9.4 out of 10

Carnegie Hill

Ranked 1st best neighborhood in Manhattan
40.7837283929254 -73.954730841717
Great for
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Schools
  • Clean & Green
  • Medical Facilities
  • Childcare
Not great for
  • Cost of Living
  • Nightlife
  • Lack of Traffic
  •  
  •  
Who lives here?
  • Families with kids
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Singles

Reviews

4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+
Editors Choice

"Carnegie Hill: Fabulous and Quiet if You Can Afford to Live Here"

This section of Manhattan is prized because it's quiet, well maintained and ritzy. Many people live in well off high rises here although the quarters may be tight compared to dwellings in the other boroughs. Many people prefer doorman buildings that have AC and elevators. There are also plenty of older pre-war buildings that are walk-ups. Apts here may be more affordable but be prepared to walk up the stairs. If there is an elevator it will be tiny! Dont' expect to get big furniture in a tiny elevator. Be sure to check out the elevator and size it up for your belongings or you will be miserable. Museums abound in the area, so if you love strolling this is a great place to live. You'll enjoy walking up and down the avenues which are clean and well attended to. The Guggenheim and Museum of Natural History Museums are close and many families simply are consumed with the planetarium that is part of the Museum of Natural History. Being in close proximity to Central Park also makes this neighborhood very prized indeed. Of course, it will be out of the price range of most, but it's a nice place to visit!
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • major museums
  • quiet
Cons
  • expensive
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Tourists
CarnegieHillE
CarnegieHillE The Natural History Musuem and the planetatarium are NOT in Carnegie Hill. They are across the park onthe West Side. The Met, Neu Gallery and other museums are in the neigbhorhood- on Museum Mile.
2yrs+
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5/5 rating details
  • Clean & Green 5/5
2yrs+
Read full review on Douglas Elliman
5/5
2yrs+

"Carnegie Hill - incredible wealth, Upper East Side living"

For Manhattan’s elite, Carnegie Hill is the prime location for beautiful homes, tasteful stores, upscale restaurants, and finer living. An Upper East Side delight, Carnegie Hill is like a page from 1920's New York City.

This 10 block neighborhood using 5th Avenue and Central Park as a cross street, spans from 85th to 95th streets in the wealthiest section of Manhattan. This neighborhood has been home to the most prominent residents of Manhattan, as this neighborhood boasts the best private schools in the city, including the Dalton School, Andrew Carnegie’s mansion, and branches of the Smithsonian Institution.

Given the posh nature of the Upper East Side and namely real estate bordering the illustrious Central Park, the beautiful brownstones which fill the tree-lined streets of each block are amongst the most expensive in the city. Homes in this neighborhood can sell for well over $5,000,000, while decently sized apartments sell for no less than $700,000. Renting and subletting in this neighborhood is expensive as well, with shoe box one room apartments going for $1,800 or more. In Manhattan, much of living and status is defined by location, and the lengths some will go to have an Upper East Side address is sometimes astonishing.

With beautiful homes and wealthy residents, it is no surprise that Carnegie Hill is home to wonderful restaurants and shopping, not to mention perfect access to one of the most beautiful sections of Central Park. Central Park, the largest park in the city and the gift of the Rockefeller’s to the tree-starved people of New York City, is the most popular park in the world, and boasts acres and acres of picturesque scenery. Dining is exquisite with French-Asian Bistros (namely Table D’Houte) and Italian Ristorantes galore.

Transportation in the neighborhood is available, though many in this neighborhood can afford chauffeured private cars. Taxis wait on each corner, but the subway is available on Lexington Avenue and East 96th Street as well as the 4, 5, and 6 trains on East 86th Street and Lexington Avenue.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5
2yrs+

"A five star neighborhood - quiet and genteel"

Carnegie Hill is a lovely neighborhood named after the mansion that Andrew Carnegie built at Fifth Avenue and 91st Street in 1901. The Carnegie Mansion today has become the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, a branch of the Smithsonian Institution. This area is widely known as and considered the most prestigious residential area of the Upper East Side. The smell of “old-money” still lingering in the air.

The architecture of Carnegie Hill is an eclectic mix of taller residential buildings, lush mansions, townhouses, and even a few wood-built homes. The neighborhood is extremely family friendly and includes several of the nation’s most elite prep schools, including Dalton, Nightingale-Bamford, Spence, and the Convent of the Sacred Heart. The public Hunter College High School can be found here, rated as one of the U.S.’s top notch high schools.

The stretch of Madison Avenue that flows through Carnegie Hill is known for its many high-end children’s clothing boutiques. Fine restaurants, upscale boutiques, and gourmet food stores are prevalent in Carnegie Hill. Tequila Jacks is a great weekend bar, while Sfoglia Restaurant will satisfy for Italian food desire. Sfoglia opened just over four years ago, and boast simplicity with sophistication when it come to serving up Pappardelle alla Bolognese. Stop by Bistro du Nord for a luscious bowl of onion soup inside this cozy townhouse.

The genteel neighborhood of Carnegie Hill, with its well-tended brownstones and quiet streets, make this area a glorious place to live. Definitely a five star community.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Charming family-friendly neighborhood"

A subdivision of the Upper East Side, Carnegie Hill is the ideal location for families with - or looking to have - young children. A far cry from the hustle and bustle of the city, this village-within-a-metropolis is a charming, close community with an Old World feel: prewar buildings, tree-lined streets of brownstones, and a restaurant scene that caters to ladies who brunch rather than night owls. It even has a playground in the middle of the street: the prestigious Hunter College High School's adjacent elementary school plays host to a public playground on 95th St and Madison. The shopping is decidedly family-friendly, too: upscale kids' boutique Jacadi is on 89th St and Madison, while mommies can rejuvenate at the nearby Crabtree and Evelyn. The food is uniformly fantastic, if traditional: Madison Avenues staples like New American Island, trendy Joanna's, Italian Vico's, and charming French Bistro de Nord (and Table d'Hote), plus the famous brunch-place Sarabeth's, are all worth trying.

The best part about Carnegie Hill, however, is its community feel. While some might find the generally WASPy ambiance homogenous, even exclusive, the neighborhood tends to congregate together, from morning breakfasts at the Three Guys diner to the annual Christmas Eve party at the much-beloved Corner Bookstore, giving the neighborhood a small-town, everybody-knows-everybody vibe that is lacking from so much of the rest of the city.
Pros
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • Near tons of schools
  • Charming cafes and bistros
Cons
  • No nightlife
  • Expensive cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Schools 5/5
2yrs+

"Quiet, tree - lined and upper crust"

Carnegie Hill is, arguably, the most prestigious neighborhood to live in New York City. It is pretty much the only neighborhood that hasn't changed architecturally since the 19th century which makes it one of the most architecturally alluring and beautiful areas. The quiet, lush streets are full of brown stones and townhouses with stoops. There has not been much upward growth or development in this area. And, the preservation of the gothic details to the building is incredible.
The handful of mansions that have been, mostly, turned into museums (such as the Cooper Hewitt) are a sight for sore eyes. It's mind blowing that one family lived in such a monstrous piece of art at one time.
The neighborhood is rich with New York blue blood history: it's named for Carnegie's lavish mansion and housed famous families such as the Vanderbilts and Rockefellers. It is more family oriented so it isn't a real destination for dining or nightlife. The shops are beautiful but are in the higher price point and tend to be a bit more conservative (read: older).
The defining restaurant of the neighborhood, I think, is Sarabeth's. It's always bustling but even when it's busy, it has a sedate kind of flow. It's an American Continental theme and is just as popular for the takeout / bakery side as the dining which I think sums up how the neighborhood works: not a lot of bustle and a little bit pretentious.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • quiet
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"Museums and schools"

Arguably the most prestigious residential district in Manhattan, Carnegie Hill is also incredibly beautiful, with brownstones and town houses that preserve their original historic detailing down to the very shiniest, well-polished detail. A number of mansions were built in this area, some of which are now used as prestigious and exclusive schools. Some notable museums and cultural institutions are also housed in what were once mansions, for example the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, the Jewish Museum, and the National Academy of Design. In addition, the area also includes the “toilet-bowl” shaped Guggenheim Museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, originally derided for its unusual shape but now celebrated. The northern part of the Upper East Side borders Spanish Harlem, and the area right around 96th Street has been traditionally considered less attractive and less desirable. However, as Carnegie Hill expands and spills over gradually into Spanish Harlem, even this part of the Upper East Side is gaining in desirability to residents. No wonder, since Carnegie Hill is really an ideal neighborhood to live the good life in New York, and maybe even raise a family. The schools are excellent, the shops are excellent, and the beauty of the buildings make it a pleasure to walk down the street.
Pros
  • major museums
  • great schools
  • Beautiful
  • quiet
Cons
  • astronomical rents
  • stodgy
  • geriatrics in fur coats abound
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
2yrs+

"A really lovely part of town"

It’s difficult to find bad things about Carnegie Hill. It really is lovely, with old buildings beautifully preserved. You could spend the entire day just looking up at decorative tone carvings on the buildings. There are trees on the streets. Old, established trees that creep up toward fourth floor windows and change brilliant colors with the seasons. And it’s right next to Central Park. It’s a nice part of Central Park, even, with room to move around without being quite so hounded by lost tourists.

The museums are nice and the neighborhood is home to some of the most iconic buildings in New York postcard history. Some of the finest schools in the city are located in Carnegie Hill, which makes it ideal for families. It’s much quieter than Lenox Hill, with fewer visitors tromping through the residential sections. It’s a low-key, subdued sort of neighborhood. It’s definitely not ideal for clubbers or the nocturnal among us.

There is the ever-present problem of having to rely on the green line for subway transport, which is absolutely bursting with people, even outside of rush hours. Fifth Avenue is bustling with cars all day long. But residences away from the busy avenues enjoy quiet hours most of the day.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Upper East Side Splendor"

Tree-lined streets of brownstones and intricately carved and decorate white stone mansions meet some of the nation’s most important museums in Carnegie Hill, an old-world aristocratic portion of the Upper East Side. Perhaps the most well-known and stimulating stretch of the neighborhood is Fifth Avenue, with lush, leafy Central Park to one side and grand architectural wonders like the Guggenheim art museum and the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum to the other. An avenue over, at Madison, grand residences that have been passed down through upper crust generations sit mixed with lofty boutiques. More magnificent, doormen-guarded residences lie to the east on Park Avenue, followed by more commercial strips on Park and Third Avenues. It is on these strips that you can find the conveniences of the area – from Duane Reades and diners to book shops and pet stores.

Carnegie Hill is best known for being an ideal (upper-class) family neighborhood, with some of the city’s best (expensive) schools, family-friendly (expensive) restaurants, the city’s biggest playground – Central Park, plenty of educational museums and large brownstones ready to accommodate parents, children and the nanny. But even for the middle-class folk who inhabit Third Avenue or who travel to Carnegie Hill from other neighborhoods, Carnegie Hill can satisfy from commercial to cultural interests.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • major museums
  • quiet
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • great schools
  • excellent restaurants
  • Near tons of schools
Cons
  • expensive
  • Expensive cost of living
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Expensive but exquisite part of Manhattan"

Carnegie Hill is a gorgeous upscale Manhattan neighborhood on the Upper East Side. It runs from 86th Street to about 96th Street and is central on the east side from Fifth Avenue at Central Park to Third Avenue. Some of New York City's most beautiful architecture is in this section of the city. If you're on Fifth Avenue, you'll overlook Central Park, and it can't get any better than that.

You'll find the old Andrew Carnegie mansion here, which now houses the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, and you'll find the Guggenheim Museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The real estate is highly coveted and very, very expensive. Nevertheless, it's largely family oriented, and the schools are purported to be some of the best in the city.

There isn't much in the way of nightlife here. You'll need to go farther east, to the west side, or downtown for that. The 92nd Street Y offers lots to do from a cultural perspective, however, especially if you get tired of the museums. There are always lectures, concerts, and classes available there for all ages.

For shopping, you won't find much on Fifth Avenue. You'll need to walk east for groceries and incidentals, but anyone with a Fifth Avenue address doesn't mind that walk. An address on Fifth Avenue in this area is a bit like owning a rare diamond.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • major museums
  • great schools
Cons
  • astronomical rents
  • No nightlife
  • Crowded
  • stodgy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
2yrs+

"Great Mix of Residences and Tourist Spots"

Anyone that has lived in the city for a while will tell you living in Carnegie Hill is the goal. Because it is to the north of most tourist spots in the city, it is much quieter, cleaner, and more upscale than most of the city but that of course carries with it a steep price.

If you can afford a piece of real estate here, you are in pretty good shape. The buildings are beautiful, the neighborhood is much more of a community than most other areas, and the schools are said to be among the best in the city. This makes it a great place to raise a family, get away from the hustle of the rest of Manhattan, and truly enjoy living in the greatest city in the world. There are some bars and cafes but true night owls will have to head south to get their fill as this is not a booming area at night.

For tourists that do venture north, the area features the Guggenheim Museum and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Otherwise, you can enjoy the great architecture in the area and maybe take a break from the fast pace of the rest of the city. It is not the best area to access via public transportation or to do shopping, however.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • quiet
Cons
  • expensive
  • No nightlife
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 4/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 5/5
2yrs+

"A Beautiful and Quiet Enclave"

Carnegie Hill is an upscale neighborhood on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The area runs from 86th Street to 96th Street and from Central Park to Third Avenue. Carnegie Hill is home to some of the most beautiful Gothic architecture on the Upper East Side.

The tree lined streets are lined with brownstones and town homes that preserve their original architectural detail. A good number of mansions where built in the area which now house some of the most prestigious private schools. The area is named after the industrialist Andrew Carnegie and his former mansion is now the home of the Cooper-Hewitt Museum. Other notable museums and cultural institutions are also housed in what were once mansions including the Jewish Museum and the National Academy of Design. The area also includes the oddly-shaped Guggenheim Museum designed by architect, Frank Lloyd Wright.

Properties are highly sought after and very expensive. However, the neighborhood is very family oriented and has excellent schools, some claim the best in the city. The beauty of the buildings combined with the abundance of trees amke walking through this neighborhood a special treat.

The northern part of Carnegie Hill borders Spanish Harlem (SpaHa) and is generally considered less desirable, although gentrification has made its way ever northward so that this area is also becoming an attractive option for both buyers and renters. The schools are excellent, the shops offer.

Because of the neighborhood's family orientation, there is not much nightlife here. You will need to venture farther south into the East 80s, over to the west side or downtown to find a greater selection of bars, restaurants, and clubs. A very popular attraction is the 92nd Street Y with its array of classes and lectures for both children and adults. There are many quaint shops along Madison Avenue but with prices out of the reach of many tourists.

If you seek a day away from the hustle and bustle of the midtown area while gazing at some of the most beautiful architecture in all of Manhattan, there is no better neighborhood to visit than Carnegie Hill.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • major museums
  • quiet
  • great schools
Cons
  • expensive
  • No nightlife
  • astronomical rents
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
  • Expensive cost of living
  • stodgy
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Country Lovers
5/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 5/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Parking 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Carnegie Hill – Costly, But Oh So Delightful"

Despite what the name might suggest to you. Carnegie HILL is nowhere near Carnegie HALL. The famed concert hall is on Seventh Avenue and 57th Street, while Carnegie Hill is defined by 96th Street to the north, 86th Street to the south, Central Park to the west, and Third Avenue to the east.

Carnegie Hill once felt like an impoverished backwater, located just north of Manhattan’s prestigious and ultra-wealthy Upper East Side. Filled with pre-war buildings and tenements, it was quiet and stable, but not considered extremely desirable. In the past few years, however, aggressive development has brought many high-rise apartment buildings to the neighborhood and the area is now one of the most prestigious in Manhattan.

Buying in Carnegie Hill is price-y by nationwide standards, but right in line with costs in most fashionable NYC neighborhoods. Studios run about $525,000 while four-bedroom residences average at about $2,275,000. Depending on your income and your definition of ‘affordable,’ rentals are relatively modest: studios may be found for under $1500.

There are nearly 2 dozen medical facilities in the area, serving both human and pet needs. Shopping and services are very convenient, and you never have to walk more than a few steps to find wonderful restaurants, specialty food shops, and some of NYC’s best museums including the Museum of the City of New York, the Jewish Museum and the Guggenheim.
Pros
  • Beautiful
  • major museums
  • quiet
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • Gorgeous architecture
Cons
  • expensive
  • astronomical rents
  • Expensive cost of living
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Parking 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
2yrs+

"Very Classy But Busy Area"

When I went through this area, the one thing I noticed was the number of businesses I found. I found a different business on every block. There are delis, small stores, restaurants, diners, and many other kinds of commercial facilities. There are also residential buildings in the area as well.

This street has a lot to offer anyone.
Pros
  • great bar scene
  • excellent restaurants
  • Beautiful
Cons
  • expensive
  • Crowded
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
  • Gay & Lesbian
  • Hipsters
  • Students
  • Trendy & Stylish
4/5 rating details
  • Neighborly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
2yrs+

"The well-to-do have maintained their positions in Carnegie"

A tightly-knit sort of community of high-end stores, restaurants and real estate can be found in this breathtakingly gorgeous neighborhood. It’s the sort of place that one imagines the well-to-do characters of Woody Allen films to reside, and the area hasn’t seen any reconstruction for quite some time, making the area an aesthetic delight for tourists and residents alike.
Pros
  • Charming cafes and bistros
  • Gorgeous architecture
  • major museums
Cons
  • astronomical rents
  • everything's overpriced for tourists
  • expensive
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
  • Tourists
3/5
2yrs+

"Great place for a slow walk, nice retirement scene"

Just about any neighborhood you hit in the Upper East Side is beautiful to behold and generally offers the stereotypical “Old New York” kind of charisma, and Carnegie Hill is no exception. If for some reason you’re looking for a nice long walk where you won’t find too many trendy restaurants or shops, this is a good place to start. If you’re an incredibly wealthy doctor or lawyer or trust fund baby looking for the perfect place to retire, you’ve found it here.
Generally the buildings in this neighborhood are pretty old, which is part of the neighborhood’s extensive charm. Though the neighborhood’s affluence is apparent, it does border on East Harlem, which is a neighborhood that is the opposite of affluent. This kind of juxtaposition of very rich residents and very poor in a city is relatively rare, and offers an interesting (depending on your point of view, I suppose) kind of tension.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees

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