exponentially cheaper than in other neighborhoods in Queens, though lacks the accessability other neighborhoods have to offer. Education is an important aspect of life for the various families that live in the neighborhood, and several schools are located within its boundaries, making it a wonderful and convenient place to live for families with school-aged children. Other offerings in the neighborhood include various churches and temples, as well as restaurants, including the Lindenwood Diner. There are also recreational facilities, the Lindenwood Shopping Center, and Linden Boulevard with various retail and cheap Restaurant options. Nightlife in this neighborhood is lacking in comparison with other sections of Queens, but this neighborhood more than makes up for it in character. Though Lindenwood is not as exciting as other more glamorous parts of the city, it maintains an almost small town feel with the mass known as New York City.

Transformation: The A and C trains running along Pitkin Avenue connect Lindenwood with the rest of the city. Buses as well as the 27 running along Linden Boulevard make this neighborhood fairly accessible.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Howard Beach - a dynamic part of Queens"

Howard Beach is a dynamic section of Queens, with a predominantly Italian-American population. Historically, the area was built along the water for commercial reasons, as it surrounded by water. The area has bee home to various celebrities and musicians, such as John Gotti and Woody Guthrie. For a great deal of its history, Howard Beach was known for its infamous residents, many of whom were apart of the mafia. Today, the neighborhood is much safer, and despite is checkered past, saw great developments even during times of strife. An important element of Howard Beach is naturally the water, with various sections situated strategically around the most beautiful sections of the water including Bay Harbour, Hawtree Creek, and Sand Beach. The main thoroughfare of Crossbay Boulevard is filled with various restraunts, some chain and some locally owned, as well as motels, jewelry shops, hair salons, gyms, dance and fitness centers, tanning and nail salons, medical offices, banks, and even the Crossbay Motorcycle store. The neighborhood is a family neighborhood filled with public, private, and parochial schools as well as various places of worship, including temples and Roman Catholic churches. This neighborhood is convenient and well connected, with real estate options ranging from homes to condominiums to rental propertied. Homes in Howard Beach are free standing with lawns, a nice shift from Manhattan living, with prices ranging from $200,000 for two bedroom homes to nearly $700,000 for the most modern waterfront housing. The waterfront homes are more expensive and decadent, many with private docks and access to the water. Frank M. Charles Memorial Park provides all residents of Howard Beach with a chance to enjoy the water, with playgrounds and recreational facilities. Howard Beach is a fantastic place to live.

Transportation: A Train to Howard Beach
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Harlem - a neighborhood underoing a renaissance"

Harlem is one of the most famous neighborhoods in New York City and has been home to Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes, and most recently the site of Bill Clinton’s humanitarian organization. With a wonderful history and dynamic present, this neighborhood has seen a rebirth in recent years, making it one of the most attractive places to live in Uptown Manhattan. Once owned by Dutch settlers, Harlem is now home to a diverse cross section of people. Real Estate in Harlem is affordable and unique, with many multiple level family homes as well as beautiful brownstones located along Striver’s Row. Due to an abundance of well-maintained apartments and accessibility to midtown Manhattan as well as the other boroughs of New York City, Harlem is a desirable location for professionals and families alike. The history of Harlem is a major reason why this neighborhood is amongst the most popular to visit in the city. A predominantly African-American neighborhood, Harlem is perhaps best known for its renaissance in the early twentieth century, which brought great music and art to the hallowed neighborhood. Successful and affluent Blacks lived and entertained in the neighborhood’s now famous streets. The Apollo Theater and the Cotton Club are world renown venues at which some of the most talented performers of modern times lent their gifts to fans of jazz, R&B, Doo-Wop, and Soul music. “Soul Food” restaurants, African stores and shops, not to mention many chain retail stores now line the main drag of 125th Street. Following a brief period of economic decline, Harlem is again a bustling and prominent section of Manhattan. The neighborhood is vibrant and offerings of every variety are plentiful. Other sites in the neighborhood include the Harbor Conservatory, Astor Tow, Morningside Park, The Harlem School of the Arts, and the world famous Sylvia’s Soul Food Restaurant. From the past to the present, Harlem has been and continues to be a wonderful tribute to art, music, and city living.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Styvesant Town - A planned community within NYC"

Stuyvesant Town is a wonderful area of the Lower East Side and popular neighborhood for families, young professionals, artists, and the like. A housing development some feel are visually reminiscent of the public housing communities located in the Bronx, Stuyvesant town is a wonderful oasis from harsher city living, providing residents with a world within a world. Developed in the late 1940s and currently home to nearly 12,000 residents, Stuyvesant Town is a great place to live. Convenience is a hallmark of this small enclave, as grocery stores, restaurants, some shopping, schools, and hospitals are located nearby. Beth Israel Hospital is located on First Avenue, and the United Nations International School is located in Stuyvesant Town. The residents of the neighborhood are extremely diverse, though “Stuy Town” is becoming more youthful, both in terms of the influx of young professionals to the well-protected and safe neighborhood, as well as families with children. Apartments in the sprawling complex are nice, with secure doors, checked entry point requiring Ids for entry, and laundry rooms in each building. Units are fairly expensive with 2 bedroom units renting for more $3,000 +. Stuyvesant Towns apartments range in size from one bedroom to 5 bedroom apartments, all overlooking trees, basketball courts, and some over looking the opulent fountain located in the center of the housing development. A beautiful park is also located in “the Oval”and in Fall and Summer months, is happening with outdoor concerts, festivals, and parties. The square is also the site of the weekly organic farmer’s market, offering samples of their tasty home grown delights. Properly named a “town,” this housing community is self-sufficient, even offering a bar within its premises. Though small in comparison to other neighborhoods in this section of Manhattan, Stuyvesant Town is a wonderful to live.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Little Italy - more a great tourist destination than a residential neighborhood."

Little Italy is one of the most famous neighborhoods in Manhattan, with beautiful old world charm. Similar to Chinatown in terms of a homogenous ethnic population and in terms of its uniquely authentic food and entertainment offerings, Little Italy is a fabulous enclave in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Little Italy was always home to a mainly Italian immigrant population. Much larger in size, most immigrants worked various low-paying jobs throughout the then bustling manufacturing industry located in what is today the somewhat chic Lower East Side. Maintaining unity and culture was not a difficult thing for the residents to do, as many were non-English speakers, had a neighborhood in which they could conduct business in their native language. With that came the establishment of several of Italian ristorantes, bistros, and cafes throughout the neighborhood, as well as small stores catering to its population. With time, the popularity of Manhattan began to grow, as well as its population, and wealth and prestige began to accompany the Lower East Side name. As rent prices soared and namely following the great Depression, the Italian population began to decrease as more and more people went to different boroughs to seek lower rent prices in different boroughs, including certain areas of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and the heavily-Italian area of Staten Island. As the population shrank and more East Asian residents began to settle in the Chinatown area, the area of Little Italy began to shrink, being somewhat enveloped by Chinatown. Today, this beautiful neighborhood, lined with walk-up buildings painted red, white, and green, and a beautiful charm exists mainly along Mulberry Street. Italian music plays, wine is poured, and a step into the beautiful Italian culture is taken when entering Little Italy. Entertainment and dining in the neighborhood are truly its calling cards, with the Feast of San Gennaro in September still amongst one of the most famous outdoor festivals in the city. Truly a classic and beautiful living representation of the ability of immigrant to come to America but to maintain their diverse cultures, Little Italy, though smaller in size, is still filled with gusto.

Transportation: 6 subway downtown to the Spring Street station then walk East 2 blocks to Mulberry Street. N or R subways downtown to the Prince Street station then walk East 3 blocks to Mulberry Street. Use the F or V subways downtown to the Broadway/Lafayette station and walk East 4 blocks to Mulberry Street and then walk south. The M103 bus also runs in the neighborhood.

Dining:
Grotta Azzurra - 177 Mulberry Street
Ferrara - 195 Grand Street
Pellegrino's - 138 Mulberry Street
Vincent's - 119 Mott St.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
Uraniumfish
Uraniumfish Totally appreciate the historical overview, but with disagree with the modern view as Little Italy having gusto. Seems to be more of a historical idea than a real place now, and I find the restaurant set-up smaltzy at best.
Dec 12, 2009
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4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Battery Park City - a wonderful neighborhood in the southernmost section of Manhattan"

Offering amazing views of the East River, as well as a wonderful population of people, Battery Park City is a great place to call home in Manhattan. This neighborhood is a planned community including three smaller neighborhoods Gateway Plaza, Rector Place, & Battery Place, perhaps the most illustrious of the three. Living in a planned community has many spectacular benefits, and though the price tag on some of the units in the newly-built high-rise buildings can be somewhat steep, the bang is definitely worth the buck in this picturesque neighborhood. With a little less than 8,000 residents, Battery Park City was heavily impacted by the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center, but today is still seeing an increase in development and building. A major feature of Battery Park City is its proximity other neighborhoods and sites, namely TriBeCa (Triangle Below Canal) and the South Street Seaport. The Seaport is known for its great views of the river and vibrant atmosphere, as well as its collection of old ships conserved and viewable by the public, including Peking, Helen McAllister, and Ambrose. At the marina in the summer, there are several outdoor concerts and shows, as well as a plethora of shops and even a modest mall located in this fantastic historical treasure. This is also a good place to set from which to set sail to Ellis Island or to Statue of Liberty. Battery Park City is a wonderful change in pace with the rest of Manhattan, harkening back to a simpler time and state of mind. Don’t forget to check out Battery Park on your visit downtown!

Transportation: 1 train to Battery Park

Dining:
Liberty View - 21 South End Ave.
SouthWest NY - 225 Liberty St.
Pan Latin Café - 400 Chambers St.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Yorkville - affordable upper east side living"

Yorkville is a more down to Earth section of the fabulous Upper East Side. Home to Gracie Mansion, the residence of current New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, Yorkville is a popular place for young professionals as well as families. The youthful nature of this section of the Upper East Side has much to do with the various colleges and universities with housing and buildings throughout the neighborhood, including the City College of New York’s Hunter Campus, as well as buildings annexed by Fordham University, its main campus located in the Bronx. Other institutions include the New York Film Academy and Berkeley College. Yorkville is in great proximity to a fabulous section of Central Park, and is filled with many high rise exclusive apartment buildings, as well as some co-operative housing options, not to mention some streets lined with beautiful brownstones. Though this neighborhood is more affordable than other sections of the Upper East Side, renting a small, sometimes called “shoe box” apartment in Yorkville is pricey, many units starting at $1500 or more. Shopping and Entertainment in Yorkville proper isn’t as diverse as in the other neighborhoods, but with its close proximity to the greater Upper East Side and the rest of Manhattan and New York City. Though constantly developing, Yorkville maintains a classic essence of New York City, filled with both charm and elegance all its own. One aspect of Yorkville is that it strips away the snobbery of the Upper East Side to reveal a more lax environment, while still being accessible, well-connected, diverse, and current.

Dining:
Heidelberg Restaurant - 1648 Second Ave., near. 86th Street
Pinocchio Ristorante - 1748 First Ave., at 90th Street
Zebú Grill - 305 E. 92nd Street, near. Second Ave.

Transportation: 4,5,6 trains along Lexington Avenue and the M15, M31, M86, M96, M98, M101, M102, and M103 buses.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"West Village - home to young professionals and celebrities."

The West Village located in the lower west side of Manhattan and juxtaposed to the vibrant East Village provides Manhattanites and its many visitors with a calm and trendy atmosphere. Filled with townhomes and multiple family apartment buildings, the West Village offers substantially lower rental and purchase prices than other neighborhoods nearby. The West Village is renown for its artistic vibe and eclectic mix of people, who shape the vibe of this dynamic neighborhood. Throughout its many streets, the West Village is home to several sites of historical interest, as well as many cultural landmarks, museums, and art spaces, including the Village Vanguard, Hudson River Park, Stonewall Inn, and the Westbeth Artists Community. Another great feature of many streets in the neighborhood is their proximity to the Hudson River, providing more privileged residents beautiful views of the water. Dining and Entertainment are bustling in this fabulous neighborhood, with the nearby Meatpacking District becoming a wonderful place for people of all ages seeking unique dining experiences as well as fabulous nights out on the town. The diverse offerings of the West Village keep the neighborhood modern and trendy, while it still maintains feelings of Old New York.

Dining:
Gottino - 52 Greenwich Ave., nr. Perry St.
Café Condesa - 183 W. 10th St., nr. 4th St.
Alfama - 551 Hudson St., at Perry St.
Kingswood - 121 W. 10th St., nr. Greenwich Ave.
P*ONG - 150 W. 10th St., nr. Waverly Pl.
Pio Maya - 40 W. 8th St., nr. MacDougal St.
The Original Sandwich Shoppe - 58A Greenwich Ave., at Perry St.

Shopping:
Kid O - 123 W. 10th St.
Verve Shoes - 338 Bleecker St.
Claudine - 19 Christopher St.
Blatt Billiards - 809 Broadway

Entertainment:
Cru Wine Bar
PD Johnson's
Magnolia Theater & Bar
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Upper West Side - trendy, with beautiful brownstones and museums."

The Upper West Side of Manhattan is a beautiful neighborhood, filled with several smaller neighborhoods, and is renown as a trendy yet elegant section of the island of Manhattan. Complete with great dining, entertainment, shopping, and housing options, this fabulous neighborhood is both a wonderful place to visit and a wonderful place to live. Comprised of several smaller neighborhoods, the Upper West Side is famous for its beautiful brownstones and eclectic mix of people. With every 10 blocks, the Upper West Side morphs but never loses its class or charm. Sites throughout the neighborhood include the New York Public Library for the Public Arts, the New York Historical Society, the Julliard School of Music, Columbia University, the American Folk Art Museum, the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, Lincoln Center which includes the Metropolitan Opera House, the Museum of Biblical Art, and the Nicholas Roerich Museum. With its various cultural and historic options, the Upper West Side is a wonderful place for people of all walks of life, namely families. The neighborhood is extremely convenient, filled with small shops, grocery stores, and many streets in close proximity to the expansive Central Park. Real Estate in the neighborhood is expensive, though rental and subletting prices are lower as one moves north toward Harlem. Throughout the Upper West Side are wonderful schools and institutions of higher learning, as well as small park made to cater to residents and visitors to the neighborhood. Dining and shopping in the neighborhood is diverse, ranging from small bagel joints to celebrity infested haunts. Nightlife in this neighborhood is also prime, boasting a hip jazz scene. The Upper West Side is well connected to other parts of the city, and is a fantastic part of Manhattan.

Transportation: 1, 2, 3 A, C, E F, V trains service the Upper West Side, as well as several buses and taxis.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Upper East Side - home to New York's rich and powerful."

The Upper East Side is one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in New York City and in the country. Renown for its affluence, upscale shops, fabulous dining, and wealthy residents, this neighborhood is a living dream for many to the city. Real Estate in this neighborhood is diverse, ranging from brownstones to high rise buildings. Located along the beautiful Central Park and filled with cultural wonders and historical sites, the Upper East Side or UES is coveted by many for its wonderful housing and prime location. Manhattan’s elite call the Upper East Side their home for many reasons. Dinging and Entertainment in the neighborhood maintains a certain level of class, with many restraunts being amongst the most expensive in the city. Though many people who live in other neighborhoods throughout the city find the neighborhood to be somewhat untouchable, visitors are often amazed by the austerity and classic Manhattan vibe displayed on the quiet yet urban streets. Transportation in this neighborhood is somewhat limited in terms of the metro, but cabs are plentiful, and many residents of the area have either personal drivers or access to private transportation. Shopping in the neighborhood is fabulous, with boutiques ranging in price, style, and size, though many are amongst the most popular in the city. Sites in the neighborhood include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the most prestigious art museum in the United States, boasting a fantastic collection of pieces from some of the world’s most famous artists. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is also located on the Upper East Side, as well as the Asia Society and the Whitney Museum of Art, as well as several embassies and government offices. Filled with several small enclaves and beautiful specialities unique to New York City, the Upper East Side as a whole is the creme de la creme of Manhattan living.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Turtle Bay, home to the United Nations."

Turtle Bay is one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in the city. Located within the sprawling area of Midtown East, Turtle Bay is the work place and home to some of the most prestigious people in the city and in the world. Turtle Bay is home to several New York City landmarks, most importantly the Chrysler Building and the United Nations Headquarters. The Chrysler Building, classically punctuating the beautiful New York City skyline with its needle point antenna, is one of the most beautiful architectural wonders in the city. The United Nations Headquarters adding an international fare to the neighborhood. The row of flags lining 1st Avenue is a beautiful sign of peace and world unity, and once you step foot on this street, you are technically no longer in the U.S. since the UN is placed on neutral ground. Tours of the headquarters are offered daily for less than $10 dollars and offered in English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and French. United Nations Row is also located in Turtle Bay, and the entire neighborhood is filled with international embassies. The neighborhood is filled with diplomats, ambassadors, UN employees, NGO offices, and air of quiet sophistication. Many of the streets are lined with brownstones and lined with trees, providing a calm and austere look to the neighborhood, though the Trump World Plaza located on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza adds an interesting modernity to the diplomatic cusp of New York City. Entertainment in the neighborhood is plentiful, with several upscale bars and small cafes, popular amongst the international and professional crowd in Turtle Bay. This neighborhood is extremely convenient and accessible, filled with every possibly amenity.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Tribeca - one of NYC's hottest and most expensive neighborhoods."

TriBeCa is one of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the city. Located on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, this bustling neighborhood is filled with great housing, dining, shopping, and nightlife. TriBeCa is a great place for people of all walks of life. Sites in this neighborhood include the beautiful Washington Market Park and the Holland Tunnel, connection New York City to New Jersey. With its large industrial style buildings filled with converted loft spaces, TriBeCa is populated with a cross-section of people, not mention the rich and famous, includes such notables as Kate Winslet and Yoko Ono. During the 70's and 80's, TriBeCa was the stomping ground for many artists and performers, and is known for its influence of the New York City film and acting scene. The TriBeCa Film Festival is held here annually and is normally well-attended, showing some of the most technically advanced independent films made throughout the world. TriBeCa is a scenic neighborhood in a great location, nearby several other popular Manhattan neighborhoods including SoHo and the Financial District. Though filled with a hip and urban crowd, this neighborhood is filled with families and great schools as well as wonderful mobility are hallmarks of this neighborhood. Despite issues caused by the September 11 attacks which caused shockwaves through the city and the world, TriBeCa has maintained an upward slope and is, and likely always will be, a site of creation and innovation.

Transportation:
The 1 or 2 train to Canal, Franklin, or Chambers Streets, or the A, C, E line to Canal or Chambers Streets.

Dining:
Nobu -105 Hudson St.
Danube - 30 Hudson St., between Duane and Reade Streets
Kitchenette - 80 W. Broadway, at Warren Street

Nightlife:
Sugar - 311 Church St.
Church Lounge - 2 Sixth Ave.
The Odeon - 145 West Broadway
Pussycat Lounge - 96 Greenwich Street

Shopping:
Color Me Mine - 116 Franklin St.
Highland Park - 175 West Broadway
What Comes Around Goes Around - 1317 Laight St. 5th floor, Rm 28
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
5/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Soho - An oasis of style and shops in NYC."

Located South of Houston Street, SoHo is one of the most fantastically hip neighborhoods Manhattan has to offer. With a population of approximately 29,000 and Canal Street to Houston Street and situated between the Hudson River and Lafayette Street, SoHo is in a fantastic location.

Transportation in the neighborhood is extremely convenient with various trains servicing the neighborhood. Another wonderful aspect of living in SoHo is the wonderful architecture and vibe of the neighborhood. Ranging from walk-ups to high-rise lofts, SoHo is home to a diverse cross-section of residents. SoHo is one of New York City’s most popular tourist spots, given its proximity to Chinatown, Little Italy, NoHo, and the Lower East Side.

Shopping is one of the neighborhood’s best attributes, featuring a wide array of women’s and men’s fashion. Designers such as Kate Spade and Steve Madden have boutiques in the neighborhood, as well as more popular chains like H&M and Banana Republic, West Broadway is the perfect place to begin a shopping trip in SoHo, as it is lined with various stores, high end boutiques, and street vendors. Dining in SoHo is a treat, with a nice selection of cuisine. For a great Mexican meal, try Dos Caminos’ SoHo location (475 W. Broadway). Nightlife in SoHo is at best trendy, with new places sparking up constantly. With dance clubs, bars, and more low-key establishments, anyone can have a fun night out on the town in this hot neighborhood.

Transportation:
To get to Soho, use the Blue Line’s A, C, or E downtown trains to Canal Street or try the C or E to Spring Street. The Red Line’s 1,2, and 3 trains service both Houston Street and Canal Street. Other trains include: N, R, Q, W to Canal Street, R, W to Prince Street, 6 to Canal and Spring Streets, and the J, M, Z trains to Canal Street.

Real Estate:
Larger Apartments (2 bedroom or more) in this neighborhood can sell for more than $15 M, while renting can exceed $15,000. Smaller units are cheaper, but this desirable neighborhood is infamous of for its high priced real estate offerings.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Noho, the trendy Lower East Side."

This creative neighborhood is filled with a diverse spectra of people, restaurants, store, apartments, and life itself. NoHo has always home to a sort of elite class of people, known for their distinctive style and taste. This popular neighborhood, located north of Houston Street to East 9th Street and east from Broadway and Mercer to Lafayette Street, is filled with unique treasures on every block. One of the main attributes of the neighborhood are the sprawling lofts located in the huge apartment buildings lining each street. Home to a variety of people, including various celebrities, as well as office spaces for trendy businesses and companies, NoHo is a pocket of class within the sea of “everything” known as the Lower East Side.

Shopping in this neighborhood is as good as it gets, with offerings ranging from chain store to unique vintage stores. Dining in this neighborhood is just as diverse, with wonderful ethnic restaurants as well as classic American dives. Entertainment in Noho is great, hosting some of the most popular and chic cafes, bars, and nightspots in the city. NoHo is one of the most beautiful neighborhoods in the city, as it more classically New York than its more recently developed neighbors. On Broadway and other streets, the architecture is astounding with beautiful townhomes and cobble stone streets. NoHo is a beautiful neighborhood, filled with a sophisticated yet youthful flare.

Getting to know NoHo:

Transportation in NoHo is quite convenient with cab and buses readily available, though many New Yorkers rely on the subway for transportation. To get to NoHo, take the F or V trains to Broadway-Lafayette Street, the C or E trains to Spring Street, or the N or R trains to Prince Street. These trains are well-connected with other parts of the city, including the Midtown area.

Real Estate:
To Rent: Studio or 1 Bedroom apartment- 4,000 or greater
Loft- $6,000-$20,000 per month

To Buy:
Studio or 1 Bedroom Apartment: $300 K- $1 M
Loft- $1.7 M-$3.5 M

Dining:
Five Points
31 Great Jones St.

Shopping:
EDGE*nyNOHO
65 Bleecker St.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
5/5
Feb 23, 2009

"The heart of NYC"

Midtown is the center of New York City and the heartbeat of the city. A prime tourist location and a hectic yet jubilant section of Manhattan, Midtown West, spanning from 40th to 58th Street between 3rd and 9th Avenue, is a delightful haunt for native New Yorkers as well as first-time visitors to the city.

Midtown is filled with the sites that make New York City famous the entire world round. Here, you’ll find the famous Radio City Music Hall, home of the beautiful Rockette dancers, as well as NBC Studios Rainbow Room, where Saturday Night Live is filmed. Other wonderful sites include Carnegie Hall and Rockefeller Center. Carnegie Hall is one of the most prestigious performance spaces in the world and everything from opera to comedy has been performed on its hallowed stage. Rockefeller Center, home of the spectacular Christmas Tree and famous ice-skating rink, is a wonderful place to spend a day with the family, as well as getting in some high-end shopping. If you’re lucky, you might

Midtown is one of the most convenient neighborhoods to live in when living in Manhattan. Real Estate in the neighborhood is generally restricted to high rise apartments, but is also home to a cross-section of ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Transportation is extremely convenient with cabs, subway, and public buses more than readily available in this popular neighborhood.

Entertainment is a synch in Midtown, with the Theater District, home of Broadway nearby. Some of the most famous American Musicals including Cats, West Side Story, RENT, and The Lion King have shown here, and it is the stomping ground of some of the world’s most talented new faces in the theater world. This is the perfect place to spend an evening in the city.

Dining and nightlife in Midtown is plentiful, with several restaurants, both chain and upscale, lining each and every street. For some, just having an authentic New York City vendor hot dog will suffice after a long day touring the city.

Midtown typifies the energy of New York, and is a must-see for any newcomer.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Lennox Hill, one of the most prestigious neighborhoods in Manhattan"

Located on Manhattan’s illustrious Upper East Side, Lenox Hill is one of the most prestigious neighborhoods in Manhattan. Lined with beautiful high rises, a wonderful tambour, and in a fantastic location, Lenox Hill is a treasure in the city.

Lenox Hill is bounded by Fifth Avenue and Lexington Avenue, going from East 66th Street to East 77th Street. This area, named for the owner of a farm in what is present-day Lenox Hill, is known for its high rise condominiums and wonderful co-operative housing options. Real Estate in this neighborhood is somewhat expensive with many units fairly recently erected. A popular home for many of the cities elite, as well as up and comers, Lenox Hill is a wonderful place to live in the city, in part due to its fantastic location, and also due to its wonderful residents.

Elegance is a theme for the offerings in this beautiful neighborhood. Sites in Lenox Hill range from beautiful landmarks to famous museums. One of the cities most popular museums, The Whitney Museum of Art, is located in Lenox Hill and is renown for its collection of modern art, as well as being a popular venue for some of the world’s most talented performance and post-modern artists. Also in Lenox Hill is the Asia Society, a wonderful historic resource with current art, film, media, and historical information on East Asian Society in New York City. Throughout the neighborhood there are smaller less renown museums and spaces, though the quality of work displayed in Lenox Hill is superb.

Dining and Entertainment in this neighborhood is wonderful, with upscale offerings in all varieties. Lenox Hill is a mature neighborhood for those with a more sophisticated entertainment pallet. A wonderful place for a night on the town, Lenox Hill is perfect for more established residents of New York City.

Transportation in Lenox Hill is convenient, as residents and visitors without their own means of transport have the options of the metro, cabs, or buses.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Feb 23, 2009

"Kips Bay, a changing neighborhood in East Manhattan"

Close to Gramercy Park and Murray Hill. Bordered by Third Avenue between 27th and 34th Streets, this neighborhood is delightful. Offering a unique charm, Kips Bay is a wonderful place to live.

Kips Bay is named for the body of water it borders. A fairly economically diverse neighborhood, Kips Bay is a bit less swanky than its neighbors, and much less exclusive. Though this neighborhood lacks the prestige of nearby neighborhoods, Kips Bay maintains a level of class all its own.

One of the best features of the neighborhood are its educational and medical facilities. Kips Bay is home to the prestigious New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts as well as the School of Medicine, not to mention the United Nations International School for the children of those affiliated with the cooperative organ. This makes Kips Bay a more desirable place for families to settle, as well as more established singles, in addition to retirees.

Accessibility is a major plus to living in Kips Bay, as this neighborhood is conveniently located and filled with wonderful shopping options. There is “Kips Bay,” a mall of sorts located within the neighborhood with various offerings. There has also been a surge of new businesses and small boutiques to Kips Bay.

Real Estate in the neighborhood is restricted to high rise apartment buildings, which are pricey. Most people who live in Kips Bay work nearby, however, offering true “bang for your buck” in terms of monthly transportation costs.

Entertainment is yours in Kips Bay, not only in terms of the offerings within this neighborhood but because of the proximity to other areas of the city, boredom is impossible!
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
5/5
Feb 17, 2009

"Gramercy Park - Arguably Manhattan's most beautiful neighborhood"

Gramercy Park is one of New York’s most esteemed and beautiful neighborhoods, home one of the most beautiful private parks in the nation. This neighborhood, known for its uptown class and sophistication yet downtown flare and modern vibe, is one of the city’s most fabulous neighborhoods.

Historically, Gramercy was the prized possession of many of the city’s most wealthy and prominent residents, passing from ownership from such people as Peter Stuyvesant to James Duane to Samuel Ruggles by the mid-nineteenth century. Real Estate in Gramercy Park is remarkable, as it is home to some of the most well-maintained and coveted prewar apartment buildings, townhomes, and brownstones, and its residents get sole access to the beautiful park at the center of the neighborhood. Ruggles decided upon the exclusivity of the neighborhood via the park, providing residents of the neighborhood a private retreat outside of their lavish homes. Still today, there is a strict code of conduct required for the “key-holders” including a ban on jogging. The attention to detail and the unique opulence throughout the neighborhood provides a stark change from the architecture of Gramercy Park’s neighbors of SoHo and the East Village, which buildings’ lack the decadence of this esteemed neighborhood. Living in this neighborhood, as residence in one of these beautiful buildings is not only exclusive but expensive, can be somewhat of a challenge for those moving with a budget.

Gramercy is known for its wonderful entertainment options, ranging from dining, to shopping, to nightlife and bars. This neighborhood maintains its air of poshness while still managing to be hip and trendy, appealing both to Wall Street tycoons to post-graduate professionals to college students to retirees.

Gramercy Park is also renown for its fine upkeep and wonderful community, as the exclusivity brings with it a more neighborly comradery, which is somewhat unfathomable in the larger neighborhoods throughout the city.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"Flatiron - one of Manhattan's most sought after neighborhoods."

Flatiron is one of the more historic neighborhoods in Manhattan, with beautiful views and gorgeous homes and apartments. Located in the heart of the city and filled with a diverse population, Flatiron is a wonderful place for anyone to call, “home.”

Flatiron is given its namesake from the architectural dream building, the Flatiron Building, world renown for its unique triangular shape. One of the other famous landmarks in this neighborhood is the fabulous Madison Square Park, a perfect afternoon getaway from the hustle and bustle of midtown Manhattan. The Met Life Building as well as the Ladies’ Mile Historic District are places of interest in this sprawling neighborhood.

A highlight of this neighborhood is its proximity to other vibrant neighborhoods in the city, namely the Garment District. Within Flatiron and beyond, shopping is a huge plus, with various chain stores as well as unique boutiques located on virtually every street corner. Dining and Nightlife options are also plentiful throughout the neighborhood, as midtown Manhattan is world renown for its distinctive offerings. Restaurant Row on Park Avenue South is peppered with cuisine from around the world, some upscale, and some more wallet-friendly options. The lovely part about dining in New York is that price does not always dictate quality, so those living on a tight budget can still enjoy the creme de la creme of the Manhattan experience.

This neighborhood is classically urban, featuring real estate offering fantastic views of the city. Real Estate in Flatiron is relatively expensive in comparison with nearby areas, but has much more to offer in terms of variety.

Flatiron is also home to the City University of New York’s Baruch Campus as well as the birthplace of Theodore Roosevelt.

Though to many considered to be a neighborhood within a neighborhood, Flatiron maintains its own flare.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"The Financial District is one of the oldest and most esteemed neighborhoods in New York City."

Located at the southern most tip of the isle of Manhattan, the Financial District is home to some of the oldest and most established financial institutions in America and in the world. Today, the neighborhood is reemerging as an up and coming home of culture.

The Financial District is best described by its many landmarks beginning with the world-famous Wall Street, home to some of the most prestigious financial institutions as well as the New York Stock Exchange, the premier institution of stock trading in the free world. The steps of the exchange are a perfect location to grab a hot dog on a fall day and watch the busy buyers and sellers scurry in and out for a quick break from their high octane job. This picturesque yet short street is the beginning of a wonderful neighborhood, filled with quiet delights and an almost serene atmosphere.

This neighborhood is filled with museums, perhaps most appropriately the Museum of American Finance. Also in this neighborhood is the Federal Hall National Memorial Museum, where America’s first president was inaugurated.

Across the street from this esteemed pillar of American History is one of great sorrow. Ground Zero, the memorial site formed following the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, is a pivotal sight when visiting this neighborhood. Currently bound by fences denoting the tragedy, Ground Zero will eventually be home to the newly designed Freedom Towers, a symbol of American viability and resilience, not to mention unity.

History is a major aspect of the Financial District’s offerings. Battery Park and the South Street Seaport are as old as New York, and offer the best views of the Statue of Liberty from Manhattan. Both are wonderful places to visit and are major haunts for tourists from around the world.

Today, the neighborhood is being revitalized in terms of real estate, with many large office buildings being converted into residential dwellings. Dining, nightlife, shopping, and entertainment are improving throughout this neighborhood, and more and more people are viewing this old neighborhood as the new place to live.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"Garment District - the heart of fashion in NYC"

Fashion finds its home in the fabulous Garment District, which shows great potential to be the next big thing in terms of Manhattan living. Located in the heart of Manhattan, this sprawling neighborhood is the epicenter of fashion in New York and arguably the United States, and is a great place to either live or to visit.

Running along Fifth and Eighth Avenues and from 34th Street to Times Square located at 42nd Street, the Garment District, or Fashion Center, is a hard area to avoid when visiting the city. In this neighborhood, you’ll find more retail stores than one could ever imagine, and something to suit the tastes of any member of the family.

Fashion is the major industry in New York and in this neighborhood as some of the most renown designers produce their looks in this neighborhood. The look of the neighborhood is dominated by somewhat imposing warehouses, filled with fabric and creativity. Originally mainly a manufacturing district, The Garment District today is the heart of fashion in New York City, with many designers also housing their show rooms throughout the neighborhood.

Walking through this bustling neighborhood is quite amazing, as it is home to Macy’s, the world’s largest department store. Spanning one New York City block and with 9 floors of shopping ranging from a home supplies store in the basement to the famous Holiday Lane as featured in the classic Miracle on 34th Street on the top floor during the holiday season, this store is described by many as magical. On any given day, anything can happen, ranging from a Calvin Klein fashion show to the unveiling of the Swarovsky crystal ball used to mark the coming of the new year at Times Square.

Also in the Garment District is the renown Empire State Building, located across the street from Macy’s. From its top floor, one can get views of the entire city, almost the same view King Kong would have had scaling up to the top.

Real Estate in the neighborhood is improving, though is somewhat limited to large buildings lacking the distinct personality of homes in neighborhoods nearby. With time, this area has seen an increase in development and namely in upscale exclusive high rise apartment buildings.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"East Village - one of Manhattans most vibrant neighborhoods"

The East Village in Lower Manhattan is the epicenter of music, art, and “hipster” culturally currently enveloping New York City and youth culture. From the streets of the East Village, trends are born of every imaginable variety ranging from new food to new fashion to new slang.

The East Village since its inception has been a hub for musicians and artists of the most talented variety. Built atop the ruins from WWII, the East Village emerged in the 1960s as the perfect spot for “beatniks” and hippies to live “easy and free” and in a center of artistic expression. Soon thereafter, such artists as Jimi Hendrix and Bob Dylan, artists such as Andy Warhol, and author of the musical RENT, the late Johnathon Larson, became staples of the neighborhood, working in such famous haunts as CBGB and Club 57. This neighborhood became a focal point in the experimental and performance theaters as well as the perfect location for the post-modern art scene.

Today, the East Village is still filled with great music and creative people, though the heart of the art scene has moved to Williamsburg, a neighborhood in the nearby borough of Brooklyn. It includes such famous neighborhoods named for streets throughout the neighborhood such as Alphabet City, Stuyvesant Town, Loisada, St. Mark’s Place, and The Bowery. Once famous simply for its high homeless population, this neighborhood is improving steadily in terms of safety and upkeep.

A great point of interest for many of the residents of the East Village is Tompkins Square Park, its answer to Central Park. In this space you’ll find many performance artists, as well as musicians and street vendors, and is the perfect place to spend a Sunday afternoon.

Dining and Entertainment are plentiful in the East Village, as well as an extremely vibrant nightlife scene. At night, this neighborhood is more catered to an artistic clientele, those truly interested in a more gritty New York experience.

Subway: F, V, 6 and L
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"Sutton Place is a beautiful and affluent neighborhood in Manhattan"

Noted as one of the most scenic and exclusive neighborhoods in the city and named for shipping giant Effington B. Sutton who settled here in the mid-nineteenth century, Sutton is wonderful place for the more established residents of the city to call home and a wonderful place to visit.

One of the more notable aspects of this beautiful neighborhood are the large and decadent brownstones, erected in the mid 19th century. These homes are both elegant and desired, as brownstones are the trademark dwelling of New Yorkers. With a distinctive history and fantastic array of people and celebrities residing in the blocks between 53rd and 57th Street on the Upper East Side, Sutton Place is a fantastic treasure.

Though rental properties in the city tend to range anywhere from $800-$3000 or more in this illustrious neighborhood, buying might be more of a challenge, as many units sell for no less than $500,000-$600,000.

Entertainment in Sutton and the surrounding neighborhood is renown for its decadence and elegance. Citing mainly upscale boutiques featuring haute couture fashions and five-star avant-garde restaurants and bistros, Sutton’s entertainment suits the residents of the neighborhood perfectly. Sutton is a beautiful neighborhood, filled with parks and running trails.

Situated along the East River, this is a wonderful detour from the sometime over-saturated running trails of the Central Park area. Transportation in this neighborhood is superb, with the 6 train running along Lexington Avenue and the E and V trains running along East 53rd Street. You can also find several buses throughout the neighborhood, and yellow taxis are plentiful. This fantastic neighborhood is a staple in the city and in the national consciousness of what New York City living is like.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids