HenryZ

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Reviews

4/5
Just now

"Walkable and convenient too"

A lovely and more affordable area of Brookline, Salisbury Road/Corey Farm is very popular with university students. It's got condos as well as single family homes and apartments and there's a good reason it's a sought after area. Between Coolidge Corner and Washington Square, it offers a huge assortment of restaurants and trendy shops in almost any director. It's very convenient to transportation and is, in general, one of the most popular and accessible areas of Brookline.

One of the nicest attractions is the accessibility to the paths going up Corey Hill. They were a part of a master design years ago, but now they provide a quick walk through a beautiful and secluded area and amazing vistas once at the top of Corey Hill. Having something like this in a busy city is very special indeed.
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4/5
Just now

"The best of everything ...."

Griggs Park is one of those extremely walkable areas just off Beacon St. in the western section of Brookline. It's close to rail links, has a Whole Foods nearby, and is a quiet little enclave of houses and apartments. It's real draw is the park itself which can be reached by a wonderful walkway called Marion Path. Living in Griggs Park is rather special since you are surrounded by parkland, birds and nature yet you can see skyscrapers not far away. It's almost surreal.

Shopping is found on Beacon St. as well as restaurants and pubs in nearby Washington Square.Considering that you feel like you live in a rural area and still have transit and everything else within a short walk, this is one of those areas you want to afford to live in!
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5/5
Just now

"This is one exclusive area!"

Fisher Hill is one of the most picturesque areas of Brookline. It's all tree-lined roads and large house lots including some very large estates. This is a very upscale area primarily inhabited by
old money or newer moguls and is considered rather exclusive. One of the largest estates, Longyear, has been turned into luxury condos and is pretty amazing. It's one of those places you strive to live in!

For the average person, a trip to the old Fisher Hill reservoir after a walk around the neighborhood, is about as close as you'll get. The reservoir is abandoned and usually most of it is dry, but what fun to see a little wild greenspace. Fisher Hill is a must see - just for the beauty and dreams of living there.
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"This is an airport that's almost an island"

It was built in 1923 as Jeffrey Field and was used for the Army Air Corps but today it is the massive airport known as Logan. Surrounded on water by three sides, it is a huge 2400 acres and employs 16,000 people. Logan's growth has been slow and over the years while it managed to eat up one residential neighborhood completely - Wood Island - and now the nearest one is Jeffries Point, a part of East Boston. There, one finds a neighborhood seemingly untouched by progress that is inhabited by all sorts of people who don't mind the noise and wholove the beautiful architecture of the houses.

Beloved and loathed, Logan is one of the top busiest airports in the United States, and not many complain that it is so close to the city.
MIT
4/5
Just now

"Energy driven neighborhood!"

This is one smart neighborhood. The MIT campus takes up most of the area of this stretch of land along the Charles River Basin. Outside of the dorms, the area becomes a mix of super high tech companies like Google, Verizon and AT&T amongst others. Most are housed in either modern office buildings or renovated industrial buildings. There's also a residential area which has more diversity than one would imagine here.

Kendall Square is the real hub of the area away from the campus. It's where you find all the bars and restaurants, the shopping and residents of the neighborhood. During the day, it's all business people - consider the wifi and cell service here nothing short of excellent - but at night it totally changes as students come out for the bars and movies. It's amazing how it transforms itself.
And with a drink in hand, you can see some of the best views of the Charles from there too.
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3/5
Just now

"Great student area!"

The area around Tufts University is, as one might expect, heavily oriented toward students and university life. Anything you might save on rent because it might be a bit of a walk to the T is cancelled out because apartments are popular in the area. The area used to be pretty bad but the need for student housing has improved it dramatically.

The good news is that you can walk almost anywhere for things you need. Ethnic restaurants, chain stores and shops are all easily found on the Somerville side of Tufts. The campus and the immediate area become a little university world but it doesn't take long to discover that a T ride away is loads of stuff. Harvard Square is one stop!
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3/5
Just now

"What a mix this neighborhood is!"

Powder House is a small neighborhood along with being one of the landmark roatries in Somerville.
The original guard house for gun powder over looks the circle and is designated an historical monument. With Tufts University only a few blocks away, there are plenty of students around and it makes for a funny mixture. There's the powder house, a park with a lot of random statues and a lot of students in jeans and t-shirts.

It's a neighborhood with good ethnic restaurants, a lower skyline with the double decker houses, and a good feel. It's walkable, friendly and not the cheapest place in Somerville to live, but it's worth it. Just don't try to walk across the Powder House roundabout ...unless you like hearing the sound of screeching brakes.
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4/5
Just now

"One of the hippest places to live!"

Full of double and triple-decker houses, West Somerville is certainly suburban but with an urban feel to it. All along Broadway is noisy and busy and both Davis and Powder House Squares add some definition to it all. I love Davis Square. On a map so many streets converge there that it literally looks like an octopus!

The whole area mixes old and new so well together that it is no wonder it often makes the lists of hippest places to live. It's got students, gays, young professionals as well as working class folks.
There’s a very diverse selection of shops and the arts - both performing and visual - are evident in the many galleries and theatrical venues. Living in West Somerville is getting pricey which is too bad. Hope it doesn't lose any of its charm.
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4/5
Just now

"Erin Go Bragh!"

South Boston means two things to Bostonians - it’s the site of the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade and it is also home to Castle Island, a large park on the waterfront. It’s a mixed neighborhood of business and residences and has an intense sense of community. Locals call themselves Southies. Originally, it was largely Irish American but they’ve been joined by young professionals, and several additional ethnic groups. Still on St Patrick’s Day, you will find everyone wearing green and Erin Go Bragh painted on buildings. Harborwalk is still under construction but will eventually lead to 43 miles of walkways along the harbor front.

You won't find a friendlier or more fun neighborhood. It's got bars, beaches, and versatility!
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4/5
Just now

"It's where to find 'restaurant row'."

The South End is an historicaly designated neighborhood, and represents one of the largest collections of Victorian housing in the city. Beautiful brick structures on shady streets, it is home to a varied mix of ethnicities. It’s considered a great gay area as well as being very artistic and cultural. It is one of the main restaurant districts and its Tremont Street is often referred to as “Restaurant Row”. Also attractive are the eleven residential parks found across the South End. These small residential squares along with sixteen community gardens ensure visitors and residents have plenty of greenspace.
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2/5
Just now

"The neighborhood of neighborhoods."

Northern Dorchester is a residential area and is also the major shopping destination for most people who in live the southern and western portions of the area. It has Uphams Corner, which is where all the shops are. Jones Hill nearby is nearly all residential and mostly all older Victorian homes. Harbor Point is where you find the University of Massachusetts and the John F. Kennedy Library, which is notable for hanging out almost over the water of the Harbor.

Like the rest of Dorchester, the northern section is a veritable tapestry of nationalities and ethnic groups and one of the reasons the area is referred to as 'the neighborhood of neighborhoods'. Expect to find double and triple-decker multi-family houses, a real mixed bag of feeling from block to block and little neighborhood to neighborhood. It takes really examining the smaller areas because they are all so very different.
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4/5
Just now

"It's a progressive and diverse little neighborhood."

North Brookline is one of those areas where you can opt out of owning a car. There's plenty of open space for walking and it's close enough to mass transit that you can get where you need to go. It's sort of a progressive neighborhood that attracts a very diverse population and it is a mixture of historical homes and well maintained apartment buildings with enough commercial density to make life convenient.

There's a seasonal farmer's market that's replaced the once huge farms in the area. Now it's trucked in. There's a wide range of amenities in this neighborhood because of huge growth, but luckily, there's some well thought out urban planning going on too. It isn't likely that the area will become overdeveloped and everyone can keep enjoying the parks and fresh air.
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4/5
Just now

"A close in neighborhood that's super quiet"

Longwood is the most eastern and therefore closest in neighborhood of Brookline. Although housing a portion of Wheelock College, it is a higher income area with the average age of a resident being early 30s and young professionals who like the quick commute. It's expensive and most of the apartments and houses are older. One of the great larger apartment buildings, the Longwood Tower, is undergoing huge renovation and would be an exciting place to live if one has the money.

This is a really quiet area and it's great if you don't expect a lot of bars or restaurants right down the block. You have to head up to Fenway Plaza for all that. This area of Brookline is more about being close, good schools and really nice places to live.
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5/5
Just now

"This is a favorite neighborhood for doctors."

High Street Hill in Brookline is more commonly known as Pill Hill. And the name is very apt. It is so close to the huge Longwood Medical Center that it became home to many of the facilities doctors and other employees. The name it isn’t recent either. It was bestowed in the late 19th Century! The area is full of beautiful Victorian homes most of which have lovely views from their sites on the hillside. Residents have managed to maintain a quiet, leafy and old feel to the streets through one of the strongest neighborhood associations anywhere. This is an area where preservation and restoration never waiver.

Leaverett Pond is one of the big attractions because it provides residents with outstanding outdoor space complete with gardens, playgrounds and room for biking and running. The community cooperation that goes into keeping the Pond area up is really outstanding.
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4/5
Just now

"A neat and tidy family area."

Just off the north side of Boylston Street and Route 9, Central Village in Brookline is a real thirty-something, young professional area. The streets are quiet, the lawns all cut, and the coolest thing is that you can walk to major shopping and restaurants in minutes. Washington Street which borders on the west is packed full of bars, restaurants, and great shopping.

If there's any draw back to the area, it like all of Brookline, doesn't allow overnight parking on the streets and you really need a car for commuting. That said, the pleasant quality of housing and the environment makes up for any inconvenience. There's always biking or walking too! Besides, any neighborhood with a Trader Joe's is great!
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3/5
Just now

"Good for young families and it's quiet."

Strawberry Hill is the smallest of all the Cambridge neighborhoods. It's mostly a residential area of multi-family homes and some apartment buildings here and there. The closest shopping area is along Mount Auburn Street which is also one of the major thoroughfares for the neighborhood. It's good for recreation since it sits across from the Fresh Pond Reservation and is also near the O'Neill Golf Course.

While it might be one of the least convenient areas of Cambridge, it also makes it a quiet area good for kids and young families. It's walkable, very safe with a low crime rate, and a nice mixture of all ages. Of course, as the older people die off, the properties are being bought by younger people so its face is changing but old Irish bars like Conley's on Belmont still thrive with new patrons discovering it all the time.
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3/5
Just now

"This area has lots of law students."

The Peabody area of Cambridge is a popular area with students at Harvard Law School, so much of the area revolves around them but also expect a lot of leafy and tree-lined streets of single family housing. It's a good area for kids with plenty of playgrounds. But, of course, like much of Cambridge, it comes at a price.

Peabody is convenient for shopping with the Fresh Pond Shopping Center at one end and Porter Square at the other. The nightlife isn't exactly rockin' but there are some good neighborhood pubs like Spirit Bar where it's fun to watch college football with your neighbors. Overall, Peabody is lower key and offers a quieter lifestyle. The most noise you'll hear are barking dogs at night.
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3/5
Just now

"A really up and coming neighborhood"

The little neighborhood of Magoun Square is shaped like a triangle. It's eastern tip at Broadway and Medford is where the actual square is found. Magoun Square itself is also a little controversial.
There have been plans afoot to revitalize it to be more of a central shopping district for the neighborhood but after a few false starts, it is due to be completely renovated starting in Spring 2010.

Magoun Square is a popular area with young professionals so it has a type of youthful feel to it.
It's up and coming yet hasn't gotten so expensive that you can't find a deal. It still has that working class, tight knit feel to it. The bars and restaurants are worth checking out and Lil Vinny's is the best Italian food outside of the North End.
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3/5
Just now

"A beautiful riverfront in Somerville"

The Ten Hills area of Somerville doesn't have ten hills. It's got one! It was named after a colonial farm rather than geological formations. Ten Hills is more or less cut off from the rest of Somerville by I93 - a good and a bad thing.

The neighborhood is up and coming but isn't destined to be as trendy as some of the adjacent areas either. It's still a reasonably priced area, has a lot of big box stores, including IKEA who has contributed big bucks to some of area renewal, and the town is planning some controlled development. What's nice is its location on the Mystic River which gives residents a lot of greenspace and is a very pretty area. Rent a canoe or paddleboat on a summer day. It's great.
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3/5
Just now

"A good place to live, play or work"

North Cambridgehas two faces ...the busy, dense areas off Cedar and Massachusetts and the more western section which is full of bike paths, parks and ball fields. Adjacent to both Davis and Porter Squares, the eastern section has easy access to both transportation and great shopping.
Check out Porter Square for a big Japanese influence including the big kinetic sculpture that soars over everything.

This neighborhood is good for families and students a like with its reasonable rents, and it is one of the most affordable sections of Cambridge. With all the greenspace of Russell Field, Comeau Field and points west, it's really popular for people who like the outdoors. Biking, running and just getting fresh air is a big draw here.
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3/5
Just now

"The hills are like a personal stairmaster."

Spring Hill is a neighborhood in the central part of Somerville. Situated on a glacial ridge, it was once a farming community. It's about as far from those rural days as one could imagine now. The once peaceful hillside is now a bustling neighborhood made up of multi-family houses. It's hard to imagine that Central or Lowell Street was a mid-1600's road. Check out the old Round House on Atherton Street for a feeling of yester year.

The good thing about Spring Hill is that it is gentrifying but not so much that it is losing its old character. There aren't any bad blocks but the farther you get from Broadway, the quieter it is.
Oh, and you'll get good exercise since you'll be walking up and down steep hills to get anywhere.
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3/5
Just now

"Best part of Somerville!"

Historic as the first place the American flag ever flew, Prospect Hill has been many things - a POW camp, a military training place and battle site. Somehow, even with a couple of hundred years of changes, it has somehow managed to maintain a peacefulness that came when farming began there.

Today, Prospect Hill's Union Square is indicative of the changing demographics. Once all working class families, you'll find more street life but with sort of a posh twist to it. It's ethnic, has loads of bars and restaurants, and is convenient for bordering on Cambridge. Stop in the sqaure and look up at the old monument ...it's pretty awe inspiring.
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"An area high on the arts"

The old Industrial Park is more commonly known as Brickbottom for all the early brick making facilities that used to be there. Early on, it was mixed with the immigrants who lived and worked there. Most of their houses are gone today and the remaining bleak looking factory buildings are
deceiving. Inside those places is some of the most exciting art work being created in Boston today. It's a long way from brick factories and the tea companies who once thrived here.

This is such a mecca for artists. A place where they can live and work and the sense of community is fantastic. The whole neighborhood is ever expanding and the energy is unbelivable!
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2/5
Just now

"A very colorful and lively area"

Mattapan is an Indian American name of old that means ‘a good place to be’, and since the 1870s, many Bostonians have chosen to call it home. It is largely a residential area consisting of single family homes and small apartment buildings.

Today, the area is one of the largest Haitian populations in Massachusetts, and they are joined by immigrants from other Caribbean countries. Mattapan Square is the commercial and cultural center of the neighborhood, and its restaurants and shops reflect the vibrant and colorful Caribbean culture its residents have brought with them. There is a large amount of urban renewal going on as is evident with the new 21,000 square foot neighborhood library being built.
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3/5
Just now

"You need a political point of view here."

West Roxbury is an almost entirely residential area that is known for civic activism and politics. Early on it was home to a 19th Century experimental Utopian community which was large enough to attract many notables. While Brook Farm no longer exists, West Roxbury has remained nearly rural with most businesses located along Centre Street where one finds excellent restaurants and shopping. The 100 acre Millennium Park consists of miles of trails, ball fields and picnic areas, and is very popular with residents and visitors alike. With direct rail links to downtown Boston, it’s no wonder the area is popular with families.
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3/5
Just now

"This place still feels rural"

Although it was once considered a suburb, Roslindale today is very much a Boston neighborhood. It still has a suburban or almost rural feel especially since there is access to the 265 acre Arnold Arboretum and to the Stony Brook Reservation, a state park. The old colonial homes are being converted into condos and the area is vibrant with young families and professionals. The old Roslindale Square, known as The Rozzy, is a chic area for restaurants and boutiques. It’s a short hop to downtown via commuter rail so it is becoming an increasingly popular area to live and to visit.
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3/5
Just now

"It's diverse and gentrifying quickly"

Little Mission Hill is only 3/4th of a square mile but packs a huge wallop. It is considered one of Boston’s beter zip codes these days, is architecturally interesting and home to a diverse cross section of people - 65% of whom bicycle or walk to work. The area is full of luxury condos right along side student rentals and artists studios. The restaurants and shopping are terrific along Huntington and Tremont, and there are fabulous views of the city so it’s easy to see why everyone loves Mission Hill. Check out Parker Hill where you can see for miles and miles.
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4/5
Just now

"So much greenspace in Hyde Park"

The Hyde Park neighborhood sits at Boston’s most southern tip and along the Neponset River. The great thing about this area is that it provides easy and fast access to city life but offers up more open space than is normally connected to such a close in suburb. The architecture of the area is notable yet is as diverse as the population. This huge range of ethnicities is easily seen in the central business area at Logan Square and Cleary Street. The neighborhood also houses one of Boston’s most famous muncipal golf courses - the George Wright which was designed by Donald Ross.
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3/5
Just now

"South Dorchester is one big mix"

South Dorchester is one of the largest and most diverse neighborhoods in Boston. A big mix of Irish Americans, African Americans, Latinos, gays and working artists make for a real tapestry. The waves of immigrants have kept things interesting with new stores and restaurants, and the face of the area constantly changes and one even finds neighborhoods within neighborhoods there. Dorchester is historic and is home to Boston’s oldest home (1648). Its south side exposure to Boston harbor also makes its green areas and parks popular. Residential and commercial areas are divided enough to make it an area with the best of both worlds.
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4/5
Just now

"Gentrified living"

Cambridgeport is a mostly residential area bordered on the north by Central Square and to the south by the Charles River. Because it is so easy to walk to great restaurants and shopping, it is a popular section of Cambridge for singles and young professionals, who also appreciate fantastic access to mass transit.

Huge revitalization and gentrification have made it a somewhat expensive yet most desirable place to live. It’s residents are ethnically and economically diverse with Harvard professors and working class immigrants living side-by-side.

The area has also become a center for people working in high tech industries located in nearby sections of Cambridge.
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5/5
Just now

"Everything is very upscale"

Considered one of Boston’s finest neighborhoods, Back Bay is a blend of retail, residential and office buildings. Skyscrapers on one side of the area and Victorian mansions on the other make for an interesting and upscale mix. Back Bay is home to Boston’s most affluent residents and its shops reflect its population with shopping destinations like Boylston and Newbury Street stores.
It’s also where you find the most expensive hotels, interesting and important buildings on Copley Square, and some of Boston’s finest restaurants and posh bars. And, the area has the Boston Public Gardens, a virtual oasis of beauty and calm in the middle of it all.
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4/5
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"Talk about walkability!"

The Agassiz area of Cambridge is also known as Harvard North for its proximity to the university and was actually named for a Harvard professor who lived there. The neighborhood spans the distance between Harvard Square and Porter Square and is chock full of wonderful Victorian houses on all the side streets. Massachusetts Avenue provides all the stores, shops and restaurants plus over on Oxford Street, you can visit all the vintage mounted animals at the Harvard Museum of History. Residents and visitors love this walkable, convenient and charming neighborhood. It’s place where you don’t need a car. Between mass transit being right there and everything being so close, it’s a hit.
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5/5
Just now

"Go BC!"

Chestnut Hill is one of Boston’s outermost neighborhoods situated on the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. It’s a very old area with a fascinating mixture of architectural styles and is very suburban in feel. Since it is home to the Boston College campus, the area is full of students as well as the residents of single-family houses. Also thanks to the college, restaurants and shopping are very diverse giving residents and visitors huge options. The atmosphere in Chestnut Hill is exciting yet rural and peaceful which makes for a type of perfection in city neighborhoods. And, if you aren’t interested in college sports, you might want to rethink it. BC sports are terrific for spectators.
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4/5
Just now

"Great area for the outdoors!"

Jamaica Plain was founded by Puritans looking for farmland out of the city yet it ironically became the center of beer production in the Boston area. Although most of the breweries closed during Prohibition and never reopened, Jamaica Plain was destined to become one of Boston’s most popular areas for students, artists and a significant Hispanic population. The neighborhood probably has more parks and greenspaces than any other in the city and can boast Jamaica Pond, the largest and deepest fresh water mass in Boston. As a part of the amazing Emerald Necklace park system, it’s no wonder the area was once called ‘the Eden of America’.
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3/5
Just now

"Up and coming area"

Founded around 1630 by colonists looking for farmland, Roxbury today proudly serves as ‘the heart of Black culture in Boston’. It’s a neighborhood undergoing complete revitalization and has literally hundreds of new businesses around the central Dudley Square district. The Roxbury Center for the Arts opened in 2005 and rapidly became a huge draw for the performing and visual arts. Other economic incentives are making for Roxbury’s exciting future. The old wood-framed houses are now attracting many artists and young professionals. Definitely a neighborhood in good transition.
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3/5
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"Sister neighborhoods"

While Fenway claims Fenway Park, it is actually located in nearby Kenmore.
Kenmore may be a sister neighborhood but is distinctly different. Almost every single apartment building or house is now owned by Boston University so the area is packed with students. Kenmore Square is the center of everything with all the shops and restaurants clustered together. Also notable is the famous Citgo sign that looms over the square. It’s always seen during telecasts of Red Sox games, and while an historical landmark dating back to 1940, it is also very controversial since there hasn’t been a gas station underneath it for years.
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4/5
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"Best bagels and lox in Boston"

Coolidge Corner is a family-oriented neighborhood of Brookline. It’s one of those
walkable areas that has a plethora of independent shops and stores, a small town feel and is popular with commuters due to easy access to mass transit on the green line. There’s a significant Jewish population denoted by several large synagogues and ethnic shops clustered near the Allston border. It’s where you find real delicatessens so expect to find the best bagels and other kosher style eats in Boston. This urban village with a rural feel also houses part of Boston University and was the birthplace of John F. Kennedy.
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4/5
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"Love the shady streets"

The Aspinwall Hill area of Brookline is a unique urban area with an almost rural feel to it. Due in large part to its late 1880s street design plan that incorporates housing density with pedestrian paths to shops and entertainment, life in Aspinwall provides the best of both worlds. It is highly convenient to public transportation, has excellent schools and is one of the most popular areas of Brookline for young professionals with families. With the convenience of all the Beacon Street shops and restaurants within walking distance and its shady streets and large apartments, it’s no wonder it is one of the most sought after areas.
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4/5
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"Fantastic for fireworks"

Corey Hill at 260 feet above sea level is not only one of the great Boston neighborhoods, but it's got some of the best views anywhere in the city. A trek to the top of the summit provides some of the most incredible views over Cambridge and The Charles.

The walk up isn't for the faint hearted but once there, it's a perfect place to hang out for a while - year round. The area has such an international feel to it with beautiful homes and some larger new apartment buildings. It's one of those places residents don't ever like to leave. Besides, there's no place like it for watching the 4th of July fireworks over Boston Harbor!
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4/5
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"Best of the old and new"

Close to Harvard University, the Allston/Brighton area is a lively cross section of students, young professionals, Russian and South American immigrants. Apartment buildings consist of traditional architecture while the area is a vibrant mix of ethnic restaurants, good watering holes, and youthful atmosphere. A section of the neighborhood is largely single-family housing and consists of lovely Victorian architecture and is known as South Allston. Bordering on the Charles River and convenient to downtown Boston as well as universities, this area manages to incorporate Boston history with a modern lifestyle all making for one of the most interesting areas of the city.
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4/5
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"It's affordable in The Port"

Area IV is an old neighborhood in Cambridge which was originally a part of the marshes that were filled in along with Back Bay to become usable. Today, it’s a densely populated section of about 7000 people who refer to their neighborhood simply as ‘The Port’. Heavy on apartment buildings and condos and light on single-family houses, Area IV is a very walkable area with easy and quick access to shopping, entertainment and restaurants. There are good “T’ connections as well as great bus service which makes it popular with commuters who are looking for affordable places to live.
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4/5
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"Great for student restaurants"

This neighborhood sitting along the Charles River is one of Cambridge’s oldest areas and is locally referred to as ‘The Coast’. Lying between Harvard Square and Central Square, it is where much of Harvard’s student housing is located as well as some of the university’s academic buildings. Because of the large student population, Riverside is full of ethnic, less expensive restaurants and shopping. It’s river location has made it popular for boat clubs and watching the rowers and sculls on the Charles is a neighborhood past time. There’s some serious competition to be seen as well as the chance to do novice rowing.
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4/5
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"Fun to sit by the pond"

Cambridge Highlands is an area on the northeastern portion of Cambridge, and it has two distinct sections. The eastern area is mostly commercial and industrial while the western end is residential. It borders Fresh Pond as well. It’s an area full of Arts and Crafts bungalows and Victorian houses, a lot of greenspace at Lusitania Field and the pond, and plentiful shopping along Alewife Brook Parkway. This small area of less than 700 people is popular with young families who have children and who like a real sense of neighborhood. It’s a very walkable area and has great access to public transportation.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"It's like everything converges here"

Davis Square is one of those place where so many streets converge that it literally looks like an octopus on a map. The neighborhood mixes new and old and is home to many students and younger professional couples. It has a gay population as well as working class folks, and is often on lists as one of the hippest places to live in the U.S. There’s a very diverse selection of shops and the arts - both performing and visual - are evident in the many galleries and theatrical venues. It may be a major intersection but it has become one of the priciest areas in Boston.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"It's like everything converges here"

Davis Square is one of those place where so many streets converge that it literally looks like an octopus on a map. The neighborhood mixes new and old and is home to many students and younger professional couples. It has a gay population as well as working class folks, and is often on lists as one of the hippest places to live in the U.S. There’s a very diverse selection of shops and the arts - both performing and visual - are evident in the many galleries and theatrical venues. It may be a major intersection but it has become one of the priciest areas in Boston.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Soccer anyone?"

Winter Hill is one of the Somerville area’s older neighborhoods and is a big mix of restored homes and apartment buildings. It is a heavily Italian and Irish area with a number of Catholic churches and is leafier than most Somerville neighborhoods. Home to The Theatre Coop, which is one of the few live repertory theatres in Boston, and to scores of soccer teams due to a new influx of Brazilian residents, Winter Hill is one of those up and coming areas. A green line stop is planned and that means the area will rocket to the top of popularity.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids

"On the hippest places to live lists"

East Somerville is a wonderful mix if Irish-Americans and Italian Americans along with college students. It makes for a vibrant and eclectic atmosphere that often makes the hippest places to live lists. It’s got a thriving arts community, a big coffeehouse scene, and many mom and pop type businesses all around the Assembly Square area. Even though densely populated, there are many greenspaces and parks along with bike paths making it livable and accessible for all. Easy access to the huge Assembly Square Mall and the Fellway path along The Charles add to its attraction.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
5/5
Just now

"A Navy Yard is recycled"

Charlestown sits on the banks of Boston Harbor and the Mystic River. It was the site of the famous Battle of Bunker Hill, consists of older Colonial housing, and for many years its population was largely Irish immigrants. Today, the Irish still maintain a cultural stronghold but have been joined by middle class professionals who are drawn by the old architecture and ease of commuting. The marinas along the Charles make it easy for boaters too. This is the second oldest neighborhood in Boston with an interesting history and future. For instance, the old Navy Yard, which once employed 47,000 workers in wartime is now being redeveloped and is a part of the Boston parks system.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"Best Irish bars and alot of government too"

The Financial District’s name says it all. It is truly the center of Boston. Most all the major banking and fund companies have offices in this downtown area but they share it with major shopping venues and large complexes converted or built as residences. Some of Boston’s oldest structures, like Faneuil Hall are located there. Plans are afoot for a 27 acre greenway space which will connect the area to other neighborhoods and allow for more tourism in the area. And all this happens right on Boston Harbor. Do note that some of the best Irish bars in Boston are found in the Financial District!
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"Once they were islands."

Once five islands now connected, East Boston is one of Boston’s most interesting neighborhoods. It has traditionally been a first stop for many immigrants coming to the U.S. and today is primarily home to Boston’s Latino population. The area also houses Logan Airport and one of the area’s most popular destinations, Constitution Beach. While somewhat isolated, vistors and residents can enjoy some of the best views of the harbor, waterfront access and
great ethnic cuisine. The area was long a foothold for the Kennedy family, who always stayed true to their East Boston roots even after moving into Boston proper.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids

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