BrendaR

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Reviews

3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"Residents always purchase flood insurance here"

Shelton View is located in Snohomish County on Bothell's western border. It is surrounded by the Queensborough/Brentwood neighborhood on the north, Lake Pleasant/Country Village on the east.

Shelton View, like the Queensborough area to the north, is a portion of the long, generally north-south oriented hill which extends from the vicinity of the Swamp Creek interchange of I-5 and I-405 south to the Sammamish River.

This area has a few ponds and wetland systems with diverse vegetative characteristics and some open water. These provide excellent habitat, particularly for the herons which nest and forage in the area.

Shelton View is almost exclusively residential. The predominant housing type is the frameconstructed, detached single family dwelling, although there is a mobile home development just east of the southeast corner of 228th and Meridian. There is a very limited amount of commercial development. Most daily and regular weekly shopping needs are satisfied at the Canyon Park shopping centers located at SR 527 and 228th Street SE. A small neighborhood business cluster is located at the northwest corner of Meridian and 228th, just outside this area.

There are no public parks in the area and just one elementary school.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"A mixture of all kinds of homes"

Fitzgerald is a residential area located in Snohomish County in the northeastern portion of Bothell, between the Canyon Creek, Canyon Park, and North Creek neighborhoods.

Fitzgerald contains a mixture of residential types ranging from large acreage single family residential to multiple family residential complexes. Higher residential densities exist in the southern and western portions of the Subarea while a lower density is reflected in the central and eastern portions. Two churches are located in the southern portion of the neighborhood along 240th ST SE. There is very little commercial development in this area.

There are no schools within Fitzgerald, but several schools are found in the surrounding neighborhoods.

There are no public parks located in Fitzgerald. However, short segments of public trails are located here and the City has planned for a north-south trail through the area. The utility corridors which run north and south through the eastern portion of Fitzgerald provide some opportunity for future trails.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"No parks and very little shopping"

Canyon Creek is a residential neighborhood located in Snohomish County at the northeastern corner of Bothell. It is bordered by Maltby Road (SR-524) on the north, 45th Avenue SE on the east, 228th Street SE on the south, and 31st Avenue on the west. The neighborhood is almost exclusively residential and includes two mobile home parks.

One elementary and one junior high school are located here. Canyon Creek Elementary is located at 21400 35th Avenue SE, and Skyview Junior High is located immediately to the south at 21404 35th Avenue SE. Canyon Creek is also home to Whole Earth Montessori.

There are no public parks located in Canyon Creek. The schools mentioned above provide some open space and recreation opportunities to the residents of the area. There are also few churches, and only a handful of shops. Major shopping must be done in another outlying neighborhood.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"No schools but a number of commercial uses"

The Lake Pleasant neighborhood is located in both the King and Snohomish County portions of Bothell, along the wooded and winding portion of the Bothell-Everett Highway between the Downtown and Canyon Park retail/service/employment centers.

A number of commercial uses, varying greatly in type and intensity, occupy the region. The commercial uses range from small retail shops, to service businesses. Many of these are located in Country Village, an outdoor shopping center. There is a limited amount of residential development, including single family residences multi-family residential complexes, an RV park on Lake Pleasant, and the Friends of Youth group living facility.

There are no schools within this area, but there are several schools in the surrounding neighborhoods.

There is one public park located within the area. The park contains wetlands, a portion of the headwaters of Horse Creek, and sloped areas.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"Family oriented and with a park"

Pioneer Hills is a residential community located on the hills east of North Creek, which borders Woodinville. The neighborhood has a single family residential character, with site-built houses in the Pioneer and Morningside neighborhoods and manufactured and mobile homes in the Hollyhills neighborhood on fee simple lots. This area is interspersed with designated tracts of open space, underdeveloped land, and vacant land.

Areas north of and adjacent to NE 180th Street comprise multi-family and professional offices. The unincorporated territory along 130th Avenue NE contains single family parcels and single family subdivisions.

Woodin Elementary School is located southwest of the corner of NE 195th Street and 130th Avenue
NE. Just to the east of this Neighborhood is Woodinville Senior High School on NE 195th Street and 136th Avenue NE.

As for wide open spaces and parks, there is just one City of Bothell neighborhood park located in the Morningside neighborhood. The 0.7 acre Bloomberg Hill Neighborhood Park contains a sportscourt, play equipment and benches.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"Some open spaces to enjoy"

Queensgate is a primarily residential neighborhood along Brickyard Road in southeastern Bothell. It is bordered to the north by the Sammamish River and State Route 522, to the east by 124th Avenue NE, which is also the border of the City of Woodinville to the south by the Tolt River Pipe Line; and to the west by Interstate 405.

The majority of this neighborhood is characterized by single family residential areas with pockets of multi-family residential, general commercial, and neighborhood businesses.

Queensgate is home to two schools. Woodmoor Elementary School is located on the southwest corner of NE 160th Street and 124th Avenue NE. Northshore Junior High School is adjacent to and west of the elementary school.

Queensgate contains regional and neighborhood parks, designated passive open space, and other public recreational areas. Brickyard Road Neighborhood Park, located at 16800 Brickyard Road NE, is 3.6 acres in size and includes a sports court, playground, picnic facilities, and open space.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"An exclusively residential neighborhood"

Queensborough/Brentwood is located in the northwest portion of Bothell. The Queensborough/Brentwood area is a portion of a long north-south-oriented hill which extends from the vicinity of the Swamp Creek interchange of I-5 and I-405 south to the Sammamish River.

This neighborhood is almost exclusively residential. The predominant housing type is the detached single family dwelling. The area contains a very limited amount of commercial development, with a small neighborhood business cluster located at 228th and Meridian which includes various retail businesses.

Two elementary schools are located within Queensborough/Brentwood. Frank Love Elementary is located at 303 224th Street SW, while Crystal Springs Elementary is located at 21615 9th Avenue SE.

Cedar Grove Park (13.75 acres) is located at 22421 SE 9th Avenue and Thrasher’s Corner Regional Park is located just northeast of the neighborhood in the Canyon Park area. The areas provide some open space for residents to enjoy.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"No public schools in this community"

Waynita/Norway Hill is located on the south side of Bothell. The boundaries of the neighborhood are as follows: on the north, the Tolt River pipeline and northward toe of Norway Hill; on the east, Interstate 405; on the south, NE 145th Street; and on the west, the City of Bothell boundary.

Waynita/Norway Hill contains primarily residential development at varying densities. Much of the neighborhoods’s residential development consists of single-family subdivisions and some multi-family developments. The remainder of the Subarea consists primarily of single family structures on unconsolidated lots of varying sizes. Existing commercial development is located at the northwest corner of the Juanita-Woodinville Way/NE 145th Street intersection and between 112th Avenue NE and I-405 north of the Tolt River Pipe Line; 100th Avenue, and 96th Avenue NE. There are also several churches located in this neighborhood.

There are no public schools within the Waynita/Norway Hill Subarea. The area does contain a private school, Cedar Park Christian School, for grades K-12.

For recreational purposes the Tolt River Pipeline runs through the neighborhood and provides walking and bicycling opportunities. The Wayne Golf Course is a privately owned facility that is open to the public year-round.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"Commercial and residential density alike"

The Westhill area is located on the west side of Bothell. The majority of the neighborhood is located in King County, with a small portion of the Subarea located in Snohomish County. Westhill comprises approximately 701 acres. The Subarea comprises the upland portion of the Westhill land mass, except at its southern end where it descends to meet SR-522.

Westhill contains extensive residential development at varying densities. The commercial activity is confined by topography to the street frontage, since the southern end of Westhill rises immediately behind the commercial properties.

There are three schools within the neighborhood: Bothell High School, located on 92nd Avenue NE and NE 180th Street; Westhill Elementary School, located on 88th Avenue NE; and Sorenson Early Childhood Center immediately north of Westhill Elementary on 88th Avenue NE.

Two neighborhood parks are located within Westhill. Conifer View Park (1.5 acres) is located at the end of NE 195th Street and Conifer View IV Park (1.0 acre), which is also known by the community as Tall Tree Park, is located at 19630 89th Place NE. These neighborhood parks contain open areas, play structures, and a sport court.
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3/5
Apr 11, 2009

"Parks, schools, and old homes"

The Maywood/Beckstrom Hill Neighborhood is located in both the King and Snohomish County portions of Bothell and comprises the majority of the north-south oriented hill between the North Creek and Horse Creek valleys.

Some of Bothell's oldest homes, dating back to the early 1900's, may be found in Maywood/Beckstrom Hill. The majority of the single family dwellings are found in subdivisions constructed since the late 1950's and early 1960's. Some large-lot single family development exists in the northwest portion of the Neighborhood along 15th Avenue SE. There are several churches in this Neighborhood which serve a variety of religious denominations. Other than numerous home occupations, there is no commercial development on Beckstrom Hill.

Maywood/Beckstrom Hill contains two public schools and two private schools. Public schools include Maywood Hills Elementary School, at 19510 104th Avenue NE, and Park Canyon Junior High School, at 23723 23rd Avenue SE. Private schools include Heritage Christian School, at 19527 104th Avenue NE, and St. Brendan's Parish School, at 10049 NE 195th Street.

There are three developed City parks in the area: Royal Oaks park, located at 106th Avenue NE and 204th Street NE, William Penn Park, located at 19901 100th Avenue NE, and Stipek Park located at 242 Street SE and 19th Avenue SE.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Much like its name"

High Point is a neighborhood in the Delridge district, so named because it is one of the highest points in Seattle—the intersection of 35th Avenue SW and SW Myrtle Street is 520 feet above sea level. High Point is an area in the western portion of Seattle. Neighboring communities include North Delridge, Riverview, High Point, Highland Park, South Delridge, and Roxhill.

Many of the houses in the neighborhood were built during World War II as government housing, and continued to serve as low-income housing through the 1990s. In 2003 a five-year project began to tear this housing down to make way for more integrated housing. A commercial complex is also currently being developed, which will include a grocery store, coffee shop, and many more commercial services.

High Point has many Southeast Asian and East African immigrants offering some diversity to this community.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Heavy industry with a splash of residential"

Delridge is an informal district of neighborhoods in West Seattle, Washington, bounded by the Duwamish River to the north and east, unincorporated White Center to the south, and West Seattle to the west, generally along 35th Avenue SW. Delridge includes the neighborhoods of (north to south, east to west) North Delridge, Riverview, High Point, Highland Park, South Delridge, and Roxhill.

Delridge may also be defined by land use, with the primarily residential and open space Delridge district extending west from W Marginal Way SW, and the heavy industrial-zoned lower Duwamish Waterway east of Marginal Way and north of SW Spokane Street as part of the adjacent Industrial District.

Delridge is traditionally a working class community, with most of the homes dating back to WWII. Between all of the adjoining neighborhoods in this area, retail shops and restaurants are dense.
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4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 5/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Most exclusive neighborhood in Bellingham"

South Hill is one of Bellingham's most exclusive neighborhoods. Nestled elegantly between Western Washington University and Bellingham Bay, it features magnificent views and historic homes in a family-friendly atmosphere.

With downtown Bellingham to the north, Fairhaven to the south, WWU to the east, and Bellingham Bay to the west, South Hill is surrounded by beauty and activity. Residents can roam up to campus any day of the week to enjoy concerts, art shows, distinguished speakers, dancing lessons, or any of the other many events that occur daily - or just take a long walk and relax.

For those who want to keep busy but avoid the hustle and bustle of the city, the South Hill neighborhood has one of the best parks in town - Boulevard. Accessible by road, trail, or kayak, Boulevard Park draws visitors of every kind. Boat watchers can stroll on the rocky, half-mile long beach and enjoy weekend sailboat regattas. Groups often spend the evening barbecuing and throwing frisbees, while others find solitude in combing the shore for shells. The colorful sunsets are universally popular.

Most South Hill residents get to appreciate those sunsets on a daily basis. Homes built on the hill are organized perfectly so that few buildings block one another from the panoramic beauty of Bellingham Bay, the San Juan Islands, the Olympic Mountains, or the Canadian Cascades. In addition, it seems that everyone on South Hill is a gardener and an architect. Houses that weren't built in the 1900's still have the classic charm and mature landscaping of the historic buildings. Rocking chairs on porches, neat sidewalks, and lifelong residents make for a friendly, welcoming atmosphere. The people typically match the charm, as neighbors are very caring and unobtrusive.

Condominiums, though not historical, hold similar appeal. Most were built on State Street, the connection between Old Fairhaven and downtown Bellingham. Therefore, these condos not only have the incredible views that the single-family houses do, but they're also just a hop, skip, and a jump from I-5 and the rest of Bellingham. Many condo-owners think of Boulevard Park as a front yard that they don't even have to maintain. Few single-family homes every go up for sale in this community, and if they do, they are snatched up immediately from those in the know.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Spacious and a respect for nature"

The South neighborhood of Bellingham is characterized by space. Located between Edgemoor and Samish, South Bellingham shares the respect for nature and convenience to Fairhaven with each.

One of the most notable features in South Bellingham is Fairhaven Park. Located just below the Old Fairhaven District, it brings visitors from throughout the area to play tennis, walk the gravel trails (appropriate for wheelchairs), watch salmon spawning in Padden Creek, or have a crazy afternoon in the kiddie pool. The covered picnic areas and large, open fields make it an ideal destination for group outings.

South Bellingham shares some of the Chuckanut tideland coastal beaches with the Edgemoor neighborhood. This area offers incredible views of Bellingham Bay and the San Juan Islands, as well as direct contact with the tideland wildlife. As with much of the South neighborhood, this area is largely protected or undeveloped.

Just far enough from Western Washington University to not yet attract students, the South neighborhood is one of the quietest and most spacious areas in Bellingham. Builders have yet to discover the room for single-family house neighborhoods or the multi-family housing zones. As a result, buyers have options for historic homes near Happy Valley, fairly recent developments off Old Fairhaven Parkway, and plenty of available land.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Fast moving and fast growing community"

The Guide Meridian neighborhood is one of the fastest growing in Bellingham. The Guide Meridian street (for which it is aptly named) runs northeast through this developing part of Bellingham, Ferndale, Lynden, and finally into Canada.

The most significant landmark in the Guide Meridian neighborhood is Whatcom Community College. Some students attend directly out of high school, while others are returning to school after facing (or during) "the real world." WCC attracts many residents to live in the Guide Meridian neighborhood, and the multi-family housing units are booming because of this.

Restaurants of all flavors are found in the Guide Meridian neighborhood. Chains such as Billy McHale's and Taco Del Mar are quite popular, as are locally owned restaurants such as Pad Thai and Myoshi Sushi. No matter what you're craving, you'll find something to please your taste buds in this part of town.

Many offices and other businesses make their home near the Guide Meridian. Madrona Medical Clinic is home to the offices of dozens of doctors and medical facilities, and it just recently expanded their building. Driving down "the Guide" (as some locals call it) you are bound to encounter gyms, car mechanics, and a number of other services. For some, the neighborhood satisfies their every need.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Plenty of commercial buzz in this community"

The Meridian neighborhood is characterized by a bustling economy. The Bellis Fair Mall spurred most of this growth with its development several years ago.

Many visitors are drawn from around the region, especially across the Canadian border, to shop in the Meridian neighborhood. The mall leases to larger retailers such as Macy's, Target, JC Penny, Kohl's, and Sears. Inside you'll find dozens and dozens of stores, including Build-a-Bear Workshop, Abercrombie and Fitch, and Hot Topic. The food court is usually busy as shoppers take advantage of the numerous restaurants, including Kojo of Japan, Ivar's, Cinnabon, and more.

The fun doesn't stop once you leave the mall doors, however. Red Robin, McDonalds, and the new Boston Pizza reside on the outskirts of the parking lot, and the food attracts more than just mall-goers. These restaurants are favorites for those who stop in from their commute on Meridian, and other customers drive from other neighborhoods in town to order that special meal.

With easy access to shopping, jobs, and I-5, the Meridian neighborhood is a smart place to live. The City of Bellingham has already recognized the need to create housing options in the Meridian neighborhood, and developers have already built comfortable apartment complexes and condominiums in the southern part of the neighborhood. However, there is still room for more.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Just like having a park in your back yard"

Silver Beach is as lovely as it sounds. On the northern shore of Lake Whatcom and the eastern edge of Bellingham, the area is predominately made up of lavish homes with the affordable gem scattered here and there.

The Silver Beach neighborhood boasts some of the only affordable lakefront homes in the area. Condominiums are available in the northeast area of Lake Whatcom, perfect for those who need water more than square feet or who want the perfect summer getaway. Other neighborhoods generally consist of larger, well-maintained single-family homes, though a few southern areas are zoned for multi-family housing. Throughout Silver Beach, residents live a quiet, comfortable life, with the great City of Bellingham at their fingertips.

No significant commercial zones exist in Silver Beach, but the popular Barkley Village is just a short drive away. A quick, breathtaking view down Alabama Hill will also lead to shopping, restaurants, and the more urban part of Bellingham.

Lake Whatcom is an integral part not only of Silver Beach, but the entire City of Bellingham. It provides the town with drinking water, recreation, and a highly valued piece of nature. At over 12 miles long, much of it is still wild. Boaters, kayakers, and hikers have access to even the least-explored areas of Lake Whatcom.

Just across the street at Whatcom Creek, miles of trails await runners, walkers, or park-goers who simply want to stroll from Bloedel-Donovan to Whatcom Falls. Bird watchers can take advantage of Scudder Pond, a preserved wetland that is always bustling with wildlife. Some backyards are simply a gate away from this wildlife, essentially having an entire park behind the house.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Everything you could possibly want and more"

The Mount Baker neighborhood has everything a person could need. Located in the northeastern part of Bellingham, homes are well-built, the commercial areas are attractive, and there is plenty of space to get outside and enjoy nature. Visitors from around the country have discovered this neighborhood and promptly moved here, making it one of the fastest growing areas in the city.

The area, labeled as a "priority urban village" by the City of Bellingham, contains offices, retailers, medical facilities, condominiums, and town homes. Unlike most "urban villages," the architecture in Barkley Village was carefully planned, thus making it a positive atmosphere for working, shopping and living.

Sunset Drive is a convenient source for Bellingham residents. Lowe's, Sunset Theater, and the Slo Pitch Pub are just a few of the dozens of shopping and entertainment spots in the Mount Baker neighborhood.

Avid skiers and snowboarders would be wise to live in the Mount Baker neighborhood. As the name suggests, the area offers Bellingham's most convenient route to Mount Baker. After passing through the commercial areas, Sunset Drive turns into the Mount Baker Highway, and it's a curvy road to Mount Baker from there.

Adolescents in the Mount Baker neighborhood attend Squalicum High School, the third and newest high school in the Bellingham School District. Opened in 1998, the school is successfully pushing its students to take more classes, complete a culminating project, and pass the state required WASL (Washington Assessment of Student Learning) before graduating. The new building helps them achieve this goal through the most modern facilities in the district.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A great neighborhood for the athletic or health conscious"

Forty percent of the Samish neighborhood consists of Lake Padden Park. This park, aptly named after the 152-acre Lake Padden, has everything a park should have and more. Motorized boats are banned from the trout-stocked lake, keeping the lake clean and giving shore, dock, and rowboat fishers a chance. Kids, adults, and dogs can be found swimming in several areas of the lake. (Long-distance swimmers frequently swim across the entire lake!)

The neighborhood seems to be a perfect fit for runners, shoppers, commuters, and everyone in between. With acres of parks and undeveloped space as well as quick access to Interstate 5 and shopping, Samish can accommodate every lifestyle.

Nearly all of the homes in Samish are single-family houses. Many of these are on large - even enormous - lots, some of the few left in Bellingham. Houses range from small to large, and affordable to more expensive. Some even have majestic views of Bellingham Bay and the Canadian Cascades.

Besides room to roam and a diverse selection, the Samish neighborhood also offers the feeling of privacy not found in any other area of Bellingham. Unlike rural areas of the state, however, this privacy does not come at the cost of convenience.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A newly cleaned up neighborhood"

Roosevelt is a neighborhood in Bellingham that has benefited from community improvements that have lowered crime rate and cleaned up the local parks.

Alabama Street cuts this neighborhood in half with mostly residential homes and duplexes. Many college students rent here as well as more permanent residents further up Alabama Hill. More people are moving to this area to stay rather than rent in the recent past. Many existing homes are renovated and the neighborhood become more attractive with each one.

Roosevelt Park is a newly renovated park and has a playground, large fields, basketball courts and public bathrooms. Pacific Trails Park also lies within neighborhood boundaries, and Whatcom Falls Park. Whatcom Falls is a sprawling, shady city park with playgrounds, fishing ponds, trails and courts.

Right in the middle of Roosevelt there is a 7-Eleven, Gas station, pharmacy, Mexican restaurant, and others. Only a couple of minutes away on Iowa Street you can find many car dealerships and other commercial businesses. Haggen grocery can be found in Barkely Village just a couple blocks away.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Features the best middle school in the district"

Edgemoor boasts some of the finest living in Washington. Located in the southernmost area of Bellingham, most homes have a view of sparkling Bellingham Bay and the San Juan Islands.

Fairhaven Middle School, built as a high school in 1903, welcomes you to the neighborhood with its noble, grand charm. It is one of the best middle schools in the district, and its well-landscaped lawn give you a taste of the rest of the Edgemoor neighborhood.

Much of the neighborhood lies on Chuckanut Drive, arguably the most beautiful road in the state. Built before I-5, it is still a lovely alternative to driving from Bellingham to Skagit County. On the way, you will discover restaurants, shops, hikes, and beaches. It is always fun to travel in a car as the passenger and see all of the many sights along the way.

Many of these beaches are directly in the Edgemoor neighborhood. One particularly notable spot is Clark's Point. Here, hikers can get an incredible view of the San Juan Islands and the Canadian Cascades or take a stroll to the small beaches below. One short trail leads to the Chuckanut Creek Estuary. Both the forest and tidelands are protected, promising decades more of accessible, healthy nature.
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"Safe environment mixed with gourmet food"

Downtown Bellingham has something for everyone. Whether you are looking for gourmet food, live music, or just a relaxing afternoon on the waterfront, you'll find it in downtown Bellingham.

Unlike the downtown areas in other cities, you can find safe and comfortable housing throughout the neighborhood. Condominiums are particularly popular. Purchasing a condominium in downtown Bellingham is not only a wise investment; it also guarantees you a wonderful quality of life. A few high-rises will be built downtown soon, helping Bellingham avoid sprawl and keep the wilderness wild. This means more opportunities for you to live in close proximity to all that downtown Bellingham has to offer.

Downtown Bellingham is paradise for the food-lover. It boasts some of the finest, most elegant dining north of Seattle. At Giuseppe's Italian Restaurant, for example, you can experience their rich Linguine bella Gina or a perfectly cooked New York Steak. If you are in the mood for a quick breakfast on your walk to work, you can grab a bagel at The Bagelry and a hazelnut latte at The Blackdrop Coffeehouse. With options of wood fire pizza at La Fiamma, potato burritos as Casa Que Pasa, California rolls at Wasabee Sushi, and dozens of other restaurants, your taste buds will never be bored.

Downtown Bellingham is not all "play," though. Businesses of every sort make their home here. Law firms, banks, and newspapers accompany the city and district offices, courthouses, and the popular Bellingham Public Library. While some choose to commute to downtown Bellingham live here or in nearby neighborhoods and simply walk to work.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Quiet, classy, and convenient"

The Columbia Neighborhood is one of the oldest, most sought-after residential neighborhoods in Bellingham. Located in Northwest Bellingham near Bellingham Bay, it is quiet, classy, and convenient.

Certain homes in the Columbia Neighborhood are fortunate to have an impressive view of Bellingham Bay. Those who don't are in close proximity to the water, allowing for a quick stroll to the beach at Zuanich Park. Maritime Heritage Park, just outside the Columbia border, offers open space to picnic, read, or walk your dog.

Cornwall Park is just a crosswalk away from the Columbia Neighborhood. There you will find the only frisbee golf course in the area, Squalicum Creek, and acres of open space to do as you please. Elizabeth Park, Carl Lobe Park, and Lorraine Ellis Park are smaller but just as peaceful, and are bordered conveniently in the Columbia Neighborhood.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Family-oriented community with a lot to do"

This family-oriented neighborhood boasts large, deep lots - many of which were once small farms on the edge of the city - with a mix of well-kept, estabished single-family homes and newer apartment complexes.

The neighborhood is on the northwest side of town and has large streets, many tree-covered lots and ready access to Bellingham Bay. Squalicum Creek borders the neighborhood, giving kids a place to ride bike trails without leaving the neighborhood. Adults enjoy Bellingham Golf & Country Club, which has an 18-hole course and outdoor swimming pool.

Park Manor Center on Northwest Avenue anchors the retail district with an Albertson's supermarket and Big Lots Store. Yeager's Sporting Good and Rite Aid pharmacy are nearby. Smaller shops, restaurants and offices are also clustered around the commercial-retail area.

This neighborhood is also close to Bellis Fair mall, the region's major shopping center, located just across Interstate 5 to the northeast.

Schools are convenient for many families: Birchwood Elementary School and Shuksan Middle School are within the neighborhood's boundaries, as is Bellingham Technical College. Some students on the northwest end of the neighborhood attend Alderwood Elementary. Teens from the Birchwood neighborhood attend Squalicum High School.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A Home For Everyone"

The Alabama Hill neighborhood in Bellingham has every type of home you could hope for. From large, extravagant houses with million-dollar views to cozy, efficient studios within walking distance of shopping, Alabama Hill can be anyone's ideal place to live.

Residents of the Alabama Hill neighborhood are never at a shortage of activities. The ever-popular Bloedel-Donovan Park, located on the west side of Lake Whatcom, can keep visitors entertained from dawn to dusk (though you may have to swat a mosquito or two during those later hours). On hot days, the park is filled with sunbathers, swimmers, and water-sport enthusiasts. Throughout the year, Bloedel-Donovan is a perfect place to walk your dog or simply relax.

Just across the street, miles of trails await runners, walkers, or park-goers who simply want to stroll from Bloedel-Donovan to Whatcom Falls Park. Bird watchers can take advantage of Scudder Pond, a preserved wetland always bustling with wildlife. Some backyards are simply a gate away from this wildlife, essentially having an entire park behind the house. In addition to these larger parks, the Alabama Hill neighborhood provides even more valued green space at St. Clair Park, Highland Heights Park and Big Rock Garden Park.

No commercial areas exist on Alabama Hill, allowing residents a peaceful escape from the daily rat race. However, Downtown Bellingham, Barkley Village, and the Guide Meridian are just a short trip away, providing easy access to every type of shopping.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"One of the best neighborhoods in Bellingham"

The Whatcom Falls neighborhood combines nature and convenience to be one of the best residential neighborhoods in Bellingham. Located on the east side of the city, this low-density area is just a short drive from downtown and several shopping centers.

One of the highlights of the neighborhood is Whatcom Falls. Whatcom Creek rushes through the 241-acre Whatcom Falls Park and tumbles over rocks, spraying water at walkers and roaring so loudly you can follow the noise from the parking lot to the waterfall. During the spring and summer, young people can be found jumping off the cliffs into the deep creek pools below.

The park also includes miles of winding trails that are popular with runners, hikers, and dog-walkers. Some curve through Whatcom Falls Park, while others connect to different parts of the city such as Bloedel-Donovan Park, Alabama Hill, and the Civic Field Complex. Other features of the park include a fishing pond for children under 12-years-old, covered picnic areas, open fields, tennis courts, and a fish hatchery.

Most of the residential neighborhoods are located south of Lakeway Drive. Constructed largely in the 1950's and 1960's, lot sizes here tend to be slightly larger than in the newer areas of Bellingham. The bigger backyards, mature landscaping, and cul-de-sacs make Whatcom Falls perfect for raising a family. Some homes are even lucky enough to have a creek running directly through the backyard, bringing nature directly to the residents.

The area's only commercial area consists of the popular Lafeen's Donuts and Ice Cream and a gas station. Most grocery shopping is done at Fred Meyer located just two minutes down Lakeway Drive, and clothing stores, restaurants, and other services aren't much further that that.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Popular neighborhood among the locals"

The Happy Valley neighborhood is one of the most popular in Bellingham, and it has even more room to grow. Its residents range from students to retirees and everyone in between.

Happy Valley lies between Fairhaven, South Hill, South Bellingham, and Western Washington University. Near the college, apartment complexes abound. Many of these were built in the sixties, seventies, and eighties, but even more are in the works to accommodate the growing university. Further south, homes range from gorgeous, older, well-landscaped homes to cute, recently developed duplexes. All of the neighborhoods are quite safe and are within walking distance of Fairhaven and shopping.

Shopping can be done in Sehome Village on the corner of Bill McDonald Parkway and Samish Road. Outdoorsy residents can shop at REI, students can find cheap textbooks at the College Store, coffee drinkers (i.e. almost all Northwesterners) can spend the evening relaxing at Starbucks, and night owls can do their grocery shopping at the 24-hour Haggen. Happy Valley residents are at no shortage of restaurants within walking distance. Pho 99 offers a comfortable environment and delicious Vietnamese food, and Espinoza's is popular for their impressive salsa bar.

Schools and parks provide Happy Valley with plenty of recreational space. Sehome High School has several tennis courts, a baseball field, and a track commonly used by the public. Happy Valley Elementary School is great for children with a playground and enormous field for football games. The Connelly Creek Nature Area is a natural oasis less than a mile from I-5, and Happy Valley Park is a peaceful escape from those long days.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A community among a park"

Cornwall Park is named for the neighborhood surrounding (you guessed it) Cornwall Park. At 70 acres, the park accounts for over a tenth of the area, leaving the rest for a variety of homes and commercial uses.

Unlike other parks with manicured lawns and shrubbery trimmed into the shapes of animals, Cornwall Park truly has a northwestern feel. At the park you can perfect your frisbee golf skills on its 9-hole course, escape the summer heat under its many trees, or picnic with some neighbors of Cornwall Park's tight-knit community. Cornwall has a few of the many tennis courts in Bellingham, a playground for children, and plenty of trails for that runner in you. Whether planning a gathering or looking for a place to unwind on your lunch break, Cornwall Park will have what you need.

The Cornwall Park neighborhood is also home to Saint Joseph's Hospital (or, as the locals call it, "Saint Joe's"). Saint Joe's not only provides excellent medical care; it is also one of the largest employers in the city. With 253 beds and a Level III Trauma Center, one need not leave the city (or even the neighborhood) to receive the best treatment. Several other medical facilities are just across the street from Saint Joseph's, making Cornwall Park the place to be for doctors, nurses, and other health practitioners.

Since Cornwall Park is just south of Meridian, residents have quick access to Bellis Fair Mall and many other shopping centers on Meridian Avenue. The Cornwall Park neighborhood is bordered by I-5 to the north, making commuting efficient. Despite the convenience to shopping and main roads, however, the neighborhood is one of the calmest areas in Bellingham.
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WWU
3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"College students only in this neighborhood"

Western Washington University (also referred to as WWU or Western) is one of six state-funded four-year universities of higher education in the state of Washington. With 12,000 undergraduates and nearly 1,000 graduate students, the school is large enough to offer many, diverse programs, while still maintaining an intimate atmosphere.

The university is broken up into seven different colleges – Business and Economics, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Huxley College of the Environment, Science and Technology, Woodring College of Education, and Fairhaven College (where students organize their own major). All are well-respected departments that produce highly qualified graduates, many of whom stay in the Bellingham area.

In addition to the many strong academic programs, Western Washington University also offers hundreds of other activities for students and community members alike. A Division II school, WWU sports teams travel across the nation to compete in sports. Home football games played at Civic Field are always a fun event, as are men's and women's basketball games in Carver Gym. The school also offers golf, softball, soccer, and much more. Western made national news in May 2007 when its Women's Crew (rowing) team won the NCAA Division II title for the third year in a row.

Music lovers will feel right at home at Western Washington University. KUGS, the school's local radio station, features student DJs, news, and a variety of musical genres. The school frequently hosts concerts and shows, ranging from local, student musicians playing in the Underground Coffee House, to more well-known bands such as Death Cab for Cutie, Andrew Byrd, and others.

Whether you intend to enroll in the university or simply live near it, Western Washington University is an incredible resource for the community. It is an integral part of Bellingham's constant growth, progress, and unique culture.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"College students haven"

This neighborhood is located just north of Western Washington University on Sehome Hill and is home to many college students as well as others.

The area was used in the early 1850s for coal mining and was one of the four original towns that now make up Bellingham. The Sehome neighborhood is a hilly section of town, offering sweeping views of Bellingham Bay and the city and nestling against the Sehome Hill Arboretum.

Among Bellingham's older neighborhoods, Sehome includes a number of turn-of-the century structures, along with an array of Craftsman-style bungalows. Register for its architectural significance. Many of the homes in the Historic District were built before 1930 and retain most of their original features.

The south campus of St. Joseph Hospital is within the neighborhood's boundaries. It provides elder care, chemical dependency rehabilitation and mental health services.

Sehome Village provides convenient shopping with a Haggen supermarket, restaurants, offices and shops. Samish Way is a strip of restaurants, motels, convenience stores and gas stations. A short drive away you can find Fred Meyer Shopping Center. Across Lincoln Street, Lakeway Center features a Cost Cutter grocery, along with other stores and restaurants.

There is also a large 180 acre park in the area, Sehome Hill Arboretum, adjacent to the campus of WWU. The park offers students and city dwellers over 5 miles (8 km) of public trails to explore. Unique features of the park include an 80-foot wooden observation tower atop Sehome Hill, with aerial views of Bellingham Bay to the south. There is also a large tunnel, cut into rock, through in which hikers can walk.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"The all inclusive neighborhood"

Puget may be the place to live if you don't want to leave your neighborhood for anything at all. With stores, services, jobs, schools, and homes, the Puget neighborhood provides residents with everything they need. It is located next to I-5, just in case you need to leave the area for some strange reason.

Most of this area is already developed with single-family houses on medium sized lots. These are desirable homes, as they are well-landscaped and maintained.

Other areas of the Puget neighborhood contain both single-family homes and multi-family complexes, all ranging in size and quality. When the Western Washington University Park and Ride moved to its current Lincoln Street spot, more and more apartment complexes popped up in the area. While this area has more WWU students than others in the Puget neighborhood, its residents are still quite diverse.

The Civic Athletic Complex, located off of Lakeway Avenue, is an active spot in town. Civic Stadium hosts Western Washington University's home football and soccer games, which always draw a crowd. During the university's off-season, the city uses the field for other sporting events and festivals. The Bellingham Bells baseball club makes Joe Martin Stadium their home field, drawing in over a hundred attendees to each game. The Arne Hanna Aquatic Center's pools and waterslides are typically open to the public for a small fee, but can also teaches swimming and scuba lessons and can be rented out for parties. The Bellingham Sportsplex contains the only ice rink in town, and its indoor soccer league is popular with Bellingham residents.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"One of the oldest yet most charming neighborhood in Bellingham"

The York District is a classic. One of the oldest neighborhoods in Bellingham, it boasts quality homes, mature landscaping, and a tight-nit community. Located just east of downtown, its nearly 3,000 residents enjoy the most unique parts of Bellingham. The neighborhood dates back to the late 1890’s, with most of the homes being built in the early 20th century. As a result, much of the architecture in the York District has strong Victorian influences.

Businesses are scattered throughout the York District, though most lie on the border between this neighborhood and downtown Bellingham. Unlike many of the newer areas in Bellingham, the York District boasts largely local and community-oriented businesses. Restaurants, bakeries, and offices can all be found in the neighborhood, and grocery stores, music shops, and cafes are within close proximity. Though desirable enough to draw residents from all over the Bellingham area, companies in the York District focus on serving their immediate community.

Quick access to I-5, downtown, and common employers draw many Bellingham residents to the neighborhood, and the safe, quiet setting make it a perfect place to raise a family. Buyers who are interested in starting out in the neighborhood can easily find affordable apartments or condominiums, and then move a block away into their dream home shortly thereafter. The York District is perfect for those who want to own their own house but experience all the luxuries of downtown Bellingham.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Shopping and schools make this is convenient area to live"

The Sunnyland neighborhood is a diverse mix of residential and commercial developments. The southern end of the neighborhood is home to several local businesses and restaurants lining busy James Street, from hardware and tire stores to an open-air market. Shopping is easy, with downtown to the south, Sunset Square to the north and a host of businesses along James Street.

Moving north, businesses and warehouses give way to quaint houses on the typical small lots found in the center of Bellingham. The homes vary between rentals and permanent residences, and the condition of the old homes also varies. Lots and homes become larger toward the northwestern side of the neighborhood.

Popular shopping areas include:

Groceries are available at Red Apple Market at James and Alabama streets. A bit farther away is Haggen supermarket, to the northwest on Meridian Street.

A short drive to the southeast is Fred Meyer Shopping Center. Across Lincoln Street from Freddy's is Lakeway Center, containing Ennen Foods, another supermarket.

Sunset Square, which features a K-Mart Discount Store, Rite Aid pharmacy, multiplex theater and several other stores, lies to the west across Interstate 5.

Schools in the area include:

Sunnyland Elementary School
Parkview Elementary School
Lowell Elementary School
Whatcom Middle School
Kulshan Middle School
Bellingham High School
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Convenience and charm floods this neighborhood"

The Lettered Streets, located on the waterfront in central Bellingham, date back to the 1850's. Today, residents of the Lettered Streets are attracted by the convenience and charm of the neighborhood.

Located just northwest of downtown Bellingham, individuals can easily access any part of Bellingham and come home to a simple, quiet neighborhood. Unlike other historical neighborhoods in Bellingham, most of the century-old houses in the Lettered District were renovated in the 1960's. Since then, the neighborhood has continued to evolve. Now, the Lettered Streets contain classic single-family homes, multi-family housing complexes, offices (many in homes), and more.

This housing diversity is mirrored in the population. People from all backgrounds and walks of life live in the area, including young couples, retirees, and students. All residents are proud of the area and take advantage of the many public spaces the Lettered Streets have to offer.

One of these is the Maritime Heritage Park. This park provides a comfortable, well-manicured lawn to picnic, read, or walk your dog. A few times a year, races go right through the Lettered Streets, including the Whatcom Volunteer Center's "Human Race", a non-profit fundraiser and run. It also boasts a fish hatchery and an educational facility where visitors can learn about salmon and watch them as they return from Bellingham Bay to Whatcom Creek.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Tight-knit community with great schools"

Ferndale is a small town with big potential. Centered between Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., and just minutes away from the larger city of Bellingham, Ferndale offers easy access to big, urban areas while still maintaining the tight-knit community feel of a rural town. I

f you search for real estate in Ferndale you will find that most properties are surrounded by natural beauty, as well as a stunning view of Mt. Baker to the east, the San Juan Islands to the west, and the Nooksack river flowing through lush farmland. Ferndale sits in one of the most enviable locations in Whatcom County.

The city of Ferndale is also home to an award-winning school system, numerous cultural events, and a newly developed downtown area. Come to Ferndale for its friendly community, affordable living, and the opportunity to find just what you're looking for in a wonderful Northwest town.

Two local favorites in Ferndale for a drink are Frank-n-Stein Brewing Company and the Main Street Bar and Grill, both located along Main Street. Bob's Burgers and Brew is also a local favorite for lunch and dinner offering gourmet burgers and specialty salads.
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2/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Consumed by the railway!"

Interbay is a neighborhood in Seattle that consists of the valley between Queen Anne Hill on the east and Magnolia on the west, plus filled-in areas of Smith Cove and Salmon Bay.

The neighborhood is bordered on the north by Salmon Bay, part of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, across which is Ballard; on the south by what remains of Smith Cove, an inlet of Elliott Bay; on the east by 15th Avenue W. and Elliott Avenue W.; and on the west by Thorndyke, 20th, and Gilman Avenues W. The Ballard Bridge crosses the ship canal from Interbay to Ballard.

Much of the neighborhood is taken up by BNSF Railway's Balmer Yard. Interbay is also home to Fishermen's Terminal on Salmon Bay and the Port of Seattle's Piers 86, 90, and 91 on Smith Cove. Its main thoroughfares are Elliott Avenue West and 15th Avenue West. The area is seemingly industrial due to what goes along with bay area living. There are a few retail businesses along 15th Avenue but intermingled with warehouses, light industrial buildings, and the like.

Just north of Dravus on 15th Avenue are the Quest Church and the nonprofit (and non-religious) Q Café, founded with funding from the church. My favorite is the bicycle and foot trail which comes north from the Central Waterfront by Belltown through Myrtle Edwards Park and continues through the pier facilities around Smith Cove. It parallels the railway tracks on their west through Interbay, ending on the west (Magnolia) side of the tracks on 20th Avenue West about three blocks south of Dravus.
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2/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Best Asian food in Seattle"

The International District of Seattle is a relatively small area for any homes or condos. The area is located just south of First Hill and east of Pioneer Square. This area is a great place to find the best Asian food in Seattle. There are more little restaurants than you can count.

The Seattle International District has been called the only place in the U.S. where Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Filipino Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Korean Americans, Laotian Americans, Cambodian Americans, and other Asian Americans live in one neighborhood.

Hing Hay Park, at the corner of S. King Street and Maynard Avenue S., is considered a hub of the International District. The Wing Luke Asian Museum is an important cultural institution in the neighborhood, as was the Nippon Kan Theatre until its recent closure.

Kobe Terrace/Danny Woo Garden, on the steep slope between I-5 and S. Main Street, is another important site, where many neighborhood residents have urban gardens. Perhaps
the neighborhood's most notable establishment is the Asian supermarket Uwajimaya. Across Fifth Avenue from Uwajimaya Village is the Union Station office complex, built where abandoned Union Pacific Railroad tracks once ran, and home to much of Amazon. COM’s operations.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A neighborhood and a lake"

Haller Lake is a small residential neighborhood located in north central Seattle. It is also the name of a lake that is planted among the community as well. The lake covers about 15 acres and it has a private shoreline with only two public access points.

Within the neighborhood are Northacres Park, a large, forested public park just east of the lake along 1st Avenue N.E., Ingraham High School, just north of the lake on N. 130th Street, Lakeside School, the alma mater of Bill Gates, Paul Allen, and Adam West in the northeast corner of the neighborhood just west of I-5, and Northwest Hospital and Medical Center, which occupies a 33 acre campus southwest of the lake on N. 115th Street. The area may be small but it is jam packed with schools and the like.

The Haller Lake Community Club is just northwest of the lake at 12579 Densmore Avenue N. The Club was formed in 1922 as the Haller Lake Improvement Club. It features a Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ installed in 1969.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Residents move her and stay"

Queen Anne is one of Seattle’s oldest and most historic neighborhoods, settled on the top of the world—or, crowning one of the most scenic hills in the city. No wonder why Queen Anne is a highly sought-out place to live. Located at the northern end of downtown Seattle, this community has some of the most breathtaking views in the city.

Depending on what side of the hill you’re on, views sweep eastward, over Lake Union and the Cascade Mountains, or they go west, over Puget Sound, the Olympic Mountains and magnificent sunsets. When looking from the south slope of Queen Anne, you can see the Seattle skyline that is put on thousands of postcards. If you look a little to the west you can see all of Elliott Bay and West Seattle.

The homes offer great charm and original character. Tree-lined streets and a smattering of local parks add to a rich sense of community. Neighbors include young couples new to the area and residents with long standing ties to Seattle and especially Queen Anne. People who move here stay here.

Queen Anne is also known for its high-caliber dining reputation. This, along with its nightlife scene has become a destination for non-locals as well as locals. Area musicians frequent the small coffee shops and clubs, and the community shows their support to the tune of standing-room only.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Quiet and in a good central location"

The neighborhood of Whittier Heights Seattle is located north of Ballard. The neighborhood is a small, square area that is made up mostly of residential homes and small businesses. It is very quiet and offers quick access to other neighborhoods, Interstate 5 and Highway 99. To the south of this area is the West Woodland neighborhood. Loyal Heights is to the west. Phinney Ridge and Greenwood to the east. Crown Hill is to the north.

There are over 1770 homes in the Whittier Heights Seattle neighborhood with the average price per square foot resting at over $250.

Schools in the area include Ballard High School and Whittier Elementary School on 75th Street. Whittier Elementary is a great school with a long waiting list. It is known as one of the best schools in the district.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Open spaces and rural recreation"

The Bear Creek neighborhood is bounded generally on the west by 196th Ave NE, Avondale Road NE and 180th Ave NE; on the north by NE 145th Street, if extended; on the east by the west crest of the Snoqualmie River Valley (Patterson Creek and approximately 150th Ave NE, if extended), and on the south by Redmond-Fall City Road (SR 202).

Low-moderate density residential uses are located along Avondale and Novelty Hill Roads within Redmond.

The Bear Creek and Evans Creek valleys are reserved for recreational, open space, equestrian and other rural uses. The fish and wildlife habitat in the streams and along the banks has been enhanced. The wetlands in the valleys remain intact and productive.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A neighborhood with a view"

Appropriately named because of its striking views of Lake Sammamish and Marymoor Park, the Viewpoint neighborhood is a residential area located on the slopes overlooking Lake Sammamish. This neighborhood is bounded to the north by Marymoor Park, to the south by NE 20th Street, to the east by Lake Sammamish and to the west by the Bellevue-Redmond Road, 156th Ave NE and SR 520, north of NE 51st Street.

Residential development is primarily Low-Moderate Density Residential, although there are higher, multiple-family densities on the shoreline north of Idylwood Park. South of Idylwood Park, the shoreline is limited to a density of four units per acre to protect water quality and to limit disturbance of the erosion hazard areas and unstable slopes in the far southern part of the neighborhood. Elsewhere, cluster subdivisions and multi-family clusters have also been used to create attractive homes whole protecting sensitive slopes and ravines.

An open space corridor runs from Idylood Park through protected, wooded ravines to the Viewpoint Open Space.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Residential areas set apart from the rest"

North Redmond is bound on the north by NE 124th/128th Street, on the south by NE 116th Street, on the east by Avondale Road and on the west by SR 202, Redmond-Woodinville Road. Prominent landmarks include Theno's Dairy, Washington Cathedral and Northstar Stables.

Residential areas are set back from the major roads on the perimeter of the neighborhood. The protected slopes and wetlands have let to generous portions of land remaining forested. Subdivisions built in the past 20 years offer a variety of housing options. Within North Redmond, there are houses built on acre lots and other more generally affordable homes built at four to eight units per acre. These new subdivisions join the residential areas on Education Hill with those on English Hill. The neighborhood is conveniently located for residents who work and shop in Redmond's urban center. Trails through open space corridors lead residents to equestrian facilities and recreational facilities.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Very little commercialization in the area"

Situated on a hillside overlooking Redmond's Sammamish Valley and the Cascade Mountains to the north and east, Grass Lawn neighborhood is located on the west side of Redmond. Neighborhood boundaries are: north, Redmond Way; south, NE 60th Street; east, SR 520 and West Lake Sammamish Parkway; west, 132nd Ave NE.

The Grass Lawn neighborhood consists of several smaller neighborhoods with similarities in character and needs as well as unique differences. The majority of the neighborhood is zoned for residential uses, with two small commercially zoned areas. The majority of the houses are built at a low-to-moderate density, with the exception of a fair amount of apartment and condominium developments in the eastern part of the neighborhood.

Grass Lawn is a mature neighborhood with established character and includes Grass Lawn Park, a facility highly valued by the neighborhood as a community gathering place. Many neighborhood residents cherish the walkability of their neighborhood and friendliness of neighbors who look out for each other.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Numerous educational facilities in the area"

Education Hill is a large residential neighborhood, that is bound on the north by NE 116th Street, on the south by downtown Redmond, on the east by Avondale Road NE and on the west by the Redmond-Woodinville Road. As the name implies, the neighborhood has several educational facilities. These include Redmond High, Redmond Junior High, Horace Mann Elementary and Norman Rockwell Elementary.

A multiple-family community is located west of 166th Ave NE and south of NE 95th Street. Several multiple-family areas also have developed along the west side of Avondale Road.

The slopes along the east side of Education Hill remain forested, protecting steep, unstable slopes and slopes with critical erosion hazards. Development has generally occurred at the top and bottom of the slopes. The slopes to the west along the Sammamish Valley also are forested, with most development taking place at the top of the slope. The steep slopes leading down to several streams have been preserved, protecting the streams from erosion and providing attractive forested areas within the neighborhood.
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5/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A classy and educated neighborhood with a yacht club"

This classy and educated neighborhood borders the bucolic Arboretum, the wooded ravines of Interlaken Park, and the Montlake Cut connecting Lake Union and Lake Washington.

The venerable Seattle Yacht Club presides west of the bridge; to the east is the Museum of History and Industry. The spiffy new Montlake Library branch attracts local brainiacs, and regattas draw rowers to May’s raucous first day of boating season. Only one major issue with this neighborhood is that traffic chokes Montlake on Husky game days and during drawbridge openings.

Locals love Cafe Logo, a heartbreakingly wonderful neighborhood Italian cuisine located on 24th Avenue East. Shopping can also be found along 24th Avenue including Mont's Market, Mountlake Bicycle Shop, or Mr. Johnson's Antiques.

At 1554 15th Avenue East, you will find Bruce Lee's grave, and landmark in Montlake - located at the Lake View Cemetery. You can also experience pre-Starbucks Seattle by visiting the Seattle's Museum of History and Industry on 24th Street.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"An area with some tragic history"

Denny-Blaine is a neighborhood in east central Seattle, Washington. It is bounded on the east by Lake Washington; on the south by E. Howell Street, beyond which is Madrona; on the west by 34th Avenue, beyond which is Madison Valley; and on the north by Lake Washington Boulevard E. and E. Prospect Street, beyond which are Washington Park and Madison Park.

The neighborhood's main thoroughfares are E. Denny Way and E. Harrison Street (east- and westbound) and Dorffel Drive E. and Lake Washington and McGilvra Boulevards E. (north- and southbound). Denny-Blaine Park is on the Lake Washington waterfront at the foot of E. Denny-Blaine Place.

A little history concludes that the neighborhood is named after its developers, Elbert F. Blaine and Charles L. Denny, who began subdividing the area in 1910. Denny was the son of Seattle pioneer Arthur Denny.

It was his greenhouse at 171 Lake Washington Blvd. E. where Kurt Cobain killed himself in 1994. The greenhouse was razed by his wife, Courtney Love, shortly thereafter and the house and property were subsequently sold to a private party. A poignant memorial to the influential and troubled rocker can be found next door in Viretta Park, where messages and dedications have been carved into wooden benches.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Riding horses is just minutes away"

The South Rose Hill and Bridle Trails neighborhoods include an area in Kirkland bordered by NE 85th street to the north, Interstate 405 to the west, the Kirkland-Redmond city border to the east, and the Kirkland-Bellevue border to the south. It offers a 481 acre park as well as homes on 3/4 acre-plus lots.

Bridle Trails is only five minutes from downtown Bellevue and downtown Kirkland and just a few minutes more to Hwy 520 and I-405. The park has show arenas for horses and 28 miles of trails that can be enjoyed by equestrians and pedestrians alike. Bridle Trails offers a rural atmosphere with many homes bordering the park for added privacy. This superb equestrian community is last of its kind in Bellevue and Kirkland.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A lot of land to be developed - what type of home do you want?"

North Rose Hill is the area lying between Interstate 405 and 132nd Avenue NE. It is bounded by NE 85th Street on the south and NE 116th Street, Slater Avenue NE, and NE 123rd Street on the north.

Most of the area is developed, but there remain significant tracts of undeveloped land. The land use pattern is relatively well established. Low-density residential uses are predominant in the North Rose Hill neighborhood, while commercial uses are concentrated along its north and south boundaries in the North Rose Hill Commercial District and the NE 85th Street Subarea.

Managed growth continues to strengthen the unique residential character by preserving established low-density residential areas and by promoting a variety of housing alternatives and styles. No matter what type of home you are looking for, North Rose Hill probably has it or something very similar.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A very average Kirkland neighborhood"

Norkirk Neighborhood is bounded roughly by the northern lines of properties adjoining Central Way, Burlington Northern Railroad to the east, 20th Ave. to the north, and the eastern edge of properties along Market Street. Major land use patterns are fairly well established in the Norkirk neighborhood.

The neighborhood is predominately residential in character and contains some of Kirkland's oldest homes. Despite the predominance of low-density residential use, there are areas containing industrial, commercial, or high-density residential use. The most significant issues for this neighborhood are maintaining the stability of older residential areas and providing adequate buffering between different types of land use.

The homes are average, not many places to shop or dine out, and not a lot of pretty scenery. This is just an average place to live, if not, a little below par.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"How will this neighborhood end up?"

This neighborhood is bounded on the west by Lake Washington and on the east by the railroad tracks. Lakeview Drive and Lake Washington Boulevard are both a focus or seam for activities in this neighborhood.

The neighborhood west of Lake Washington Boulevard includes parks, single and multifamily dwellings, commercial uses, and marinas. The primary policy direction for the area, including the Houghton Slope and east of Lakeview Drive, would be to continue the primarily low-density residential uses. However, between Lakeview Drive and Lake Washington Boulevard, medium-density residential uses would be permitted, as well as limited offices. Offices and limited freeway commercial would also be allowed at the southern end of the neighborhood near Yarrow Bay.

There is much development ongoing and in the works in Lakewood. We will see what happens in the future.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"An attractive urban village in the making"

The Totem Lake neighborhood is located in the northeast corner of Kirkland. The neighborhood encompasses about one square mile, generally bounded by NE 132nd Street on the north, Slater Avenue and I-405 on the east, and the boundary created by established single family residential areas on the south and west.

Development in the neighborhood includes residential, office, retail, light industrial and institutional uses. The neighborhood is home to many residents and the City’s largest employer, the Evergreen Hospital Medical Center.

The center of the neighborhood also contains the Totem Lake Mall, a regional retail center. I-405 interchanges at NE 124th Street and NE 116th Street provide regional access to and through the neighborhood.

The significant natural features include Totem Lake, Juanita Creek and associated wetlands, and the steep slopes that bound the neighborhood to the north and east. The city plans to implement the vision of the Totem Lake neighborhood as an attractive urban village that is welcoming to visitors and residents alike.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Overall, just a nice place to live"

Highlands is a Kirkland neighborhood that lies north of NE 85th Street and is bounded by Interstate 405 to the east and the railroad right-of-way to the north and west, which is currently owned by Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF).

The majority of the area is developed with low-density residential use, with the southern portion of the neighborhood designated for medium density residential. There are no commercial zones located within the neighborhood, although there are several nearby, including Norkirk Industrial area to the southwest, NE 85th Street Subarea to the east Totem Lake to the north, and downtown.

Highlands is an ideal residential neighborhood close to the downtown that values its quality of life and limited vehicular access. As infill of the neighborhood occurs, its primary focus as a single-family neighborhood with areas of multifamily development continues. A variety of housing types and styles provide for a changing and diverse population, responding to the needs of young families and allowing people to continue living here long after children leave home. Newer, medium density multi-family housing is redeveloping in the southern portion of the neighborhood, adjoining the freeway interchange. It stabilizes the image of the neighborhood as a place that welcomes a variety of people at a variety of incomes.

The natural setting of the neighborhood with its valued tree canopy is protected and enhanced. Neighborhood parks are within walking distance and offer active and passive recreation opportunities. An extensive system of pedestrian and bike routes connect the parks.

Since there are no schools or commercial development in the Highlands community, residents rely on nearby shopping areas and institutions outside the neighborhood. The street network provides safe circulation for people and cars. Ample sidewalks promote pedestrian mobility between schools and activity centers. The pedestrian and bike connections within the neighborhood offer nonvehicular choices to commuters. These community connections strengthen the social fabric of the neighborhood.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A great deal of room to expand"

The Everest neighborhood is generally situated between the Burlington Northern railroad tracks and I-405, and between NE 68th Street and NE 85th Street. The neighborhood contains a wide variety of land uses and a substantial amount of undeveloped land. There is a lot of room to grow and expand in the future.

Single-family development is located in the central and eastern portions of the Everest Neighborhood, whereas multifamily development is concentrated toward the south. Light industrial development is clustered in the western part of the neighborhood and extends northeast along the railroad tracks.

Most of the Everest community is residential in character, including older single-family homes, which add variety to Kirkland’s housing supply and provide alternatives to multifamily units and newer single-family homes.
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"Families with kids are welcome here"

Westwood is its own little town a few miles southwest of downtown Seattle, in between the Fauntleroy neighborhood and the Duwamish River. The area is primarily residential, but includes the Westwood Village Shopping Center, as well as ample greenspaces.

The area's many parks are a result of the citywide Olmsted Plan, which mandated interconnected parks thoughout the city. The town's healthy schools and frequent neighborhood events add to the atmosphere of a strong community. This is a great place to raise your family if you are looking for somewhere safe and rich in family ties.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Lucky to find a home in this area"

Fauntleroy Seattle is a neighborhood in the southwestern area of West Seattle. This neighborhood borders the Puget Sound and offers expansive views of Vashon Island and Bainbridge Island. Fauntleroy is a primarily residential area and offers a quiet community only a few miles from downtown. Many homes in Fauntleroy offer breath taking views of the Puget Sound. Finding one of these homes for sale would be a treasure. They just don't go on the market very often.

The neighborhood of Fauntleroy is close to the other Seattle neighborhoods like Westwood, West Seattle, and White Center.

The western shore is a great place to catch sunsets over Vashon Island, which lies a few miles west in Puget Sound. On clear days you can see the Olympic Mountains, which are about 40 miles further west. Like most Seattle neighborhoods, Fauntleroy also boasts ample green spaces, including 135-acre Lincoln Park on Fauntleroy's northern edge.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Mountains, a lake, and a golf course"

Sandwiched between mountains and a lake to the southeast of Seattle, Newcastle is one of the oldest communities in its area. Due to the presence of coal, Newcastle developed quickly in the 1800s but has undergone a significant transformation from those rough beginnings.

What was once the Newcastle dump is now the site of the popular and pristine Golf Club at Newcastle. The Golf Club features two 18-hole public courses (Coal Creek and China Creek), extensive practice facilities, and a 44,000 square foot clubhouse (the most important thing about golf). The Calcutta Grill is located here and offers one of the Pacific Northwest's favorite eateries. Scottish bagpipe entertainment is also common.

Like many suburbs in the area, Newcastle is largely a prosperous, residential community providing access to downtown Seattle, but maintaining its own pace as well. The area is quiet and peaceful despite being close to the city. It is truly a suburb all its own.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Flying fish abound"

This is the heart of Seattle and the number one tourist site in the area, attracting frenzied crowds of visitors and locals. The oldest continually operating farmer's market in the country, Pike Place features fresh fish, fruits and vegetables, and arts and crafts as far as the eye can see.

Abundant restaurants in the area include Maximilien in the Market and Lowell's. Shops offer goods from around the world, but you really shouldn't barter - although some do. Bring some change as there are always street musicians singing for their supper.

The Market is built on the edge of a steep hill, and consists of several lower levels located below the main level. Each level features a variety of unique and artsy shops. Antique dealers, comic book sellers, and small family-owned restaurants all populate the area. There is even one of the few remaining head shops left in Seattle. The upper street level contains fishmongers, fresh produce stands and craft stalls operating in the covered arcades.

One of the Market's major attractions is Pike Place Fish Market, where employees throw three-foot salmon and other fish to each other rather than passing them by hand. When a customer orders a fish, an employee at the Fish Market's ice-covered fish table picks up the fish and hurls it over the countertop, where another employee catches it and preps it for sale. This is worth seeing!
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Overcoming the past"

Rainier Beach is located just southeast of Seattle along Lake Washington and is a largely residential area. Development of the town began when it was connected to Seattle by the Rainier Valley Electric Railway in 1896, and during the period of growth throughout and after the Second World War the area was urbanized.

The neighborhood fought to overcome some seriously high crime rates and has been somewhat successful, managing to attract many middle-class Seattle workers trying to avoid high rent.

To date, this is not the best of Seattle neighborhoods, and certainly not a place for single women to reside, but it is improving significantly.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"An elite village in Seattle"

Beaux Arts is a very small, yet largely wealthy area of metropolitan Seattle. Originally founded as an art colony and named after the french Academy of Beaux Arts, residents of the town today enjoy narrow, tree-lined streets and a private beach on Lake Washington.

The elite town has only several hundred residents and no town hall. Originally, membership in the Beaux Arts Village was bestowed for a small fee. Now it comes with ownership of a home here. You won't find a lot of children, but will find many retirees with a bank roll.

There is much nature in Beaux Arts and many many trees. As a result, and I find this quite interesting, when you plan to cut a tree down from your yard, you must consult the Bald Eagle Management Plan. This applies even when you plan on clearing an area for construction. There is a serious price to pay if you neglect this "law."
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Horses are welcome here"

Bridle Trails is a tranquil neighborhood at the north end of Bellevue. It offers a 481 acre park as well as many residential homes on 3/4 acre-plus lots. There is a lot of room to spread out and not feel so cramped and close to your neighbors as in the city.

Bridle Trails is only five minutes from downtown Bellevue and downtown Kirkland and just a few minutes more to Hwy 520 and I-405.

The park itself has show arenas for horses and 28 miles of trails that can be enjoyed by equestrians and pedestrians alike. Bridle Trails offers a rural atmosphere with many homes bordering the park for added privacy. This superb equestrian community is last of its kind in Bellevue and Kirkland.
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"Two beautiful lakes and a lot of nature"

The Sammamish/East Lake Hills neighborhood is on the east side of Bellevue and is adjacent to Lake Sammamish. Due to its proximity, it offers views of Lake Sammamish and Phantom Lake, and is centrally located between the Crossroads and Factoria neighborhoods.

There is also ready access to the Lake Hills Greenbelt, a large wetland area with an extensive trail system ideal for viewing local wildlife. If you like living close to nature, without being away from the city amenities, then you will take a liking to Sammamish.

I have friends who live in the area, and although I am very much a city girl, I do enjoy taking my daughter to view some of the local wildlife, pick wildflowers, and hike along endless trails. The lake is beautiful and a nice place to enjoy on weekends in the summer, or if you are fortunate to live there, all year around.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"The best high school in the state"

Newport is something of a residential Mecca for much of King County. The neighborhood comprises the southwest corner of Bellevue and is lined by Lake Washington on its west side, giving Newport ready access to some of the finest vistas, schools, and open spaces in the state.

Despite its close proximity to bustling downtown Bellevue, Newport still prides itself on maintaining a small, tight-knit neighborhood with a character of its own. Homes in Newport range from modest to extravagant, and from affordable to astronomical. There is something for everyone looking to enjoy the amenities of this suburban gem.

Newport High School was listed in Newsweek as one of five Bellevue School District High Schools in the top 200. The Newport High School goal is to prepare all students for the rigors of college and they recently passed an initiative on high school accountability. You could not ask for a better high school and it is known all over the country.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Easy to go green here"

Crossroads is a neighborhood in Bellevue that takes its name from the 40-acre Crossroads Mall at the heart of the neighborhood. The mall serves as an informal community center and is known for its inclusion of such activities as free live music, public art and cultural events, and a weekly farmers' market. This is a great place to buy your healthful and organic produce and overall green way of life products.

The Crossroads neighborhood has a large international population - including sizable Asian, Eastern European, and Hispanic populations - and over sixty languages are spoken in the area's schools. Children get a great deal of exposure to the diversity living among them.

The name 'Crossroads,' therefore, is a fitting one; it describes the meeting of cultures and sharing of ideas that make this unique community so remarkable. The neighborhood is rich in diversity and culture.
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5/5
Apr 10, 2009

"The best neighborhood in Bellevue"

Somerset is a marvelous, sought-after community which looks out across some of the best vistas in Bellevue. Somerset offers beautiful homes with sweeping views of the Seattle skyline, Lake Washington, and the Olympic Mountains, with gorgeous sunsets and sparkling city lights. This is a coveted place to live in the overall Seattle area.

There is also Bellevue’s excellent school system, nearby shopping, and ready access to downtown Bellevue and Downtown Seattle. Somerset maintains a feeling of community with an active committee planning frequent neighborhood events. All of this, set with the backdrop of Bellevue’s amazing views, makes Somerset an ideal place to live.

I recommend Somerset as one of the greatest places to raise a family. It is safe and inviting. The schools are some of the best in Seattle and shopping is practically at your back door. If you don't mind paying a good chunk for a home in the area, then Somerset is worth looking into.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Major Commercial Center"

Factoria is in the southern region of Bellevue and is one of the city's major commercial centers. Factoria's commercial development is largely centered around the existence of the Factoria Mall and its eight-theater cinema. Numerous office buildings of various size are scattered in the area, most significantly the 5-tower Newport Corporate Center which is prominently visible from the junction of I-5 and I-405. Typical to a business district, Factoria is dotted with shops, business services, fast food, and theme restaurants. There are numerous chain restaurants scattered throughout.

Factoria does not have a significant residential community of its own, though a few condominium and apartment complexes have recently been built. The area is instead used by surrounding neighborhoods as a shopping and business center. If you are looking for a home with front and backyard, this is not your area of Bellevue.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A nice family-oriented neighborhood, rich in diversity"

West Lake Hills sits in the heart of Bellevue and has easy access to the best that the city has to offer. The neighborhood was originally developed in the 1950s and was the Northwest’s first "planned community.” Since then, West Lake Hills has remained a quiet residential community where families can grow and live for generations to come.

As many homes approach the half-century mark, some areas of the neighborhood are going through redevelopment while others are preserving their original charm. Much of the neighborhood is adjacent to the Lake Hills Greenbelt, a large wetland preserve with an extensive trail system ideal for viewing local wildlife.

The West Lake Hills neighborhood has a large international population, and more than 40 percent of students in the area’s public schools speak a first language other than English. This offers a unique opportunity for children to grow up in a tolerant, culturally diverse setting. West Lake Hills is also home to Bellevue Community College, which serves over 20,000 full- and part-time students.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Classic and trendy city living"

This lively, trendy downtown neighborhood offers the best in condo living and artist lofts. It sits over Elliot Bay and is home to the splashiest sunset views over the Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains. Belltown is also a hop skip and a jump from Pike Place Market, and walking distance to the downtown business district, Seattle Center, and the foot of Queen Anne Hill.

A Belltown residence’s backyard has the most up-to-date nightlife alongside some of Seattle’s old faithful venues. The Moore Theatre, for example, is a historic concert hall on Second Avenue. A lively array of boutiques, galleries, cafes, thrift stores, salons and restaurants are all within a stone’s throw. Dining options range from thrifty international fare to high-end Seattle cuisine. Sidewalk dining springs to life during fair weather months.

Belltown is bonafide city living. Everything here is within walking distance. Which means locals can keep their cars parked for days, or not even own one. One added bonus of cosmopolitan living is access to many bus lines, and a lot of Belltown is in the city’s free bus zone. If you live in Belltown and work in a different neighborhood, you will have quick access to Interstate 5, Highway 99, and a the Seattle Metro bus system.

If you want to get out of Belltown, you can hop in a cab and take a five dollar cab ride to a different neighborhood. Belltown is just minutes from Capitol Hill, Uptown, Downtown, and Denny Triangle.
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"A lot to do, but wouldn't want to live here"

Seattle's downtown, including the neighborhoods of Belltown and the Denny Regrade, features a smorgasbord of activities for locals and tourists alike, from visiting parks to dining at the area's superb restaurants.

The waterfront activities have always been popular with both locals and visitors alike. Pike Place Market is known around the world for its colorful produce and flying fish, fresh from the day's catch and tossed for packaging. The Piers and the Washington State Ferries both provide afternoons of enjoyment, from shops and restaurants, to the lazy ferry runs across Puget Sound to the nearby islands.

In the Denny Regrade neighborhood you'll find the Seattle Center, where over 9 million people come each year to ride the elevator up the famous Space Needle, or to watch concerts, plays and sporting events at any one of the venues, including the Key Arena, the Mercer Center, Seattle Repertory Theatre, and Opera House. If walking around the Seattle Center isn't enough exercise for you, nearby Myrtle Edwards Park is a great place to walk or jog.

If it's food you're after, you will find excellent restaurants in nearby Belltown, right downtown. El Gaucho, Axis, Brasa, and the Flying Fish are just a few for starters. For hamburgers and beer, try the Two Bells Tavern; for coffee and light fare, look up La Vita e Bella.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Scenes from Sleepless in Seattle"

The neighborhood of Westlake Seattle is a narrow strip of land along the western edge of Lake Union. The Westlake community is largely commercial with a little bit of residential running through it. It is home to many large companies, and nicer chain style restaurants such as McCormick’s and Outback.

Living in Westlake gives you very quick access to South Lake Union, Uptown, Denny Triangle, and Fremont.

This is also the neighborhood in which Tom Hanks’ character in Sleepless in Seattle had a houseboat. Of course, when in the area, seeing the houseboat is a must. I have only been in this area once, saw the houseboat and ate at McCormick’s, then it was off to shop at Pike Market.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Schools, parks, athletics...this place has it all!"

Ravenna has become one of Seattle’s most desirable communities. Cozy Tudors and bungalows are mixed in with wonderful craftsman-style homes. The streets are quiet and tree-lined, making this a dreamy little pocket of Seattle living.

Good schools, beautiful parks, and athletic fields are the focal point for the residents of Ravenna. On afternoons and weekends, the parks and ball fields are bustling with life and young sports activists. Ravenna has earned itself a reputation as a wonderful community to raise the family.

While there are a limited number of restaurants and specialty shops within walking distance, many residents of Ravenna simply slip off to other areas for shopping and nightlife. Ravenna is close to Green Lake, the University Village shopping center, and near the freeway for downtown access. Many residents do their shopping on 65th Street, which has beautiful grocery stores, furniture stores, cafes, and just about everything else.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Seattle's hidden treasure with a park"

Seward Park is a home to herons, eagles, and a wooded peninsula. It is one of Seattle’s local treasures. The park itself is the peninsula, and it comes chalked full of tennis courts, fishing docks, walking trails, and a public swimming beach.

Like most out-of-the-way neighborhoods, Seward Park has a tight-knit community feel, a strong ethnic diversity and a style that mixes old charm with contemporary remodels. Houses start on the outskirt of the park. Residences run the gamut: Tudor, family, brick, stucco, mid-century and modern. Many of them are multi-storied to catch the views from the hills. There are homes in bright primary colors, and yards with sprawling rock gardens, bulging hydrangeas and rose bushes. The best recommendation is that home turnover rate is low.

The commercial section of Seward Park is small but resourceful. There’s a PCC along with some private businesses and local eateries. The neighborhood is a star attraction during the summer. People come here for Seward Park’s swimming beach and the Seafair festivities which include hydroplane races. The park is circled by a paved path, and a number of sports events are held here—from a 5K run for owners and their dogs, to triathlons and weeknight criterion bike rides. The park also has an amphitheater and hosts a number of cultural celebrations.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Living next to the zoo"

One of the defining characteristics for Phinney Ridge residents is their backyard: Woodland Park Zoo. You might hear locals complain about sleepless nights—waking up to monkey hoots, elephant blares or wolves howling at the full moon. But Phinney Ridge draws animal lovers. One estimate says there are three dogs for every fire hydrant! Phinney Ridge even has a do-it-yourself Dog Wash.

Homes are large bungalows and single-family styles. They’re often perched on steep streets and come in a range of colors and designs. Homeownership pride shows itself in the well maintained and tended landscapes, lush gardens, and home improvement projects. This is the kind of neighborhood where everyone knows each other’s names, and kids gather in the streets to play. Over the years, Phinney Ridge has attracted many first-time home buyers and new families.

Phinney’s ridge is on the east side of one of Seattle’s many slopes, giving this neighborhood beautiful views to the Olympic Mountains and over the Puget Sound.

One of the top spots to visit while in Phinney Ridge is Red Mill Burgers, where they serve some of the best burgers in Seattle.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"An affordable Seattle neighborhood"

The neighborhood of South Park is located along the Duwamish River just north of Boulevard Park in Seattle. It was reported in the Seattle Times that this is one of the few remaining affordable neighborhoods of Seattle, Washington.

The houses are everything from small brick homes and modest fixer-uppers to turn-of-the-century and mid-century homes. New, shingled condos and some new homes are cropping up as well. Yards here are modest but diversely landscaped and planted. Some have fruit trees and closely mowed lawns; others have wild gardens and overflowing flower boxes. On a recent visit, we saw people out and about, walking down the small sidewalks in the middle of a weekday. There is a darling community center with baseball fields.

The business section is small and colorful (orange and yellow storefronts) and also on the up-and-up, with an increasing number of shops, restaurants, and services.

The neighborhood is on the upswing, and has been for some time. Anyone who loves community building need apply.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Every kind of home available here"

The neighborhood of Admiral is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Seattle. In the early days of Admiral, the only way to reach this neighborhood was by cable car or water ferry. Today, Admiral is easily accessible by the West Seattle Bridge.

Admiral is full of various kinds of real estate. The neighborhood offers homes and condos for sale that are in high demand.

Admiral offers views of Downtown, Belltown, the Space Needle. Admiral also offers views of Elliott Bay and Mount Rainier. The closest neighborhoods around The Admiral District are Alki Beach, West Seattle, and Fauntleroy.

From Admiral, you’re able to quickly access highway 509 that runs to South Seattle. You also have quick access to highway 99 just over the West Seattle Bridge. Highway 99 runs north and south and gives you the ability to be anywhere in Seattle very easily.
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5/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A well-kept community with great schools"

The neighborhood of Laurelhurst is located just north east of the University District along the edge of Lake Washington. The majority of homes in this neighborhood are as beautiful as the views. There is quick access to Interstate 5, which will get you into Downtown within minutes.

Laurelhurst is a very upscale neighborhood with strong roots. It's not uncommon for people to continue living in this same neighborhood that they grew up in. You may even find several generations all living in the same area. Laurelhurst is known for its well-kept lawns, views, schools, and beautiful and peaceful streets. There is a strong pride of ownership in this neighborhood. The residents are largely professional, and you may have doctors and lawyers living right next to each other.

On the shores of this peninsula jutting out into Lake Washington you'll find the local private waterfront park, referred to by residents simply as "the Beach Club." This is a popular place among locals.

The Laurelhurst Elementary School is just one of the fine schools this neighborhood boasts about. It is located on 4530 46th Ave N.E.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Just as the name suggest - gorgeous sunsets"

Sunset Hill is located north of Ballard. This neighborhood is beautiful. There are some very impressive views of the Puget Sound. As the name suggests, this neighborhood provides some of the best sunsets in Seattle.

Sunset Hill is close to other Seattle neighborhoods such as Ballard, Loyal Heights, and North Beach. Sunset Hill residents enjoy the expansive views of Shilshole Bay and the Olympic Mountains, as well as the enjoyment of living in a relatively peaceful area. Downtown Seattle is close by, but the pace is a little slower here. It is quiet in the neighborhood and instead of the residents listening to the humming of traffic on I-5, they savor the sounds of marine animals and animals barking in the distance. Interestingly, the barking sound comes from seals and sea lions nearby rather than dogs.

There is a small business district at the intersection of 32nd Avenue Northwest and Northwest 65th Street. Several commercial storefronts have evolved slowly over the years. For major retail therapy, head into the downtown area - you just won’t find it in Sunset Hill.
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2/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Public housing galore"

Yesler Terrace is a large public housing development in Seattle and is located on the southernmost part of First Hill, along Yesler Way immediately east of downtown Seattle. Uphill across Interstate 5 from Pioneer Square and the International District, it consists of several hundred two-story rowhouses and a small number of community buildings. Unlike most public housing developments, residents have their own private yards.

Plans are still evolving to turn this public housing district into a mixed-income neighborhood, but it is still considered one of the poorest communities in Seattle. It is difficult to find residents who really care and want to fight for their neighborhood’s betterment, because most either have given up hope or are trying to get out.

The main thoroughfare in Yesler Terrace is Yesler Way, which cuts right through the neighborhood. There is no shopping, restaurants worth eating at, or galleries in the area. This is a public housing neighborhood exclusively.
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5/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Georgeous homes and great schools"

Located between the University District, Fremont and north of Lake Union and downtown, Wallingford is known for its gorgeous bungalows and craftsman-style homes. There are also condominiums, modern designs and apartment buildings sprinkled amidst the early- to mid-century houses. Corners seem to sprout some enormous magnificent houses and a few Victorians were spotted as well. The new construction is tasteful, and respects the going style.

Many of the homes are propped up off the street, seeming to reach for views that can go east or west, north and south: to Lake Union, Green Lake, or to either of the mountain ranges. Steep and curved cement stairways run up to porch entrances.

Two main arteries run through Wallingford: 45th Street and 50th Street. The main downtown district is the always-bustling 45th Street, a busy thoroughfare that runs east-west and is filled with pedestrians. People from all over the city come here for the wide array of restaurants, coffee shops, a tea house, movie theaters and funky retail stores.

Wallingford is packed with good schools, and has been a tight-knit community for years. Another main thoroughfare is the Burke-Gilman Trail, a paved recreational path for bicyclists, runners and walkers. The trail begins at the nearby Gas Works Park, off Lake Union. And the zoo, in nearby Woodland Park is a short drive or manageable walk for those north of 45th.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"College student haven"

This is a community that is always in motion, just like any college town. The residents here, for the most part, are a lively mix of students, faculty, and employees of the University of Washington.

Life in the U-District (as it’s commonly called) ranges from multi-story gracious homes on shaded avenues with green meridians, to condominiums, apartments, and well-worn bungalow homes that are temporary residents to cycles of students. There is also a Greek system here, nestled in across the street from the north entrance of campus.

The University District is flanked by the greenbelt of Ravenna and the open shopping center of the University Village. The main collegiate attraction here is University Way, aka, The Ave, which has the standard-issue array of cheap eats and international fare, used bookstores, unique boutiques, cafes, music stores and plenty of curiosity shops.

Students stock up at the University Book Store, which is also a popular venue for author readings. From spring through fall, there’s a Farmer’s Market on the north end of University Way.

The U-District is beautiful and bucolic in the fall, and famous for its cherry blossoms in the spring.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A little bit of everything"

Located just across Elliott Bay from downtown Seattle, West Seattle offers its residents tight-knit communities within four main neighborhoods: Admiral, Alki, Fauntleroy and Delridge. The salt-water air and beach charm of Alki is a favorite, with first-rate views of the city, Puget Sound and the mountains. Fauntleroy offers pretty much the same but with a view of the islands rather than the city.

West Seattle living is a mix of traditional mid-century bungalows, single family homes, large craftsman style homes, and modern, million-dollar condominiums that line up along Alki Beach.

For dining and entertainment, California Avenue is one of the main strips, with a wide assortment of shops and restaurants. If you want to get to Seattle, it’s a quick trip across the West Seattle Bridge. Or, in the spring and summer months, hop on the passenger ferry that transports riders across the bay. Don’t forget to breathe in that fresh salty air!
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Boasting a Huge Park within the Neighborhood"

The neighborhood of Magnolia is beautiful. It is like entering another world, like a fairy tale on an island, almost. While it’s actually a peninsula, Magnolia is located minutes from downtown, but set off from the rest of Seattle by three bridges.

Magnolia feels so serene because of the pristine landscaping along with an almost nonexistent presence of any construction. Even though it’s tucked away from the rest of Seattle, people make the trip here on gorgeous evenings for front-row views of the sunset, Puget Sound, the San Juan Islands and the Olympic mountain range. Nothing beats it.

On top of the views offered by the neighborhood of Magnolia Seattle, there is a small neighborhood feel due to the great little restaurants and shops in the middle of Magnolia. Magnolia is a great self-contained neighborhood. If you ever want to venture out of Magnolia, you can be in the neighborhoods of Downtown, Belltown, Queen Anne, and Uptown in less than 10 minutes.

Many different styles of houses abound in Magnolia, from Tudor-style homes, mid-century charmers and contemporary styles, to bungalows, small brick and box houses. Gardens are well-manicured with sculpted trees and bushes. Mixed in with a predominance of homes are condos and a few rental properties, which can keep a pricey neighborhood slightly more balanced.

Magnolia’s business district is along McGraw Street. The area has a sweet selection of shops and restaurants, with all the mainstream amenities. Another popular spot is Fisherman’s Terminal, a marina with restaurants and retail that also houses the Alaska Fishing Fleet.

Magnolia’s jewel is Discovery Park, the Seattle’s largest park. There are over 530 acres that include seven miles of trails winding along a cliff and down to the beach. Its inhabitants are eagles, herons, falcons, seals, owls; visitors include dogs, joggers and walkers. Paths also run along tall-grassy bluffs that look over Puget Sound. If this isn’t enough, there are historical homes above these bluffs, remnants from an old naval base, Fort Lawton; and there’s Daybreak Star Cultural Center, a cultural center for the United Indians of all Tribes Foundation.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Former home of Kurt Cobain"

Madrona is a neighborhood that is located along the shores of Lake Washington. Madrona is located between Leschi and Madison Valley. Madrona is also close to Madison Park. The homes here are situated along many winding roads that go up the slope of the mountain on your way into the Downtown Seattle core. This neighborhood has been home to a few celebrities, most notably Kurt Cobain.

The homes are a mix of mid-century, contemporary, brick and bungalow styles. This is a spectacular walking area, with parks and gardens that unfold and bloom throughout the seasons. The small but growing business strip is on 34th, which includes restaurants, shops and retailers, cafes, a local winery and a renovated yellow-stucco gas station (now a frame shop and gallery).

Along the lake you have Madrona Park, which comes with a snack bar, picnic tables and covered shelters that can be reserved through the Public Parks system. A bathhouse doubles as the home to a dance company and offers year-round classes. This swimming beach is full-service: lifeguards, a roped-in swimming area, floating dock and facilities.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Industrial yet neighborly all at the same time"

The neighborhood of Georgetown is located in the heart of south Seattle. It is a largely industrial area with a small patch of single-family homes. Georgetown is a neighborhood where there is the potential for much growth, and, it’s happening.

This historic neighborhood is located south of the city. Georgetown boasts industry, commerce, and charming tree-lined streets tucked in between old brick factories, artist lofts, Seattle’s first railroad and office parks. This area, which runs along the Duwamish River, has enjoyed an upswing over the recent years.

Living in Georgetown means living among families, shared occupancies, some new condos, and a growing artist population that is taking advantage of the affordable studio space. The neighborhood is quaint and colorful: huge trees tower over the streets and two-story roofs. Residences range from bungalows and small box homes to brick houses and Tudor/Victorian styles. They come in all colors down here, from bright green, robin’s egg blue and one yellow house with a bright orange door. Despite the industrial surrounding, the streets are quiet with a mix of neatly mowed lawns and bursting English-style gardens.

Residents here are strong on local pride. They’ve watched their abandoned historic buildings bloom into a revival of restaurants and shops. There is a local park, of course, and ball field included in the mix.

If you have an artistic or urban-industrial bent and like the idea of getting in on an upstart neighborhood and enjoy a fixer-upper home, Georgetown could be your place.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A diverse neighborhood with a community pea patch!"

Lake Washington’s marina community, Leschi is settled along the lake and up into the windy forested hills to the west. Another revitalized community, it still offers a diverse neighborhood mix, but the closer you get to the water, the pricier and fancier the real estate.

Residences in Leschi include condominiums (especially along the lake), refurbished bungalows and craftsman, contemporary styles, bricks, Tudors and mid-century ramblers. Curvy streets wind away from the lakefront, which means many residences get at least a partial lake view. There are parks too—from a popular lakeside park to pocket parks sprinkled up in the slopes. Don’t miss the community pea patch, the tennis courts and the historical beach cottages.

Leschi town center is about two blocks long and vacation-esque. Set off the marina, there’s a local grocery store, restaurants, small businesses, condos, a deli and a Starbucks. On the weekends, Leschi is a resting stop and watering hole for tribes of recreational and competitive cyclists.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A very busy neighborhood"

Many residents of Seattle have not a clue about the magnificent estates and streets of Mount Baker. We’re talking embassy-style homes facing grassy, tree-lined meridians. All of this hidden behind the fun and fanfare of Lake Washington Boulevard. However, this doesn’t represent all of Mount Baker.

The homes are a vibrant range: multi-story brick, Tudor, modern architecture and modest all-American bungalows. The gardens are well-tended, some of them quite big, many of them overflowing with plants and flowers. While there are still some fixer-uppers around, this is a neighborhood of the fixed-ups. Mount Baker is also a neighborhood of long-timers.

This is a busy neighborhood. Mount Baker is the local host for the yearly hydroplane races and the Blue Angel air shows; it’s a main thoroughfare for bicyclists, joggers and triathlon trainers. It’s the host to rowing regattas and clubs. Mount Baker Beach comes with a bathhouse, a sandy beach with a floating dock and lifeguards. In the winter, there’s a parade of Christmas ships.

Also a portal to Seattle, Mount Baker is a straight shot to Seattle, or to the east side of town. It’s just off I-90, a gateway interstate that runs east and west.
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3/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Right behind the mall"

Northgate is located near the neighborhoods of Pinehurst, Maple Leaf, and Victory Heights. On the other side of I-5 is the neighborhood of Licton Springs.

Despite its settlement behind the Northgate Mall, this is the kind of neighborhood that remind you of a careless childhood. An assortment of Northwest trees rise above the modest homes. Rose gardens, fruit trees, hedges and maples give Northgate’s residential gem a fairy tale feel.

The homes here are older—ranging from ramblers and bricks to two-story mid-century family houses. There’s a coziness of a well-lived in town here, with homes you can move right into or revamp.

Of note, the Northgate Mall was the first regional mall in the country. But there are other shopping options too, like a bustling business district on Roosevelt Avenue—grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations, everything you need, mall-free. The Northgate Mall is a major Seattle shopping area. Besides the mall, there are many chain restaurants and other shopping areas that surround the mall. From Downtown, one could be in Northgate in about 20 to 25 minute.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A great place to go for a walk"

Located in one of Seattle’s most affluent areas, Madison Park offers wide tree-lined streets and wonderful walking areas. Most of the homes are either nearby or overlooking Lake Washington and are large and beautiful to say the least.

Houses in Madison Park combine stately turn-of-the-century architecture and mature, lushly landscaped properties. There are still some bungalows and beach-style houses remaining from the old days, but new construction, and large majestic Tudors dominate the area.

Madison Park offers a unique business district at the east end of Madison Avenue. Specialty shops, restaurants, a book store and coffee shops, a grocery store and banks are frequented not only by the locals, but by people living close by as well. There is a tight-knit community here, and residents can hardly walk the main drag on a nice day without stopping to chat with a friend or neighbor along the way. In the summer, Madison Beach attracts swimmers and sunbathers from all over. Across the street from the beach, there’s a children’s play area and tennis courts. Some days, Madison Park feels like an at-home vacation destination.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"A quiet and charming little neighborhood"

The neighborhood of Maple Leaf is in the North Seattle area. Maple Leaf is located east of Interstate 5 and north of the neighborhood of Roosevelt. Maple Leaf is located just west of Lake City and Highway 522 serves as the border between Lake City and Maple Leaf.

Maple Leaf is a quiet, charming community, chock full of mid-century homes, brick houses, ramblers and two-story houses that cozy up with blackberry bushes, flocks of giant trees and memories of childhood. A row of condominiums stands at the edge of the neighborhood and appears to be a barricade into the community.

The yards are small but pulsing with personality—not just in the free-spirited rose gardens and flowers, but the lawn décor as well. There is virtually no noise from the busier surrounding sections of town. Maple Leaf has views going east and west, to the Cascade Mountain range and Olympic Mountains.

Between Northgate Mall and Roosevelt, there are plenty of stores, entertainment offerings, and business sections to choose from. This is a well lived-in community and the residents seem very happy and well-established here.
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4/5
Apr 10, 2009

"Living on a natural preserve"

Green Lake Seattle is a beautiful neighborhood in an area about 15 minutes north of Downtown Seattle. The neighborhood gets its name from the lake that occupies most of the neighborhood. During the spring and summer months, there are people jogging, walking, and roller blading around the three mile trail that circles the lake.

Living in this neighborhood means living within walking distance of this luscious lake, along with a surrounding array of restaurants and shops. Single family homes are located on all sides of the lake with new condominiums and town homes cropping up on the east side of the lake. There are signs of new construction around the neighborhood, but Green Lake is defined by its turn-of-the-century craftsman style homes and bungalow architecture.

Green Lake is a natural preserve to hundreds of species of plants and trees, along with waterfowls and birds. There’s even a Bathhouse Theater that features a local theater company. An estimated one million people visit Green Lake every year.
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4/5
Apr 09, 2009

"Many schools to choose from"

Gatewood is located in the very hilly district of west Seattle. The highest point of the hilly area is the Gatewood district. It is adjacent to the High Point neighborhood. The intersection of 35th Avenue SW and SW Myrtle Street sits 520 feet above sea level, which illustrates the hilly nature of this area. The hill is situated among two large water towers and is also the location of Out Lady of Guadalupe School and Parish - which is on the peak of the highest known hill in west Seattle.

The surrounding neighborhoods of Gatewood are overlapping and quite close together. The Washington State Ferries dock in nearby Fauntleroy neighborhood and provide transportation for the residents of Gatewood. There is service to Vashon Island and to Southworth on the Kitsap Peninsula. Running between Duwamish Head and downtown Seattle is a passenger-only ferry, no cars allowed.

There are numerous schools in the highly residential area of Gatewood and its surrounding neighborhoods of west Seattle including South Seattle Community College, West Seattle High School, Chief Sealth High School, Seattle Lutheran High School, Gatewood Elementary School, Madison Middle School, Denny Middle School, Roxhill Elementary School, Alki Elementary School, Lafayette Elementary School, Highland Park Elementary School, Sanislo Elementary School, Pathfinder Elementary School, Holy Family School Seattle, Holy Rosary West Seattle, Schmitz Park Elementary School, and Our Lady of Guadalupe.
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3/5
Apr 09, 2009

"One large neighborhood"

Beacon Hill is one of Seattle’s oldest and largest neighborhoods. Beacon Hill is not only a neighborhood but also one of the many hills in Seattle. The neighborhood of Beacon Hill Seattle is quite large. Due to its size, the city of Seattle has subdivided Beacon Hill into North Beacon Hill, Mid Beacon Hill, Holly Park and South Beacon Hill. Beacon Hill begins close to the southern border of Interstate 90 and runs along Interstate 5. The eastern border of Beacon Hill is about half way between Interstate 5 and Lake Washington. The remaining area between the eastern border is taken up by the neighborhoods of Mount Baker, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Seward Park.

There are close to 5000 homes in Beacon Hill and the average selling price is a reasonable $360,000. There are also over 400 condos available with an average selling price of just under $300,000.

The area is highly residential and most commercial stops take place outside of the area. When living in Beacon Hill and working somewhere else, you will have quick access to Rainier Avenue, Martin Luther King Way, Interstate 5 and Highway 900.
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5/5
Apr 09, 2009

"Lush, green and inviting place to live"

Eastlake is one of the oldest and funkiest communities in Seattle. Located between the University district and downtown, the atmosphere here is colorful, cozy, and definitely homespun. The neighborhood is tucked between the east side of Lake Union and stretch of Interstate 5. The interstate is elevated to eliminate the noise level in the area. The neighborhood is also in close proximity to The University District, Capitol Hill, Wallingford, Westlake, and South Lake Union.

The living options include bungalows, condos, apartments and Eastlake’s special feature - houseboats. The houseboat community has a personality all its own. Docks and boardwalks connect multi-story modern homes and quaint, primary-color cottages with gardens and roof balconies.

The main thoroughfare is Eastlake Avenue and is populated with landmark restaurants and taverns, salons, burger joints, small businesses, art galleries, fine dining and shops. Eastlake spreads itself like a large saddle over two bodies of water known as Lake Union and Portage Bay. Eastlake possesses the warmth and eccentric feel of a beach community, with lush gardens and brightly painted houses. One of the streets in the area has a line of homes in green, pink, purple, yellow, and red.

The north end of the neighborhood sits on an old boatyard. From the Lake Union side, the views overlook downtown, the Olympic Mountains, and the sunsets. From Portage Bay, the view faces the University of Washington. The land-locked homes here rise up along a steep hill, to catch views of the Cascade Mountains, Lake Washington and the moon rises. There are over 450 homes in the neighborhood with the average selling price of approximately $400,000 USD.
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4/5
Apr 09, 2009

"A great little place to live"

Columbia City Seattle is an area in Rainier Valley that is “up and coming”. There are numerous great restaurants and shops and new construction taking place in the form of condos. Columbia City is such a small area of Seattle that if you’re not careful, you’ll blink while driving through it while going up or down Rainier Avenue. The neighborhood is surrounded by Hillman City, Beacon Hill, Genesee, and Lakewood.

There are well over 1,000 homes in the Columbia City area. Residences here include gentle ramblers, two-story shingled and box homes, and bungalows. The yards vary from being modest and minimalist to sprouting wild and care-free gardens. Streets are lined with tall leafy trees and rugged bushes. Along with a vibrant ethnic mix, is the sound of children playing in the streets.

There was a huge effort by the community approximately ten years ago which included nightly “dog walks.” The purpose was to reacquaint neighbors and keep the streets safe for kids. Nowadays, Wednesdays are dedicated to a Farmer’s Market. Other proud features include a beautiful colonial library, a new movie theater and venues that host reading series and live music. The neighborhood has really pulled together and provided its residents with a great homespun family atmosphere.
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MichelleWilliams
MichelleWilliams The area boomed owing to war II and postwar industries, transfer massive numbers of African Americans to the community throughout the Sixties. although the Nineteen Seventies saw several empty storefronts, in massive half the realm has rebounded. Today, the whole downtown is taken into account a Historic District. In recent decades, space|the world|the realm} has experienced AN flow of town residents probing for low-cost housing with quick access to the downtown area.
Nov 15, 2013
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4/5
Apr 09, 2009

"Lots of shopping and coffee choices"

Pioneer Square is located at the south end of Downtown Seattle and just north of Safeco Field and the Qwest Field. The area is home to many of Seattle’s oldest historic buildings and hosts many of Seattle’s best art galleries, nightclubs, and restaurants. There are so many unique and eclectic shops in the area, that you can easily lose a day just snooping around the boutiques. Pioneer Square is an urban explorer’s dream.

Of course, when in Seattle it is a must to drink coffee and you will never run out of your share of places to find a cup a java. From Tully’s Coffee at 408 2nd Avenue or 625 5th Avenue South, to numerous Starbucks’ on 1st, 2nd, and 5th Avenues, to my personal favorite Seattle’s Best at 621 2nd Avenue, Seattle boasts java. Since it does rain nearly everyday, coffee is a must on the dark and blustery morning commute to work.

Pioneer Square contains only condos, so if you are in the market for a home with a front yard, move on and out. There are approximately 175 condos in Pioneer Square with more potentially being built. The average selling price for a condo in Pioneer Square is approximately $485,000. The average price per square foot was $386.

Pioneer Place Park is at the corner of James Street and 1st Avenue. The iron pergola that sits in this brick park is a landmark in Seattle. It was originally built to greet visitors to the 1909 World’s Fair, and heralded the way into a public comfort station. The park is also home to a Tlingit totem pole. Just behind the park is the Pioneer Building, headquarters of the Underground Tour.
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3/5
Apr 09, 2009

"Every range of housing price"

Arbor Heights is a quiet neighborhood located in south west Seattle. You will find the area on the way to Fauntleroy via Vashon/Southworth ferry. It is protected by the Puget Sound on the west and is sheltered from the buzz of its urban and suburban neighbors. Lincoln Park is on Fauntleroy Way Southwest in West Seattle, just north of the Fauntleroy ferry dock. It boasts 135 acres and 5,350 feet of Puget Sound shoreline. Fauntleroy Creek, with its fish ladder, and Cove Park are other environmental gems here.

Housing in the Arbor Heights area range from quaint 200K one bedroom single family homes located in the center of Arbor Heights close to shopping at Westwood, restaurants, parks, bus lines, and just a block or two to Arbor Heights Elementary, to 1M plus homes situated on the bluff and encompassing the Olympic Range south to Mt. Rainier. The bluff homes enjoy rights to their own private beaches, sunset, ferries, and eagle eye views from their own balconies.

There is only one elementary school in Arbor Heights, Arbor Heights Elementary, and no secondary schools. The area is primarily zoned residential and the nearest commercial facilities are just north in Roxhill neighborhood. There is also a small commercial and retail area down the hill to the west in Fauntleroy neighborhood.
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4/5
Apr 09, 2009

"Fremont is the center of the universe"

Fremont is an artsy and eclectic neighborhood located in the north-central area of Seattle. Overlooking Salmon Bay, the small community of Fremont bills boasts itself as “the center of the universe.” It is bordered to the east by the Wallingford neighborhood and to the west by the trendy Ballard neighborhood.

Known best for its offbeat and irreverent parades, parties and sidewalk art, Fremont is home to such Seattle landmarks as the Annual Solstice Parade. The parade is famous for its nude cyclists and quirky celebrations; the Fremont Troll Monument; and the neighborhood’s controversial 7-ton Lenin statue.

In order to get a true feel for Fremont a walking tour is in order and probably the best way to appreciate Fremont’s unusual artistic character. You must sample some of the neighborhood’s homemade microbreweries and bistros. True to its nature, Fremont’s culinary opportunities are both cosmopolitan and exceptional. Choices run the gamut, from traditional Asian cuisine and western vegetarian to Italian trattorias and upscale seafood restaurants. Lodging isn’t hard to find in Seattle and is within minutes from Fremont’s best attractions. There is so much to do in this area and it is all within walking distance or a short cab ride.

The people who live in this area are so friendly and very much relaxed. Nightlife hotspots are located within walking distance of many residences, but never keep the rest of the neighborhood up at night.

You will find many condos and a little over 1300 homes in the neighborhood. If you are looking for a little bit of everything in a neighborhood, Fremont is just that place.
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3/5
Apr 09, 2009

"The oldest neighborhood in Seattle, rich in history"

Ballard is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the Seattle area. It was settled by Danish and Finish immigrants in the early 1800s and today its Scandinavian roots are reflected in its rich historic landmarks and winding streets.

There are trendy cafes, neighborhood pubs, and unique shops which have made Ballard a favorite destination for locals and visitors alike. Stores range from home design shops that focus on “green living” to the latest in chic apparel. Visitors can find a wide range of ethnic restaurants in Ballard, from popular Thai cuisine to upscale dining.

Ballard’s pubs, like its restaurants, are often known as much for their unusual settings as for their excellent fare. Converted hardware stores, historic buildings and Ballard’s famous library have become settings for unique meeting places, adding to the attractive atmosphere that makes up one of Seattle’s most popular neighborhoods.

The neighborhood overlooks Salmon Bay and is known for its panoramic views of the Olympic Mountains, sandy beaches, and winding forest trails that are great for hiking. Golden Garden Park is found in Ballard and includes an off-leash dog park, fishing pier, and boat launch.

Owning a home in Ballard provides you with quick access to 15th Avenue West, which takes you straight into Queen Anne, Belltown, and Downtown. There is also efficient and quick access to Highway 99.

There have been many new condos built in Ballard recently. Some of the Ballard condos are within blocks of Market Street which will give many new residents quick access to many fun things.
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4/5
Apr 09, 2009

"The best seafood in Seattle"

Alki Beach is a beautiful part of Seattle located on the western peninsula. The neighborhood offers stunning views of Elliott Bay and the entire Seattle skyline. At the very tip of Alki Point you are able to witness Qwest Stadium and Safeco Field, and if you look to the north, you are able to gaze at the Space Needle, Key Arena, and Queen Anne Hill.

There is just one main drag through Alki Beach named Alki Drive. On sunny weekends, Alki Drive is flooded with cars, motorcycles, and bicyclists. While driving down Alki Drive, plan on seeing a whole lot of condos. Some of the newer condos are very nice and have replaced most of the historic homes that had been in the area for decades. Some residents were disheartened at the disappearance of history but there is quite a demand for housing in Seattle, especially Alki Beach. Most of the condos do, however, offer great views of the city, Elliott Bay, and the skyline at night.

For the best seafood and steakhouse in the greater Seattle area, come to Salty’s on Alki Beach located at 1936 Harbor Avenue. Once you are on the West Seattle Bridge, take the Harbor Avenue Exit (do not take the Harbor Island exit). Turn right onto Harbor Avenue and follow it for one mile. Salty’s is on the right side of the street, on the waterfront. There is plenty of free parking in their parking lot or on the street. They offer award-winning cuisine, wine bar, and live music. The view from Salty’s is priceless.

Alki Beach Park offers 2.5 miles of sandy beach, with a great seawall for walking and people watching. The park runs from Duwamish Head to Alki Point. Next to Green Lake, Alki Beach Park is known as the place to see and be seen participating in something athletic. The water is cold, but on an exceptionally hot August afternoon, this place can’t be beat.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Residents with a wide array of ethnic background"

Sunnyside is a neighborhood in northwestern Queens that is surrounded by other communities such as Astoria/Long Island City to the north, Hunters Point to the west, Greenpoint and Maspeth to the south, and Woodside to the east. Sunnyside also lies within Long Island City and is bounded at this overlap by Sunnyside Yards.

Most of Sunnyside’s residents are from various ethnic backgrounds and as a result offers many restaurants and stores to meet the needs of its residents’ cultures.

Sunnyside has easy access to Manhattan and Brooklyn via the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and the Long Island Expressway. The easy access transportation makes Sunnyside a popular place to reside if working in the City.

P.S. 199, P.S. 150, P.S. 11 and I.S. 125 are some of the public schools serving the area. The schools offer great diversity and exposure to all cultures and backgrounds. Children will not grow up sheltered from the rest of the world in this neighborhood.
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wartman
wartman The original poster could not possibly have any firsthand knowledge of New York. Very few people drive into Manhattan from Sunnyside to go to work. There is too much traffic during the weekday. People either take the subway or the bus.
Jan 10, 2013
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Private Parks and Gardens Throughout the Area"

Jackson Heights is a northwestern neighborhood in Queens and is known as an urban melting pot that is rich in ethnic diversity. Most of the neighborhood is a National Register Historic District, and approximately half of the area is noted as being a New York City Historic District. The area is comprised of mainly large garden apartment buildings and many private home groupings.

Jackson Heights was the first garden community built in the United States, as part of the international Garden City movement at the turn of the last century. As a result, there are more private parks within walking distance of each other than in any other city in America. The parks or gardens are tucked in the mid-blocks, mostly hidden from view by the buildings surrounding them. Several approach the size of Gramercy Park, in Manhattan, and others are slightly larger. As befits private parks, unless given an invitation, the key to gain entry is to own a co-op around its perimeter. The basis for the private ownership of the parks of Jackson Heights is derived from its founding principle--as a privately owned little garden city, built largely under the oversight of one person. The gardens of the co-ops help make the historic part of the neighborhood highly desirable.

Jackson Heights has more school choices within walking distance than any other city America, except for some sections of Manhattan. Students attend P.S. 69 or P.S. 212 for primary school. Middle schools in the neighborhood include I.S. 145 and I.S. 230. There are also other private schools and parochial private schools.

The community is also home to many houses of worship from a wide array of religions, due in part to the rich diversity this community holds.

Jackson Heights has the highest density of trees and greenery in New York City along its residential streets. The trees provide not only shade during those hot New York summers, but also a great look for its residents.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great rental prices in the area"

Laurelton is a neighborhood in Queens that is surrounded by other communities like Cambria Heights, St. Albans, Springfield Gardens, and Rosedale. Laurelton was named after the laurels that covered the area over one hundred years ago.

The area is primarily a residential neighborhood with one and two family homes. Spanish and English Tudor style homes populate the area. Rental prices in the neighborhood are reasonable with studios running $550-$800, one bedrooms from $750-$1000, and two bedrooms from $1050-$1250.

Transportation in Laurelton is pretty good. You can catch the Long Island Rail Road, at 225th Street and 141st Road which should get you to Penn Station in 35 minutes. Shopping and restaurants are just a short train ride away.

There is not much in the way of nightlife or hotspots for singles. Most single residents travel to the city for fun on the weekends.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"A long trip to Manhattan"

Bayswater is a small community on the eastern end of the Rockaway Peninsula in the Queens borough. The neighborhood is located northeast of Far Rockaway and south of Jamaica Bay. The area was once the location of many summer hotels like the Sunset Lodge, but now is a residential community all year around.

The residents are diverse with large populations of African Americans and Orthodox Jewish residents. Due to the ethnicity, you will find many kosher restaurants and stores, as well as culture rich food offered by the local eateries.

The distance from Manhattan is somewhat of a deterrent, as it is quite a commute. The A line travels in this area, but if you are in need of getting into the City on a regular basis, this neighborhood is probably not a good place to live.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great Outdoor Museum and Lots of Festivals"

Bellerose Floral Park is a neighborhood on the eastern edge of Queens along the border of Nassau County. The neighborhood is comprised of detached single-family homes.

The area is also home to the Queens County Farm Museum, which houses an array of farm animals and antique farming equipment. The Museum is a great place to take your family and enjoy a day or afternoon.

Other neighborhood attractions include St. Gregory the Great Church and School, which hosts a 10-day long festival each June, an event that is known throughout Queens and Western Nassau. The Parish's school and church are now divided by the Cross Island Parkway, and a tunnel was created to run under the Parkway to allow access between facilities.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Best Place to Live and Retire"

Bayside is a community located in northeastern Queens and is bordered by neighboring areas like Auburndale to the west, Douglaston/Little Neck to the east, and Oakland Gardens to the south.

Bayside is a relatively affluent suburban/urban neighborhood and offers some interesting tidbits of news. The neighborhood has been included in CNN Money's list of Most Expensive Housing Markets, and was also a contender for CNN Money's ranking of Best Places to Live 2005, and Best Places to Retire 2005.

Bayside's major highways include the Long Island Expressway, Clearview Expressway, and the Cross Island Parkway. Bayside is well connected to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and Long Island by the Long Island Rail Road's Port Washington Branch at the Bayside station.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great Park Area for Living and Playing"

Forest Park is really a park within a neighborhood, or perhaps more notably, a neighborhood within a park. Forest Park is an urban forest that spans approximately 538 acres. The area offers a wide variety of recreational activities and facilities including tennis courts and playgrounds, as well as The Carousel, George Seuffert, Sr., Bandshell, the Bridle Path, and Victory Field.

Many annual events in the park neighborhood include the Halloween Walk, the Victorian Christmas, Nature Trails Day, and much more. These annual events draw residents from many neighboring communities.

Forest Hills Gardens is the residential area of Forest Park and provides a lush environment for some of the neighborhood’s wealthier crowd. Apartments and co-ops are also located among the area. Austin Street is where you will find a few shops and restaurants.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"That's One Big Park!"

Flushing Meadows Corona Park is a neighborhood (primarily a park) located between Flushing and Corona in Queens. The area used to be nothing but swampland but now is the largest park in Queens. At 1,255 acres, you are able to stretch a little more than just your legs! The park is 1.5 times larger than Manhattan’s Central Park.

The park is so big that it often hosts the New York Mets at Shea Stadium and the U.S. Open Tennis, as well as hundreds and thousands of visitors every weekend. There are two lakes located in the area as well as playing fields, picnic areas, bicycle rental stands, and mini-golf courses.

The park is also home to the Queens Museum of Art, the New York Hall of Science, and the Queens Zoo. There is so much to do in this area, you and your family will never bore.

The only downfall of the neighborhood is the litter and periodic vandalism that occurs in the park. Trash receptacles are everywhere, but during the summer and busy weekends, they fill before attendants can empty them and rubbish ends up all over the ground.
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wartman
wartman Shea Stadium was home to the Mets until 2008. Demolition began that fall. Shea's replacement, Citifield, opened nearby in the spring of 2009.
Jan 10, 2013
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great area for your family"

Fresh Meadows is a neighborhood in Queens that provides some open spaces and top-ranked schools. This is a great place for young families. Both of the public and private schools in the area offer an array of special programs that challenge the students. Francis Lewis High School is the neighborhood’s high school and has the only Army Junior R.O.T.C. program in Queens. There are seven advanced placement courses, and over time perhaps more in the works, as well as University Scholars Programs, in which gifted students take college-courses (including genetic engineering) while in high school.

Also in the area is the 211-acre Cunningham Park, with 20 tennis courts, 28 baseball fields, a walking path, nature trail, 6 soccer fields and 4 playgrounds. Residents may also bike or walk along a portion of the former Vanderbilt Motor Parkway, built in 1906 as a race track and later a private toll road that once extended to Lake Ronkonkoma on Long Island.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Congested with lots of bars"

East Flushing is a different kind of area than its neighbor, Flushing, in Queens. East Flushing at first glance is much more congested and populated. There is a high density of bars in East Flushing, which makes me more concerned for the residents. Lots of locals frequent the bars on more than just the weekends. The pub-bars can get very busy with residents filling them up after work hours Monday-Friday.

The area is highly residential and most people who live in East Flushing work outside of the neighborhood. There are not a large number of restaurants in the neighborhood, but a few pizza joints are popular among locals. Daro’s is a place of choice for many.

Most people travel to nearby Flushing for shopping and schools, as choices are limited in East Flushing.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"No schools in the neighborhood"

Breezy Point Roxbury is a neighborhood of about 1.9 square miles that is abundant in nature and 22 miles from Manhattan via car. Although, bicycles, piloted by bare-chested men with wraparound sunglasses, practically outnumber those cars.

Security gates block almost all side streets, which are posted with intimidating no-trespassing signs. There’s even a distinct lingo: “Dinks,” the many powder-blue-shirted security officers, make sure that D.F.D.’s, or people who are “down for the day,” don’t use areas reserved for “Pointers.”

All Breezy Point’s private land belongs to a large co-op, which, like most Park Avenue apartments houses, curtails access. Here, though, annual charges are typically less than $2,000, for tap water, beach cleaning and basketball court maintenance.

Visitors to Breezy Point who want to get their feet wet can pick up a free day-use permit at the Moorish-style visitors center at Jacob Riis Park. It will allow them to park at the 30-car lot just beyond 22nd Street, at the end of Rockaway Point Boulevard, where a short path leads through the dunes to water. Breezy Point residents, though, have it easier, as their private beaches are never more than a short stroll away.

There are no public schools in Breezy Point and children attend nearby Belle Harbor School or Beach Channel High School.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great beach and peaceful neighborhood"

Broad Channel is often referred to as the “Venice of New York,” because of the many canals bringing water to the residents’ property.

Broad Channel is a tranquil island neighborhood that is about a mile long and four blocks wide. It is connected to the Rockaway Peninsula and the mainland by Cross Bay Boulevard and its two bridges.

The island used to be nothing but marsh, but over time development has evolved this area into a tightly knit community of over 3,000 residents and growing with each passing year. Summer homes and bungalows to larger single family homes are bursting out all over the neighborhood.

Great beach access with views that are priceless make this area a nice place to live or vacate.
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wartman
wartman The title of this post is incorrect. Broad Channel has no beaches. It is in the middle of a salt marsh. The area beaches are located on the ocean side of the nearby Rockaway Peninsula.

Also, no canals were dug here. Homes were built on small marshy islands that were reshaped to provide easy small boat access close to the houses.

It's appears very unlikely that this poster has ever been to this community and merely wrote this based on looking at Google Maps.
Jan 10, 2013
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Lots of noise coming from the air"

Brookville is a neighborhood in Queens that borders the John F. Kennedy International Airport. Due to its proximity to the airport, noise is a bit of an issue. Continuous air traffic makes it difficult to enjoy an outdoor barbeque with friends during the summer months. Trees are a big help in the area, blocking some of the noice, but success is limited.

Why would people want to live in this area, so close to the constant air travel? The park. Brookville Park is located nearby and quite a draw for residents and tourists passing through while traveling. The park is located on Brookville Boulevard and South Conduit Avenue and is a great place to bring your guests for a labor day weekend bbq.
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2/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Nothing but patches of weeds and sand, but maybe potential"

Arvene Edgemere is a neighborhood in Queens along the Rockaway Peninsula sandwiched in by Rockaway Park and Bayswater/Far Rockaway. In the past, the area was a haven for inexpensive beach front hotels but over time became barren land. In the 1990s restoration began to take placed the beachfront neighborhood is beginning to take shape once again.

There is not much here, but barren land and weeds that have been growing for years. There are a few bungalows on the unmapped Marvin Street near Beach 28th. The boardwalk stretches from Beach 9th Street in the east to Beach 126th Street in the west, making it among the longest boardwalks on the east coast. This area is officially known as Ocean Promenade. The beaches are barren with signs indicating “closed.”

Plans are in the works but the area still remains barren. The only signs that there were once piers are the stones from the jettys that still remain. There is subway service and a few trend setters hoping for the next big thing - a big comeback. Time will tell.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Another culturally diverse neighborhood"

Astoria is a popular neighborhood in northwest Queens bounded to the north and west by the East River. The area has kept its longtime residents happy while attracting many new ones.

It boast a convenient trip to Manhattan, urban but with space and greenery, and decent, but appreciating real estate prices. Once known only as a hub of Greek life, Astoria is home to immigrants from around the world, and young people who have fled pricey Manhattan and Brooklyn. Eating and cultural options have grown, earning it a reputation as a gem of Queens. Astoria has always been known for Greek food (it is the Greek capital of NYC), and lately it has gained a reputation for fine dining and innovative cooking.

Astoria Park is smack on the East River with gorgeous views of Upper Manhattan and the Queensboro and Hellgate Bridges. The arts are picking up steam in Astoria. Local culture is led by the innovative American Museum of the Moving Image. It is one of the finest museums in New York City for kids, for adults, and definitely for movie aficionados.
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2/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Not a lot to offer"

Auburndale is a neighborhood in the northern Queens and is surrounded by Clearview to the north, Murray Hill to the west, Bayside to the east, and Fresh Meadows to the south.

The area is the site of the Long Island Rail Road Auburndale on the Port Washington Branch, providing regular service to and from Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan.

There is not a lot happening in this neighborhood other than a few public schools for younger children and the Queens Borough Public Library’s Auburndale Branch. Most residents head to Bayside or Murray Hill for restaurants and shopping. Public transportation will get you just about anywhere in this area.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Culturally Diverse Area"

East Elmhurst is a neighborhood located in north central Queens surrounded by the LaGuardia Airport to the north, Jackson Heights to the west, North Corona to the south, and a bit of Flushing Meadow Corona Park to the east. The exact borders are somewhat arguable. The neighborhood is often thought to include the entire area north of Northern Boulevard to LaGuardia Airport, between the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Shea Stadium. This has yet to be proven.

East Elmhurst is a highly culturally diverse area. The community was once home to such notable people as Malcolm X, Langston Hughes, and Jackie Robinson. The neighborhood of East Elmhurst is located in Community Board 3 and is protected by the New York Police Department's 115th Precinct. Over the past few years, crime in this area that was once high, has been seen on the decreasing trend.

There are a few private schools in the area, including Monsignor McClancy Memorial High School, an all boys catholic school, and St. Gabriel School, a co-ed catholic school for grades PK-8.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"This neighborhood has just about everything"

Flushing is a neighborhood in north central Queens. It is surrounded by College Point, Whitestone, Murray Hill, and Flushing Meadow Corona Park.

Flushing is a thriving business and residential area. It is known for its selection of authentic, reasonably priced ethnic restaurants. The most popular Asian restaurant district is centered at the intersection of Prince Street and Roosevelt Avenue. Latino cuisine can also be found on College Point Boulevard near Sanford Avenue.

The Queens Borough Public Library, located at the intersection of Kissena Boulevard and Main Street, is the largest branch library in New York City. The library has developed into a valuable community resource and houses an auditorium for public events. The current building, designed by Polshek Partnership Architects, is the third to be built on the site - the first was a gift from Andrew Carnegie.

Flushing is host to world-class sporting events. Shea Stadium is home to Major League Baseball's New York Mets, and the United States Tennis Association USTA National Tennis Center is home to the U.S. Open tennis tournament.

Queens College, a senior college of the City University of New York, is located in Flushing. CUNY School of Law is next door and it also contains a public-interest law firm, Main Street Legal Services, that serves Flushing's predominantly immigrant and working-class communities.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Close to two large airports"

Forest Hills is a neighborhood in central Queens that is surrounded by Corona to the north, Rego Park to the west, Forest Park to the south, and Flushing Meadow Corona Park to the east. The area is home to a mix of upper to middle class residents with most of the upper class living in the prestigious Forest Hills Gardens area.

There are more than ten synagogues located in the area which is quite a draw for many Jewish New Yorkers. The Jewish population has increased over the years. It is also home to many airline pilots because of its proximity to both JFK International and LaGuardia airports. JetBlue is based there as well.

The neighborhood contains areas of private houses with little commerce, such as the Gardens area, dense commercial districts full of stores and large apartment complexes, and streets with the six-story brick apartment buildings common throughout Queens.

The main thoroughfare is the 12-lane-wide Queens Boulevard. Metropolitan Avenue is known for its antique shops. The commercial heart of Forest Hills is a mile-long stretch of Austin Street, a block removed from Queens Boulevard, that features an eclectic (though increasingly upscale) collection of shops, restaurants and nightlife.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Urban shopping and loads of transportation"

Elmhurst is a northwestern Queens neighborhood that is surrounded by Jackson Heights to the north, Maspeth to the west, Middle Village and Rego Park to the south, and Corona and North Corona to the east.

Elmhurst is home to two urban shopping malls. The recently expanded Queens Center Mall, the most profitable mall per square foot in the United States, and the recently renovated and expanded Queens Place Mall, a smaller round shopping center originally built as a Macy's branch.

Accessible subway stations are Woodhaven Boulevard, Grand Avenue–Newtown and Elmhurst Avenue, all served by the G, R, and V trains of the IND Queens Boulevard Line. In addition, the IRT Flushing Line, served by the 7 train, runs along Roosevelt Avenue, the north border of Elmhurst, with stations at 74th Street–Broadway, 82nd Street-Jackson Heights and 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"The neighborhood schools have some issues"

Far Rockaway is one of four neighborhoods located on the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens. It is the easternmost section of the Rockaways. Rockaway’s character is very inner-city oceanfront district feel. The area is being renewed with new beach houses and waterfront development. Time has been spent in cleaning up the neighborhood and as a result the crime rate is at an all-time low.

The one-way streets, already narrow, are made more so by parked cars. They connect areas with sometimes strikingly varied housing styles. It is not uncommon to see 1900s shingle-style homes sitting next to stucco-fronted Capes topped with statues of lions and palms.

Schools in the area are known to have some issues. Schools are crowded and test scores are low, and as a result the children are suffering. Improvement tactics are on their way, but haven’t resulted as of yet.

Many residents take advantage of the neighborhood’s beachfront, biking along the 40-foot-wide promenade that hugs East Rockaway Inlet. The area, with few bars or restaurants, is dominated by nail salons and 99-cent stores. A place called Corner Cuisine, on New Haven Avenue and Beach 20 Street, beats the fast-food joints. It has Haitian specialties; a small order of rice, beans and chicken is $6.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Huge Shopping Area and Lots of Schools"

Glendale is located in west central Queens (nearly at the epi-center of the borough). Glendale is surrounded by Ridgewood, Cypress Hills Cemetery, Forest Hills, and Middle Village. The area is characterized as a low-scale residential community in relation to the more developed neighborhoods that surrounding it.

Over the years, Glendale has evolved from a large farming community to textiles and breweries. There is a huge shopping center called “The Shops at Atlas Park” - which opened in May of 2006. The shopping center has absolutely every retail shop you can imagine and then some. Eateries are also abundant in this area.

Glendale is also known for its high concentration of German Restaurants, including Zum Stammtisch (the Family Table). Stammtisch Restaurant is found in most New York City restaurant guides and is highly regarded as a great place to eat.

There are many schools in the neighborhood which make this area popular with young families. Over six elementary schools, as well as intermediate schools make transporting kids a little less hectic.
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wartman
wartman This description is a bit outdated and frankly some of it appears to have been copied in from another web site. The part about Glendale having an economy based on textiles and breweries is historical (about 100 years ago). I WISH Glendale currently had a beer garden or microbrewery. It does not.

There is only one German restaurant left (Zum Stammtisch) as of this writing (November 2012) although they recently added an adjacent German pork store, which is nice.

The Shops at Atlas Park has some stores but right now is troubled (original owner went bankrupt, complex was sold, etc.). Many spaces are vacant and there has been a chronic problem with getting people to shop there.

In my opinion, the problem is that they do not provide free parking. About this issue, there is definitely some denial among the owners of the complex. They seem to think that people will pay to park and shop here. This is unrealistic. This area is not that much of a shopping destination and likely never will be. Relative to the rest of Queens and Brooklyn, it's kind of in the middle of nowhere. If they want shoppers they have to provide some free parking. Perhaps the first three hours could be free and then they could start charging.

The rest of this description of Glendale is reasonably accurate.
Nov 02, 2012
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Everything beach in this area"

Rockaway Park Seaside is a neighborhood in Queens that is sometimes referred to as the “Irish Riviera.” The area is located along the Rockaway Peninsula and is nestled between Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The area was once a beach getaway but has in recent years become a great residential neighborhood with all the benefits from living on the beach.

During the summer the area is crowded with New Yorkers flooding the area. A long boardwalk and sandy beaches made the neighborhood a popular site when there is good weather. Manhattan is accessible via the A train at the Rockaway Park-Beach, 116th Street Station. The area is also serviced by buses operated by the MTA Bus Company. Public transportation in the area is efficient and will transport you basically anywhere you need or want to go.

Attraction in the area include the beach, the beach, and did I say…the beach! From bird watching to beach combing, strolling along the beach in Rockaway Park Seaside will bring great pleasure.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Polish Influence with Old World Charm"

Ridgewood is a neighborhood located in Queens that is surrounded by Maspeth to the north, Bushwick to the west, Glendale to the south, and Middle Village to the east. Metropolitan Avenue is bounded to the north of Ridgewood. Transportation to Manhattan and strong neighborhood character and charm have made Ridgewood a huge draw for the artsy type and those priced out of Brooklyn.

The Fresh Pond Road M subway stop at 62nd St. sits down a dead-end residential street with wooden homes, different-color front doors and American flags. A friend told me that artists recently moved to Ridgewood for the low rents. One-bedrooms in the area go for about $1,150 per month. Brownstones, townhouses, and attached brick homes dominate sections of Ridgewood east of Fresh Pond Road. The brownstones make Ridgewood a very unique neighborhood in all of Queens.

For those seeking a congenial hangout, Casey Jones Saloon is an ideal local bar. Around the corner on 68th Ave., Casey Jones draws the old-school Ridgewood crowd, both men and women born in the neighborhood. The Polish influence stays strong in Ridgewood. Morscher's Pork Store sells almost every kind of pork known to man.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Great shopping found in this neighborhood"

Murray Hill is a neighborhood in Queens that is surrounded by Flushing, Auburnadale, and Clearview. Murray Hill is a part of Flushing, beyond the end of the number 7 subway line, where mid-rise brick buildings apartment buildings give way to close-set homes, and a crowded urban feel becomes a calmer and quieter suburban one.

Murray Hill has remained a slow and sleepy area even today. Once home to Irish and Italian immigrants, now an increasingly Korean enclave exists. The immigrants moving into the area have brought with them commercial vitality. However, the area does suffer from illegally crowded houses, as with other areas in Queens.

Murray Hill is about a mile east of a main commercial hub, Main Street in Flushing, with easy bus access. There is also the Long Island Rail Road, whose Murray Hill Station is little more than a forlorn plaza with a pay phone and a bus stop. No parking is available for commuters except on the street. Transportation is very good and you could live in the area and never have to drive anywhere.

Murray Hill Plaza, a small shopping hub with a big parking lot, sits on Northern Boulevard near 155th Street. Northern Boulevard itself, a busy artery, holds a mix of Korean restaurants, carwashes and bridal boutiques. There is also Seoul Plaza, a high-end mini shopping mall with valet parking.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"A little noisy but a good place to live"

Rosedale is a neighborhood in the southeastern portion of Queens and is bordered to the north by Cambria Heights, to the east by Valley Stream (portion of Nassau County), to the west by Laurelton and Brookville Park, and to the south by John F. Kennedy International Airport. Rosedale lies at the eastern edge New York City and forms part of the boundary between Queens and Nassau County.

As you can imagine, due to the neighborhood’s proximity to JFK International Airport, there is a lot of air traffic noise. In some areas, residents cannot and will not sit in their back yards due to the heavy noise. Most of the area, however, is clustered by trees which make these portions of the neighborhood quiet. I suppose you must be choosey when selecting a place to live.

The area’s architecture is mostly a sprawl of suburban 1950s and 1960s construction. It closely resembles its neighbor, Nassau, and is only a part of Queens by its political considerations.

Brookville Park encompasses 90 acres, and most of it, the portion south of 149th Avenue, is undeveloped and wild. The cultivated section is generally between South Conduit Avenue, 147th Avenue, 232nd Street and Brookville Boulevard. A natural stream divides that section in two, punctuated by Conselyea's Pond just north of 147th. Many residents of Rosedale frequent the park on weekends.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"The word is getting out about this neighborhood"

New Dorp Beach is a beach located at the foot of New Dorp, along the southern shore of Staten Island. The neighborhood is between Midland Beach and Oakwood Beach. The overall area sits as a parkland of the Parks Department. Many of the streets from the past are now walking paths. Old remains of beachfront hotels and cottages are now buried in over ten foot tall sand dunes.

New Dorp is Staten Island’s food haven with choices ranging from upscale Indian and sushi to quintessential neighborhood pizza. Excellent sushi is a New Dorp Lane’s chic eatery where locals come to see and be seen.

Many residents keep their mouths shut about this rare gem for living, but the word is starting to creep out. You know what that means? Influx of people that will drive prices upward.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Eateries, Fishing, Boating, and More"

Old Howard Beach is a section of Howard Beach that lies between Shellbank Basin and Hawtree Creek in Queens.

The houses in Old Howard Beach are a bit more affordable than those lying in Howard Beach. The area offers smaller two-bedroom homes with no driveway and small yards. Many of the homes are converted summer bungalows, hence the size. Many of the neighborhood’s residents do not move, they stay for generations. A large segment of the population is multigenerational. Many of the homes that do sell or sold to the current residents’ children.

The area several yacht and boat clubs near the area, so you do not always need a boat slip of your own. The area is prone to flooding due to most of Howard Beach being built on reclaimed land. Residents have seen partially submerged cars in the streets and water in their basements rising to waist level.

There is virtually no nightlife in Old Howard Beach but in adjacent Howard Beach there is no shortage of eateries. Recreation revolves around the water with plenty of opportunities to sail, fish, and crab.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Popular Horse Racing Track and Lots of Schools"

Ozone Park is a southwestern neighborhood in Queens that is surrounded by Woodhaven to the north, Cypress Hills to the west, Howard Beach to the south, and South Ozone to the east. The primarily middle class neighborhood is home of the Aqueduct Racetrack, a popular spot for thoroughbred racing.

Ozone Park is becoming one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in all of New York City. It is richly diverse and becoming more and more ethnically rich. The residents are mainly middle class working families with Italian or German heritage. Residents either rent or own private homes along the neighborhood’s tree-lined streets. There are a few pockets of wealthier areas located along the southern part of the community near the Belt Parkway.

There are a number of public and private schools in the area. Some of the more well known schools include P.S. 63, P.S. 64, John Adams High School, Little Dolphin Pre-School, and Divine Mercy Catholic Academy.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Close to JFK Airport"

Springfield Gardens South is a southeastern neighborhood of Queens. The community of St. Albans lies to the north, South Jamaica to the northwest, South Ozone to the west, and John F. Kennedy International Airport to the south.

Many homes in the area have been torn down and larger ones built due to more and more families moving into the neighborhood. The area is filled with low-rise suburbanesque buildings, with part of the neighborhood being registered as a Historic District. Today Springfield Gardens South is home to many immigrants including Caribbean, Jamaican, Haitian, and Guyanese.

Major streets in the neighborhood include Farmers Boulevard, Merrick Boulevard, Springfield Boulevard, Rockaway Boulevard, and Guy R. Brewer Boulevard. Here you will find most of the area’s retail stores, restaurants, delis, and commercial services.

Since the are is so close to JFK International Airport, there is quite a bit of air noise that residents must contend with. Aside from the air traffic travel (and it is quite loud) this is a nice suburban area.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"A thriving commerical area"

New Dorp is a neighborhood in Staten Island that lies at the foot of Todt Hill. The community is one of the most thriving commercial areas on the Island, despite the surrounding development.

New Dorp is the home of Engine Company 165 (nicknamed the “Toxic Avengers”) and Ladder Company 85 (nicknamed “The Monster Truck”) of the Fire Department of New York.

The neighborhood is primarily Italian American, Albanian American and a splash of Irish Americans and Polish Amrcians. Most of the population in the area belongs to the Roman Catholic Church.

The best place to eat in the area is Pazzo Pizzeria. The pizza tastes just like Brooklyn pizza which is hard to beat. The stuffed artichoke is the best by far.

Schools in the area include several high schools including Staten Island Technical High School, New Dorp High School, and Richmondtown Preparatory High School, and New Dorp Christian Academy. The private elementary schools include Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish Elementary School, New Dorp Christian Academy.
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4/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Larger commerical area within this neighborhood"

Meiers Corners is a neighborhood in New York City’s Staten Island borough that is sometimes mistaken for Westerleigh, an adjacent community. Meiers Corners comes from the commercial district where Watchogue Road, Jewett Avenue, Victory Boulevard, and Bradley Avenue all meet.

The south end of the neighborhood sits high above on a plateau where the elevation has increased. The Susan Wagner High School can be found in this area.

The area is highly residential and does not offer the five-star dining you find in Manhattan, but there are a few eateries within the commercial district. All of your retail needs and services can be found along Victory Boulevard and Bradley.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"Lots of diversity"

Corona is a neighborhood located in north central Queens and is surrounded Rego Park and Forest Hills to the south, Flushing Meadow Corona Park to the east, North Corona to the north, and Elmhurst to the east.

Corona's main thoroughfares include Corona Avenue, Roosevelt Avenue, Northern Boulevard, Junction Boulevard, and 108th Street. Most commercial businesses and shopping can be found in this area. The 7 train runs through the neighborhood with stops at 111th Street, 103rd Street-Corona Plaza and Junction Boulevard.

Today, Corona is very diverse with residents from all over the world. As a result, the attractions in the neighborhood area just as diverse. Corona is bordered on the east by Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, one of the largest parks in New York City and the site of the 1939 and 1964 World's Fairs. Located within the park are Shea Stadium, home of the New York Mets, and the USTA National Tennis Center, where the U.S. Open in tennis is held annually. Corona was the home of famous jazz musician Louis Armstrong, whose house is now a museum. The popular Lemon Ice King of Corona is located on the intersection of 108th Street and Corona Avenue.
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3/5
Apr 02, 2009

"A neighborhood amongst a great golf course"

Clearview is a neighborhood in Queens that is surrounded by water on its north and east frontages. The area also has a golf course situated among its resident’s dwellings. The neighborhood is costly due to both of these reasons in terms of real estate. Although, I am not a golfer, I have always lived on or near a golf course and thus understand the appeal. The homes on the golf course in Clearview are quite costly.

The Clearview Park Golf Course is located at the foot of the Throgs Neck Bridge in Queens. The golf course is noted a “top choice” for golf by many golfers all over the state. There is a newly renovated clubhouse, including a bar and grill, banquet rooms, and of course, 18 holes of fine golf.

Aside from the Golf Course eateries, there is nothing else but some chain restaurants in the neighborhood. For something a bit more local and traditional you have to travel into the city.
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4/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Upscale neighborhood with great pizza"

Castleton Corners is upscale neighborhood on the north shore of Staten Island. Castleton Corners is also referred to as “Four Corners.” The homes in this area are older and have some land accompanied with each dwelling. The streets are tree-lined and provide shady summertime strolls along the neighborhood. Backdoor barbeques are not a thing of the past in Castleton Corners, and if you are looking for old time Americana, this is a great place to start.

The neighborhood’s commercial hub is primarily around the corner of Victory Boulevard and Manor Road, but has decreased in buzzing due to the residents frequenting the Staten Island Mall. Although you will still find businesses and eateries centralized around the corner.

When in the area, it is crucial you stop by Joe & Pat’s Pizzeria. The restaurant is legendary and they are known for their super thin crust pizza. The food is exceptional and truly a New York legend.

Home values in Castleton Corners can easily surpass $1 million dollars, so if you are planning to make this neighborhood your home, you better bring your well-padded wallet.
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4/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Great schools and a wide variety of housing"

Bay Terrace is a centrally located neighborhood in Staten Island that offers quite a mix in home style and alternatives. There are affordable priced co-ops, single and two family homes, townhouses, and split-level high-ranch houses.

In recent years, Bay Terrace has given way to many new commercial establishments, including a large shopping center that was built on a former swim club. Due to the influx of Jewish families from Brooklyn and Queens that settled into the area in the 1970s, Bay Terrace has become rich in diversity.

The P.S. 53 is found in the Bay Terrace and was one of the few public elementary schools in New York to receive a distinguished GreatSchools rating of 9 out of 10. This school is widely known as being a safe and above average school to send your children to.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Park brings traffic problems to neighborhood"

Charleston is lush, clean, with plenty of trees lining the streets of the neighborhood. Most the homes in the area are single-family houses: detached colonials, Victorians, ranches, raised ranches and even French mansard homes.

The clay pits that originally attracted Balthazar Kreischer are the basis of a New York state park called Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, the city's only state park preserve. It is a 260-acre nature preserve with wetlands, sand barrens, streams and woodlands, picnicking and hiking on designated trails, as well as more than five miles of bridle paths.

Outside the park, some residents complain about traffic related problems: narrow streets, speeding tractor trailer trucks and inadequate parking. Employees of businesses in the area often park alongside residents' property because few sidewalks exist, sometimes leaving muddy tire tracks in lawns.

One unusual business is the Colonial Rifle Range, which has existed for 70 years on Arthur Kill Road, one of the community's main thoroughfares even though it is a winding road with just two lanes.

The only school within Charleston was formerly known as P.S. 4 and is now an annex to P.S. 25, a special education school in neighboring Pleasant Plains. The school, which has nine classes for ages 10 to 21 years old, teaches students educational subjects and such daily living activities as cooking, cleaning, shopping and going to the library. Most of the area’s children attend P.S. 56.
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2/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Largest Liberian Population Outside Africa"

Clifton is a northeastern Staten Island neighborhood that faces Upper New York Bay on the east. The area is bordered on the north by Stapleton, on the south by Rosebank, and on the southwest by Concord.

Clifton has the largest Liberian population outside of Africa, with an estimated 8,000 strong and growing. Housing prices are some of the lowest in the borough as a result of the immigrant population and overall neighborhood vibe.

The Park Hill Apartments are a privately owned and federally subsidized low income housing complex that is located on Vanderbilt Avenue and Park Hill Avenue. The complex was formerly nicknamed “Crack Hill” due to the many arrests for possession and sale of crack cocaine. The crime in this area has greatly decreased over the past few years
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Loads of traffic"

Bulls Head is a west-central Staten Island neighborhood. The area received its name from an 18th century tavern found at the intersection of Victory Boulevard and Richmond Avenue. The corner of this intersection is one of the busiest on Staten Island and traffic is heaviest in this area even during mid-day hours and weekdays.

Bulls Head is serviced by local buses along the busy traffic area of Victory Boulevard and Richmond Avenue to various points like Staten Island Mall, the ferry, and the Eltingville Transit Center. Express buses to Manhattan are also provided in the community.

Schools in the area include P.S. 60 (elementary school) and I.S. 72 (intermediate school). The area schools are known as above average and good places to send your children.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"A growing community"

Bloomfield is a neighborhood on the west shore of Staten Island that lies immediately to the north of Travis.

Commercial development in the area has increased since the early 2000s, when large office complexes were built. The establishment of other businesses in Bloomfield occurred including a Hilton Hotel in 2003. Due to the vast areas of open space in Bloomfield the community has caught the eye from many developers.

The area of Bloomfield is serviced by the S46/S96 bus along South Avenue. The bus service makes travel more efficient in the area.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"A synagogue and shopping center nearby"

Arden Heights is a neighborhood located on the south shore of Staten Island. The Arden Heights name refers to the hill that sits just above the Village Greens shopping center and housing development. The area features clustered townhouses built around looped streets. The Village Greens shopping center service the area of Arden Heights.

The Arden Heights Boulevard Jewish Center is located in the area. The synagogue is located at 1766 Arthur Kill Road off of Arden Avenue. They are known to have a congregation that accepts and welcomes single and interfaith families.

Arden Heights is serviced by express buses that travel to Manhattan, as well as the S74 and S84 bus routes to the ferry. There is also service to and from the Staten Island Mall on weekdays only.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"A town, not a neighborhood"

With its family-friendly atmosphere, Great Kills is the kind of place where people settle, sometimes for generations on end. About 26,000 people, most all of them middle and upper-middle class, live in Great Kills. More than 90 percent of the residents are white, and there remains a strong Italian presence. It’s the continuity of the place — and what some describe as Old World charm — that residents often find appealing.

Many residents call Great Kills a town, not a neighborhood. The neighborhood boundaries are somewhat ambiguous, but many consider the borders to be Richmond Avenue to the southwest, Arthur Kill Road to the north, and Fieldway and Greaves Avenues on the eastern side.

Yacht clubs, marinas and large new homes fill the area nearest to the water. Along Tennyson Drive and the aptly named Mansion Avenue in particular, grandiose new homes, many of them brick colonials, overlook the water.

In between, clustered near the train station at Nelson Avenue and Amboy Road, is the commercial center. Bagel shops, pizzerias, beauty salons, a post office and library make up a small downtown.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Great shopping nearby"

Heartland Village is a highly residential area located in the New Springville neighborhood of Staten Island. It occupies a square-shaped area that includes a boundary of Richmond Avenue, Rockland Avenue, Richmond Hill Road, and Forest Hill Road. The Staten Island Mall is also located here, for all your shopping needs and desires.

Due to the neighborhood’s proximity to Staten Island Mall, Heartland Village has become increasingly popular. The area has emerged as one of the largest commercial and administrative hubs in Staten Island.

Most of the homes in Heartland Village consist of two family medium-sized homes. New construction in the area has recently brought about larger homes and condominiums. Due to the increase in population over the years, new schools have been provided to the area. P.S. 69 , the Daniel D. Tompkins School and I.S. 72, the Rocco Laurie Intermediate School provide education to resident children in the community.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Give your car a break, walk and ride the bus"

The neighborhood of Livingston in Staten Island offers elegant tree-lined streets with well kept homes in a variety of styles. There is little traffic and 1950s feel in the air. The area is very suburban, somewhat rural as noted by locals, even though downtown Manhattan is just seven miles away.

Livingston is at the northern edge of Staten Island, on the Kill Van Kull, directly across from Bayonne, N.J. Walker Park, covering 5.3 acres, whose main entrance is at Delafield Place and Bard Avenue, is central to the neighborhood. The Community Association holds its monthly meetings in the clubhouse at the park. Softball, basketball, football and tennis players find games at the park. The area is great for kids and young people wanting to participate in outdoor sports. The neighborhood also has several private preschools and elementary schools.

Little mileage needs to be put on your car while living in Livingston because everything your family needs is so conveniently located. Even the Staten Island Ferry is either a nice half-hour walk away along the new North Shore promenade that encircles the ballpark at St. George or just a short hop on any of four buses along Richmond Terrace.
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4/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Well-established area with lots of trees"

Eltingville is a well-established neighborhood on the south shore of Staten Island. The community, which runs from Raritan Bay into the southerly center of the island, attracts young families looking for trees, lawns and backyards.

Among the things attracting young families to Eltingville is its position at a crossroads: people can easily reach the Staten Island Railway from the main bus lines along Richmond Avenue, which transfer to and from buses along Hylan Boulevard, another main thoroughfare. In addition, these main streets, along with Amboy Road from Richmond Avenue to Armstrong Avenue, are shopping destinations, with supermarkets, drugstores, delis and bagel shops, pet stores, pizzerias, travel agencies and restaurants.

Most housing in the area is detached and semidetached one- and two-family homes and schools are a large attraction to the area. Public School 42, with about 1,000 students, is one of the 200 schools in the city exempt from the uniform curriculum. Tottenville High School, in Huguenot about two miles from Eltingville, is the largest high school in Staten Island, with 4,028 students. The high school’s marching band is known for winning many state championships, as well as their girl’s soccer, gymnastics, and baseball teams.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Great place for kids and raising a family"

In the neighborhood of New Brighton there are houses of all sizes and descriptions. Single-family detached homes to attached brick townhouses populate the area. The overall area is green and blissfully quiet, aside from Forest Avenue where you will find locally owned food shops.

A number of low-rise, Main Street-style commercial districts, like Forest Avenue, service New Brighton with banks, small businesses and casual restaurants. R. H. Tugs, on the waterfront, serves burgers and American fare, while Adobe Blues, which serves Mexican food, has a bar that is popular with different age groups at different hours of the day.

Light traffic makes New Brighton an ideal spot for children, for whom there are a number of public and private schools. Public schools include P.S. 31, on Layton Avenue, which teaches kindergarten through fifth grade. I.S. 61, is on Castleton Avenue, and serves students in Grades 6 to 9, before they move on to Curtis High School, on Hamilton Avenue, in nearby St. George. Curtis High School has a great reputation amongst other high schools in Staten Island.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Major shopping strip and busy streets"

Dongan Hills is a neighborhood located on Staten Island’s east shore. The area was one of the first communities to exhibit an upsurge in home construction post WWII. At that time, many small single family homes were built in the community, as well as a public housing project known as the General Berry Houses. General Berry Houses is the southernmost public housing project in Staten Island.

Dongan Hills is served by the Dongan Hills station of the Staten Island Rapid Transit, and by several bus routes, mostly along Richmond Road, which is also the major shopping and business street for the community. The FDNY Engine Company 159 is also located in the neighborhood.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"No longer a wooded area"

Annadale is a neighborhood located on the south shore of Staten Island. Annadale was once an over-abundant woodland but much of the area has been cleared to make room for new homes. A 222-acre park known as Blue Heron Park, is located in the heart of the city was converted into a wildlife preserve. Much of the park area consists of ponds, swamps, and small streams which empty into the nearby Raritan Bay.

The northwestern portion of Annadale is often regarded as a separate neighborhood called Arden Heights. The area overall is highly residential and there is not a lot of commercial fare in the neighborhood. Shopping and dining out should be done elsewhere.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Need an alternative high school?"

Concord is a northeastern Staten Island neighborhood bordered by Grasmere, Clifton, Dongan Hills, and Emerson Hill. Much of the neighborhood consists of single-family homes, small apartment buildings, and condominiums.

The neighborhood’s center is traversed by some of the most heavily traveled roads on Staten Island, including Clove Road, Richmond Road, Targee Street, and the Staten Island Expressway.

Concord High School, Staten Island’s only transfer alternative high school is located on Rhine Avenue in Concord. The neighborhood is also home to a large medical arts complex on Ralph Place that evolved from the former Doctors Hospital that closed in 2003.
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3/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Great neighborhood pond with swans"

Grasmere is a community in Staten Island that is bounded to the north by the Staten Island Expressway and neighbor to Emerson Hill. A major attraction in the area is the 15-acre Brady’s Pond. This freshwater pond is great for swimming and equipped with lifeguards, rowboats, and sandy beach. Swans glide along the surface accompanied by a backdrop of greenery and large houses. Some of the luxury homes on Brady’s Pond exceed $1 million.

Hylan Boulevard, at Grasmere’s southern and eastern borders, is the closest thing to a commercial thoroughfare, with several bakeries, restaurants and markets evoking the area’s Italian roots.

Grasmere is a stop on the Staten Island Railway, with a 10-minute ride to St. George, the stop closest to the ferry. The Staten Island Expressway at Grasmere’s northern border leads into the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. Buses also service the area.

Elementary schools include the William C. Wilcox School, Public School 48, on Targee Street, which teaches kindergarten through Grade 5. One middle school option is the Michael J. Petrides School, on Ocean Terrace near Milford Avenue, teaching kindergarten through Grade 12 and accommodating special-education students. The high school is Concord High School and fairs pretty well on overall test scores.
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4/5
Apr 01, 2009

"Great Beach Neighborhood"

Oakwood Beach is located in east central Staten Island and lies along the southern shore bordered by the Atlantic Ocean.

Points of interest in the area include the string of cemeteries on the southwest side, Frederick Douglass Memorial Park, and African-American burial ground. The historic Richmond Town lies to the immediate west. Oakwood Beach is the site of a sewage treatment facility. To the south of the facility lies the Gateway National Recreation Area, also known as Great Kills Park.

The actual beach is a great place to go. Oakwaood Beach offers a nice slice of coastline. There’s boating, swimming, fishing, whitewater paddling, and golf nearby at Silver Lake Golf Course. The area gets a lot of rain, so dress accordingly.
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