3.6 out of 10

Garment District

Ranked 40th best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.7497493168934 -73.9892260576046
Great for
  • Public Transport
  • Shopping Options
  • Safe & Sound
  • Gym & Fitness
  • Pest Free
Not great for
  • Schools
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Childcare
  • Resale or Rental Value
  • Medical Facilities
Who lives here?
  • Singles
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists

Reviews

1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Mar 08, 2012

"Garment District – A Gritty New York Neighborhood"

If you want to get a really good feel for the Garment District, a noisy, crowded, and practically unlivable neighborhood in midtown Manhttan, rent the HBO document Schmatta: Rags to Riches to Rags. It talks about the area’s history as a center for clothing manufacturing and shows in stark detail the hard urban personality of the area.

The Garment District is a commercial, not a residential neighborhood, and the businesses here are industrial. That means lots of deliveries and lots of fume-spewing trucks making runs at all hours of the day and night. It’s a smallish area, running from 34th Street to 42nd Street (south to north) and Fifth Avenue to Ninth Avenue (east to west)

The area has seen some development, with a few luxury high-rises dotting the skyline. But for the most part, apartments are rundown...and surprisingly not more affordable than far more upscale neighborhoods. Studios run about $2,400 and one-bedrooms about $3,500.

Purchasing an apartment can be a wise investment as values are going up in this area. And the average price of an apartment is under $500,000, as compared with the multi-million dollar average price tag in areas such as the Upper West Side and Gramercy.

Perhaps in an effort to shake its association with the sweatshop history associated with the area, politicos and business development groups have begun referring to the Garment District as the Fashion District. But don’t be fooled. Although the designer creations that will be seen in red carpet runway shows in Paris and Milan, the manufacturers that produce the mass-market version of those fashions are threadbare and gritty, just like Garment District.
Pros
  • central to everything
  • close to major transport
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
Cons
  • Dangerous
  • Crowded
  • crime rates
  • Ugly
  • dingy apartments
  • dead at night
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Dec 31, 2011

"Garment District: Great for the Fashion or Home Designer Fan"

The Fashion District has never been my favorite place to visit. It's just ho hum. Yes, you can find some very interesting shops there if you are into design. Materials, buttons, ribbons, rugs, furs, etc. abound here, but they are typically in shops targeting businesses not consumers. Wholesale is typically their game here so tourists might find it very off putting, boring and a waste of time. You can walk along the main avenues of Broadway and find interesting shops and places to eat, but overall the area is really geared toward business and nothing else. Those looking for housing would be better off looking in another area as this area is quite pricey. There are not a lot of grocery shops that are affordable here so you would probably be miserable.

Good thing is Manhattan is so walkable you can walk several blocks in any direction and typically find yourself in another neighborhood. Transportation abounds, the neighborhood is pretty safe, but there is little to do in form of entertainment. Street festivals can be found sprinkled about in the summer months along the avenues providing some relief from the otherwise boring nature of this neighborhood.

Anyone who wants to see a sign of life should walk along the main avenues instead of the side streets.
Pros
  • THE place for anyone who in the clothesmaking/design fields
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
Cons
  • Lacks luster and fun
  • Crowded
  • Ugly
Recommended for
  • Professionals
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jan 12, 2011

"Garments And Not Much Elase"

The Garment District is filled with history being the home of New York's once busy garment industry. has a rich historical is bordered by Times Square to the north and Herald Square to the east. Both areas are tow of the busiest tourist spots in all of the city so that the streets are always packed.

The Garment District is not the cleanest and brightest area of the city by far. About the best that can be said for it is that it is a great area or catch a train or grab some fast food to satisfy that hunger pang. It is also a bit of a sketchy area at night with many homeless sleeping in doorways. Some of the old buildings have large, loft-like apartments, great for artists.

Yet, the Garment District is all about garments and if you are in the fashion industry this is the place to be. It is the home base for those who love fashion and consider it an art form. There are many design studios in the area, as well as sewing and millinery shops. You also go to the garment district if you need clothing accessories such as a zipper, buttons, trims, and sewing supplies. One of the larger stores is Mood (form Project runway) which has aisle after aisle of embroiders, brocaded, and lace fabrics from all over the world. There are also the small stores on nearly every street that are dark and dirty and where you get in make your purchase and exit, stage left.

For most people the Garment District is a place to pass through on their way to somewhere else. However, if you are interested in clothes and clothing design, this is a good to shop. The area is also home to the Fashion Institute of Technology.

Because the crowds are mostly made up people who work in the Garment District, there are many fast-food restaurants such as White Castle, McDonald's, and Pax for sandwiches and soup. The area offers nothing in terms of culture, fun, or sightseeing opportunities. But, if you lose a button on your sweater, it will be no problem t find a replacement.
Pros
  • close to major transport
  • Historic distric which was once home to New York's buzzing garment industry
  • THE place for anyone who in the clothesmaking/design fields
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
  • Great for wholesale
Cons
  • crime rates
  • Crowded
  • dingy apartments
  • Ugly
  • dead at night
  • impersonal place
  • boring
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Students
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Jan 11, 2011

"Central Shopping and Tourist Destination"

The Garment District, better known to New Yorkers as the Fashion District or simply the Herald Square area, is located right in the middle of the hustle and bustle of Midtown.

The area is always packed because it is the central location for shopping and located near Times Square and the epicenter of the world's foot traffic. The stores in the area vary from largely affordable boutiques and chains to many much more upscale locations as well. The area is known as the capital of the fashion world and just about every major designer owns space in the neighborhood. There are also a lot of fashion wholesalers selling cheaper options as well as supplies.

This is largely a commercial area without much residential space. The space that is available is costly and may only be worth it to someone who works in the area. Though the area is very accessible by most trains, this is because everyone is coming here. The streets are almost always packed, maybe even worse on the weekends. The traffic is at a standstill, both car and foot traffic, and there is someone trying to sell you something everywhere as vendors and kiosks are lined up along the same streets as the stores and boutiques.

Ultimately, this is a place to come and spend some money and take part in the tourist trap aspect of it and then move on to the rest of your day.
Pros
  • central to everything
  • Historic distric which was once home to New York's buzzing garment industry
  • THE place for anyone who in the clothesmaking/design fields
Cons
  • Crowded
  • overrun by tourists
  • very expensive
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Tourists
  • Trendy & Stylish
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
Dec 29, 2010

"Noisy, crowded neighborhood only good for visits"

The Garment District aka the Fashion District of Manhattan is not my favorite neighborhood. I lived in the area in the 80s when I worked in the district, which means that I could walk to work. But that's the only reason to live there, if you ask me. It's certainly a centrally located area, but much of it is very crowded and commercial. Depending on where you live, it can be difficult to find a decent grocery store because it just isn't that residential. 34th Street is miserable for walking due to the crowds. If you want to shop and visit Macy's, you'll definitely go there, but if you're a local, you'll avoid it like the plague.

That said, it's certainly in the middle of everything, and it borders the theater district and Times Square. Madison Square Garden and Penn Station are in the neighborhood, so if you take the train to Long Island or New Jersey a lot, you're all set if you live nearby. And if fashion is your life, this may be a perfect place for you to live because you'll be right in the center. It certainly isn't a cheap neighborhood for apartments, but it isn't the most expensive area in the city either. I also think the Garment District is better suited to single people and couples than for families.
Pros
  • central to everything
  • close to major transport
  • THE place for anyone who in the clothesmaking/design fields
Cons
  • crime rates
  • Crowded
  • terrible grocery stores
  • Ugly
  • overrun by tourists
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Trendy & Stylish
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Dec 28, 2010

"Noisy, Crowded – Get In, Get Out"

Crowded, cramped, chaotic. A million different languages spoken at break-neck speed all around you, people shoving fliers at you while others shove their stores’ items in your face as you pass while shouting a three-second sales pitch. The only reason you would ever need or want to be in the Garment District is if you work there or if you need supplies for making clothes. In other words, this is a neighborhood full of union sewers, fashion industry types and FIT and Parsons students. Many of the side streets offer up little more than studios, warehouse-type spaces and workrooms. But then there are the side streets – 39th between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, for example – that are a long row of wholesale stores hawking fabric, buttons, trims and sewing supplies. Some of the fabric stores are sort of magical, if you’re into that kind of thing. (But then if you weren’t, why would you be in the Garment District?) You can get lost in Mood, a fabric store frequented by the pros (you’ll recognize it from seasons of Project Runway), where aisle after aisle is jam-packed with all things embroidered, patterned, beaded and brocaded. M& J Trims is a hot-pink-painted wonderland of glitzy embellishments, one-of-a-kind buttons and decadent trim with lace, fringe, tassels and more. Then there are the dirty, gray stores where you get in, get your needles and pin cushions and get out.

It doesn’t help that the Garment District is bordered by Times Square and includes Herald Square – two of the most bustling tourist spots in the city. While Macy’s might have what you need for family and friends at Christmas and 34th Street in general is as convenient as an outdoor strip mall can be, the general result is overcrowding. With heavy shopping traffic at one side and heavy photo-taking traffic at the other, the streets of this neighborhood stay packed. Because most of the Garment District crowd are there to work, the food is fast, cheap (well, relatively) and easy. Think Pax and Bread Market – soups, sandwiches and salads that are ready to go. That’s pretty much the modus operandus in these parts: fast, efficient, affordable. Nothing much to see or do in the way of fun or culture, no extras, no frills – unless you’re looking for actual frills. Those you’ll find wholesale here.
Pros
  • THE place for anyone who in the clothesmaking/design fields
  • Great for wholesale
  • central to everything
Cons
  • Dangerous at night
  • Dirty
  • Nothing to do outside of the clothing industry
  • crime rates
  • dingy apartments
  • Crowded
  • dead at night
  • Ugly
  • impersonal place
  • overrun by tourists
Recommended for
  • Tourists
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Dec 26, 2010

"Why Everyone Hates the Garment District"

If you're visiting the garment district, you're likely lost.

If you just need an office space, you could do worse. It's centrally located and easy to get to. It's also possible to get some good commercial spaces, because almost nobody wants them.

What's wrong with it? Even if the sweat shops are gone (no comment) the vibe of them is still there. It's industrial in the ugliest of ways and I just can't shake the icky feeling I have whenever I'm there. It feels cheap, dishonest, and dirty.

There is no romance. No charm. No innovation.

If you want style and fashion, visit the shops on Madison and Fifth. The garment district has no style, fashion, or class. It's like a Chinatown without food or culture or a warehouse without the space.

A perpetual bad mood floats over from Penn Station, with rats and unhappy European tourists judging how ugly New York is. It gives the rest of Manhattan a bad name.

Live here if you're on your own and the only thing you care about is a quick commute. If you don't care about your neighborhood, you might like it. If you want calm, charm, or community...look elsewhere.

There's nothing to do here but witness homelessness and misery.
Pros
  • central to everything
Cons
  • crime rates
  • Crowded
  • dead at night
  • dingy apartments
  • terrible grocery stores
  • Ugly
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Oct 08, 2010

"Why does everyone hate the Garment District?"

Okay. First of all, not every place in New York can be glowing and clean all the time. Up until a few decades ago, most places weren’t glowing and clean. The Garment District is not a fantastic place to live, that’s for sure. It’s a great place to catch a train or to get something you need. It’s also dirty and kind of sketchy at night.

But it has its uses. Unlike other descriptively named neighborhoods (I’m looking at you, Meatpacking District), this place still does what it says it does. It’s about garments. If you are really in the fashion industry, this is a great place to be. It’s not for fashionistas, who like to strap of sexy heals and wear fur vests. No, it’s for people who really love fashion as an art and as an industry. There are major design studios located here, and more sewing and millinery and shoe-design supplies than anywhere else in the city.

If you need a coat quilted, you go to the Garment District. If you need a copper zipper, you go to the Garment District. If you need a leather skirt to be hand stitched, you go to the Garment District. If you need a Parisian cornflower toile, you go to the Garment District.

So this is very much the kind of working neighborhood New York used to be comprised of. The people who don’t like the Garment District are those who don’t have a use for it. If you do have a use for it, you’ll be grateful it’s still there.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
Mar 26, 2010

"I generally avoid it"

Sounds like it would be an awesome place for fashionistas, doesn't it? But it's not. Unless you are a fashionista capable of creating your own designs with some fabric and stitching, which in no way applies to me. Not only that, but this neighborhood isn't exactly known for being a place that anyone would be dying to grab a bite or hang out after dark. Not. Recommended.
Pros
  • close to major transport
  • Historic distric which was once home to New York's buzzing garment industry
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
Cons
  • crime rates
  • dingy apartments
  • terrible grocery stores
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Mar 22, 2010

"You go there not for fun but because you need something"

Known as the fashion and manufacturing center of the city (and of the United States, for that matter) the garment district features some behemoth institutions as well: The Javits Convention Center, Penn Station, Madison Square Garden, Port Authority, the New York Public Library, and the central NYC Post Office, which until only recently used to be open 24/7. If you're alive and living in the city, chances are you've had reason to come to one of these institutions or other, and have been to the Garment District. I can't say it's my favorite place to hang out. While sitting on the front steps of the beautiful Beaux-Arts buildings of the post office and of the public library can be pleasant, the experience is seriously marred by the noise and smells of traffic on the streets. Weird fact: the AMC Empire Theater, one of those huge 25-screen multiplex theaters, is the largest structure in NYC to have been physically moved (in 1998). It was rolled 170 feet in a single day, after months of preparation. I do love Bryant Park, especially the always fun and always rowdy experience of watching free movies in the park in summer times, but otherwise this area gets a big thumbs down from me for its impersonal scale, noise, and unsavory characters hanging out near the entrance to Penn Station.
Pros
  • central to everything
  • close to major transport
Cons
  • very expensive
  • overrun by tourists
  • impersonal place
Recommended for
  • Singles
2/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 1/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Mar 13, 2010

"Loud and impersonal"

Huge and impersonal in its buildings, the Garment District can really defeat your best intentions. There isn't a reason you'd want to be here if you don't live here, except to make use of the obvious, centrally located big attractions. For example, Penn Station is in this area, which means all the shady characters who hand around Penn Station are also in the area. Their presence has gotten a lot better since Bloomberg and Giuliani, but still. Another obvious attraction in the area is the New York Public Library, the main one which features an enormous study room. It's a great place to get work done, since there are so few other distractions. Bryant Park is also nearby, and it's one of my favorite destinations during the summers. You can not only watch free films in the evenings, but just hang out and lounge on lazy summer afternoons, and read a book. Other large and imposing structures in the area include the James Farley post office, Madison Square Garden, and the Javitz Convention Center. The area is dominated by loud, glittering, and ultra-commercial Broadway, which then spills over into the side streets. Aside from these two destinations, Penn Station and the Public Library, I have found very little reason to head to the Garment District, as it feels imposing and impersonal to walk down the street here.
1/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 1/5
  • Safe & Sound 1/5
  • Clean & Green 1/5
  • Pest Free 1/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
Mar 11, 2010

"Not much is redeemable about this neighborhood"

I'm here several times a week and I have yet to find one thing about this part of town that I enjoy aside from the Artichoke cafe on 37th. It's crowded, it's filthy, and the majority of aholes who won't lay off their horn in traffic seem to congregate in the garment district.
Down toward 9th and 10th Ave is an utter wasteland and the more inland you head, the more tourists and congestion you get. This area is just a lose - lose.
All of the restaurants are either scary or catered towards tourists (i.e. a massive TGI Fridays.) and there isn't any nightlife to speak of. I'll mention the Artichoke one more time because it's darling and the owners are really nice. But, that's it!
The shops are weird to boot. Just giant bead shops, knock sunglasses shops, cheap shoe shops. It just kinda makes me feel dirty whenever I'm in this neighborhood.
Cons
  • Ugly
  • boring
  • crime rates
  • dead at night
  • terrible grocery stores
  • dingy apartments
  • Crowded
2/5
Dec 26, 2009

"Despite the name, has nothing on Madison Avenue"

Also known as the Fashion District or the Garment Center, this midtown neighborhood - spanning from 5th to 9th Avenues and from 34th to 42nd St, is historically known for its link with the fashion industry. That said, the name sounds more elegant than it is. While Oscar de la Renta, Calvin Klein, and Nicole Miller may have workshops and business centres here, it doesn't really mean much to the average passerby, who is far more likely to be entranced by those same designers' shop windows on the elegant Madison Avenue. Less charming, the Garment District is merely another midtown collection of office blocks from the street level. That said, there are some benefits to the district. Many New Yorkers head there when looking for beads, curtains, or other fabric (Halloween costumes for the creatively minded, for example) - some mom-and-pop-type textiles stores still exist in the district, including wholesalers sometimes willing to sell to individuals.

Where to eat in the neighborhood? Sad to say it's slim pickings, but Smith and Wollensky has a decent reputation as one of the city's Great Steakhouses, with a strong showing in lobster for the less carnivorously minded.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Dec 17, 2009

"The Politicaly Incorrect Fur District"

In spite of loud protests from the anti fur lobby and the growing popularity of faux fur many New Yorkers still prefer to use coats fashioned out of animal fur to ward off the biting chill of the bitter New York City winters. The best place to buy these warmth inducing minks, shearlings, silver foxes and more is along a nondescript stretch of W29th Street between 7th and 8th Avenues round the corner from the transport hub of Penn Station.
This section of W29th is known as the fur district of New York City as it continues to host outlets and factory stores of several well known furriers like Konstanine Leathers, the Fur depot, Rafael Shearlings, Peter Duffy Furs and Ritz Furs who offer a wide variety of furs for sale at prices which are generally much lower than those charged by department stores and designer fur salons. Moreover these stores also custom create fur coats and also provide other invaluable services like cleaning, repairing and storing of fur coats as furs are generally quite expensive and do require a certain amount of care if they are to last you a lifetime. The Fur district is essentially a commercial district which is populated with warehouses and factory stores and doesnt have much appeal as a residential neighborhood.
Pros
  • Historic distric which was once home to New York's buzzing garment industry
  • Some of the old buildings host huge loft like apartments
  • central to everything
  • close to major transport
Cons
  • Burgeoning rents in the neighborhood have led to the demise of many garment factories, a loss of New York's history.
  • Certain areas of the neighborhood are downright ugly
  • boring
  • crime rates
  • Crowded
  • dead at night
  • dingy apartments
  • impersonal place
  • overrun by tourists
  • terrible grocery stores
  • Ugly
  • very expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Apr 14, 2009

"W 52nd St - Turns out it's Fabulous"

My girlfriend lived on W 52nd St (between 8th and 9th) so by association I sort of lived there too.

It turned out to be a fun neighborhood. The block itself doesn't have much to offer - it has a Starbucks, a nice Italian restaurant (Osteria Pepe Rosso) and a large space for the post office. But the flash in the pan are two classy and happening gay bars in the middle of the block adding a splash of color to the otherwise plain block.

The overall saving grace was that the avenues had a lot to offer - 8th ave has the classy Thalia, and the Russian Vodka room around the corner. 9th Ave has several restaurants (Queen of Sheba) and restaurant row (46th St) is an easy Sunday brunch walk away. 9th Ave also has miscellaneous delis and utility shops if you need to run down and get something. Times Sq and theaters are not too far either, if you're new enough to NYC to care about those.

It's well connected with the 50th St subway not too far. The street is very clean, and feels residential unlike the horrors of my garment district dwelling.

Overall a quiet street and block with a few hidden gems, not too far from the well endowed avenues in that area.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Mar 19, 2009

"King Kong Lives Here"

This small district is barely one square mile, but has big attractions for all to enjoy. Anchored in by the Empire State Building, Madison Square Garden, Penn Station, and the General Post Office, you feel very secure and surrounded.

The community remains to be the fashion capital of the world for many designers, couture houses and showrooms. The area is not what it used to be since the flood of the sweatshops spewing out clothes has now infiltrated many areas of Chinatown, rather than being primarily based in the Garment District.

Nearby restaurants and bars to check out, in Garment District and neighboring districts, are the Falai Restaurant and Radegast (ultra chic American Bohemian beer hall). The lobby of the Empire State Building is also worth a peek. The gorgeous art deco and marble bring “old-school” back to life. Ride up the elevator to the 86th floor observatory and gaze at the lights of the Chrysler Building. This experience can be very romantic at night, as the last elevator leaves at 11:15 PM. You can also step inside the NY Skyride, a huge flight simulator that takes you and about 50 guests on a trip around NYC.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Feb 25, 2009

"I could take it or leave it"

When I was a young newly inducted New Yorker, one of my roommates was a budding young assistant designer who worked in this neighborhood, and she said she often saw needles littering the sidewalks here. Not that the street isn’t safe – it isn’t the South Bronx or anything, but it’s not exactly the Upper East Side either.
This city is the one and only fashion capitol of the United States, and this neighborhood is where the art form is churned out. Of the clothing manufactured in the U.S., a huge percentage of it comes out of this neighborhood. However, it’s not so popular as it once was to manufacture clothes in the U.S. (as labor is cheaper elsewhere), and many of these factories are being converted into apartments. (And if I had my pick of New York apartments, I’d most likely go for the converted factory space – the size of these apartments usually exceed the New York standard shoebox apartments.)
4/5
Feb 17, 2009

"Garment District - the heart of fashion in NYC"

Fashion finds its home in the fabulous Garment District, which shows great potential to be the next big thing in terms of Manhattan living. Located in the heart of Manhattan, this sprawling neighborhood is the epicenter of fashion in New York and arguably the United States, and is a great place to either live or to visit.

Running along Fifth and Eighth Avenues and from 34th Street to Times Square located at 42nd Street, the Garment District, or Fashion Center, is a hard area to avoid when visiting the city. In this neighborhood, you’ll find more retail stores than one could ever imagine, and something to suit the tastes of any member of the family.

Fashion is the major industry in New York and in this neighborhood as some of the most renown designers produce their looks in this neighborhood. The look of the neighborhood is dominated by somewhat imposing warehouses, filled with fabric and creativity. Originally mainly a manufacturing district, The Garment District today is the heart of fashion in New York City, with many designers also housing their show rooms throughout the neighborhood.

Walking through this bustling neighborhood is quite amazing, as it is home to Macy’s, the world’s largest department store. Spanning one New York City block and with 9 floors of shopping ranging from a home supplies store in the basement to the famous Holiday Lane as featured in the classic Miracle on 34th Street on the top floor during the holiday season, this store is described by many as magical. On any given day, anything can happen, ranging from a Calvin Klein fashion show to the unveiling of the Swarovsky crystal ball used to mark the coming of the new year at Times Square.

Also in the Garment District is the renown Empire State Building, located across the street from Macy’s. From its top floor, one can get views of the entire city, almost the same view King Kong would have had scaling up to the top.

Real Estate in the neighborhood is improving, though is somewhat limited to large buildings lacking the distinct personality of homes in neighborhoods nearby. With time, this area has seen an increase in development and namely in upscale exclusive high rise apartment buildings.
Recommended for
  • Singles

Best Streets in Garment District

1

7 Ave

4/5
"Fashion Center of the World"
40.7525627737322 -73.9894852779971
2

West 40 St

3.5/5
"Summer fun street"
40.755082998874 -73.9886753180997
3

8 Ave

3/5
"The Minnesota Strip in New York City????"
40.7534525551913 -73.9925439550624
4

West 34th St

3/5
""Hustle and Bustle of New York""
40.751225972516 -73.9911802753176
5

West 37th St

2/5
"Same ol' Same"
40.7531519841653 -73.9898499065212
6

West 33 St

2/5
"Busy but worth it. "
40.750566225333 -73.9916907764671
7

West 31 St

2/5
"Convenient, But Loud and Dirty"
40.7473225720786 -73.9878064349567
8

West 36 St

2/5
"Shop Till You Drop"
40.7525528989472 -73.9903392677165
9

West 38th St

1.5/5
"Check Out The New Apartments on W. 38th Street"
40.7537808626123 -73.9894204874224
10

West 35 St

1.5/5
"Rather drab and uneventful"
40.7519143712139 -73.9907414491851